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The Catholic times. [volume] (Columbus, Ohio) 1951-current, June 26, 1953, Image 6

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Be Loyal To
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--------Library Notes--------
New, Exciting Book Describes
World Of Noted Film Pioneer
From the Department of Library Science
College of St. Marv of the Springs
The World of Robert Flaherty,
by Richard Griffith Duell, Sloan
and Pierce. New York, 1953, $5.00.
Robert Flaherty is renowned in
the film world as the father of the
documentary film, and his own life
is as exciting as any of the classics
such as "Nanook of the North.”
“Elephant Boy," and “The Louisi
ana Story”—he captured on film.
St. Charles Grads
Attend Conference
On Seminary Life
St Charles High School graduat
es who have shown an interest in
the seminary life took part in a
“Vocation Day” held at the sem
inary last week.
The young men attended Bene
diction prior to the conference di
rected by Father Edward Healy of
the St. Charles faculty.
Following the conference on
“Seminary Life” a question period
was conducted. The graduates re
mained at the Seminary overnight
and attended Mass the next morn
ing.
A similar “Vocation Day” will be
held in August for any graduates
of high schools in the diocese who
max w ish to learn more of semin
ary life.
-STEEPLEJACKS-
Every Operation and Workman Fully Insured
Specialists In
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0
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Don’t Buy Any Used Car Until—
You Have Seen and Driven The
Exciting 1951—V-8 Studebaker
From $1595
You are due for the thrill of a lifetime.
Me have a fpw one-ownera left. Taken
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Kobineon-Hanralian
Funeral Directors
Cor Winter A Franklin.
Delaware
fhe firm.* Hated here deserve
to be remembered when vou are
distributing voui pationage to
the different liner of business
The Peoples Store
Delaware
PERPETUAL NOVENA
Every Tuesday 7:30 p.m.
St. (Christopher’s
(Church
Grandview 4 Ida
While a young man, he spent eight
years exploring Northern Europe
and Labrador and during this per
iod became acquainted with, and
gained respect and admuat-ion of
the Eskimos which he never lost.
Whether his locale was the far
North. India, or the South Seas,
his basic material was the spirit
of man and this is what makes his
pictures great artistic achieve
ments. Complete with many pic
tures Flaherty himself took, this
book conveys—as the author hoped
it would—"impressions of a life
lixed with greater distinctions than
any he has known.
E.Q.
Reporters For the Union, by Ber
nard A. Weisberger Little, Brown,
and Co., Boston. 1953,, $4.50.
As do all modern wars, the Civ
il War had its officers, construc
tion troops, engineer specialists,
photographers, and like all wars
it affected the lives of millions and
had a finality of decision. But the
Civil War. for the first time in any
appreciable numbers, also had cor
respondents. This is the story of
the first war correspondents whose
important job was to relay to the
people in the North the news from
the camps and battlefields. Writ
ing in a both witty and vigorous
style the author presents the man
ner in which the opinionated war
correspondent got his news along
with a clear view of the confusion
and anguish of the era.
M.S.
The Wild Ohio, by Bart Spicer
Mead and Co., New York, 1953.
A realistic, adventuresome tale
is The Wild Ohio. Departing from
the usual we find here even the
innermost thoughts of the average
traveler and his guide who helps
him cross the many rugged miles
of the journey. This story shows
just how unprepared the French
emigres were for the dark forests,
epen plains and unpredictable riv
ers—so completely different was
all this from their ideas of what
America would he. Truly this is a
historical novel of great value
since it brings to us a different
picture of the early days of our
nation. P.K.
------------------o----------------
Rosary Pupils
Three Rosary High students are
participating in Ohio University’s
summer school workshop from
June 22 to 27.
The students, Patricia Cowgill,
Phyllis Patton, and Joanne Hoover,
all seniors, are candidate*, for exe
cutive positions on the school pap
er, the Rotarian.
The girls will attend conferences
conducted by men and women who
have been successful in the field of
student publications. I nder their
supervision, laboratory work will
he done on all phases of newspap
er production.
This is the second year Rosary
students attended the Athens work
shop. I.ast year those attending
studied yearbook production Ro
sary’s yearbook, the Campanile u
being discontinued as ot this year,
hut there will be more frequent is
sues of the school paper.
By MURRAY
ctl
p*
CRADLE OF
IfcD11
CHRISTIAN CIV1LI HHUm
\x
in
North America,
appropriately-by
THE CATHOLIC TIMES, FRIDAY, JUNE 26, 1953
Essay Contest Winners
A St. Joseph's Academy student, Miss Patricia Havens, center,
in the above photo, was the winner in the recent essay
contest sponsored by the Columbus Chapter of United World Fed
eralists open to all parochial students in the Columbus area. Other
winners were Dolores Egger, left, also of St. Joseph's Academy,
and Antoinette Sergio, right of St. Mary's High School. The students
wrote on the subject "How May The U-N Be Strengthened." One
other winner, not pictured here, was Edward Miller of St. Charles.
Judges for the contest were Norman Dohn, political editor of the
Columbus Dispatch Harold Grimm, professor of history at Ohio
State University, and Kenneth Martin, professor of political science
at Capital University.
Private School Building
Shows Big Gain In ’53
WASHINGTON (NC) Non-public school building in
America is increasing at a far faster rate than public school
construction, according to figures released by the Depart
ment of Commerce here.
By the end of May the nation had spent $156,000,000 on
new parochial and other private
schools and colleges. This was an
increase of 17.3 per cent over the
amount spent in the first five
months of 1952. In May alone the
estimated expenditure was $32,
000,000, 23 percent higher than the
total for May, 1952.
Public school construction be
tween the same five-month periods
rose only 3.5 per cent. The total
amounts spent, however, xxere
much greater: $683,000,000 through
May. 1953, compared to $660,000,
000 for the same period last year
Church building by all denomin
ations has also risen sharply from
last year, increasing by
cent.
14.9 per
through
than six
the Jan-
Total new construction
out the country rose less
per cent over last year in
uary-May period.
in the*e
A part of the increase
categories over last year can be
explained hy the removal of con
trols from building materials in the
summer of 1952. Since that time it
has been possible to buy building
materials for school and church
construction on the open market
without priorities. There are also
a number of other reasons for this
ear’s increase, such as different
weather conditions. Department of
Commerce officials haxe pointed
out.
Construction of new hospitals
and other institutions, many of
ST AUGUST/N£'S
Government
DECREE OF /94-8 BEARS ON ITS ..
FLAG THE CROSS SYMBOL OF THATEUCTSD\ include SB Such
ByJACOUES CARTIER- 400 TEARS AGO,______A-pTOCeSSlOnF•■ __
/s owe of
Colosseum
ar
LEAST THREE QOMAN CHURCHES
BU7LT WH STOWE FROM THE
T1 11 ..................
Invest With
Columbus' Oldest
Savings & Loan
'Despite WAi S and
I revolution LiniruSin.
France. every seven 1
Years from o/g
here deposited regular amnunta ef lump
■urn* here—where they aerure liberal
yarning, ererr ait month, and are eecured
h» the beat firal morlagee an homee and
has
iints of the Region.
This uears Osfensions-------
processions _____
*T TEAM O» BO Ml HN1NCING
60 E. Broad St. AD. 5810—AD. 6342
R. H. WHO. Pros. •. 0. HARRIS, Sey.
which had a high priority for ma
terials under controls, showed a
decline from last year.
Private hospital building in the
first five months of 1952 dropped
to $129,000,000 from $104,000,000
a year earlier a decline of 21.3 per
cent. Public hospital construction
between the same periods declined
from $188,000,000 to $168,000,000,
a drop of 10.6 per cent. Part of the
decline in public hospital building
xx as explained here by the decrease
in construction of new hospitals for
veterans.
Construction of social and re
creational facilities also showed a
marked increase over last year.
Building in this category rose to
$56,000,000 in the first five months
ot this year compared to $45,000.
000 in the same period of 1952. an
increase of 24.4 per cent.
o----------------
Frederick R. Curran,
Noled Reporter. Dies
LONG ISLAND CITY, N.Y.—(NC)
—Frederick R. Curran, reporter on
the New York Journal-American
18
It uUs a common
practice to use tAc mateual
until P1US VI forbade it under
pain cf e^com/nuniedtion
SCOUT
NEWS
in The Diocese
The Explorer Scouts of Post 214,
St. Mary Magdalene Church, re
cently returned from a trip to Ken
tucky, where the boys hiked the
34-mile Lincoln Trail.
Highlights of the trip included
a visit to Frankfort, Kentucky, a
tour of the city, including the Old
State House, and a visit to the
grave of Daniel Boone.
From Frankfort, the itinerary
included a visit to Bardstown, a
trip to the “Old Kentucky Home",
St. Joseph's Cathedral, with its
beautiful paintings, and a tour of
the Trappist
semane.
0. P. Calio
MEN'S & LADIES' TAILORING
N. 3rd St. MA. 3623
Friday
Linden Electric & Appliance
2594 Cleveland Avenue
JE. 6121
Clark Bros. Hardware Co.
1433 Oakland Park Avanua
LU. 1963
Monastery at Geth-
along the Lincoln
never-to-be-forgotten
The hike
Trail was a
experience through rugged, back
woods Kentucky to Knob Creek,
the birthplace of the Great Eman
cipator. and on to the Lincoln Me
morial at Hodgensville.
The return trip included visits
to Harrodsville. with its interesting
reproduction of a Colonial Settle
ment, Lexington, and the beautiful
campus of the University of Ken
tucky. and an overnight camp at
Blue Lick, the scene of the last
battle of the Revolution.
Those making the journey in
cluded J. J. Martin and H. Har
ris. in charge of the trip, and the
following Explorer Scouts: Tim
Martin, Allen Hoffman Tom Eyer
man, Jim Boehm. Bob Boehm, Jim
Davis, Bill Patton. Tom Young,
Mick Melragon, Joe Reis, and Lar
ry Halter.
The Boy Scouts from St. Mary
Magdalene went on an overnight
hike recently to the Hilltop Con
servation Camp. There are 22 boys
in the troop under the direction of
W. E. Davis.
since 1929 and a charter member of
the Catholic Institute of the Press,
died in St. John’s Hospital here
alter a brief illness. He was 59.
Where is
your there?
BUCKEYE FEDERAL
unaa* *a» ioa* »SWCUTio«
WEDDING
SPECIALISTS
Formal
Wear
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1121 BEGGS BLDG
you
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en with al) the monthly
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lavini your share now I
At Buckeye voo enjoy
he added protection ot
inenred earing*.
bow mueb
next paycheck
The Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Co.
ROBERT T. CULL
Retirement Income Family Income
Juvenile. Business Insurance.
TRENOR MOTOR SALES
Dodge Plymouth Used Cars
Trucks
3241 N. High Street, Columbus, LA. 1115
YOU CAN HAVE
The Experience—dependability—Integrity of
General Maintenance &
Engineering Co.
1231 McKinley Avenue, Columbus 8, Ohio
Io Recommend How to Improve Appearance and Reduce
Maintenance Expense
Schools
Phone
Free
We must continue to make strong
appeals for the novitate in India
for our Brothers. Our missions
would bo sorely crippled without
their treasured assistance. Finan
cial straits are threatening to close
its doors. We need $200 to support
each for his one yoar training
course.
ST. JAMES the LESS CHURCH
1652 Oakland Park Avenue
7TH ANNUAL
SUMMER FESTIVAL
June 26-27
IN
Churches Parish Houses Etc.
RA. 8456 Collect or Write Us For
Inspection Suggestions Estimates
No Obligation
Dauntless Damien
A recent letter from Father Chittilapilly, director of the DAMIEN
INSTITUTE in Indie is heartbreaking. He tells us that "in our state
of the 50,000 lepers, there are 10,000 contagious cases requiring isola
tion and treatment, but only 1,600 are in the four hospitals. The rest
wander through the streets of big towns helpless and homeless. They
cook their food in parks and market places. They pollute the tanks
and wells by bathing and washing their clothes. They sleep on the
verandahs of shops and houses. There is no more room in the state
hospital, and no government funds for a new hospital. Thus, the pub
lic, especially the Catholics, must feed, house, clothe and give medical
aid to them. Hence, the Damien Institute was founded. Over 200 of
the 1,000 lepers in this town need hospitalization." He describes what
they need: hospital, dispensary, work house, recreation hall, shop, lab
oratory, bungalow for a doctor, quarters for workers, and a chapel and
convent. Also, personnel (a doctor and two Sisters to start), medicines,
instruments and apparatus.
What a colossal task to undertake! What tremendous courage and
heroic trust in God must this great priest have to give him the heart
even to try It. We can only thank God there are such great souls.
Won't you help him? Every little mite will help. Your LEPER FUND
dollars go to him. A medical kit costs $75. The lepers plead, "Lord,
help me." The Lord answers, "I will" THROUGH YOU.
HOLY FATHER AND YOU
For over five years our wonderful Holy Father has been dispensing
every kind of charity to more than 850,000 Arab refugees from Pales
tine. Monsignor McMahon is President of the Pontifical Mission and
spent four years in tfeeir midst, organizing it and setting it in operation.
Fr. Tuohy represents him there now. Our latest pamphlet “Sufficient
Unto the Dav” tells this great story. Ask for it when you send an alms
to the REFUGEE FUND.
GRASS-ROOTS CHURCH
The Church must be native if it is to thrive in a new lend. A native
clergy make it a native Church. CHRYSOSTOMS is our $l-a-month
club supporting our Near East seminaries. Won't you join today? You
can help no greater charity. Perhaps you'd like to "adopt a priest" by
giving one his yearly tution ($100) for each of his six years training.
You may give weekly $2, monthly $8.35, quarterly $25, or all at once.
FATIMA IS FOREVER
Our need of Mary s love will go on forever in this life. So too, should
our expression of love for Her. We must do it in both word and DEED.
Your mite for Her new FATIMA CHAPEL in JORDAN will not escape
Her notice and Her love will quickly overtake you.
BROTHERS
AD. 8189
SISTERS
The lifelong grateful prayers and
years of missionary toils await the
generous hearts who will help
three poor girls with the Nazareth
Sisters in Beyrouth. Sisters Nai
ireh, Genevieve and Joan each
need $150 for the one year left of
training. Won't you help one?
Give in any installments.
MAKE ROOM FOR GOD IN YOUR WILL. REMEMBER HIS MISSIONS.
SACRED HEART SHRINE
Sister Beatrice, Superior of the Poor Clares et Chalakudy, India, Is still
carrying a debt of $800 on the shrine built et the convent, which serv
es also as a church for the neighboring Catholics. For a poor com
munity in a very poor country such a sum is crushing. She writes that
she can see no relief in sight. Have you a kind thought for these
Sisters?
UNWANTED HEROINES
We have pleaded without avail for those gallant young ladies, our lay
missionaries now laboring in Jordan. Gloriously giving their lives for
Christ’s banner, they merit at least a notice. We need furniture and
equipment for the “new team” in Zarka. Haven’t you a small gift
for them?
"STRINGLESS GIFTS" ARK TIKS OF LOVE BINDING YOU TO TH!
SACRED HEART.
(m/nearHstOlissionsi^i
tamcit Cardlnwt Spellmen, President Mtgr. Theme* J. McMahon, Mot'I Sec’y
Send ell cemmenicetien*
CATHOLIC NEAR EAST WELFARE ASSOCIATION
480 Lexington Ave. at 46th St. New York 17, N. Y.
Saturday
R. Wilke Meats, Inc.
175 E. Rich Street
AD. 7157
C. W. Beat Sales & Service
1417 Oakland Park Ava. JE. 2133
Devere Cooper Locke

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