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Millheim Journal. [volume] (Millheim, Pa.) 1876-1984, October 21, 1880, Image 2

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THURSDAY. OCT. 21 1880.
THE MILLH'EIM JOURNAL
Is publishedcvfry Thurvl.u. in Mhv ov's Build
ing, cornet*of Main a* ii Point streets :tt
SI.OO PER AN N :*M, IN ADVANCE
i)i- IT not paid In advance.
.-//)!!EBTTSI.Wr RITES.
1 week. 1 mo. "mo. C. mo. 1 year.
1 square I#l o.M >;*'. w I s•' •> I
\i cot iiltt!,.. S I 4 (>H j loot I 1}U;1
Vicoh;mu,..| siV| 7 .">0 I 1.0 tie j l"'' 1
1 column,.. I 800 | 1200 | 20 iXi I &> 00 | t-o W
Due inelt makes a square. Adminis;raters
and K reenters' Notices >2.50. Transient ad
vertlsements Kitd locals 10 v uis per line for
first insert! Nt unil j cents per lino lor each ad
ditional insertion.
Job Work done on short notice.
I'EiXIMiSa & BllUl.liF.il,
Editors and Proprietors.
Qlmrcli & Sunday School Directory.
Evangolical.
Rev. Samuel Smith and Rev. 11". H. llartman,
Preachers.
Sunday School, 2t\ M.— l>. L. Zcrby, supt.
Rev. S. Smith will preach next Sunday morn
ing,
Methodist.
Rev. J. Benson Akers, rreacher-ln-chareic.
Sunday School at lkj v. M.—Dav. Klmport, supt
Reformed.
Rev. C. lr. F. Siegd, Pastor.
Preaching ou Sunday forenoon in Aarons
burg.
United Brethren.
Lutheran.
Rev. John limit inson, Pistor.—
rommunion services in Aaron-burg on Sun
day tnorninjj in German and in the evening
English.
Sunday United School.
Meets at 9a. m.—F. D. Luse, supt.
Lotec & Society Directory.
Millheini Lodge, No. 955, I. O. O. F. meets in
;. a n PennStreet, every Satunlay evening,
l 'a.ee.V Decree Meeting every Thursday on
or before the full moon ot each nmntli.
A. O. DeimxuKH, See. B. O. Dbixixgkb, N. G
Pre viilenee Grange. No. 217 P. of H.. meets in
Mexamlor s block on the second Saturday of
each month at OH. p. m.. and on the fourth Sa
turday of each month at l - P- M-.
1) L.Zerbt. See. A. O. Deininger, Master..
The Mtlllielm B. & L. Association meets in
the Penn street school house on tne evening ot
tli£ second Monday of each mont h.
A. Walter, Sec, B. O. Deisinoer, 1 rest.
"Hie Milibeim Cornet Band meets in the
Town Hall on Monday and Thursday evenings.
F. P. Otto, See,, • - F. llariek, Pies t.
Millheim Escort of Co. 8.. sih licet., N. G..
1 old their drill meeting on the second >t>r> ot
Alexander's Block, every Tuesday and I nday
eveniug,
01 ; a Director
Regular Terms of Court —Fourth Mondays of
January, Apri. August and November.
president Judge—lion. Chas. A. Major, Lock
Additional'"Law judge—Hon. John H. Orvis,
Bellefonte. „ . T - ,
Associate Judges —Hons, bainuel Fi ank, John
Dlveu.
Pretlwuotavy-J. C. Harper. _ _ „
KurCTme-o. til:'iio-m A - Tobias.
Recordsi'o. '.ad F. Fortncy.
Sheriff—John Spansrler.
Treasurer—Adam Yea rick.
Countv survey . —,L>seph Devling.
Coroner—Dr. fo-e; u Adams.
County • on:!::: ,oners—Andrew Gregg, George
S'.vab, Jacob Duukle.
Clerk to County Commissioners—llenry Beck.
Attorney to County Commissioners—C. M.
Bower.
'anitor of the Court House—Bartrim Galbraith.
ounty Auditors—James T. Stewart, George
K. Williams, Thomas B. Jamison,
iry Commissioners —Johu Shannon, David W.
Kline.
uperintendent of Public Schools—Prof. Henry
Meyer.
BEMOC3ATIC NATIONAL TICKET,
FOB PRESIDENT,
GEN. WIN FIELD S. HANCOCK.
Of Pennsylvania.
FOB VICE PRESIDENT,
HON. WM. 11. ENGLISH,
Of Indiano.
STATE TICKET.
SUPREME JUDGE,
GEORGE A. JENKS, Jefferson Co,
AUDITOR GENERAL,
ROBERT P.DECIIERT, Philadelphia.
Democratic County Ticket.
lor Congress,
A. G. CURTIN.
For Legislature, •
J. P. GEPIIART.
W. A. MURRAY.
For District Attorney,
W. C. HEINLE.
For County Surveyor'
SAMUEL BRUGGER.
THE OUTLOOK IN NOVEM
EER.
Hancock will bo our next Pres
ident.
Since the Democrats have revived
from the shock they received by the
result of the Indiana and Ohio elec
tions, they braz3 UD again and get
ready for a more desperate and success
ful battle in November. The effect
which their defeat had 011 them was
somewhat like the one produced on
the Republican party by the loss of
Maine. At iirst a little stunned, but
afterward more energetic and deter
mined than ever.
There are several points which indi
cate a favorable result of the Novem
ber election for the Democracy, in
spite of the defeat in Indiana. In the
iirst place the Democrats have decid
edly the strongest and most inspir
ing presidential candidate, with a
record that stands tho severest tests.
Another thing will greatly serve tho
■ n Nov ""-be-. T' ore will
be no fe.leral supervision of the voting
no deputy marshal 4or supervisors in
Indiana and Ohio, as wore in lite con
gressional elections and this fact will
be so significant, that it will he worth
thousands of votes to the Democrats.
Besides, the thorough union of the two
great factions in New York, the T.un
many and anti-Tammanv wings, so
eurejhat state for the Democrats in
November, will make New Jersey and
Gonncctiuct follow suit and make the j
i South, to >:o solid than ever. There is j
! a powerful advance along the whole i
j Hancock line, since the perfect unity j
jof the Democrats in New York has
| been restored, and the Republican
leaders comm.nice to get uneasy and
are not near as confident of success as
they were right after the October elec
tion* The Democrats took a new foot
hold and with a mighty ami over
whelming lush, lead ou by the superb
Gen. Hancock, they will storm the
Republican barricades and erect the
banner of victory at tho end of the
second day of November.
MR. ENGLISH AT HOME.
What a Townsman and Neigh
bor'of the Next Vice-Presi
dent Has to Say About
Him.
(From the JVcio York )\'orld, Oct. Sth,
18S0.
Air. Henry 1). Tierce, a lawyer of
Indianapolis and partner of ex-United
States Senator Turple, is .stopping a
few days in New York with Mr. Gal
lagher, the editor of the Mining Jour
nal, homeward bound from the White
Mountains, He was met yesterday by
a B oral reporter and was asked if he
kneA* Mr. English well.
lie said: "1 have been a visitor at
his family fireside since ntv boyhood.
In busiuess it has been my lot fre
quently to come in contact with him
in the courts antagonistically, for his
own and his bank interests have
brought him in confiict with the claims
of my clients, who weie sometimes
rival creditors, and occasionally delay
; seeking debtors. I say unhesitatingly
that I never knew Mr. English to do
an oppressive act. He has been charg
ed with foreclosing mortgages. Ho
! took and foreclosed them fairly and
simply as a matter of business. As a
President of the First National, the
wealthiest bank iu Indiana, for fifteen
or twenty years, it would be rather
singular if his name did not figure ex
- teusively in the court records, lie
simply did his duty to himsetf, the
parties for whom ho loaned, and his
bank—many of tho bauk loans, at
least some to my knowledge, being
originally made in tho name or the
nTwwsft F'te 1 is I 'pfo%fp^" reliable,
and just such a person as wius ttie
highest place and confidence in finan
cial circles of New York. Every fair
business man of Indiana knows this.
; His wealth, in my judgment, has been
overestimated; a large property lie
certainly lias, but much of it is unpro
ductive. I give it as my judgment
that the few who have aired their
private misfortunes in opposition jour
nals for partisan purposes could, never
theless, go to Mr. English and those
for whom he has acted, after the elec
tion, snd receive back their properties
at a discount of 20 per cent, upon
what the same have cost him. Shrink
age and widespread disaster loaded
liirn with properties he would gladly
return at less than cost, I think. Few
men with idle means would a year or
two ago have thought for a moment of
giving him cost for them."
"How about his buying tax titles?"
'.'People who are compelled to de
fault in interest and cannot pay their
loans, always let their taxes go unpaid.
Many an Eastern loan company knows
this, Mr. Eoglish has prudently
protected Himself and his fiduciaries by
looking to taxes, I have profession
ally represented many Eeastern inter
ests iD the same way, and often found
our interests and claims conllicting
with his; but 1 never knew Milliam 11.
English to buy a single property at tax
sale on speculation. lie bought only
where compelled to protect himself
and his fiduciaries, Indianapolis suf
fered a severe blow from the panic.
Large and moderate-size dwellings
went begging for tenants. People who
had homes sought cottages and rooms
in blocks. Mr. English, in the face of
gratuitous adyice to the contrary,
proved himself a real recognized public
benefactor when, at a bad time, lie
builtbundredsof small houses iu manu
facturing districts—au action which
in the city press, when he was not a
candidate, resounded to his praise as a
public-spirited citizen. His friends
knew that he was actuated largely by
a desire to maintain Indianapolis as a
'City of Ilomes,' for which, more than
aught else, she has been noted, llis
reward in this respect, I regret to add,
has been a most unremunerative rent
roll and slanderous stories by 11011-
paying tenants. Scores of his houses
have stood vacant for months for want
of tenants, a prey for tramps. 'Eng
lish over builds,' 'too sanguine of his
chosen city's growth,' 'mistake,' said
many of his present critics, who care
fully confine their mean 3 to bonds and
stocks."
"The Republican journals have said
lie was not a hospitable man."
"Probably it is little known that Mr.
English's household has been broken
up in a manner that should excite
sympathy. A more devoted and ten
der husband and son never lived. His
wife after long suffering and the ton
dercat caro, died a few years ago. The
household was then maiutainiM as a
home for his aged parents. Then his
father died; next his only daughter
married and moved to another state,
where she is now surrounded by the
cares of her own household. The old
home is still maintained as of yore for
the mother's sake, a bright but feeble,
frail old lady, now over eighty years of
age, too feeble to ptcsidc a.s hostess, all
their meals even being brought from u
hotel on another square. Am in with
more tenderness and warmth of feeling
for those he cherished 1 never knew.
During the last long and extremely
painful illness of his venerable father,
Mr. ElishaEnglish, the son was almost
unremittingly by his f.ithci -s side night
and day, nursing him with the tender
ness and devotion of a woman. This 1
saw.
Mr. English is frank and sincere. |
A man of firm convictions, 110 vevor
shiiks. lie never acts by indirection.
Nothing sly or canning in his composi
tion; nor will lie try to raaguify his
own importance iu the canvass by
criticisms of others. I do not believe
that on just grounds any fault can be
found with him for any want of bear
ing his full share of the labor and
proper expenditure incident to the
canvass."
Mr. Pierce concluded with some
emphasis: "I believe if Mr. English
should bo elected, the business men of
the country would lind—when they
knew him, and when ho should lie
called upon for advice or influence
concerning or giving proper directions
to legislation or otherwise—that in
public affairs they have a wise and safe
and valuable instrumentality for the
public good. If every public man shall
prove us able, earnest, prudent and
sagacious as will Mr. English, if elec
ted, there will be no extreme or revo
lutionary policy adop'ed in anything,
lie is a man who will let 'well enough
alone,' and he opposed to any injuri
ous changes in tariff or in financial
policy. Moreover, unlike Garfield, he
has the courage of his convictions.
The Northern Method of Bull-
Dozing.
Special Dispatch to Tub Timks.
NEW YORK, October 14.—There is
much indignation expressed in Brook
lyn because the owners of the Plauel
Mills, which employ hundreds of
workingraen, have put up placards
saying that the election of General
Hancock means lower wages and hard
times and the success of the Republi
can ticket means the reverse; although
that if Garfield is elected the mills will
continue to run, but if he is defeated
who employ thousands, have, it is said,
i warned employes that they wruld have
ta close the establishment if Hancock
s elected.
-
WASHINGTON LETTER.
Washington, I). C. Oct. 16th, 18S0.
Our Radical friends have destroyed
one "argument"— one that has here
tofore has some effect—against Gen.
Hancock. They have appealed to
business men against a change, on the
ground that the currency and the
tariff would be meddled with under a
Democratic Administration. As the
Radical gains of Representatives in
Vermont. Ohio and Indiana give them
control of the House, no such inter
ference with tariff or currency will be
possible even if hundreds of Hancock's
were elected President. Of course,
even if House, Senate and President
were Democratic, no violent changes
would be made either in the currency
or in the tariff, and any change that
( might be made would be beneficial, but
it is in one sense gratifying to know
that the "argument" has lost all the
force it had. Business smen who are
satisfied with the present condition of
laws can rest easy and can vote for I
Hancock without any of the dangers
that Radical orators have foretold.
The Secretary of the Interior ought
to feel himself burdened with lesponsi*
bility for the renewed troubles with
the Utes. He went to the Indian
country to study the situation, and
come back well informed as to the
affairs of the Utes and other tribes.
Had he been at his post when the
recent Indian murder was committed
which threatens to bring on a war, he
could doubtless have taken prompt and
effective action to avert serious conse
quences. Bui he was in the West,
speaking for Garfield, and his depart
ment was in change of men who had
not enjoyed the benefits of recent in
vestigation in the Ute country,and
who even if tlisy could have acted as
intelligently as the Secretary, woald
not have commanded the same respite
from Indians or settlers.
By all means, the Democratic Com
mittees should give us as few more
addresses as possible between tnis time
and November 2nd. Committees
hould let results of their work speak
for them. Every Democrat in the
country will be happy to receive from
Chairman Barnum, early in Novem
ber, an announcement that Hancock
and English are elected, and tho Dem
ocratic Committee of Indiana can then
with a great deal of propiiety and to
the general satisfaction, announce that
the State has returned to her position
in the Democratic ranks. But the
Conservative voters are tired of pro
ductions of the sort issued of late.
Apologies for defeat are Dot in order.
I venture the assertion that the two
weeks between October lbth and elec
tion day will be better employed by the
Democracy of Indiana and New York,
acting with little reference to Commit
tees, than wtro the two weeks prior to
October 12th.
If, us is claiittad, the Republicans
have secured control of the next House
of Representatives, those timid manu
facturers and workmen who voted the
Republican ticket last week for fear of
a "change," can express their regard
for General Hancock by voting him,
the "change" being impossible unless
the Democracy control both Houses.
CARROLL.
PETERSON'S MAGAZINE is oa our
table for November, ahead of all others,
ami as usual, more ami more improved.
It is a wonder how this unrivalled
lady's book can be published at, so low
a price, yet always be getting better;
but the secret, we suppose, 'lies in its
enormous circulation. The November
issue leads off with a capital stool en
gtaving, "Missy In The Sulks," and is
followed by one of those double-size
steel fashion plates, supeibly coh>red,
only seen in this periodical. Then
comes a weird engraving, "The Moat
ed Manor House," illustrating a power
ful story; and theu some fifty wood
cuts of dresses, patterns i.i embroidery,
crochet, &c., Ac. "Mary, Queen of
Scots," is a profusely illustrated arti
cle on that happy queon; and there are
tales besides, and novelets, Ac., Ac.
With this number appears tho Pros
pectus for 1881, when Six ORIGINAL
NOVELETS will be given, aud in ad
dition a hundred shorter storks. A se
ries of brilliautly illustrated articles
will also appear. Also a PATER PAT
TERN FOR A DRESS, every month. The
price of "Peterson" is but Two DOL
LARS A YEAR, or less than any other
firs-class magazine, postage free. To
clubs tho terms are eveu lower, viz:
two copies for $1.5 >, with a superb,
copyright mezz jtlnt (size 24 inches by
20) "(J RAN'FATHER TELLS OF YORK
TOWN," or an illustrated ALBUM,
QUARTO, GILT, as a premium. Or
four copies for $0.50. and an extra copy
of the magazine itself as premium. Or
five copies for SS.OO, with both an (x
--tra copy and either tfie Engraving or
Album for premium. For large clubs
the premiums are even more tempt
ing. Xoic is the ti)nc to get up clubs for
IBS 1. Specimens are sent, gratis, if
written for. Subscribe to nothing until
you have seen a copy of "Peterson."
Address CHARLES J. PETERSON, 300
Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa.
KT"AV M 1.*.: - icrThe residence of
n Henry Mowrer, near Aaronsburg, on or
about September "Jst. in<t.. a stray bull, about
one year old. black, brown streak t.n back,
wh tc on underpaid of body. The owner is re
quested to py easts and take the same nwav,
otherwiso he will bedisjKiscd of as the law di
rects. JOHN J. MUMKK,
Sept. 30th, 1880. Tuw u clerk.
VDMINISTItATIR'S NOTlCE.—Letters rf
adniinietrutior on the esfule of Faiuuel
it. Aloyer, late of Aalllietui, decease 1, having
been granted to tie subscriber, all per-ams
knowing them-elvts indebted t< said ( fate
nj'e herebv lotiiird to make immediate pay
ment, and those laving claims against the
same to present theu duly authenticated lor
settlement.
All persons having unsettled accouuta with
said decedent are hereby requested to call
for settlement at hw late residence on Friday,
October 22nd next, at 1 o'clock I*. M.
Gt THOMAS HOBTKHM AN.
THE BOOT & SHOE MAN y
LOCK HAVEN. j®|
I have a very large stock of 1
•S BOOTS, SHOES, gj|
psd Slippers & Ladies VT
WALKING SnOES,
aA Just opened up for Spring and pzl
Sumnmr wear. My stock Is
F-.-rpk as cheap as it was a year JsfKP
fe£fl§ ago, because I bought it
a for cash before llie ad
vauce, I am tho only Maria
g§ shoo dealer in l ock BSSfI j
Hoveh that buys If'
for cash & pays ■ "
M no rent where-
than any HBj
you will te convinced
that your place to buy Is
RUPTURE ImperM 0 Truss
WHBLa is what you want.
The greatest Invention of the age! See our
pamphlet. Sent free. Prof J. Y. EGAN, Og
densburg, N. Y. 29-ly
riPESi M wabit esiwe
wi? & g bj§ tJVI les time and at less cost
than by any other means.
No suffering or inconvenience. Treatment
shipped to any part of the U. S. or uanadas.
Full particulars free. Address,
(Established 1803) B.s. DISPENSARY,
Berrien Springs, Mich
BKNJ. F. GRAFTON. STOUT B. LADD,
H ALBERT E. PAINE.
Late Oommissitmer of Patents,
PATENTS
PAINE, GRAFTON & LADD,
Attorney s-at-Law and Solicitors of American
and Foreign Patents. _
412 FIFTH STRKF.T, WASHINGTON, D. C .
Practice patent law in all its branches in the
Putent OHico and in the Supreme and Circuit
Courts of the United States. Pamphlet sent free
n receipt of stamp for postage.
THIS MPES EEvS
Newspaper Advertising Bureau (16 Spruce
Street), where adver- BgBBaa irAINf/
frssrevs NE# YORK. 1
BROCKERHOFF HOUSE
BELLEFONTE, PA
First Class in all respects.
This is the place for the business
man, the farmer, the mechanic.
Omni I( all trains.
W. It. TELER, Proprietor.
PENNSYLVANIA RAIL ROAD.
Philadelphia & Eric R. R. Div.
SIJM ME!i77 J K 1\ 1 />' LE.
On and after HUN]>AY, May ISHO, the
trains on the Philadelphia & Kile Railroad Di
vision will run as follows :
Wl STWABI).
ERIK MAIL leaves Philadelphia 11 Sip. in.
" •' llarrislmi-K 4 25a. m.
" " Williamsport 8 35a. IU.
" 44 Jersey Shore. 907 a. in.
" 44 Lock llaven- 940a. in.
" " Kenovo 11 00a.in
" arr. at Erie ?56p. in.
NIAGARA EXT. leaves Philadelphia Vino a. in.
" " llaiTishurg 12 20a. in.
" arr.at Williamsport 3IS p. 111.
44 44 Look Haven. 4 2o j>. in.
FAST LINK leaves Philadelphia .11 SO a. m.
44 44 Hairlsburg 335 p. in.
44 arr. at Williamsport 7 25 p. in.
44 44 Lock lluven 840 p. in,
EASTWARD.
PACIFIC EXP.leaves Lock Haven.. r>4sa.m.
44 44 Jersey Shore.. 715 am.
# 4 44 Wllllainsport. 755 a. in.
44 arr. at Harrishurg ...11 40a. ni.
44 44 Philadelphia. 3IS p.m.
DAY EXPRESS leaves Lm k Haven. .11 10a. in.
44 Williamsport 12 20 p. in.
44 arr. at Harrishurg .. 340 p.m.
44 44 Philadelphia 6 45p.m.
ERIK MAIL leaves Itenovo 840 p.m.
44 Lock Haven 9 SO p. m.
44 44 vvilliamsport 1110 p.m.
44 arr. at llarrisburg 2 45 a. ni.
44 44 Philadelphia 7 40 a.m.
FAST LINE leaves Williamsport 12 35 a. ill.
44 arr. at Harrlsburg 3 SO a.m.
♦ 4 44 Philadelphia 7 4oa. in.
Erie Mall West and Day Express East make
close connections at Northumberland with L.
& B. R. R. trains from Wilkesbarrc aud Scran
ton.
Erie Mail West. Niagara Express West and
Fast I.lne West make close connection at Wll-
UUlllsport with N.G 4 . It. W. trains north.
Niagara Express West and Day Express East
make close connection at Lock 11aveil with B.
E. V. It. K. tralr.s.
Kile Mail East and West connect at Erie
with trains on L. !■'. & M.S. R. R.: atCorrywlth
G. C. Si A. V. It It ;at Eiuporiiun with 15. N. Y.
& P. It. It., and at Driftwood witli A. V. It. It.
parlor cars w ill run between Philadelphia
and Williainsport n Niagara Express West
and Day Express East, bleeping cars ou all
night trains.
WM. A. BALDWIN, General Sup't.
L. C. & S. CJAIL ROAD.
WESTWARD.
1. 3. 5.
LEAVE A.M. r. M. P.M.
Montandon 7 00 2 00 6 20
Lewisburg Arrive 7 15 2 {6 35
Lewisburg Leave 7 15 2 2i£
Fair Ground 7 20 2 30
Uiehl 7 30 2 40
Vickiburg 7 35 2 45
MiiJlinourg Arrive 750 3 o5
i Mifninburg Leave 7 ">> 3 15
Uillmont 8 10 335
I l.auieiton 8 20 3 50J
Coburn 0 3u
Arrive at Spring Mills l oo
EASTWARD. .
11 4. *6.
I.RAVE A.V A.M. p.M
spring Mills
Cobitrn lo 4.5
Laureltm 1155 4 05
Milluiont 12 00 4 20
Miitlinburg Arrive 1230 4 40
Mirtiinburg Leave 12.30 4 50
VifKsburg 12 45 5 05
ISlehl 12 5-2 5 13
Fair Ground 1 02 5 25
Lewisburg Arrive 1 lo 5."A)
Lewisburg Leave 6 "5 1 20 5 45
Art*, at Montandon 6 50 1 30 6"0
No*. 1 & 2 connect at Mo;B#yvlyji &j!h Erie
Mail west Oil the l ,v "
N os. 3 & 4 with Day Express east and Niagara
Express west.
Ne.s. 5 & 6 with Fast Line west.
An Omnibus will run !>etwecii Lewisburg and
Montandon, to convey icissengers to ami from
Pacific Express east on tiie Philadelphia & Erie
Railroad.
The regular Railroad Tickets will be honored
between these two points.
B ~;'l OU< ct.. Bd M
I iaolsiMPtEi I
gfl SB 4t HfflllPM Jt Cire. 4ft-, H B
.1 iSO BTRONCI 1
33 &a >.lt Sever Wears 0l A ,. •£ WB
lIfIMESTIU
T.ATVTTnn I
is ^Fashions
rrloe, 86 CcuU.
They aro cspeolafly dasfgnorf to weef
the requirements of thoso who dealro
to dress well. They are unaurpataedl
In Style, perfect In Fit, ond so aimpTo
that they are readily underatood by tho
tnost inexperienced. Send 80. for oat*
clogue. Address,
- "Domestic". Fashion. CoV
NEW YORK. *
CAMPAIGN
Beautiful Campaign Badges of the ltepubll can
and Democratic Candidates.
GARFIELD HANCOCK
AND f I J- C AND
ARTHUR, V/JLV ENGLISH,
Containing life-like Photographs of the Can
didates; encased in pretty Miniature Gilt
Frames, with pin for attaching to coat or vest.
Active agents can make $lO a day selling them,
and city and country merchants can make a
handsome profit Price 10 cents each; 2 for 15
cents; 10 for 50 cents, or 100 for $3.50. Photo
graphs same price as Badges. CRAYON POR
TRAITS on tinted plate paper. Heroic size 22 by
28, for 25 cents. FLAGS ALL SIZES, KINDS AND
PRICKS. Now is the Harvest time for agents,
and dealers. Send for samples and full parti
culars to
U. S. MANUFACTURING CO.,
8-3 m 116 Smitlilield Street, Pittsburg. Pa.
"DTPTtI CTnUTC procured for all soldiers disabled
rJjfluiUrllJ in the U. S. service from any
cause, also for heirs of deceased soldiers. Tho
slightest disability entitles to pension. PENSIONS
INCREASED. The laws being more liberal now,
thousands are entitled to higher rates. Bounty
and new discharges procured. Those who are
in doubt as to whether entitled to anything
should send two 3 cent stamps for our "circular
of information."
Address, with stamps, Stoddart & Co. Solici
tors of Claims and Patents. Room 3, St. Cloud
Building, Washington, I>. C.
28-2 m b STODDART & CO.
BAULAND & NEWMAN,
BELIJEPONTE, PA.
HEAPJJYA"BTEBB FORIARBAINS.
GRAND FALL OPENING
AT
THE BEE HIVE
OIBTIE PRICE^STOBE.
We are nov/opening and displaying the largest,
best and cheapest stock of goods ever offered in
Centre county, comprising full lines of
DRY GOODS, CARPETS, NOTIONS
YARNS, BOOTS & SHOES,
MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS.
Clothing Md eto Order Spec ility.
_A.II GOODS ZBAABKED IS FLAW FIGURES.
The public are cordially invited to call and ex
amine our stock. Remember the place,
ALLEGHENY STREET, BELLEFONTE, PA.
Respectfully Yours,
BAULAND 85 NEWMAN
Onr Motto is : One price, ttu best pits. ant no misrepresentation.
Great Peremtor^
' OF
DRY GO©BF3 AT OOST
IB\ 0". TROXELL,
I.(UK HAVEN. l'A.
Agent U r the closing out sale of a lai ge and desirable assortment of
Ladles' 3D M: GDS, IN" otions, Ladies' and
Gents' Furnishing Gcods, Shawls,
"ill wool square & long Sl.awis, Bioc-.e, Paisley. and Black Cashmere ShawW, all w 00l ft alpacca
;
Ca- rimeres. Tweeds. Jeans, Supine.- 1 ,
lied, white and pl.dd Flannel-*, Linsry. Hleaclic 1 and Unb!e:tche.l as well as colored COTTON
FLANN hLS, DOMESTIC GOODS. Muslins, Sheetings, Table Linens, Towlings.&c.
O
CARPETS! CARPETS! CARPETS I
Tapestry. Brussels. ail wool extra super Ingrain Carpets, also a fine assortment and the most
ts-autiful designs in e|e ti 1 arjiets, bt—idHall and Stair Carpet to mutch. Floor and Tablo
tMI Cloth*, Window shading ted Curtin fixtures. Butter, Eggs. I.ard, Bacon and Woo 1| taken in
exchange for goods. If you desire bargains don't lorget the place,
Corner of Maine mi Yes r Streest. Lock Eaten, Fern
"No lady should bo without it."— Shippensburg, (Pa.) Chronicle.
AND BESTL-®SR
PETERSON'S MAGAZINE
FULL-SIZE PAPER PATERNS!
Supplement will be given in every number for ISBI. containing a full-size pattern for a
lady's or child's dress. Every Subscriber iciU receive, during the year, twelve of these patterns,
worth more alone, than the siibscripiion price ."*43*
Fetkkron's Magazine is the best and cheapest of the lady's books. It gives more for tho
money, and combines greater merits, than any other, in short it lias the
BKSTSTEKL ENGRAVINGS, BEST ORIGINA.trSTORIES,
BEST COLORED FASHIONS, BEST WORK-TABLE PATTERNS,
BEST DRESS PATTERN 3, BEST 3IUSIC, Etc,, Etc.
Its Immense circulation and long established reputation enables its proprietor to distance all
competition. In ISBO a New Feature was introduced, which will be improved on in 1881, being a
scries of
Splendidly Illustrated Articles.
The stories, novelets, &c. in " Peterson" are admitted to be the best published. Ail the most
popular female writers contribute to It. In 1881, about 100 original stories will be given, and iu
addition Six Copyright Novelets, by Ann 8. Stephens, Frank Lee Benedict,.-fane G. Austin,
Mary V. Spencer, Sidney Trevor, and that inimitable humorist, the authoi ot Jo.-iah Aden 3
Avife." The
COLORED STEEL FASHION PLATES
In "Peterson" are ahead of all others. These plates are engraved on steel, twice the C9CAL
size, and are unequalled for beauty. They will lie superbly colored. Also Household AND othmr
receipts; articles iu Art Embroidery, Flower Culture; in short evei> thing interesting to ladies.
TERMS (Always in Advance) #2.00 A YEAR.
*-UNPARALLELED OFFERS TO CLUBS.-®*
2 Copies for $3.50 S With a costly steel engraving , "Gran' father Tells of Yorktown,"
3 " " 4.50 > (24 x 20) or an Illustrated Album, quarto, gilt, for getting up the Club.
4 Copies for SOSO I With an extra copy of the Magazine for 1881, as a premium, to the per
-6 " " 9.00 ( son getting up the Club. . „„„„ ... , .
5 Copies for AS.OO S With both an extra copy of the Magazine for 1831, and the picture, or
7 m " 10.00 J Album, to the person getting up tilt Club.
FOR LARGER CLUBS STILL GREATER INDUCEMENTS!
Addiess, post_pau js HAßljES Jt PETERSON,
. 300 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa,
AS-Specimenssent gratis, if written for, to setup clubs with.

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