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The daily exchange. [volume] (Baltimore, Md.) 1858-1861, February 27, 1858, Image 1

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VOL. I—NO. 6.
THE DAILY EXCHANGE.
PI 3LISHED E\ ERY MORNING, (SUNDAYS EXCEPTED.)
BY
KERR & CO.
OFFICE, CARROLL HALL,
FE K. CORNER OF BALTIMORE AND CALVERT STREETS.
EDITORS AND PRORIETORS.
CHARLES G. KERR. THOMAS W. KALI.. JR.
TERMS:
In the city TWELVE AND A HALF CENTS per week, paya
ble to the carrier. Mailed to subscribers, out of the city, J
at six DOLLARS per annum: THREE DOLLARS for six months
and ONE DOLLAR for two months Invariably in advance
for the time ordered.
ADVERTISING RATES.
TABLE:
(SQUARE —EIGHT LINES.)
One insertion 50
Two insertions 75
Three " $l.OO
Four " $1.25
Five " $1.50
One week $1.75
One month $4.00
Advertisements occupying a larger or smaller space, or
iuterted for a longer or shorter time, charged for propor- :
tionately.
THE DAILY EXCHANGE.
PROSPECTUS.
lINDER the above title it is proposed to
J conduct and publish in the citv of Baltimore a first
class Commercial and Political MORNING XEWSPAPER.
'his enterprise has been prompted by the conviction
that the rapid growth of Baltimore in population and j
wealth, its constantly augmenting trade, and its conse- i
quently increased commercial and political importance,
not only justify but demand an effort to introduce into the
field of journalism that elem .mt of competition, which, in j
all other branches of business, has so materially contribu
ted to the prosperity of the city.
" THE EXCHANGE." With regard to the name, —if an
apology were needed, for thus introducing what may per
haps be deemed a novelty in the nomenclature of journal
ism.—it has been adopted, not simply for its peculiar ap
propriateness in connection with tiiose commercial inter- ,
ests to which a paper of the character proposed must be •
largely devoted; but in its wide and more comprehensive 1
acceptation, as embracing within its scope all those topics
which come within the province of the public press.
Ist. XEwa.—lt will, of course.be the first aim of the
proprietors to furnish the readers of THE EXCHANGE
with the most prompt, full and authentic intelligence upon
all matters of public iuterest, at home and abroad ; and to
secure the accomplishment of this result, and the perfec
tion of every arrangement required to place THE EX
CHANGE in this particular on a level with the best jour
nals of the country, no necessary expense or exertion will
be spared
2d. COMMERCE.—The commercial department of the pa
per will include, not only the usual daily reports and
weekly reviews of the markets,domestic and foreign, com
piled with fulness and accuracy, but a frequent editorial
discussion of the leading financial questions of the day, 1
with regard to which the mercantile community naturally j
look to public press for comment and suggestion.
3d. POLITICS. —The interests of commerce and the state
of the markets are so constantly and intimately affected
by the aspect of political affairs throughout the world, that
a journal which aspires to be any thing more than a mere
commercial reporter or daily price current, must uecessa
sarlly devote a large space in its columns to the dissemi
nation of political intelligence, and the discussion of polit
ical questions. In this department of the paper, which,
apart from its commercial importance, also possesses a
peculiar and exclusive interest of its own, it will be the
object of THE EXCHANGE to preserve a position of honest ,
and fearless independence, equally removed from servile
partisanship upon the one hand, and timid neutrality upon
the other.
4th. LITERATURE AND ART.— Candid and impartial re
Views of current literature and contemporaneous art. mu
sical and dramatical criticisms, by competent judges, and
original contributions upon subjects of literary or scientific
interest, will always find an appropriate place in the col
umns of THE EXCHANGE, and i: will be the constant
aim of the proprietors to render it a valuable and interest
ing journal for the family as well as for the counting
room .
(Education.
PATAPSCO FEMALE INSTITUTE MARYLAND
THE, TRUSTEES of tile Patapseo Female
Institute announce to the public that the additional
buildings and improvements commenced by them a \ ear ago
in accordance with the subjoined resolutions, are now com
plete. These improvements have not been made with a
view to Increase the school, but for the greater conveni
ence and comfort of the usual number of pupil.-.
The new chapel is a handsome and most appropriate
structure. for the exclusive use of the inmates of the In
stitute, and in all its arrangements it is most complete. It
i 3 furnished with a new organ of fine construction and ex
cellent tone.
The administration of Mr. Archer for the past year and
the present has been attended with unprecedented suc
cess, and the Trustees feel themselves fully justified in
recommending the Institute to the continued favor of the
South.
It ha? pre-eminence in healthfuluess. The pupils avoid
ing, on the one hand, the debilitating effects of a Southern
climate, and on the other the rigors of the North, have
few of the interruptions incident to both these climates.
It is sufficiently near to the city of Baltimore to enjoy the
benefits of a city without any of its evils
AS an Institution of learning it has the advantage of a
full organization, a resident chaplain, and a corps of ac
complished teachers and professors, called together from
time to time in the long experience of those having charge
of the Institute.
The Trustees of the Patapsco Female Institute, having
been duly notified by Mrs. Lincoln Phelps of her intention
to resign her office of principal at the close of the present
school year, have elected Robert H. Archer as her succes
sor. The eminent success of Mr. Archer in conducting for
many years a School for Young Ladies in the city of Balti
more, entitles liira to our confidence a? a person peculiarly
qualified to maintain the present high standing, and insure
the permanent prosperity of the Institution: and with this
view we are engaged in the erection of another building in
addition to the present extensive accommodations of the
Institute.
CHAS. W. HORSEY. PRESIDENT. WM. DENNY, M.
D., SECRETARY. T. WATKIXS LIGOX. E. HAMMOND,
JOHN. P. KENNEDY. _ fe22 (ltf.
I AW s< SHOOLOFTHE UNIVERSITY
J AT CAMBRIDGE. MASS.
The Instructors in this School are
Hon. JOEL PARKER. LL.D., Royal Professor.
Hon THEOPHILCS PARSONS, LL.D., Dane Professor.
Hon EMORY WASHBURN, LL.D., University Professor.
The course of instruction embraces the various branches
of the Common i.tw, and of Equity, Admiralty, Com
merclal, International and Constitutional Law. and the
Jurisprudence of the United States. The Law Library
consists of about 14.000 volumes, and as new works ap
pear they are added, and every effort is made to render it
complete.
Instruction is given by oral lectures and expositions,
(and by recitations and examinations, in connection with
them.) of which there are ten every week. Two Moot
Courts are also holden in each week, at each of which a
cause, previously given out, is argued by four students, i
and an opiuion delivered by the Presiding Instructor
Rooms and other facilities are also provided for the Club
Courts: and an Assembly is held weekly for practice in de
bate. and acquiring a knowledge of parliamentary law and
proceedings.
Students may enter the School in any stage of their pro
fessional studies or mercantile pursuits, and at the com
menement of either term, or in the middle or other part of i
term.
They are at liberty to select what studies they will pur- !
ue according to their view of their own wants and at
tainments.
The Academical year, which commences on Thursday,
six weeks after the third Wednesday in July, is divided
into two terms, of twenty weeks each, with a vacation of
six weeks at the end of each term.
During the Winter vacation, the Library is opened,
warmed, and lighted, for the use of the members of the
School.
Applications for admission, or for Catalogues, or any
farther information, may be made to either of the Profes
sors at Cambridge.
Cambridge, Mass., January, 1358. [l6t-law6m.
Rltfririncs, ferfumeries, &r.
BRYAN'S PULMONIC WAFERS FOR
Coughs, Colds, Asthma, Consumption and all diseases
of the Lungs. For sale at WISEMAN'S Drug Store,
Baltimore and Fremont streets. Baltimore
f22-dlm.
J. PURVIANCE POLK & CO~
APOTHECARIES,
Corner of Fayette and St. Paul Street!,
AND
N. HYNSON JENNINGS & CO.
APOTHECARIES,
No. 88 N. CHARLES STRRET,
Baltimore.
Respectfully call the attention of citizens and the travel
ling community to their large and choice assortment of
MEDICINES, PERFUMERY. FINE STATIONERY and FANCY
ARTICLES, which maybe confidently relied on as being
what we represent them, as we select none but of the pu
rest quality. Also, MEDICINE CHESTS, SUROICAL INSTRU
MENTS, TRUSSES. DIETETIC PREPARATIONS, &C.. kc.
Written orders filled promptly and with care, subject to
be returned at our expense if not of standard quality.
fe22-tf.
ISEMAN'S VERMIFUGE,
OR WORM DESTROYER.
This remedy for Worms is one of the most extraordinary
ever used. It effectually eradicates Worms of all sorts
from children and adults.
Warranted not to contain Mercury in any form, nor anv
other mineral.
For sale by WISEMAN, Druggist, corner of Baltimore
and Fremont streets. Price 25 cents. dim
THE BALSAM OF WILD CHERRY;
PREPARED AT DR. CNEAL'S DRUG
Store. Corner of Ma lison and F.utaw Streets, is a reli
able remedy for Coughs. Colds. Hoarseness, Soreness and
pains in the Chest. Consumptive cases derive much ad
v antage from its use. Wild Cherry Bark. Tai . Bloodroot,
and Indian Hemp enter into its composition. Its taste is
pleasant and its use entirely safe. feb22-3t
RPHOSE OF SCROFULOUS HABIT.
A with Swelled Neck. Tumors. King s Evil. Ac , Mer
curial and Syphilitic diseases and affections generally aris
ing from a taint in the system, requiring AU alterative
course of treatment, are recommended to take "THE AL
TERATITE SYRCP." madeat Pr O'Neal's Drug Store,
Corner of Madison and Eutaw Streets. It rids the system
of accumulated humors, as Tetter, Boils, Pimples, Ring
worm, AC. feh2J :it
0Q ' BLTLOK.IW DEPOT: 00
SASH. DOORS. BLINDS, FRAMES, NOT BF.D SASH.
MOULDINGS. CASINGS. Ac., DRESSED FLOORING
AND OTHER LUMBER, LIME. BRICKS. HAIR, HARD
WARE. GLASS, OIL, PAINTS, and every description ol
BL ILDING MATERIAL, at moderate rates and on accom
modating terms. Particular attention paid to orders and
contracts from abroad. Estimates of the entire cost 01
buildings furnished with accuracy and despatch Ship
ments effected promptly to all accessible points bv
R. JOHNSON,
NO 99 Pratt street, (near Bowly's wharf )
f23-tf Baltimore, Md.
———
TUB MERCANTILE LIBRARY ASSOCIATION', j
(Founded in 1839.)
Occupies the First Floor of the Athenaeum Building, X. H". j
Corner of tit. Paul and Saratoga Streets'.
nPHE ROOMS are large and conitbrtalde,
A well heated and lighted, and (juiet.
The Library contains now about 15.000 volumes, care
fully selected, of History, Poetry, Drama, Theology, Arts
and Science, Biography, Voyages and Travels, Essays and
Reviews, and Fiction, and is increasing at the rate of about
1,000 volumes per annum. It is constantly supplied with
the best publications of all these branches of knowledge, as
well as a fair representation of the current light literature
of the present time.
The Reading Room is furnished with most of the Maga
; sines and Reviews of this country aud England, as well
as a number of American and English newspapers.
The Association was formed for the special benefit of the
CLERKS OF THE CITY, and is exclusively under their
control. They alone are eligible for ACTlVEmembership. I
The fee for this class is $3 per annum, payable in advance,
but the use of its Books and Rooms is open to all other
classes, as HONORARY members, upon the payment of
i $5 per annum, in advance. They may draw books from
the Library, visit the rooms, and are entited to ALL THE
PRIVILEGES of the Association, except voting and hold
ing office. Ladies may beconie Honorary members in their
i own right. The accounts of either Active or Honorary
members may be transferred for the use of ladies or others.
The Rooms are open from 10 o'clock A. M„ till 2 o'clock
P. M.. for the reception of ladies—and from 2 o'clock till
I 10 o'clock P. St.. for Gentlemen.
Of persons now using the Library,
8L ACCOUNTS ARE FOR LADY*SUBSCRIBERS,
300 " '• HONORARY MEMBERS.
850 '• " ACTIVE MEMBERS. fe22 tf
Mors.
HT. ROBERTS,
• MERCER AXD TAILOR,
No. 205 BALTIMORE STREET,
ly. Baltimore.
READY made clothi ng.
JOHN II HE A, ,£ CO.,
NORTH EAST CORNER OF PRATT AND SOUTH STS..
Have on hand a large and select Stock of WINTER !
CLOTHING, that they are running off at a LOW FIGURE,
to make room for SPRING STYLES. Persons in want
would do well to give them a call.
Also —A large stock of PIECE GOODS, suitable for cus
tom trade, which will be got up in good style at low
prices. _ _ fe22-LM.
VJ A M UK I. ~ T A N E Y H I 1, L.
O MERCHANT TAILOR,
No. 2 LIGHT ST., OPPOSITE FOUNTAIN HOTEL,
Will in a few days receive his full SPRIXG STOCK of
Goods—consisting of CLOTHS, CA.SSI MERES, VEST
INGS, &c.. and will be *)> leased to take Orders from his J
friends and the public. A fit guaranteed. Prices reason- J
able. fe22-lm
JOHN A. GRIFFITH'S
M E R C H A X T T A I L < R I X fi
AND FASHIONABLE READY-MADE CLOTHING
ESTA B LISH ME NT,
No. 187 BALTIMORE STREET,
AND I a LIGHT STREET.
The advertiser lias opened his SELECTION OF GOODS \
from this and other markets, which he solicits gentlemen j
to examine, confident that his assortment is COMPLETE !
both in quality and styles.
His READY-MADE' DEPARTMENT abounds in variety, j
in which any taste can be suited, and where gentlemen i
can be accommodated at LOW PRICES, considering the j
quality of the Goods offered.
Gentlemen selecting goods from his stock can have j
Garments made to orders in his Custom Department with
dispatch and promptness—two characteristics of his es
tablishment, where he lias the best cutters that can be i
procured. fe22-lm. I
prnss aitir tflusic.
/WHICKERING & sons^
AND
XrXNS & CLARK'S
CELEBRATED PIANO FORTES,
Constantly receiving and for sale only bv
F. i). BEXTEEN,
181 Baltimore street and 84 Fayette,
third store west of Charles at.
Purchasers will find it to their interest to examine f< r ;
themselves the superior qualities of the above Pianos.
Piano Stools. Prince A Co.'s Melodeons from -45 upwards
fe22-Im. * !
E W MUS 1 C .— Just Published, by
i* MILLER if: BEACHAM, 181 BALTIMORE ST:
A DAY DREAM—by J. C. Engelbrecht.
ANVIL CHORES—from Verdi's Trovatore.
LANCER'S QUADRlLLES—taughtby Ed. Leiimann.
•BGARPING-SCHOOI. LlFE—by Chas. Grobe.
•This beautiful composition, describing a dav at a FE- !
MALE BOARDING SCHOOL, is one of the .Author's best
efforts. fe'22lm. j
HENRY MCCAFFREY, !
M i: sl o P U li I. 1 sH E it,
No. 207 BALTIMORE STREET,
MUSIC PUBLISHED and received daily-
Music BOUND in the NEATEST STYLE.
fe'22-lm. MUSIC FOLIOS at. ALL PRICES
BOUDOIR "seavevo "MACHINE.
PRICE S4O.—THIS MACHINE IS RF.
commended by I. M. Singer & Co., Wheeler k Wilson ;
and Grover & Baker as being the best single thread Ma- 1
chine in the known world: and the price being low, pur
chasers will find it greatly to their advantage to exam- I
ine it.
Also. Wheeler & Wilson's superior FAMILY MACHINE,
in Rosewood. Black Walnut and Mahogany ca ■ Wheel '
er and Wilson's Machines are really the best article ever
invented for sewing. A great number of certificates can I
be seen at our store from ladies and gentlemen who have 1
had them in use for a length of time.
E. M. PUXDERSOX & CO.,
fc22 tf. 2uy Baltimore street.
A NEW ERA IN PHOTOGRAPHY
AT
P. L. PERKINS'
METROPOLITAN GALLERi,
No. 99 BALTIMORE STREET, OPPOSITE HOLLIDAY.
ALL THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF
the art successfully carried on at this establishment
and no humbug used to cheat or deceive the public. MR
P.'S new invention of producing Life-Size Pictures from
small daguerreotypes on CANVAS IS the admiration of all
who see them. Mr. Kerkhoven, the Great French artist,
has been retained for coloring, in his beautiful style, the
above gems. The public will please call and see. fc22-lm.
I. 0.0. F.
ODD FELLOWS AND MASON'S RE
GALIA, BANNERS, &c., L\ S. Bunting and Silk •
Flags, Military (roods and Ladies' Dress Trimmings, al
wav on hand and for sale by
A.SISCO,
No. 95 BALTIMORE St,
fe22-ly. Baltimore' I
J L. M'PHAIL &TBR0 1 S
• HAT, CAP AND FUR STORE,
No. 132 BALTIMORE STREET,
Between Xorth and Calvert streets, (north side.) fe22tf.
ELDON HALL RESTAURANT.
No. 78, WEST FAYETTE STREET,
REAR EXTRAXCE IS BASK LANE.
r I MI E undersigned have very recently fitted tip
JL the Wilding in Fayette street, between St. Paul and
Charles St a, known as ; Ebl on Hall", as a restaurant of the
' first class. No expense has been spared to make it acceptable
in all its appointments, to gentlemen who may feel disposed
to pay it a visit. There is at all times upon the "snack"
j counter edibles which can be served up at a moment's notice
J and at all hours there are always private rooms for the ac
; comodation of gentlemen, who may desire to "exchange"
thoughts over something which may cheer the inner man.
They challenge competition in the matter of CIGARS,
GOOD LIQUORS, ami ATTENDANCE BY FAITHFUL SER
VANTS, which altogether make up the comforts of a restau
rant.
DINNERS and SUPPERS served for PARTIES prompt
j ly, AND FAMILIES SUPPLIED with TERRAPINS, OYS
TERS ke., at the shortest notice.
There are peculiar advantages, in this establishment for
the accomodation of gentlemen. The building lias a rear
entrance from Bank Lane, while there is a private entrance
admiting to all parts of the house, without passing through
the bar. REILLY & SNYDER
( fe22d-lw&2aw2w.
RI NX'S EATIN G SALOON,
No. 40 WEST PRATT STREET,
Between Frederick and Market Space.
'yHF, PROPRIETOR OF THIS WIDE-
A ly known Saloon, having recently made extensive
improvements in several departments of his buildings, is
prepared to furnish DINNERS, SUPPERS, kc., at as cheap
rates and in a style which he will not permit of being sur
passed. Families supplied with Oysters, in every variety
, of style; also. Terrapins, Turtles, Poultry, Venison and
Fish; the last named he is daily in receipt of by Express
from the South.
All articles delivered free bv RIXN'S Express Wagon
fe22-tf.
L~ADIES' AND CHILDREN'S bIIESS
FITTING,
TAUGHT Br
MRS. PETT ET,
AT
436 BALTIMORE STREET. BETWEEN GREEN k PEARL.
TERMS— $2.50.
Boy's suits and Dress Bodies fitted to give perfect satis
faction. Ladies are requested to call and examine the
plan taught. fe23 3t.
WILLI A M HA R R 1 S ,
MAKER AND IMPORTER OF
GUNS, RIFLES and PISTOLS,
116 West Pratt street,
j keeps constantly on hand a large assortment of Bird AND
j Ducking Guns, (double and single barrel;) Six banelled
Revolvers; Rifles made to order : Dupont's Gun Powder;
Powder Flasks. Bird Bags. Shot Belts and Pouches, and
many other articles necessary for Sportsmen. Repairing
done at the shortest notice, and with neatness. [fe22-lm
.1 AM ES M. ANDERSON & SON,
ENGRAVERS,
Xo. 148 Baltimore Street,
BANK NOTE, STEEL & COPPER PLATE PRINTING.
INVITATION, WEDDING. VISITING
Cards, etc., Engraved and Printed in the most fashion
able styles. Corporate and Notarial Seals. Letter Stamps,
etc. London and Paris Visiting Cards, De La Rue's EN
velopes, etc. fe22tf
HCENIX SPICE MILLS,
WAREHOUSE 58 SOUTH STREET,
WM H. CRAWFORD k CO..
PROPRIETORS,
Offer to the wholesale trade of this city the South and IFeri
GOODS of equal quality nnd price on same terms as any
other house in the United states. fe22-tf.
~ LEATHER WFOTT
HEMLOCK, OAK & SOLE LEATHER.
4000 SIDES OF HEMLOCK and OAK SOLE LEATHER IN
j STORE AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. I pledge myself to deliver
to any State SOUTO or WEST of BALTIMORE. HEMLOCK
•SOLE LEATHER as low, if not lower, and in quality
equal, if not superior to what can be obtained in New
York or any other City in the Union.
Southern and Western Merchants, and Baltimoreans,
having orders to fill with Hemlock or Oak Sole, or any
kind or quality of LEATHER, are respectfully invited to
call at NO. 42 SOUTH CALVERT STREET, one door north
of Lombard.
FRANCIS H. GRUPY,
HIDES, OIL AND LEATHER DEALER.
A full assortment of TANNERS' aud CURRIERS' TOOLS
at New York prices [feb22 6t]
; GREEN BALTED and DRY HIDES ALWAYS WANTED
I
BALTIMORE, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1858.
Insurant* (Cunipucs.
IT ABLE FIRE INSURANCE
A SOCIETY.
CHA It TER PERPETUAL.
OK KICK. NO. 19 SOUTH STREET
THE BALTIMORE EQUITABLE SOCIETY w ,11 li.-ur.* I
HOI SKS ninl FURNITURE from LOSS oil DAMAGE BY '
FIRE, at very cheap rates. 011 the Mutual or beneficial
plan, and grant Carpenter's Risks. 011 ptea-inp terms
Owners of Property in-nred in t!e EQUITABLE Office
have no further responsibility than the amount of their •
deposits, and on the expiration .f policies, they are etiti 1
tied to receive a cash dividend of twenty eight per cent.
The public are respectfully invited to call at the otfire.
Xo. 19 SOUTH STREET, where the principles on which
the Society insure will fully explained
DIRECTORS:
! THOMAS KELSO, BEXJAMIX DEFORD.
WILLIAM KEXXEDV, SAMUEL KIRBV,
HENRY RIEMAX, MICHAEL WARNER 1
JAMES FRAZIER, DANIEL DAIL,
CHARLES R. CARROLL, ROBERT A. ROBBIX,
AUSTIN JENKINS, DANIEL WARFIELD.
FRANCIS A. CROOK, Treasurer.
IH'CII B. .b>N'K>. SrcivUuv. fe24 1-
npHE GREAT WESTERN ("MARINE)
X INSURANCE COMPANY
OF XE W YORK.
Authorized Capital $5,000,000 j
Cash Capital (already paid in) 1.000.000
Surplus Fund (represented by scrip) sfio 000 j
Assetts Jan. 1,1858 2,27*>.000 i
This Company combines the advantages of the mixed !
plan (so long and profitably practiced by the best Life In- '
surauce Companies in Europe) blending tlie desirable se- 1
curity of a large Cash Capital , with a liberal return of the j
profits to its customers.
All Marine and Inland risks insured on most favorable
terms.
RICH'D LATHERS, Prest. Jxo. A. PARKER. Ist V. Prest.
DOUGLAS ROBINSON, Sec'y. J. F. Cox. 2d do.
COLIN MACKENZIE, Agent in Baltimore,
fe23-tf Ofiii-e Commercial Ibiihliii:--.
BALTIMORE FIRE INSURANCE iuo.
(ESTABLISHED UPWARDS UK HALF A
CENTURY.)
NE If EC 1 LI)IXC.
S. W. CORN ER OF SOUTH AND \\ ATKR STREETS. I
This Company INSURES AGAINST I.OSS ul: DAM j
AGE BY FIRE, in city or country, on the various <le- t
scriptions of property.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS.
J. I. COIIEX, Jr., President
E. A. TAYLOR. WM. GILMOR.
W. G. HARRISON, J. PENXINUTOX.
S. T. THOMPSON, JOSHUA I. COHEN.
GEO. R. VICKERS, J. BIROKHEAP, JR..
F. W. ALRICKS. FRANCIS T. KISG,
S. O. HOFFMAN, HENRY CARROLL,
DAVID S. WILSON, R. S. STEUAUT
IV. F. WORTHING TON,
fe22-tf. FRED'K WOODWORTII. Secretary. !
THE HOWARD FIRE INSUR \.\< E
COMPANY OF BALTIMORE.
.Make Insurances on every description of Property within ;
the limits of the City.
OpptcE— S. E. COR. HOWARD AND CLAY STREETS.
ANDREW REESE, PRESIDENT.
DIRECTORS:
M. Benzinger. Augustus Sh river,
Aaron Fenton, Henry J. Werdebaugh.
William Ortwine, Ceo. P. Thomas,
Samuel R. Smith, Chas. W. George,
.Tames M. Pouder, Wm. G. Power.
Charles Hoffman. Elisha H. Perkins.
fe22-lm. gGEO. HARLAN W1 M.IAMS, Secy.
IMRE INSURANCE ALKM Y.
GEORGE B. COALE,
COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS, GAY STREET, .
AGENT WITH PULL POWERS FOR THE
HARTFORD FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY,
Cash Capital $500,000.
HOME INSURANCE CO. OK NEW YORK CITY'.
Cash Capital J500.000.
NORTH AMERICAN FIRE INS. CO. OF HARTFORD, i
Cash Capital $300,000.
Property of all kinds in TOWN or COUNTRY' insured at I
the most reasonable terms.
JOHNSTON'S INSUR AM E ROOMS,
PIKEXIX BUILDINGS.
73 SECOND STREET.
AGGREGATE CAPITAL REPRESENTED
EIGHT MILLIONS DOLLARS
MARINE INSURANCE,
FIRE INSURANCE,
LIFE INSURANCE,
Companies. Capital and Surplus. '
MERCANTILE MUTUAL (Marine) In. Co . N Y, $931.000
INSURANCE Co. of the VALLEY' OF VA 353 000
SECURITY FIRE INSURANCE Co of N Y 350 000
PHtKNIX " " 3X5.000 ;
WASHINGTON " • 38X000
NEW WORLD 354.000
ALBEMARLE Ya. 400.000
LYNCHBURG " •• 181,000
COMMONWEALTH •• Pa. 178.000 j
U.S. LIFE •• " J .250.000 j
And other strictly FIRST CLASS Companies, forming '
an AGGREGATE CAPITAL of
OVER EIGHT MILLIONS DOLLARS.
Policies issued; losses adjusted and paid at this office, the
subscriber being fully accredited agent.
THUS. D. JOHNSTON. I
fe22-ly. Underwriter. '
MARINE IN SI KA.M E.
COL CM 111 A N
(MARINE)
INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW YORK.
Cash Capital • $500,000
Cash paid in - *200.000
Security notes paid in - - 300,000
TIIOS. LORD, President.
R. C. MORRIS, Vice President.
PI EP.RE C. KANE. Secretary
The undersigned haying been duly appointed AGENT of
this Company, is prepared to receive applications for IN
| SCRANCE on ail Marine and Inland risks
SOL. B DA VIES,
of Davies & Warfield,
fe22-6m. No. 10 Spear's wharf. ;
BALTIMORE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY.
No- 15 SOUTH STREET.
INCORPORATED IN 1830— Charter Perpetual. j
JOHN I. DONALDSON, President.
HMHIS COMPANY proposes to insure lives
i _l_ for one or more years, or for life. With their rates I
j the assured enjoys the benefit of an immediate in lieu of
a prospective and uncertain bonus. He risks neither his
; policy nor the premium he has paid.
These premiums may he made payable annually, semi j
| annually, or quarterly, at option of the assured,
j The Company buys and grants annuities.
Sells endowments for Children.
| Makes atl contracts in which Ufa or the interest of Monev
is involved. A. B. COULTER,
Secretary. i
Medical Examiner, Dr. DONALDSON, 84 Franklin street.
| f22 ly
I7URE AND LIFE INSURANCE
OFFICE, NO 63 SECOND STREET.
BALTIMOBK.
JOHN G. PROUD & SONS,
Representing Companies of the highest standing, with large
Cash Capitals. Policies issued, and Losses paid at
the Agency.
i .ETNA INSURANCE Co., of Hartford, Conn. $1,500 000
PHQCNIX 350,000
j SPRINGFIELD " Springfield, Mass. 375.000
1 -ETN A LIFE 11 Hartford, 225.000
! U. S. LIFE " New York 400.000
|_ fe22-ly.
ASSOCIATED FIREMEN'S INSUR
ANCE OFFICE. No. 4 SOUTH STREET.
OPEN DAILY for the INSURANCE OF ALL DESCRIP
TIONS OF PROPERTY WITHIN THE LIMITS OF THE
: CITY.
JOHN R. MOORE, President.
DIRECTORS.
J JAMES GETTY, Mechanical, J. C. WHEEDEN. Columbian,
J GEORGE lIARMAN, Union. J. TRUST. First Baltimore,'
, NOAH WALKER Friendship. FRANCIS BURNS, United.
! J - T - FARLOW. Deptford, JAMES YOUNG, Franklin.
ALLEN PAINE, Liberty, J. REASON, JR.. Washington.
SAMUEL KIRK, Jndejwndent, LANCASTER OULD. Patapsco,
| R. C. MASON, Vigilant, F. A. MILLER. Howard.
WM. A. HACK. New Market, JAS. A. BRUCE. Watchman,
1 JAS. B. GEORGE, SR., Pioneer Jos. C. BOYD. Lafauctte
Hook and Ladder Co. No. *I.
| fe'22-tf. JOHN DUKEHART. Secretary.
MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE."
THE SUN MUTAL INSURANCE
COMPANY OF NEW YORK.
Insures Marine and Inland Navigation Risks, on terms as
favorable as those of any other Company. AII persons tak
ing Policies from this Company are entitled to a share or
the profits, without incurring any liability, beyond the
amount of Premium. The assets of the Company, liable
for the payment of losses, are over $2,000,000.
A. B. NEILSON, Press'!.
A. SEATON, V. Pres't J. WHITEHEAD, Sec.
I C. OLIVER O'DOXNELL. Agent in Baltimore.
| fe22-ly. No. 51 EXCHANGE PLACE.
NATIONAL FIRE INSURANCE COM
PANY OF BALTIMORE.
Incorporated bv the
STATE OF MARYLAND, 1849
OFFICE XO. 13 SOUTH STREET
THF. COMPANY INSURES EVERY
DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY
IN THE CITY OR COUNTY.
AGAINST LOSS OR DAMAGE
m , BY FIRE.
The Directors meet daily to determine upon applications
for INSURANCE.
JOHN B. SEIDF.XSTRICKER.
President.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS:
Allen A. Chapman, William Woodward.
Henry M. Bash. George Bartlett.
Wm Heald, Adam Denmead,
John W. Ross, Joseph W. Jenkins,
Edward J Church, Thomas M. Sullivan,
Job Smith, George Small.
JOHN K. MAGKUDER,
fe26 tf Secretary.
OTT "& II E W E S ~
59 EXCHANGE PLACE,
PRODUCE COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
(with particular attention paid to the sale of BUTTER.)
I At all seasons of the year, we have every grade and
style of BUTTER, and as we are the Agents of the Dairy
men. receiving it direct from the farms, we think that we
ought to be able to give entire satisfaction in price and
quality. Now in store and arriving—
-80 Packages of prime Goshen.
50 Tubs and Firkins of New York State.
950 Kegs of Glades.
200 Kegs of Western Pennsylvania.
05 Kegs Virginia.
150 Kegs and 10 Bhls. Ohio—3oo very small Kegs for
shipping, and 30 Bids, prime fresh Roll.
Also—3oo Bushels DRIED APPLES and PEACHES: 70
Kegs of LARI); 00 Boxes EASTERN CHEESE- 9 000
KNIFE BRICK: 80 Bags GROUND NUTS; 9 Boxes Vir
ginia PIPE HEADS and 3 Bales WOOL. fe22-ti
C. WES T <£• SO N ,
MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS
IN ETHEREAL OIL. ALCOHOL, (all proof- ]
COLOGNE, SPIRITS. CAMPHINE, LARD OIL, I.INSKKI:
OIL. (tc.
Our facilities for manufacturing being large, we are pre
pared to offer great inducements to persons purchasing
goods in our line.
Manufactory, 306 West Pratt street, Warehouse and
Counting Room, 115 West Lombard street, between Ligh
and Charles. fe22 tf
T<> Advertisers.— ln order to afford the public m '
! opportunity to juitgcfor themselves of the merits of the Et
I change, large editions will be issued far the first few (lays of
its publication, and distributed widely and gratuitously '
j within the. city, and oho in those sections of the country
j which are connected with Baltimore, by business relations
Merchants and others who may propose to advertise in our
! columns, will do well therefore to send in their advertise
j merits once, and thereby obtain the advantage of the, exbn
; ded circidation which such gratuitous distribution of the
: paper, U,th in town and country, mill afford, an adrantace
which none who understand th.- value of legitimate adceiih- I
inn wilt fail, to appreciate. Far rates of advertising see !
| Table elsewhere.
distribution •
form in part its own canvassing. PersbiL bangc P'> -
courage the Knterjyrise can continue the experimfflu J"..* 7 }' j
own pi a surf if residing within the city, by settlingf rr.mnlH '
i to time with th? carrier upon the terms stated elsewhere: if out
of the city by sending their orders to the office of the paper, nc- ;
companied by pre-payment for the time sjjecifieil.
To Correspondents.— Every communication intended j
: for publication must be accompanied by the name of the j
; writer. Manuscripts shoidd be written on one side of the
paper only .
~ BALTIMORE.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1858.
John Milton affirmed that education alone to he |
complete v. hich fairly fit* a man to discharge, with ;
equal facility, all the duties of a citizen in peace t
| and in war. This is especially true in a Republic |
where the existence of a large standing array
would he regarded as alike inimical to liberty and
| burdensome to the people, and in a State whose
Bill of Rights proclaims "a well regulated militia !
j to he the proper and natural defence of a free gov-
I eminent." The popular jealousy and distnist of
1 any thing approaching to a regular military estab- j
lishment, and the popular preference for the em
i ployment of volunteers in any emergency requiring
the services of an armed force, whether for the i
| purpose of repressing domestic rebellion or of re- j
j polling foreign invasion, has been strikingly exem- |
| plified in the recent delcates in Congress on the j
i army bill, ft is true that the present condition of j
I the national finances Is peculiarly inauspicious for j
; the success of a proposition involving a very con
| siderable addition to the national expenses. With
i an empty treasury and diminished revenues, it is
; not surprising that an increase of the army should
. he viewed with little favor at the present time, i
! Vet the objections which have been urged against '
I such increase have a deeper foundation than mere
motives of economy; they spring from the con
j firmed and rooted antipathy of the people to stand
i iug armies, and from that popular feeling which
! regards the professional soldier as an anomaly ,
I in a free government a useless fungus upon
| the surface of the body politic.
The annual appropriations for the Military Acad
' emy at West Point have repeatedly been opposed,
j both in and out of Congress, upon these grounds,
i How far this sentiment is just, and reasonable, and
i how far it may be referable to ancient prejudices
; ami traditional associations of European origin, we
! do not now propose to determine. So far as the
feeling may find expression in hostility to West
| Point, we believe it to Vie unreasonable and absurd.
At present, however, our business is simply with
j the fact itself, and with the inferences deducible
therefrom. There is such a sentiment as we have
| described generally pervading our people and ani
-1 mating our legislators. One consequence is inevi
j table, and that is. apart from the fate of the partic
ular measure HOW pending in Congress, the general
I policy of our government will always be to reduce
our army to the minimum standard of a peace es
l tablisluuent. Our main reliance in time of war
must lielupou volunteers. It is well perhaps that
| this should be the case; but the reliance will prove to
: be very uncertain and insecure, unless more efficient
steps are taken to provide for the military educa
: tion of the people. The home and the fireside may
I furnish defenders sufficiently patriotic and brave,
but the camp and the drill-ground must form the
| soldier. Officers competent to command are want
| ed, as well as soldiers accustomed to obey. These
can not be extemporized for the occasion: they
must bo found ready fashioned to our hand. Eur
this purpose we require a thorough reorganization
of our State Militia laws, and above all, the estab
lishment and encouragement of military schools or
' academies, where the elements both of military and
! civil education may be taught together; w here the
rising generations of the Republic may tie indoctri
nated at once in the polished learning of the da
i sics; in the theory and practice of tactics and the
expert use of arms, and in the sound principles of
military subordination and habitual obedience to
| law. Thus will bo formed a body of citizens equally
qualified to serve the .State in the council and in
the field, adorned with all the various aceomplish
| incuts of the schblar, the soldier, and the gentle
i man.
THE PRIVATEEIt GENERAL ARMSTRONG.
The claim connected with the above named priva
| teer, and growing out of one of the most gallant
naval actions of the war of 1812, has so long been
before the public, under one phnse or another, and
J always with interest, that we are induced to copy
: from a contemporary the following succinct history
| of its character and present coudition:
THE PRIVATEER GEX. ARMSTRONG. —This extraor
[ dinarv and remarkable case has lately been referred
; to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Sen
ate, on an adverse report from the Court of Claims.
There is no case on record within the history of this
! country that is so full of romantic glorv and chival
ry, or so tilled with interest and incident. It has
been pending before the Government of the United
States for now nearly half a century. The gallant
defence which this little brig made against the gun
j boats of a large British fleet in the neutral port of
; Faval in 1814, is familiar to every schoolboy. The
British lost over 300 men in killed and wounded,
while the American loss was only two killed and
i seven wounded.
i Immediately after the destruction of the vessel,
I the Portuguese Government called on England for
i an apology for having violated the neutrality of her
I port, and made reclamation for the damages occa
; sioned by the English vessels. Lord Castlereagli at
i once apologized to her old ally, and made a partial
! indemnification.
The claim was periodically prosecuted against
Portugal by this Government tor a long series of
| years, and was finally abandoned. In 1848 a report
; from the Committee on Foreign Affairs recommend
ed its further prosecution. In 1850 a peremptory
I demand was made against Portugal on her own ail-
I mission as well as that of England, and an American
frigate sent to Lisbon to receive our Minister, Mr.
James B. Clay, in case of-refusal. England maie
common cause with Portugal in resisting this claim,
anil Mr. Clay demanded his passports and left. Por
j tugal then proposed to pay a lot of old claims never
I insisted on, provided we would agree to arbitrate
! the Armstrong claim. This proposition was ac
: cepted by a succeeding Administration, although
' Gen. Taylor had peremptorily refused it. Louis
| Napoleon was chosen arbiter.
The evidence containing the admissions and con
j cessions of Portugal and England was excluded from
: the documents presented to the arbiter; and Louis
Napoleon, after having made himself Emperor, and
formed an alliance with England, decided the case
| against the Americans, (which was virtually in
favor of his new ally,) having found by his ex-parte
decree that the Americans, and not the English,
had violated the neutrality of the Portuguese port!
The claimants protested against this atrocious
award, but our Government thought proper to
ratify it.
In 1854 they again went to Congress for relief.
The Committee on Foreign Affairs of both Houses,
unanimously reported in their favor. After thebill
I had passed in the Senate to a third reading, it was
reconsidered anil lost by one vote. The Ifouse re
ferred it to the Court of Claims. Here it was thor
oughly argued and investigated, by distinguished
counsel, and decided in favor of the claimants. The
decision rendered by Chief Justice Gilchrist, is one
of the ablest opinions on international law ever de
i livered by a Court.
j Judge .Searburgh; who concurred in the opinion,
■ after the lapse of a year asked for a re-hearing. The
j case was re-argued, and he decided the law against
! the claimants, admitting that "it might be true that
| the claimants are entitled to relief on other ground?:''
j and that "Congress will doubtless do justice to the
\ claimants." Judge Blackford having dissented cn
: tirely in the first instance, the opinion of the chief
| justice stands alone in favor of the claimants on the
law, with the equity of the case admitted by Judge
! Scarburgli.
Under these circumstances, this claim appeals di
rectly to the patriotism, justice and equity of the
American people, and through them to their repre
! sentatives in Congress; for it will not be goiug too
far to say-that if an appeal were made to every
; State Legislature and to the people of every con
! gressional district, the voice of our citizens would
I render a unanimous verdict in favor of Capt. Reed
: and the gallent men who so nobly sacrificed their
blood and treasure in sustainsng tlie honor of their
country,* cause.— The "States.
! .
In Perpignan France, a woman was condemned
j to the penitentiary for life, for having murdered her
I father-in-law, 75 years of age, to whom she wascom
i pelled to pay an annuity.
CONGRESSIONAL.
THIRTY-FIFTH CONGRESS—First Session.
THURSDAY, FEHRUARY 2.5, 1858.
The Vice President laid before the Senate a com- j
munication from the Secretary ot War, made in I
compliance with a resolution calling for copies !
of certain maps to accompany the report of i
Lieut. Col. .1. I). (Iraham; which was read, and '
on motion of .Mr. Stuart, referred to the Commit- !
tec on Printing.
MEMORIALS, At'.
1 ' ' following memorials. Ac., were presented and '■
appropn..,"}j. rre( |. 1 ;
Hy Mr P,i Mvn: From Cnpt. Robert A. Wain-j
w i i<rht. ot ttieordiMnco corps, asking the reimburse
ment ot certain public iimnev which was stolen from
mm in boston while commandant of the arsenal, j
ana tor which lie had accounted to the Govern- '
ment.
% Mr. Thomson, of New Jersey: From citizens I
ot Woodbury, New Jersey, asking the adoption of
some measure by which the Southern States shall !
receive a fair compensation out of the public treasu- I
rvor public domain for their slaves when thevshall
think proper to emancipate thein.
By Mr. Green: From J. and li. R. Porter, ask- I
ing remuneration for losses sustained while trans- !
porting merchandise to Great Salt Lake city, in
consequence of the orders given by the commander i
of the United States troops in the Territory of
Utah.
REPORTS FROM COMMITTEES.
Mr. Brown, from the Committee on the District |
of Columbia, to which was referred the memorial of !
the Corporation ot Georgetown in relation to the i
expenses ot county roads in Washington county. 1
submiteod a report, accompanied by a bill to relieve j
the Corporation of Georgetown from the expense of
making and repairing roads west of Rock Creek.
Also, from the same committee, to which was re- i
ferrcd the bill to incorporate the Washington N'a- j
tiqnal Monument Society, reported back the same I
without amendment and recommended its pas- '
sage.
Mr. Hamlin, from the Committee on Commerce, j
submitted a report, accompanied by a bill for the I
relief of the owner of the barque Attica, of Port- i
land, Maine.
Mr. Stuart, from the Committee on Public Lands,
asked to be discharged from the further consider.!- j
tion of the papers relating to the claim of 15. E. Ed- ]
wards, and that they be referred to the Committee
on Private Land Claims; which was agreed to.
Also, from the same committee, to which was re
ferred the joint resolution to extend the limitations
of the act entitled "An act for the relief of citizens
of towns upon lands of the United States under cer
tain circumstances," approved 23d March, 1844, re
ported back the same with a recommendation that
it do not pass.
Mr. Polk, from the Committee on Claims, to
which was referred the memorial of Anthony S.
Robinson, submitted a report to accompany a bill
previously reported.
RESOLUTIONS.
Mr. Mason submitted the following resolutions
for consideration:
Resolved, That the Secretary of the Navy be di
rected to furnish to the Senate in tabular form a
statement showing the names and appropriate de
scription of all vessels of the navv of the United
States which have been captured, lost, or destroy
ed since its organization or restoration in 1798, wlio
commanded them, for what cause they were so cap
tured, lost, or destroyed, when and where it oc
curred; whether the causes which produced these
results were ascertained by investigations by
courts-martial, courts of inquiry, or otherwise,
the findings of such courts-martial and the opin
ions of such courts (if either or any were held) in
each case, how far these findings and opinions were
carried into effect by them, on whom devolved the
duty of executing them. And, further, to state the
names, character, and force of all prizes of enemy's
vessels of war captured by the United States naVv
which were taken by said enemy in 'neutral ports,
by which the captors were deprived of a right to
property therein, which right was conferred upon
them by the law regulating the apportionment and
distribution of prize-money, arising from captures
made by equal or inferior forces : whether prizes
so retaken have ben reclaimed from the enemy or
from any neutral Power which has thus in violation
of international law permitted prizes so situated to
\ be carried from its port or ports by an enemy.
And. further, how or whether the said captors
have been compensated or sustained in their right
to property thus acquired; and, so far as the rec
ords of this Department may not supply the infor
mation, that he cause the same to be compiled from
1 other sources (if such there be) worthy in his judg
ment of reliance, designating in such case the one
from the other.
ll' -old , That the Secretary of the Navy he di
rected to furnish to the Senate a statement giving
the names, character and force of any andall ships
of-war or other armed vessels captured by our navy
and subsequently taken into the serv ice of the United
States failing a condemnation by our courts, or
without a jut and regular valuation of them hav
ing been made: and whether in such cases, if any,
a fair and equitable remuneration has ever been
made to the captors for the transfer of their prizes
to the Government; and further, whether any mer
chant vessel has been justly captured by the United
States navy which has not been sent home for judi
cial examination or condemnation, but which has,
from motives dictated by State policy, been taken
from the captors and restored to previous owners;
whether any. and if any a fair and equitable, remu
neration has been made to the captors for restora
tions thus made.
/letolreil, That the Secretary of State bo directed
to furnish to the Senate copies of any and all cor
respondence which may have occurred with any for
eign Governmentyrelative to prize vessels belonging
to the navy of the United States which had been
taken from their ports by the enemy, for reclama
tion of them or their value: and also copies of any
reports or correspondence of and with the captors of
such vessels as have been taken from them in neu
tral ports.
Mr. Mason avowed the object of the resolutions
to be to obtain from the Department a correct his
tory of ail the leading events connected with the
navy, and observed that they had been introduced
after consultation with one of the oldest and most
accomplished otficers of the navy.
The resolutions w ere agreed to.
Mr. Polk introduced a bill in relation to conflict
ing land claims: which was rsad and referred to
the Committee on Private Land Claims.
Mr. Iverson moved to take up a private bill, on
its third reading, for the relief of Mrs. Barnard.
Mr. Johnson, of Arkansas, supposed if there was
time to take up a private bill, it would be more con
venient and proper to proceed to the consideration
of the army bill; and expressed the hope that the
Senate would take up that bill and continue it until
disposed of.
MINNESOTA SENATORS.
Mr. Crittenden said before the question was taken
lie desired to proceed to a question of privilege.
He had received a letter from his friend, Gen.
Shields, who claims a right to a seat in the Senate,
and he felt it his duty to press that claim : and after
the letter was read he should move that the oath of
ollice be administered to Gen. Shields, and that he
be permitted to take his seat.
[The Reporter gives a mere synopsis of the letter.
The purport of it was that the enabling act of the
last session authorized the inhabitants of Minnesota
to form a constitution and State government, and
to come into the Union : that this authority was ab
solute; that under it the people formed a constitu
tion and State government, and have come into the
Union in the manner specified in the act. That, in
addition to this, the act authorized them to deter
mine for themselves whether they would be a State
at that time, viz : on the second Monday in .Tulv,
1857: and, if they should so determine, that the
constitution should be submitted to the people for
final approval and ratification. The Convention de
termined to become a State at that time, and sub
mitted the constitution for such approval and ratifi
cation. Therefore, by the authority of Congress,
Minnesota is a State, upon an equal footing with all
other States. It also cited as precedents the case
of Ohio, which caine into the Union under a similar
enabling act. in 1802, and is now in the Union with
out any authority of law; also, the case of Indiana,
whose Representative was admitted on the strength
of a similar enabling act, in 1810, without any other
law. That according to these precedents the Rep
resentatives from Minnesota are entitled to admis
sion without further legislation. ]
Mr. Johnson, of Arkansas, made a question of or
der, contending that the question was not one of
privilege; that there was no such State as Minnesota
recognized by the body; and hence that no such
question as that of privilege could be entertained.
Me hoped the Senator from Kentucky would with
draw his motion and suffer the army bill to be dis
posed of.
After some remarks from Messrs. Mason, Hunter,
Crittenden, Pugh, and others—
The chair said that it would take the sense of the
Senate as to its being a question of privilege.
Mr. Crittenden argued at some length to show
that it was a question of privilege, and cited cases
where Representatives had been admitted in ad
vance of the State: when
Mr. Johnson, of Arkansas, thought it must be ap
parent to all that this question, if permitted to go
on. would be carried through the whole Kansas de
bate to the prejudice of the army bill, which had al
ready been so long before them, and always inter
rupted by some petty question, that had caused the
bill, important as it was, to be overridden. The
Government had asked this increase of the army,
and it was due to tliem either to grant it or reject it.
He would move to lay the subject on the table.
Mr. Seward made an appeal to the Senator to
withdraw the motion, as he desired to offer a brief
remark on the subject.
Mr. Johnson must decline, though intending 110
discourtesy to the Senator from New York.
The question having been taken, it was decided in
the negative bv the following vote:
YEAS—Messrs. Allen, Biggs, Bright, Brown, Clay,
F"ne, Green, Hammond, Hunter,lverson, Johnson,
. of Arkansas, Johnson, of Tennessee, Jones, Mallo
ry. Mason, Pearee, Poik, Sebastian, Slidell, Thom
son, of New Jersey, Toombs and Wright—22.
NAYS —Messrs. Bell, Benjamin, Broderick, Clark,
Collamer, Crittenden, Dixon, Doolittle, Douglas,
Durkee, Fessendeu, Fitch, Foot, Foster, Gwin,
Hauilin, Harlan, Houston, King, Pugh, Seward,
Simmons, Stuart, Sumner, Trumbull and Wilson —
, 26.
1 The discussion was then continued by Messrs. Se
[ ward, Hunter, Mason. Simmons and Toombs, wtien
Mr. Toombs submitted the following resolution,
which was agreed to, and closed the question for
the present.
Resolved, That the question of the admission of
! .lames Shields to a seat in this body as a Senator i
from the State of Minnesota to be referred to the j
Judiciary Committee, with instructions to inquire j
; whether"or not Minnesota is a State of the Union |
i under the Constitution and laws.
INCREASE 0V THE ARMY.
' The Senate then proceeded to consider the bill j
to increase the military establishment of the United
! States; and the bill was discussed until a late hour, I
Messrs. Bell, Johnson, of Arkansas, Fitch, llous-
I ton, Broderick, Brown, and others participating: j
1 when the question was taken on the amendment of j
Mr. Johnson, of Tennessee, which, in effect, was to j
: substitute volunteers for regulars to a number not !
exceeding 3,000, and decided in the negative bv the I
following vote:
Yeas—Messrs. Bell. Broderick. Cameron, Chan- I
' dler, Clark, Dixon. Doolittle, Douglas, Dourkee. j
j Fessenden, Foote, Foster, Hale. Hamlin, llarlin, ■
I Houston, Johnson of Tennessee. King. Seward, |
| Simmons, Sumner, Toombs, and Wilson—23.
Mays—Messrs. Allen, Bayard, Benjamin, Biggs. :
Bigler, Brown, Clay, Crittenden, l.vans, Fitch, j
| Creen, Hammond, Hunter, Iverson, Johnson of Ar- ;
j kansas: Mallory, Mason, T'earce, Folk. Fugh. Sebas '
I tian."Slidell, Stuart, Thomson of N. Jersey, Wright 1
| andYulee—2B.
Mr. Hunter submitted his amendment as a snbsti
! tute for the bill of the committee, which is in effect j
I to raise under the direction of the President one
| regiment of dragoons and two regiments of infan- |
try: the President to appoint the officers below the j
i grade of field officers as may not be appointed du- ■
| ring the present session, Ac.
| Mr. Pugh moved to amend the amendment of Mr. |
| Hunter, which in effect was to allow the President J
j to accept the services of three thousand volunteers j
j to serve for two years unless sooner discharged, the j
j officers to be elected or appointed according to the
f laws ot the several States. The question having
| been taken on this amendment, it was decided in the j
j affirmative by the following vote:
j A EAS —Messrs. Bell, Broderick, Cameron, Chand- i
! ler, Clark, Crittenden. Dixon. Doolittle, Douglas, j
j Durkee, Fessenden,- Foote. Foster, Hale, Hamlin,
! Harlan, Houston, Johnson of Tennessee, King, Pugh, i
| Seward, Simmons, Sumner, Toombs, Trumbull and !
I Wilson—2G.
j XAYS—-Messrs. Allen, Bayard. Benjamin. Briggs. j
I Bigler, Brown, Clay, Evans, Fitch.' Green, Ham- I
tnond, Hunter, Iverson, Johnson of Arkansas, Mai- j
| lory, Mason, Pearce, Folk, Sebastian, Slidell, Stuart, j
i Thompson of Kentucky, Thomson of Mew Jersey, j
j Wright, and Yulee—2s.
i The bill was then reported, and on the question j
J of its passage, it was lost by the following vote :
A EAS —Messrs. Bell, Biggs, Broderick, Cameron,
i Crittenden, Douglas, Green, (twin. Houston, John- j
\ son of Tennessee, Mallory, Pugh, Seward, Stuart, j
i Thompson of Kentucky, and Toombs—lo.
MATS— Messrs. Allen, llayard, Benjamin, Bigler, j
Brown, Chandler, Clark, Clav, Dixon, Doolittle, !
Durkee, Evans, Fessenden, Fitch, Foot, Foster, j
Hale, Hamlin, Hammond. Harlan, Hunter, Iverson, \
| Johnson of Arkansas, King, Mason, Polk, Sebas- j
tian, Simmons, Slidell, Sumner, Thomson of Mew I
! Jersey, Trumbull, Wilson, Wright and Yulee—3s. j
Mir. Hale moved to reconsider the vote rejecting i
the bill.
Mr. Toombs moved to lay the motion to reeonsid- ;
I er on the table; which motion was disagreed to: so i
I that the bill may come up again in some other j
i form.
PERSONAL EXPLANATION.
Messrs. Bell and Johnson, of Tennessee, made ex- j
| planations concerning remarks made by each on the
I two preceding days of debate on the Tennessee re
] solutions of instruction, which ended in the resto
! ration of kindly feeling between the two Senn
it tors.
At G o'clock, P. if., the Senate adjourned to
Monday.
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.
The Speaker laid before the House the voluminous
, evidence taken in the contested election case from
i the third Congressional districtof Maryland: which
i j was referred to the Committee on Elections and or
-1 dered to be printed.
J Also, a communication from the Treasury De
? partment, respecting an appropriation of Sto,ooo
• ; for repairing the saloon of the old portion of the
I i Patent Office; which was referred to the Committee
i of Ways and Means; and ordered to be printed.
Also, a communication from the Secretary of the
Interior, in reply to the resolution of the House of
r January 4. 1858, in relation to the sales and other
! disposals of the public lands, which was laid on the
- j table and ordered to be printed.
i Also, a communication from the Department of
- ' the Interior, replying to a resolution of January 19.
> | 1857, respecting the number of suits in the United
| States courts during the year 1857: which was re
ferred to the Committee on the Judiciary, and or
t dered to be printed.
THE ARMY BILL.
Mr. Quitman, of Mississippi, by unanimous con
i sent, reported from the Committee on Military Af
fairs a bill to provide for the organization of a regi
ment of mounted volunteers for the defence of the
frontier of Texas, and to authorize the President to
i 1 call into the service of the United States four addi
tional regiments of volunteers.
Mr. Quitman said, although this matter demand
1 ed immediate attention, he did not propose to press
it at once upon the House, hut would move its post
> ponement to a day certain. lie believed this bill
i was more indicative of the public sentiment than
any that had been presented. The President's mes
sage relating to the subject was not referred to the
committee until a few weeks ago, and, the matter
having already been elaborately discussed in the
Senate, it was time the House should also present
its views, and give some reply to the request of the
President for more troops, and to the request of the
Texas legislature for volunteers. If additional milita
ry force was to be given to the President at all.every
one knew that it ought to be done at once, so that
they could be organized and equipped as speedily
as possible. He moved that the l>ill he re-commit
ted to the Committee on Military A Hairs: and then
the bill (having been read twice) was, on his mo
i tion, postponed until Wednesday next and ordered
' to be printed.
Mr. Faulkner, of Virginia, from the same commit
tee, made a minority report on the subject, accom
panied by a bill, which was disposed of in the same
manner.
Mr. Gartrell, of Georgia, on leave presented res
olutions of the Legislature of Georgia in relation to
bountv lands for the Georgia volunteers called into
the I'nited States service in 1 H:7: which were re
ferred to the Committee on Public Lands and order
ed to be printed.
EXPULSION OF MR. 0. B. MATTESON.
The preamble and resolution offered by Mr. llar
j ris, of Illinois, expelling from his seat in this House
Mr. Orsamus 15. Matteson, a member from New-
York, cam? up for consideration by special assign
: ment.
i Mr. Harris, of Illinois, said he introduced the re
solution in the belief not only that the House had
power to p9ss it, but that it was the duty of the
House to take such action. He would not have in
: troduced it, however, but for the fact that the House
! had previously entered upon an investigation of the
! transactions of members of the last House, and
: raised a committee to prosecute inquiries in remote
parts of the country. He thought the cases already
j on the docket should be disposed of before any new
; cases were set down for trial. The Constitution
gave the House power "to expel a member," in the
broadest sense, without defining or limiting of
fences, and the provision that it shall require a two
thirds vote sufficiently guarded the power against
abuse. He had at first proposed to refer the matter
; to a committee in order to obtain their sanction,
but, at the suggestion of some of the political asso
ciates of the member, be had modified the resolu
i tion to its present form, wliicli met bis own views.
The facts connected with this case were on record,
! and doubtless members were familiar with them.—
; He bad done bis duty in bringing the matter before
I the House, and was not particular as to the course
I to be pursued.
Mr. Keitt, of South Carolina, explained the cir
cumstances under which he had moved the last post
ponement of the subject for one month. A gentle
man named Moulton, who claimed to be a Democrat,
and the competitor of Mr. Matteson, in the election
some years ago, called upon him and requested that
be would move a postponement, in consequence of
the serious illness of Mr. Matteson's wife, a? Mr.
Harris would not be present when the case came up.
Since then he had received letters and newspapers
from Mr. M.'s district, asserting that the excuse was
fabricated. On the other liantl, he had received in
formation from similar sources asserting the contra
ry. This morning Mr. Moulton placed in his hand
; a letter from Mrs. Matteson's reputed family pliy
| sician, to the effect that she had scarcely seen a well
day for the last six monthss and for the past few
weeks had been suffering more than usual. He had
i no motion to make or comment to offer.
Mr. Seward of Georgia, said, while ho condemned
the conduct of the member affected by the resolu
tion, he stood there to support the Constitution, and
if need be to defend the constitutional rights of the
member. The House had not only civil but crimi
nal jurisdiction over its members; but lie contended
that, unless some law or constitutional provision
could be shown effecting a personal and perpetual
disqualification of its members, the House by its ac
tion at the last session had entirely exhausted its
J power in this case. There was not a word or line
in the Constitution which prevented Mr. Matteson's
constituents from re-electing liirn, and he could not
be punished twice for the same offence, it was
j onlv in case of impeachment that a member could
be disqualified from holding a seat.
' He qutoed from Cusliing's Manual to the effect
that expulsion could not be regarded as a disquali
fication, unless so provided by law. lie voted for
Mr. Matteson's expulsion at (lie last session, but In
did not believe that that expulsion deprived liis con
stituents of the right to send liiin back, lie was
defending only the Constitution and law and tin
rights of constituencies, and believed that a second
expulsion would be an act of tvranny. it had beer
said that if the election had taken place subsequent
to the expulsion the House would have bad no right
to act a second time; but in his opinion the time el
the election made no difference as to the right of tin
' people.
Mr. Houston, of Alabama, suggested that the of
fence having been committed after his election t(
this Congress gave this House jurisdiction.
Mr. Seward insisted that Congress had exhaust**
i its power in the premises, and that Mr. Matteson';
I constituents bad a right to elect whom they pleased
PRICE TWO CENTS.
The fact that he resigned to avoid expulsion made
no difference in the case. There was legally no per
manent disqualification attached to any member, as
was the cast- in the liritish Parliament. In eonclu
sion he moved to refer the resolution to a select com
mittee of five.
Mr. Stanton, of Ohio, notwithstanding his posi
i tion in a select committee, did not hold himself
hound to vote for the expulsion of anv member for
an offense against a past Congress. The great ob
ject of Congressional investigation was to advise the
public of the nature of the official acts of their re
j presentatives. No man should he twice tried and
: punished for the same offence. He moved that the
; resolution be laid upon the table, hut subsequently
withdrew the motion.
Mr. Taylor, of Louisiana, said this grave subject
j was one which had frequently engaged the attcn
| tion of Congress. The excitement growing out ot
the facts upon which this resolution was based, had
: long since passed away, and they were now to act
I upon cool judgment. Legislative assemblies had no
; inherent power; only such as mar be conferred by
j law. It was true that in England it was not possi
hie to find the origin of parliamentary powers, hut
; the various precedents and decisions showed that
they had a legal basis. Hut in this country there
1 was no such obscurity. Every measure for the pro
i tection of members of our colonial assemblies, was
supplied by legislation, as in each ease the necessity
arose.
; The only power of Congress over its members was
I derived from the Constitution, and that gave no
right to expel except for disorderly conduct, and
; by a two-third vote. The British "Parliament and
I many ot the State Legislatures had by law power to
| expel for infamous or disgraceful conduct, but Con
j gress had no such power. The House could'embodv
; in its rules whatever should be considered disorder
| ly conduct, and make that, and that onlv, ground
| of expulsion. For instance, during the discussion
j of an important treaty in the Senate, one of its mem
j hers communicated it to a newspaper correspondent
! in violation of the rule of secrecy. This would have
! been good ground for expulsion but for the fact that
I the rule did not prescribe the penalty; and immedi
j atelv afterwards the Senate adopted a rule that
j such an offence should be ground for expulsion.
Where there was 110 law there was no offence,
j and the adoption of any other construction would
| clothe the House with arbitrary and therefore tyran-
I ical power. The expulsion of Mr. Matteson would
I be an undignified act. and a dangerous precedent.
I Nothing was to he gained by it, because Mr. Maite
j son did not occupy his scat, and being generally re
| garded as a moral carrion, he had no doubt his con
stituents would emphatically condemn him at the
; next election.
Mr. Giddings, of Ohio, maintained that Matteson's
district had a right to be represented. His absence
; from the House at. the present crisis showed that he
j was unworthy of his seat, and he hoped the House
would act promptly. He rejoiced that the House
I had commenced a system of purification. It was
| the proudest day of the Republican party, when
they permitted the axe to fall upon their own politi-
I cal associate who was found to be unworthy,
j Mr. Hughes, of Indiana, conceived that the House
I had ample jurisdiction in this case, but thought the
| important considerations involved called for delibe
| ration. He regretted that the House had not acted
with more deliberation in the case of Mr. Woleott,
j of Boston, who was sent to prison over the votes of
i a respectable minority, and under the gag of the
| previous question. He took this occasion to protest
! against that proceeding. He desired to see the reso
j lution modified somewhat, and for that purpose
j would more to refer it to the Committee on the
! Judiciary.
He had no doubt as to the extent of the power of
S the House, and referred to the celebrated Wilkes of
| Middlesex casein England, by which it was deter
mined that a member once expelled could not again
! hold his scat in Parliament. The House might not
have power to punish a second time; but Matteson
| had resigned to avoid his punishment, and the bar
j of a former conviction could not be interposed. It
| seemed to be conceded that he had forfeited the re
| spect of the House, and his usefulness was gone.—
i Therefore, as a matter of justice to the House, and
: | to the constituents of the member, he would vote
i lor his expulsion, when a resolution should be pre
j sented in proper form, but the present resolution
did not place the matter on a proper basis, and he
would not vote tor it. The House had acted hastily
j enough ic imprisoning a citizen on suspicion of at
i tempting to corrupt members, and he hoped they
! would not be slow to rid themselves of a member
who was known to be corrupt.
Mr. Smith, of Virginia, hoped and believed that
in this matter there would be no parties in the
f! House. The question was whether a member, dri
■ ; ven from the House by his own confession of guilt,
and by the judgment of the House, should be per
| mitted to sit among them, representing a portion of
I i the people of this country ? He denied that the
Constitution limited the power of expulsion to di?
I orderly conduct, contending that the clause author
| izing the expulsion of a member, by a two-thirds
j vote, stood entirely independent ot* the context.
: The power to expel was absolute under the Consti
j tution. and only controlled by considerations of jus
tice and honor. Mr. Matteson had never been en
dors-d by his constituents, and they were not to
> presume that they would elect an unworthy man to
, j represent them. At all events, they ought to have
an opportunity to pass upon him, and if they choose
to elect him. he would then have a right to his seat,
i He would not act in hot haste, but it was their dutv
! to act and to establish a precedent tor the future
j Mr. N ichols, of Ohio, was in favor of the referenc
j to the Judiciary Committee. There was no doubt
j that the action of the House in the thirty-fourth
, i Congress was a virtual expulsion, and he doubted
j the power and this right of the House to exercise
, i any further jurisdiction. Having tried, convicted,
. j and punished the member from New York, he pro
. j tested in the name of justice, against any further
retribution. When a constituency had elected a
representative they had a right to be represented
. • by him, unless he was expelled for some subsequent
I offence. The second expulsion of Mr. Matteson
| would therefore be an infringement upon the rights
. | of his constituents.
| to be permitted to escape the penalties of miscon
duct by the ruse of a resignation?
Mr. Nichols replied that Mr. Mutteson had not
j escaped, because, according to the gentleman's own
| argument, he had been virtually expelled. He de
i nied that the House had an arbitrary power of ex
; pulsion; if they had, a majority of two-thirds could
expel members for political opinions. He ivouldnot
j defend the course of the member from Xew York,
I but was opposed to any arbitrary exercise of power,
| such as that by which the House had lately sent a
j citizen to the common jail.
Mr. Jones, of Tennessee, believed that Mr. Mat
j teson was morally disqualified from holding a seat,
j and would vote for the resolution expelling him.
j and against the motion to commit. No constituen
cy had a right to send unworthy men to sit with
them in the American Congress.
! Mr. Ready, of Tennessee, opposed the motion to
refer to the Judiciary Committee, because it would
delay the action of the House, and favored a refer
ence to a select committee.
Mr. Curtis, of lowa, said as Mr. Matteson hail
' done nothing to remove the taint resting upon him,
J he was in favor of his expulsion. If lie was un
worthy to sit 111 the last Congress he was also un-
I worthy to sit in this.
| Mr. Harris, of Illinois, replied to the various ol>-
I jeetions which had been urged against the resolu-
I tion. He denied that expulsion was an act of pun
j i hinent towards the member; it was an act of self
-1 protection on the part of the House. It had been
! decided by various precedents that members might
i be expelled for other offences than disorderly con-
I duct. A Senator was expelled by a vote of 35 to 1
i for an offence committed in the Stale of Tennessee,
j He had received batches of letters and newspapers
| from Mr. Matteson's district requesting and demand
' ing his expulsion.
Mr. 11. answered numerous interrogatories pro-
I pounded to him by members, and closed by sayiim
j that Mr. Matteson had been found guilty of degrad
j ing the House of which he was a member, and ol
' corruption, and ought to be expelled,
i He moved the previous question.
Mr. Grow, of Pennsylvania, denied that Congress
i had a right to expel a member for facts which ex
j isted and were known at the time of his election to
| Congress. The letter to Wni. C. Johnson, upon
; which the whole charge was based, was known to
. Mr. Matteson's constituents before liis election, and
j used in the canvass against him. Gentlemen must
i remember that the constituencies of the respective
: Congressional districts selected their associates, and
| whatever their personal characters they all stood on
| that float rs equals.
The House was not to arrogate to itself the pow-
I or of saying despotically who should sit in it, or of
j excluding any man either because of his personal
| character or because of his political opinions, Al
: though a man had been convicted of murder or
j treason, if his constituents choose to endorse him it
was not their business. He stood on thatfloor as their
1 peer. Congress was making rapid strides in tramp
; ling down'public and private rights, and he protest
; ed against this new doctrine of the rightof arbitral!
; expulsion. If members disliked their associates in
j Congress their only remedy was to sit as far off' as
] possible.
Mr. Purviance, of Pennsylvania, did not doubt
i the power of the House in the premises, but doubt
:ed the expediency of exercising it. In anal ago u
j cases the Constitution provided that men should not
L be tried twice for the same offence, and it would be
l safer for the House to follow the same rule. He
i renewed the motion for the previous question,
! which had been withdrawn in favor of Mr. Grow
and himself.
! The demand for the previous question was se
| conded.
Mr. Sherman, of Ohio, moved to lay the whole
| subject on the table; which motion was lost, as foi
lows:
YKVS.—Messrs. Abbott, Bennett, Billinghorst.
Bliss, Brnyton. Buffinton, Burlingame. Campbell,
| Case, Cliatfee. Clark of Connecticut. Clawsou, Col
: fax, Covode, Cragin, Davis of Maryland, Davis ol
lowa. Dean. Dick, Dodil, Durfe.e, Edie, Farnsworth,
(Gildings, Goodwin, Granger, Grow, Harlan, Hoi
! ton, How ai d, Kunkel of Pennsylvania, Lamar, Leacli
i Loiter, Lovejoy, Marshall of Kentucky. Maynard.
Morgan, Morse of Xew Y'in k. Murray. Parker, Pettit
Potter,Purviance, Ritchie,Bobbins. Rovce Sherman
oLOhio, Stanton, Stevens, Stewart of Pennsv Ivania,
Tappan. Taylor of Louisiana, Thompson, Tompkins,
Wade, Walbridgc. VValdron, Walton, Washburn of
i Wisconsin, and Wood—6l.
N AYS —Messrs. Adrain, Alii, Atkins, Avery, Barks
l dale, Bingham, Bishop, Boeock, Bonham, Bryan,
i Burnett, Burns, Burroughs, Caskie, Chapman,
Clark of Missouri, Clay, Clemens, Clingman, Cobb,

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