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The Catholic times. [volume] (Columbus, Ohio) 1951-current, June 11, 1954, Image 1

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The Road To
True Peace Lead#
Through Mary
Vol. Ill, No. 36
Fr. Vanns Article Clarified
is a divorced person with the first
spouse still living. Unfortunately,
there are many Catholics in this
situation. Some are to be found in
every large parish. Often these
persons are regular in their church
attendance, though they are debar
red from the sacraments as long as
they intend to continue their sinful
marriage status. They have their
children baptized and send them to
the parochial school and catechism
classes.
There are some cases in which
luch bad marriages can be validat
ed and Catholics who have put
themselves in such an unfortunate
situation should refer the matter
to their pastor to find out if there
is a possibility of having their
present union rectified.
But if both parties to the pre
vious union were baptized, the
marriage was validly contracted
and consummated, and both are
still living, there is no power
on earth that can break the mari
tal bond.
Hence, if a person bound by
such a marriage obtains a civil di
vorce and marries again, this sec
ond marriage is not a true mar
riage in the sight of God. Such is
the teaching of the Catholic
Church.
Accordingly, the Church declares
that those who enter an invalid
marriage commit a serious sin and
continue to commit sin as long as
they voluntarily use the privileges
connected with married life. Cath
olics in this situation cannot be ad
mitted to the sacraments.
If they are publicly known to be
living in an invalid marriage and
53 To Attend
Final Retreat
For Priests
Fifty-three priests will attend
the fourth and final retreat to be
held June 14-17 at St. Charles Sem
inary.
The retreat, under the direction
of Father Edward L. Conlon. S.J.
of Chicago, will open at 6 p.m.
June 14, and will end in the eve
ning of June 17.
The group includes the following
priests:
Monsignors Paul Glenn and Mat
thew Howard Fathers Leo Bene
detti, William Connor, Albert Cul
liton, David Dennis, Arthur Di
mond, Thomas Duffy, Richard En
dres, Clement Faistle, John Gamba,
Robert Gately, Hugh Gilbert.
Charles Haluska. Paul Hammer,
Edward Healey, Carl Heilman, Lou
is Hoffman, Ralph Huntzinger. Jo
seph Jerabeck. Jerome Kendzier
ski, Robert Klee, James Kraus,
Paul Laurinaitis, I^o Lawler.
Thomas Lowery, George Marzluf,
Paul Meyer, Bernard McClory,
James McEwan. Robert Noon. Mi
chael Nugent. Robert O'Brien.
Lawrence ‘O'Connor and William
Patterson.
Fathers Thomas Sabrey, Robert
Schmidt, George Schorr, Omer
Schroeder. Robert Schuer. Donald
Schulz, Edward Spiers, Joseph
Stanton. William Stecker, Leo Sul
livan. Vaclovas Suminas, Joseph
Switzalski. John Tague, Michael
Welinitz, Robert White, Augustine
Winkler, John Wolf and George
Wolz.
Catholics are urged to ask God’s
blessings on these priests for the
success of the retreat.
Priest Explains Canon Laws
Relating To ’“Bad Marriages
Widespread discussion has been touched off by recent articles beginning with one written by
Father Vann, O.P., in Blackfriars magazine of England and reproduced in the Catholic Digest—dealing
with the situation of a Catholic involved in an invalid marriage. In view of this the N.C.W.C. News serv
ice asked one of the country's most distinguished authorities to set down Catholic teaching on this point
briefly and in simple language. Dr. Connell is dean of the School of Sacred Theology of the Catholic
University of America.
By Very Rev. Dr. Francis J. Connell, C.SS.R.
Written for N C.W.C. NEWS SERVICE
Throughout the United States at the present time there are many invalid marriages—
that is, conjugal unions that are not genuine marriages in the eyes of God, even though they
may be recognized as true marriages by the civil law.
In most cases the reason why the marital union is null and void is that one of the pair
die without some expression of re
pentance they will be denied
Christian burial. To some this doc
trine may appear harsh, but it is
the teaching of Jesus Christ as ex
pounded by His Church.
A Catholic living in an invalid
marriage should not on that ac
count give up all religious prac
tices. He should pray and observe
the Church laws regarding fast and
abstinence and attendance at Mass.
Through these good works he may
merit one day the spiritual
strength to return to God.
But he should realize that as
long as he has the intention of
continuing in sin, he cannot re
gain sanctifying grace. One of
the essential conditions for the
forgiveness of sin and the restor
ation to the friendship of God is
that the sinner firmly resolve to
avoid sin (at least all mortal sin)
in future.
Sometimes Catholics involved in
a bad marriage protest that way
they do not wish to commit sin,
that they are remaining in their
deplorable state unwillingly. How
ever, they are using the word
unwillingly in a wide sense. They
mean that they wish their present
union were not invalid, and that
there is a measure of reluctance on
their part in remaining in this con
dition.
They do not mean that they are
sincerely resolved to abstain from
all the privileges of married life in
future, which is the kind of un
willingness that is required in re
lation to sin before a person is
capable oi receiving the pardon of
his sins and restoration to the state
of grace.
Some Catholic women joined to
a divorced man might put up the
excuse: “I agreed to live as this
man’s wife. He thinks the marriage
is good because he believes in di
vorce.
“Must I not, therefore fulfill my
contract and perform the duties
of a wife?” The answer is that,
even though the other party is in
good faith, the Catholic who knows
that the marriage is null and void
may not perform any action that
is sinful. Hence for such a person
every act of sexual intercourse is a
mortal sin. The contract in ques
tion has no binding force, since no
Fr. Wolf Presents
Discussion Series
On W BNS TV
Father John Wolf, S.T.D., of St.
Charles Seminary, is currently
producing a series of religious dis
cussion programs each Sunday af
ternoon on television station
WBNS-TV..
Seen at 2:30 on “Columbus
Churches,” the series concerns it
self with fundamental questions of
religion. Father Woif asks ques
tions of three St. Charles High
School students appearing with
them. The answers given are dis
cussed for about twenty minutes
and the remainder of the program
is devoted to a summation by Fa
ther Wolf.
Students appearing with Father
are Bill Dunn, Peter Park and
Jack Carter. Sunday the group will
discuss the human soul what it
is we are saving, what we are sav
ing it from, and what we are sav
ing it for.
one can make a valid contract to
do something sinful.
Neither can any Catholic entan
gled in a bad marriage claim that
it is impossible for him or her to
do what is required by God s law.
For God will always give' us the
grace we need to obey His law and
(Continued on Page 2)
Film Industry
Is Scored For
Indecent Ads
NEW YORK (NC) Movie
men have got to put some action
behind their resolutions against in
decent advertising or face the
wrath of a disgusted public, a film
trade journal warned here.
“An ugly and perhaps crucial
high-point of indecency” in movie
advertising threatens to crush the
good name of the movie industry
and to blot out public respect for
film makers, the Motion Picture
Daily said in a front page article.
Written by Martin Quigley, pub
lisher of the newspaper, the article
said that current movie ads “with
purple suggestiveness in text and
illustration” constitute a “first-rate
chamber of horrors.” Newspaper
columns, he said, are “muddied
with suggestive and vulgar theatri
cal advertising.”
Mr. Quigley, who was co-author
of the production »code which
guides movie morality, advised the
moviemen to adopt "regular and
thorough-going policing’’ to get de
cent standards back into film ads.
“It is sheer futility to adopt (ad
vertising) codes and pass resolu
tions and then assume that by
these gestures responsibility has
been discharged,” he said.
He said that the film makers and
distributors are cultivating a bad
name not only with the public but
“with many important newspapers
whose columns have been giving
voice to their own and the public's
complaint.” Some newspapers, he
said, have been driven to setting
up codes “and even outright cen
sorship to protect their columns
and their own good name from ob
jectionable movie advertising.”
He warned the film makers that
the movie industry “is not a fly
by-night carnival business in
which, come the morning dawn,
the outfit is on its way to a new
crop of suckers in the next town.
Carnival business ethics should
have no part in today's movie in
dustry.”
Mr. Quigley said that the movies
must depend on the good will of
the public. Advertisements that are
scandalous in text and illustration
will be interpreted by an intelli
gent public as “a profession of in
competence, and a disregard of the
public interest.” he stated.
He said deterioration of decency
standards in film ads has been
gradual and that no one source is
accountable. “One advertiser after
another has sought to top, per
haps by only a little, what the fel
low just ahead of him has done,”
Mr. Quigley said.
He called upon men in the posi
tion of “final authority” to awaken
to the fact that, to the public, "ad
vertising is an all-revealing dis
closure of the character of the in
dustry and the judgment, taste and
purposes of the people who run
it.”
294 Adult Converts Confirmed
The photo above was taken during the adult Confirmation ceremonies conducted Sunday afternoon at St. Joseph
Cathedral, Bishop Hettinger presiding. In all 294 persons received the Sacrament.
1 he ...iolic Times
Columbus 16, Ohio, Friday, Juno 11, 1954
Plans for a new Infirmary
Building at Saint Mary of the
Springs have been completed by
the architect. Louis F. Karlsberger.
Ground will be broken as soon as
possible next year, according to
Reverend Mother M. Aloyse. Moth
er General.
Saint Mary of the Springs, which
is the headquarters for more than
six-hundred-fifty Dominican Sis
ters who staff colleges, academies,
parochial schools and a convales
cent hospital throughout the coun
try and especially in this diocese,
has dire need of such a building
for its aged and infirm Sisters.
Present quarters occupied by the
sick are wholly inadequate.
The new building will provide
Diocesan Camps
To Open Sunday
Summer vacation season begins
Sunday for. the boys and girls of
the Diocese when the two Diocesan
Camps open for the annual 10 week
summer session Approximately 80
young boys will register at Camp
St. Joseph in Lockbourne. Ohio, be
tween the hours of 2 and 5 p.
this Sunday. For the past few
w'eeks workers have been busy
getting the cabins and other build
ings in shape to handle the large
crowds of applicants for the sum
mer.
The camp will be supervised by
a large staff of qualified counsel
or-seminarians of the Columbus
Diocese. Mr. Eugene Yoris will
serve in the capacity of Camp Mas
ter for the year. Mrs. Betty Newell
will be in charge of the kitchen and
dining room.
Officials at Camp St. Rita are
making plans to register about 60
girls for the first period. Miss Al
ice Kiernan, head counsellor for the
camp will be assisted in the care of
the youngsters this year by an ex
perienced group of Senior and
Junior counsellors. Mrs. Alma Vath
will return to the camp as chief
cook and dietician.
Applications are being received
at the Camp Office, 246 E. Town
St., for all of the 10 periods There
is still plenty of room for the
summer sessions.
pires and dictatorships.
The Holy Father's participation
in the honors paid to St. Boniface
was in the form of a long Encycli
cal letter, named after its opening
I
Mt
5
“3- v
Infirmary To Be Built At College
Examining the plans for the new Infirmary Building to be erected at St. Mary of
the Springs for Sisters of the Community are, left to right, Sister M. Virginia, O.P., vicaress
Mr. Louis Karlsberger, architect, and Reverend Mother M. Aloyse, O.P., superior-general.*
facilities for approximately eighty
Sisters, with provision for future
expansion as required. It will con
sist of three stories and a base
ment with brick exterior and fire
proof floors and roof. Interior fin
ish will be executed with an eye
toward a pleasant, cheerful atmos
phere, durability and ease of main
tenance. Included will be a lobby,
waiting area, offices, parlors, chap
lain's facilities, doctors’ facilities,
and a chapel.
Facilities will be provided for
both the critically ill and the in
firm. In addition to the nursing
unit, there will be a solarium, ster
ilizing and supply room, laboratory
pharmacy, a radiographic depart
ment with dark room, and treat-
(Meanwhile, reports from Vien
na state that the restrictions im
posed upon His Eminence Aloisi
us Cardinal Stepinac in his na
tive village of Krasic have been
further tightened. He is watched
day and night and requests for
permits to visit the Cardinal are
almost invariably turned down.
For foreigners in particular it is
quite useless to apply for a per
mit, the reports say. The reason
given for the new restrictions is
that the Cardinal had “misin
formed some of his visitors and
made false statements liable to
harm the prestige of Yugoslavia
abroad.)
The letter of Stefanovich, as re­
Pope Writes Encyclical
Honoring St. Boniface
VATICAN CITY (NC) His Holiness Pope Pius XII
has joined the Bishops of Germany and other European coun
tries in commemorating the 12th centenary of the martyrdom
of St. Boniface.
He attributed the success of this English-born “Apostle of
the Germans” to his fidelity to the Holy See and pointed out
how through 1.200 years the Gospel preached by him has
triumphantly withstood wars and schisms and outlived em-
words “Ecclesiae Fastos.”
Publication of the document co
incides with the celebrations now
under way at Fulda, Germany,
where St. Boniface is buried, and
those scheduled later this month
in Plymouth, England, near the
Saint s birthplace of Crediton in
Devonshire, and early next month
in Dokkum. Holland, where he was
martyred by pagan Frisians in 754.
Pointing out that one of the
greatest characteristics of the life
and work of St. Boniface was his
attachment and fidelity to the Holy
See, the encyclical letter said:
'-On this jubilee occasion, and
in compliance with your (the
Bishops') request, We consider it
most opportune to place the un
ion of this shining martyr with
the Holy See and its great under
takings in its full light.
As a matter of fact, while this
will confirm the faith and fidelity
of those who adhere to the in
fallible magisterium of the Roman
Pontiff, it can also not fail to move
in a salutary way, through a pro
founder reflection, all those who.
for whatever reason, are separated
from the successors of St. Peter.”
so that they will correspond with
God’s grace and travel the path of
unity with the Church.
In the first half of the encyclical
(Continued on Page 2)
ment room.
A clinic for the examination of
Sisters housed in the Infirmary, as
well as for the active Sisters of the
congregation will be provided. This
department will contain a dental
room, examination and treatment
room, and cubicles for basal metab
olism, electrocardiograph heat
therapy, diathermy, hydrotherapy,
etc.
Storage and service facilities will
include a main kitchen designed
for central tray service and refec
tory service for ambulatory pat
ients, laundry, store rooms, and in
dividual heating plant. Construc
tion of the building will be in
charge of E. Elford and Son, Inc.,
of Columbus.
Tito’s Police Boss Asks
All-Out War on Religion
GRAZ, Austria (NC) Bitterly disappointed at the
failure to shake the Croat and Slovene people from loyalty to
their traditional faith, Yugoslavia’s secret police boss has
given new instructions for all-out war on Bishops and priests.
According to reports received here from Ljubljana, capi
tal of Slovenia, these instructions are contained in a confi-
dential circular letter from M.
Stefanovich, head of the OZNA (se
cret police). The letter, which is
said to have becotne known through
an “indiscretion,” was issued on
the 10th anniversary of the organi
zation of OZNA.
ported here, started out by prais
ing OZNA agents for their efforts
“to cripple the reactionary Catho
lic Church and to eliminate the
influence of the Bishops, the arch
enemies of the Yugoslav people.”
Wa Have Failed
But. the letter went on. “I must
frankly say that I am terribly dis
appointed in my expectations. We
have failed to break the grip of
the Roman Catholic Church and
the Vatican on the masses of the
people in Slovenia. Croatia, Istria
and Dalmatia. In some remote parts
of the country, a priest enjoys
higher prestige and exercises great
er influence than leading (com
munist) party members.”
The letter then cited statistics
showing that, compared with
pre-war years, church attendance
in Croatia has increased up to
60 per cent, in Slovenia up to
40, and in Bosnia up to 30 per
cent.
“There are many cases in the
towns of Croatia, particularly in
Zagreb, where civil servants get
up early on Sunday mornings,
sometimes before 5 o’clock, in or
der to go to Mass at 6 o'clock and
thus avoid our control and public
attention attendant on going to the
10 or 11 o'clock Sunday Masses,”
the letter said. It also noted the
“sad and disturbing” fact that in
some parts of Croatia Cardinal
Stepinac is much popular than any
communist leader, including Mar
shal Tito.
“As long as the Slovenes and
Croats passionately adhere to their
religion and the alien Catholic
Church. Yugoslavia can never be
consolidated and communism can
never penetrate into all veins and
limbs of the state organism,' the
letter said.
In view of this situation. Stefan
ovich then urged all members of
the secret police to study thorough
ly the impact of the Catholic re
ligion upon the “backward masses”
and to send to OZNA headquarters
their own observations and pro
posals how this influence could be
broken forever. He made it clear
the OZNA is preparing to launch,
after the harvest has been brought
in, an all-out attack on the Church
in Yugoslavia.
In the meantime he urged the
intensification of anti-reli i o u s
propaganda among youth and or
dered that all Confirmation visits
by Bishops in rural areas be stop
ped.
-------------------o-------------------
Encyclical On Virginity
Now Available In Pamphlet
WASHINGTON (NC) The
encyclical letter on Holy Virginity,
which Pope Pius XII issued March
25. 1954. is now axailable in
pamphlet form complete with foot
notes. from the N.C.W.C. Publica
tions Office, 1312 Mass Ave Wash
ington 5, D.C.
Named
Monsignor Wolz, a faculty mem
ber at St. Charles since his return
to this country
in 1937 from
special studies
in Rome, is
widely known as
a Seri pt i're
scholar and pro
fessor of Orien
tal Bib 1 i a 1)
languages.
Born in Co
lumbus, Monsig
nor Wolz attend-
Msgr. Wolz
e St. Mary
grade and high school, later enter
ing St. Charles Seminary. Upon the
completion of his philosophy
course at St. Charles. Monsignor
Wolz was sent to the American
College in Rome for special studies.
He was ordained Oct 28. 1934. in
Rome and was awarded the degree
of Doctor of Sacred Theology by
the Gregorian University lhere in
1937.
In January of 1950 Bishop Ready
named Monsignor Wolz administra
tor of St. Margaret of Cortona par
ish. Marble Cliff, Columbus.
Besides these duties Monsignor
Wolz is professor of German at
the College of St. Mary of the
Springs. Columbus Judex Synoda
lis of the Diocese and the Consult
ant on International Relations for
Apostolic Delegate
VATICAN CITY (Radio. NC)
—Archbishop Gerald P. O’Hara.
Bishop of Savannah-Atlanta, has
been named Apostolic Delegate to
Great Britain, thus receiving his
third majdr diplomatic assignment
from the Holy See.
Archbishop O’Hara, a 59-year-old
native of Green Ridge, near Scran
ton, Pa succeeds to the post left
vacant by the transfer last Novem
ber of Archbishop William God
frey from the apostolic delegation
in London to the archbishopric of
Liverpool.
The parishes with their new
boundaries are as follows:
St. Aloysius
NORTHERN BOUNDARY:
Fisher Road from Wilson Road
on the west to the Scioto River
the Scioto River from a point on
an airline directly east from Fish
er Road to a point on an airline
directly north from North Central
Avenue on the east.
EASTERN BOUNDARY:
Both sides North Central Ave
nue beginning at a point project
ed directly north to the Scioto
River to West Broad Street (U.S.
Route 40) on the south South Cen
tral Avenue (excluded) from West
Broad Street (U.S. Route 40) on
the north to Sullivant Avenue on
the south.
SOUTHERN BOUNDARY:
North side of Sullivant Avenue
from South Central Avenue on the
west to South Hague Avenue on
the west.
WESTERN BOUNDARY:
East side of South Hague Avenue
from Sullivant Avenue on the
south to West Broad Street (U.S.
Route 40) on the north West
Broad Street west to Wilson Road
Wilson Road north to Fisher Road.
St. Mary Magdalene
NORTHERN BOUNDARY:
South side of West Broad Street
(U.S. Route 40) from a point on an
airline directly north from Jose
phine Avenue on the west to South
Hague Avenue on the east.
EASTERN BOUNDARY:
West side of South Hague Ave­
Have You
Made Your
Easter Duty?
Price Ton Cents $3.00 A Year
Pope Pius XI I
Honors Three
Local Priests
Pope Pius XII has honored three priests of the Diocese
of Columbus for their outstanding labors for the Church by
elevating one to the rank of Domestic Prelate and two to Papal
Chamberlains.
The announcement of the high Papal honors came In a
cablegram from Bishop Ready in Rome to Monsignor Paul
Glenn, rector of St. Charles Semi
nary. All
members
three priests are faculty
of that institution.
a Domestic Prelate with
of Right Reverend Mon-
the title
signor was Father George T. Wolz,
S.T D., professor of Scripture and
vice rector of the Seminary. Father
Paul J. O’Dea, M.A., Dean of
Studies at the Seminary, and Fa
ther Edward F. Spiers, Ph. D.. Pro
fessor of Mathematics and Athletic
Director at the Seminary, who was
recently appointed Principal of the
new' Watterson High school in Co
lumbus. were named Papal Cham
berlains with the title of Very Rev
erend Monsignor.
the Diocesan Council of Catholic
Women.
A faculty member of St. Charles
Seminary since 1946 and Dean of
Studies there since 1950, Monsignor
O Dea has spent
most of his
priestly life
teaching the
fields of educa
tion and psy
chology.
The new Mon
signor, a native
of Columbus, at
tended the
grade schools of
Holy Name and
I a u 1 ate M*gr. O'Dea
Conception par
ishes in Columbus and then took
his high school, college and philos
ophy training at St. Charles Semi
nary.
Monsignor O'Dea finished his
seminary training at Mount St
Mary of the West, Norwood, Ohio,
and was ordained May 22, 1941.
Foi the next five years. Monsig
nor O’Dea was Chaplain of the Con
vent of the Good Shepherd, Colum
bus and taught psychology at the
St. Francis Hospital Nursing
School.
During this time Monsignor
O Dea attended Ohio State Uni
versity and was awarded the de
gree of Master of Arts in Education
and Psychology.
Monsignor Spiers a member of
the St. Charles faculty since his
ordination in 1939. was also born
in Col u u s
and attended St.
John’s parochial
school there.
His high
school, college
and philosopny
training were
taken at St.
Charles Semi
nary. Columbus.
He compl e e
i s theological
course at Mount
St. Mary of the
West, Norwood.
March 3, 1939.
Msgr. Spiers
and was ordained
Monsignor Spiers received his
Master of Arts degree from Cath
olic University in Washington in
1945. majoring in mathematics and
education. He received his Doctor
ate in Education from Ohio State
University in 1950.
Until his appointment as Princi
pal of the new Watterson High
School Dr. Spiers was Dean of
Students (Prefect of Discipline). Di
rector of Athletics and Student
Council Adviser at St. Charles.
New Boundaries Drawn
For Six Local Parishes
New boundaries for six parishes in the Diocese of Co
lumbus were announced this week by the Chancery Office.
The parishes affected by the boundary changes are: St. Aloy
sius, St. Mary Magdalene. St. Agnes and St. Margaret of Con
tena all in Columbus Our Lady of Perpetual Help. Grove City,
and St. Cecilia, New Rome.
nue from West Broad Street (U.S.
Route 40) on the North to Sullivant
Avenue on the south east on Sub
livant Avenue to South Ogden Ave
nue South Ogden Avenue (exclud
ed) from Sullivant Avenue on the
north to Eakin Road on the south,
then southwards on an airline to
Clime Road.
SOUTHERN BOUNDARY:
Beginning at a point on Clime
Road directly south of South Og
den Avenue on an airline, then
west on Clime Road to a point di
rectly south on an airline from
Josephine Avenue.
WESTERN BOUNDARY:
Both sides of Josephine Avenue
beginning at a point projected di
rectly south to Clime Road and
continuing northwards to a point
on an airline where it would inter
sect with West Broad Street (U.S.
Route 40).
St. Agnes
NORTHERN BOUNDARY:
South side of Sullivant Avenue
from South Ogden Avenue on the
west to State Route 3 (South Cen
tral Avenue) on the east.
EASTERN BOUNDARY:
State Route 3 (South Central Av
enue) from Sullivant Avenue on
the north to Clime Road on the
south.
SOUTHERN BOUNDARY:
Beginning at a point on Clime
Road directly south of South Og
den Avenue on an airline, then
(Continued on Page 2)

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