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The daily exchange. [volume] (Baltimore, Md.) 1858-1861, March 02, 1858, Image 1

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VOL. I—NO. 8.
THE DAILY EXCHANGE.
PI BUSHED EVERY MORNING, (SUNDAYS EXCEPTED.)
BY
KERR & CO.
OFFICE, CARROLL HALL,
S. E. CORNER OF 11 \LTIMORE AND CALVERT STREETS.
EDITORS AND PRoRIETORS
CKART.ES (4. KERR. THOMAS \V. HALL, .IK.
TERMS
In the city TWELVE AND A HALF CENTS per week, paya
tic to the carrier Mailed to subscribers, out of the city,
at six DOLLARS per annum; THREE DOLLARS for six months
an.l ONE DOLLAR for two months. Invariably in advance
for the time ordered.
ADVERTISING RATES.
TABLE:
(SQUARE —EIGHT LINKS.)
One insertion -50
Tvvo insertions 75
Three '• $l.OO
Four ' $1.25
Five " $1.50
One week $1.75
< >ne month $4.00
Advertisements occupying a larger or smaller space, or
inserted for a longer or shorter time, charged for propor
tionately.
THE DAILY EXCHANGE.
PROSPECTUS.
UNDER the above tills' it is proposed to
conduct and publish in the city of Baltimore a flrst
clasi Commercial and Political MORNING NEWSPAPER.
This enterprise been prompted by the conviction
that the rapid growth of Baltimore in population and
wealth, its constantly augmenting trade, aud its eonse
queatly increased commercial and political importance,
not only justify but demand an effort to introduce into the
field of journalism that element of competition, which, in i
all other branches of business, lias so materially contribu- i
ted to the prosperity of the city,
"THE EXCHANGE " With regard to the name, —if an '
apology were needed, for thus introducing what may per- j
liaps be deemed a novelty iu the nomenclature of journal- i
ism.—it has been adopted, not simply for its peculiar ap
propriatcness in connection with those commercial inter
ests to which a paper of the character proposed must be j
largely devoted, but in its wide and more comprehensive
acceptation, as embracing within its scope all those topics
which come within the province of the public press.
Ist. NEWS. —It will, of course, be the first aim of the ;
proprietors to furnish the readers of THE EXCHANGE J
with the most prompt, full and authentic intelligence upon
all matters of public interest, at home and abroad : and to !
secure the accomplishment of this result, and the perfec
tion of every arrangement required to place THE EX ;
CHANGE in this particular on a level with the best jour
nals of the country, no necessary expense or exertion will
be spared.
2d. COMMERCE. —Tim commercial department of the pa '
• per will include, not only the usual daily reports and
weekly reviews of the markets, domestic and foreign, com !
piled with fulness and accuracy, hut a frequent editorial j
discussion of the leading financial questions of the day, '
with regard to which the mercantile community naturally j
look to the public press for comment and suggestion.
3d, POLITICS. —The interests of commerce anil the state
of the markets are so constantly and intimately affected
by the aspect of political affairs throughout the world, that
a journal which aspires to be any thing more than a mere ;
commercial reporter or daily price current, must necessa- !
sarily devote a large space in its columns to the dissemi j
nation of political intelligence, and the discussion of polit- 1
ieal questions. In this department of the paper, which, j
apart from its commercial importance, also possesses a i
peculiar and exclusive interest of its own, it will be the
object of THE EXCHANGE to preserve a position of honest
and fearless independence, equally removed from servile i
partisanship upon the one hand, and timid neutrality upon
the other.
4th, LITERATURE AND ART—Candid and impartial re
views of current literature and contemporaneous art. mu
sical and dramatical criticisms, by competent judges, and
original contributions upon subjects of literary or scientific I
interest, will alway find an appropriate place in the col- i
urnns of THE EXCHANGE, and it will le the constant :
aim of the proprietors to render it a valuable and interest
ing journal for the family as well as for the counting- i
room
(timrntton.
PATAPSCO FEMALE INSTITUTE, MARYLAND
'TMIF. TRUSTEES oftho Fatapsco Female
X Institute announce to the public (hat the additional '
buildings and improvements commenced by them a.\ ear ago i
in accordance with the subjoined resolutions, are now coin- j
plete. These improvements have not been made with a !
view to increase the school, but for the greater conveni
en re and comfort of the usual number of pupils
The new chap 1 i> a handsome and most appropriate- j
structure, for the exclusive use of the inmates of the In- •
stitute. and in all its arrangements it is most complete. It !
is furnished with a new organ of fine construction and ex- !
celleut tone.
The administration of Mr. Archer for the past year and !
the present has been attended with unprecedented sue- 1
cess, and the Trustees feel themselves fully justified in ]
recommending the Institute to the continued favor of the •
South.
It has pre-eminence in liea'th fulness. The pupils avoid
ing, on tiie one hand, the debilitating effects of a Southern j
climate, and on the other the rigors of the North, have ,
few of the interruptions incident to both these climates.
It is sufficiently near to the city of Baltimore to enjoy the j
benefits of a city without any of its evils.
As an Institution of learning it has the advantage of a
full organization, a resident chaplain, and a corps of ac- I
complished teachers and professors, called together from
time to time in the long experience of those having charge
of the Institute.
The Trustees of the Fatapsco Female Institute, having ;
been duly notified by Mrs. Lincoln I'helps of her intention j
to resign her office of principal at the close of the present
school year, have elected Robert H Archer as her succes
sor. The eminent success of Mr. Archer in conducting for
many years a School for Young Ladies in the city of Balti
more. entitles him to our confidence as a person peculiarly j
qualified to maintain the present high standing, and insure j
the permanent prosperity of the Institution; and with this j
view we are engaged in the erection of another building in ;
addition to the present extensive accommodations of the j
Institute
CHAS. W. DORSEY, PRESIDENT. WM. DENNY, M. 1
D.. SECRETARY T. WATKIN3 LIGON. E. HAMMOND,
JOHN. 1* KENNEDY. fe22 dtf. |
LA W S< • 1 1( >OL. <)F THF. I \ I VKRSITY
AT CAMBRIDGE, MASS.
The Instructors in this School arc
Hon. JOEL PARKER, LL.D.. Royal Professor.
Hon. THKOPIIILUS PARSONS. LL.D.. Pane Profes I\
Hon. EMORY WASHBURN, LL P.. University Professor. [
The course of instruction embraces the various branches I
of the Common Law. and of Equity, Admiralty. Com- j
mercial. International and Constitutional Law, and the |
Jurisprudence of the United States. The Law Library •
consists of about 14.000 volumes, and as new works ap |
pear they are added, and every effort is made to render it ;
complete.
Instruction is given by oral lectures and expositions. '
(and by recitations and examinations, in connection with j
them.) of which there are ten every week. Two Moot !
Courts are also holden in each week, at each of which a j
cause, previously given out. is argued by four students,
and an opinion delivered by the Presiding Instructor |
Rooms and other facilities are also provided for the Club j
Courts; and an Assembly is held weekly for practice in de- i
bate, and acquiring a knowledge of parliamentary law and
proceedings.
Students may enter the School in any stage of their pro
fessional studies or mercantile pursuits, and at the com
meneraeut of either term, or in the middle or other part of
term.
They arc at liberty to select what studies they will pur |
ue according to their view of their own wants and at
tainments.
The Academical year, which commences on Thursday, !
six weeks after the third Wednesday in July, is divided '
into two terras, of twenty weeks each, with a vacation of I
six weeks at the end of each term
During the Winter vacation, the Library is opened. |
warmed, and lighted, for the use of the members of the
School.
Applications for admission, or for Catalogues, or any
further information, may be made to either of the Profes
sors at Cambridge.
Cambridge, Mass.. January, 1858. [d6t-law6m.
Ulebitmes, perfumeries, £c.
B - RYAN'S PULMONIC WAFERS FOR
Coughs. Colds. Asthma, Consumption and all diseases
of the Lungs. For sale at WISEMAN'S Drug Store.
Baltimore and Fremont streets. Baltimore
f22-dlm
J. PURVIANCE POLKLTCOT
APOTHECARIES,
Corner of Fayette and St. Paul Streets.
AND
N. HYNSON JENNINGS & CO.
APOTHECARIES,
NO 88 N CHARLES STREET,
Baltimore,
Respectfully call the attention of citizens and the travel
ling community to their large and choice assortment of
MEDICINES, PERFUMERY, FINE STATIONERY and FANCY
ARTICLES, which maybe confidently relied OH as being
what we represent them, as we select none but of the pu
rest quality Also. MEDICINE CHESTS. SURGICAL INSTRU
MENTS. TRUSSES. DIETETIC PREPARATIONS, kc., kc.
Written orders filled promptly and with care, subject to :
bo returned at our expense if not of standard quality.
fe22-tf
WISEMAN'S VERMFFUGE7 ~
OR WORM DESTROYER. |
This remedy for Worms is one of the most extraordinary \
ever used. It effectually eradicates Worms of all sorts j
from children and adults.
Warranted not to contain Mercury in any form, nor any "
other mineral.
For sale by WISEMAN, Druggist, corner of Baltimore
and Fremont streets. Price 25 cents. dim. !
THE BALSAM OF WILD CHERKYj ~~
PREPARED AT DR. CVNEAL'S DRUG I
Store, Corner of Madison and Eutaw Streets, is a reli- j
able remedy for Coughs. Colds, Hoarseness, Soreness and
pains in the Chest. Consumptive cases derive much ad- j
v antage from its use Wild Cherry Bark. Tar. Bloodroot.
and Indian Hemp enter into its composition Its taste is j
pleasant and its use entirely safe. feb22 3t 1
• OF SOROFIJLOI S HABIT\ '
1_ with Swelled Neck, Tumors. King's Evil, A:o., Mer
curial and Syphilitic diseases and affections generally aris
ing from a taint in the system, requiring an alterative
course of treatment, are recommended to take ' THE AL
TERATIVE SYRUP. ' made at Dr O'Neal s Drug Store,
Corner of Madison and Eutaw Streets It rid 9 the system
of accumulated humors, as Tetter, Boils. Pimples. Ring
worm. Ac. feh22-3t
0Q BUILDERS'DEPOT.
SASH. DOORS. BLINDS. FRAMES, HOT BED SASH,
MOULDINGS. CASINGS, Ac., DRESSED FLOORING
AX BOTHER LUMBER. LIME. BRICKS. HAIR. HARD
WAKE, GLASS. OIL, FAINTS, and every description of
BUILDING MATERIAL, at moderate rates and on accotn
modating terms. Particular attention paid to orders and
contracts from abroad. Estimates of the entire cost 04
buildings furnished with accuracy and despatch. Ship
ments effected promptly to all accessible points by
R. JOHNSON.
No. 69 Pratt street, (near Bowly'a wharf,)
fe23-tf Baltimore, Md,
THE MERCANTILE LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
(Founded in 1839.)
Occupies the First Floor of the Atheneeum Building. N. W.
Corner of St. Faul and Saratoga Streets.
THE ROOMS are large and comfortable,
well heated and lighted, and quiet.
The Library contains now about 15,000 volumes, care
fully selected, of History, Poetry, Drama, Theology, Arts
and Science. Biography, Voyages and Travels, Essays and
Reviews, and Fiction, and is increasing at the rate of about
1.000 volumes per annum. It is constantly supplied with
the best publications of all these branches of knowledge, as
well as a fair representation of the current light literature
of the present time.
The Reading Room is furnished with most of the Maga
zines and Reviews of this country and England, as well
a3 a number of American and English newspapers.
The Association was formed for the special benefit of the
CLERKS OF THE CITY, and is exclusively under their
control. They alone are eligible for ACTIVE membership.
The fee for this class is $3 per annum, payable in advance,
hut the use of its Rooks and Rooms is open to all other
classes, as HONORARY nieinl>ers, upon the payment of
$6 per annum, in advance. They may draw books from
the Library, visit the rooms, and are entited to ALL THE
PRIVILEGES of the Association, except voting and hold
ing office. Ladies may become Honorary members in their
own right. The accounts of either Active or Honorary
members may he transferred for the use of ladies or others.
The Rooms are open from 1U o'clock A. M., till 2 o'clock
P. M., for the reception of ladies—and from 2 o'clock till
10 o'clock P. M., for Gentlemen.
Of persons now using the Library,
84 ACCOUNTS ARK FOR LADY*SUBSCRIBERS,
300 44 " HONORARY MEMBERS.
650 14 44 ACTIVE MEMBERS. fe22 tf
WM. P. WEBB & CO.,
IMPORTERS AND COMMISSION" MERCHANTS
FOR THE SALE OF
MEX S FURNISHING GOODS,
±XD ,
T.A ILORP' TRIMMINGS,
( SHIRTS, UMBRELLAS. TWIST.
| COLLARS, SILESIAS. GAI.LOOXS,
\ CRAVATS, BCTTOifS, CORDS.
THREAD, SEWING SILK, MACHINE TWIST.
No. 20 SOUTH CHARLES STREETS.
Four doors below German St.,
Baltimore.
bailors.
H T. ROBERTS^
• MERCER AND TAILOR,
No. 205 BALTIMORE STREET,
f'~- iy. Baltimore.
READY M A D K CLOTHING.
JOIIX II RE A. <f CO,
NORTH EAST CORNER OF I'R.ATT AND SOUTH STS..
Have on hand a large and seleet Stock or WINTER
CLOTHING, that they are running offat a LOW FIGURE,
to make room for SPRING STYLES. Persons in want
would do well to give them a call.
Also—A large stock of PIECE GOODS, suitable for cus
tom trade, which will he got up in good style at low
Prices. fe22 1m
SA M U E L TAN EY H IL L.
MERCHANT TAILOR,
No. 2 LIGHT ST., OPPOSITE FOUNTAIN HOTEL.
Will in a few days receive his full SPRIXG STOCK of
Goods—consisting of CLOTHS. CASSIMERES, VEST
INGS, &c., and will be "pleased to take Orders from his
friends and the public. A fit guaranteed. Prices reason
able. fe22lm.
JOHN A. GRIFFITH'S
MERCHANT TAILORING
AND FASHIONABLE READY MADE CLOTHING
EST A BLISHMENT,
No. IS7 BALTIMORE STREET,
AND LIGHT STREET.
The advertiser has opened his SELECTION OF GOODS
from this and other markets, which he solicits gentlemen
to examine, confident that his assortment is COMPLETE
both in quality anil styles.
His READY-MADE'DEPARTMENT abounds in variety,
in which any taste can he suited, and where gentlemen
can tie accommodated at LOW PRICES, considering the
quality of the Goods offered.
Gentlemen selecting goods from his stock can have
Garments made to orders in his Custom Department witli
dispatch and promptness—two characteristics of his cs
tablishment, where he has the liest cutters that can be
procured ft-22-lm.
ptnos aitb \\\m.
C WHICKERING & SONS;
' AND
NUNXS k CLARK'S
CELEBRATED PIANO FORTES,
Constantly receiving and for sale only by
F. b. BEXTEEX,
181 Baltimore street and 84 Fayette,
third store west of Charles st
Purchasers will find it to their interest to examine f.
themselves the superior qualities of the above Pianos.
Piano Stools Prince & Co.'s Melodeons from $4O upwards
fe22-lm.
NK W M I SI( '. - JUSI Published, by
MILLER it- BE A CHAM, 181 BALTIMORE ST :
A DAY" BREAM—by J. C. Kngclbrecht.
ANVIL CHORUS—from Verdi's Trovatore.
LANCER'S QUADRILLES —taught by Ed. Lehmann.
* BOARDING-SCHOOL LlFE—by Chas. Grobe.
•This beautiful composition, describing a day at a FE
MALE BOARDING SCHOOL, is one of the Author's best
efforts. fe22-lm.
HENRY MCCAFFREY.
MUSIC PUBLISHER,
No. 207 BALTIMORE STREET,
A/|"USI<' PUBLISHED and received daily.
I MUSIC BOUND ,11 the NEATEST STYLE
fe22lm. MUSIC FOLIOS at ALL PRICES
BOUDOIR SEW INO MACHINE.
PRICE S4O.—THIS MACHINE IS RE
coimncnded by I. M. Singer ,V Co.. Wheeler A Wilson
and Grorer & Baker as being the best single thread Ma
chine in the known world; and the price being low, pur
chasers will find it greatly to their advantage to exam
ine it.
Also, Wheeler & Wilson's superior FAMILY MACHINE,
in Rosewood, Black Walnut and Mahogany cases. Wheel
er and Wilson's Machines are really the liest article ever
invented for sewing. A great number of certificates can
he seen at our store from ladies and gentlemen who have
had them in use for a length of time.
E. M. PUNPERSON A CO.,
fe22-tf. 209 Baltimore street.
I. 0. 0. F.
ODD FELLOWS AND MASON'S RE
GALIA, BANNERS, kc.. I". S. Bunting and Silk
Flags, Military Goods and Ladies' Dress Trimmings, al
way on hand and for sale by
A. SISCO,
No. 95 BALTIMORE ST,
fe22-ly. Baltimore'
JTTM ' P HA J ~
• HAT, CAP AND FUR STORE,
No. 132 BALTIMORE STREET,
Between North and Calvert streets, (north side.) fe22tf.
gestamts.
ELDON HALL RESTAURANT.
No. 78, WEST FAYETTE STREET,
REAR ENTRANCE IN BANK LANE.
rpHE undersigned have very recently fitted up
_l_ the building in Fayette street, between St. Paul and
Charles Sts.,known as"Kldon Hall".as a restaurant of the
first class. No expense has been spared to make it acceptable
in all its appointments, to gentlemen who may feel disposed
to pay it a visit. There is at all times upon the u snack"
counter edibles which can be served up at a moment's notice
and at all hours there are always private rooms for the ac
i comodation of gentlemen, who may desire to "exchange''
thoughts over something which may cheer the inner man.
They challenge competition in the matter of CIGARS.
1 GOOD LIQUORS, and ATTENDANCE BY FAITHFUL SER
VANTS, which altogether make up the comforts of a restau
l rant.
DINNERS and SUPPERS served for PARTIES prompt
ly, ANI) FAMILIES SUPPLIED with TERRAPINS, OYS
TERS kc.. at the shortest notice.
There are peculiar advantages, in this establishment for
the accomodation of gentlemen. The building has a rear
entrance from Bank Lane, while there is a private entrance
admiting to all parts of the house, without passing through
the bar. KLILLY & SNYDER
fe22d-lw&2aw2w. i
RTNN'S EATING SALOON;
No. 40 WEST PRATT STREET,
Between Frederick and Market Space.
r PHF. PROPRIETOR OF THIS WIDE
JL ly known Saloon, having recently made extensive ;
improvements in several departments of his buildups, is i
prepared to furnish DINNERS, SUPPERS, &c., at as cheap
rates and in a style which he will not jwrmit of fceing sur- i
passed Families supplied with Oysters, in every variety
of style; also. Terrapins, Turtles, Poultry, Venison and
Fish; the last named he is daily in receipt of by Express
from the South.
All articles delivered free by RINN'S Express Wagon.
fo'2'2 tf.
L~ adiks' ANYI C DRESS
FITTING,
TA U43-WT /; Y
MRS. PET TE T,
AT
436 BALTIMORE STREET, BETWEEN GREEN k PEARL.
TERMS— S2 50
Boy's suits and Dress Bodies fitted to give perfect satis
faction. Ladies are requested to call and examine the
j plan taught. fe23 3t.
WI L L T A M HAR]R I S "
MAKER AND IMPORTER OF
GUNS, RIFLES and PISTOLS
116 West Pratt street,
j keeps constantly on hand a large assortment of Bird and
; Ducking Guns, (double and single barrel;) Six barrelled
• Revolvers; Rifles made to order; Dupont's Gun Powder;
i Powder Flasks. Bird Bags, Shot Belts and Pouches, and
, many other articles necessary for Sport-men. Repairing
I done at the shortest notice, and with neatness. [fe22-lm.
JAMES M. ANDERSON & SON,
ENGRAVERS,
Xo 148 Baltimore Street,
! BANK NOTE. STEEL & COPPER PLATE PRINTING.
INVITATION, WEDDING, VISITING
Cards, etc.. Engraved and Printed in the most fashion
: able styles. Corporate and Notarial Seals. Letter Stamps,
i etc. London and Paris Visiting Cards, De La Rue's En
i velopes, etc. fe22tf
PHCENIX SPU E MILLS,
WAREHOUSE 58 SOUTH STREET,
Offer to the wholesale trode of this cifv the South and West
GOODS of equal quality and price oil same terms as any
other house in the United states. 1e22-tf.
LEATHER DEPOT.
HEMLOCK, OAK & SOLE LEATHER.
4000 SIDES OF HEMLOCK and OAK SOLE LEATHER IN
STORE AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. I pledge myself to deliver
to any State SOOTH or WEST of BALTIMORE, HEMLOCK
SOLE LEATHER as low, if not lower, and in quality
equal, if not superior to what cau be obtained in New
York or any other City in the Union.
Southern and Western Merchants, and Baltimoreans,
having orders to fill with Hemlock or Oak Sole, or any
kind or quality of LEATHER, are respectfully invited to
call at NO. 42 SOUTH CALVERT STREET, one door north
of Lombard.
FRANCIS II GRUPY,
HIDES, OIL AND LEATHER DEALER.
MVA fall assortment of Tanxers' and Curriers' Tools
st New York prices. ffeb22 6tl
GREEN SALTEI) and DRY HIDES ALWAYS WANTED
WM H. CRAWFORD A CO.
PROPRIETORS,
BALTIMORE, TUESDAY, MARCH % 1858.
Insurance (tumpnies.
I? QUIT ABLE FIRE INSURANCE
li SOCIETY.
CHARTER PERPETUAL.
OFFICE. NO. 19 SOI'TH STREET.
THE BALTIMORE EQUITABLE SOCIETY will Insure
HOUSES and FURNITURE from LOSS OR DAM ACE BY
FIRE, at very cheap rates, on the Mutual or Beneficial
plan, and (.'rant Carpenter's Risks, on pleasing terms.
Owners of Property insured in the EQUITABLE Office
have no further responsibility than the amount of their
deposits, and on the expiration of policies, they are enti
tied to receive a cash dividend of twenty-eight per cent
The public are respectfully invited to call at the office.
No. 19 SOUTH STREET, where the principles on which
the Society insure will he fully explained
DIRECTORS:
TIIOMAS KELSO, BENJAMIN DEFORD.
WILLIAM KENNEDY, SAMUEL KIRBY,
HENRY HIEMAX, MICHAEL WARNER 1
JAMES FRAZIER, DANIEL DAII..
CHARLES R. CARROLL, ROBERT A. DOBBIN,
AUSTIN JENKINS, DANIEL WARFIELU.
FRANCIS A. CROOK, Treasurer.
HPOH B. JOKES, Secretary. fe24-ly *
HPHK GKEAT VYESTKKN (M XUINfTi
X INSURANCE COMPANY
OF NEW YORK
Authorized Capital $5,000.( 00
Cash Capital (alreadyjkiid in) 1.000.b00
Surplus Fund (represented by scrip) 560.(1)0
Assctts Jan. 1,1858 * 2,276.000
This Company combines the advantages of the mixed
plan (so long and profitably practiced by the best Life In
surance Companies in Kusope) blending the desirable se
curity of a large Cash Capital, with a liberal return of the
profits to its customers.
All Marine and Inland risks insured on most favorable
terms.
RICH'D LATHERS, Prest. JNO. A. PARKER, Ist V. Prest.
DOUGLAS ROBINSON, Scc'y. J. F. Cox, 2d do.
COLIN MACKENZIE, Agent in Baltimore,
fe23-tf Office Commercial Building?.
INSURANCE CO.
(ESTABLISHED UPWARDS OF HALF A
CENTURY.)
NEW BUILDING,
S. W. CORNER OF SOUTH AND WATER STREETS.
This Company INSURES AGAINST LOSS OR DAM |
AGE BY FIRE, in the city or country, on the various de j
scriptions of property.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS.
J. I. COHEN, JR., President
E ; A. TAYLOR, WM. GILMOK,
W. G. HARRISON, J. PENNINGTON.
S. T. THOMPSON, JOSHUA I. COHEN,
GEO. B. VICKERS, J. BIRCKIIEAD, JR..
F. W. ALRICKS, FRANCIS T. KING,
S. O. HOFFMAN, HENRY CARROLL.
DAVID S. WILSON, R. S. STEUART
W. F. WORTHING TON,
fe22-TF. FBBD'K WOODWORTH, Secretary
IMIE HOWARD FIRE INSURANCE
COMPANY OF BALTIMORE,
Make Insurances on every description of Property within
the limits of the City.
OFFICE—B. E. COR HOWARD AND CLAY STREETS
ANDREW REESE, PRESIDENT,
DIRECTORS :
M. Benzinger, Augustus Slu-iver,
Aaron Fenton, Henry J. Werdebaugli,
William Ortwine, Geo. P. Thomas,
Samuel R. Smith, Chas. \Y George,
James M. Pouder, Wm. G. Power.
Charles Hoffman, Elisha H. Perkins
fe'22-lm. BGKO. HARI.AX WII.UAMS. See'y.
IMRE INSURANCE AGENCY.
GEORGE B. COALE.
COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS, GAY STREET,
AGENT WITH FI LL POWERS FOR THE
HARTFORD FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY,
Cash Capital $500,000
HOME INSURANCE CO. OF NEW YORK CITY,
Cash Capital $500.000.
NORTH AMERICAN FIRE INS. CO. OF HARTFORD,
Cash Capital $300,000.
Property of all kinds in TOWN or COUNTRY insured at
the most reasonable terms.
JOHNSTON'S INSURANCE ROOMS
J PIKENIX BUILDINGS.
73 SECOND STREET
AGGREGATE CAPITAL REPRESENTED
F.IGIIT MILLIONS DOLLARS
MARINE INSURANCE,
FIRE INSURANCE.
LIFE INSURANCE,
Companies. Capital ami Surplus.
MERCANTILE MUTUAL (Marine) In. Co.. .V Y J9.11.000
INSURANCE Co. of the VALLEY OF VA. *352 000
SECURITY FIRE INSURANCE Co of N V 250 000
PHffiNIX 235 000
WASHINGTON •• 288,000
NEW WORLD li.-y.OOO
ALBEMARLE Ya 400.000
LYNCHBURG " 181000
COMMONWEALTH " Pa. 178,000
U.S. LIFE •• 1,250,000
And other strictly FIRST CLASS Companies, forming
an AGGREGATE CAPITAL of
OVER EIGHT MILLIONS DOLLARS.
Policies issued; losses adjusted and paii! at this office, the
subscriber being fully accredited agent.
THOS. D. JOHNSTON.
fe22-ly. Underwriter.
AVARINE INSURANCE.
IVL COLUMBIA A
(MARINE)
INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW YORK.
Cash Capital - - $500,000
Cash paid in 200,000
Security notes paid in - 300.000
THOS. LORD, President.
R. C. MORRIS, Vice President.
PIERRE C. KANE. Secretary.
The undersigned having been duly appointed AGENT of
this Company, is prepared to receive applications for IN
SCRANCE on all Marine and Inland risks.
SOL. B DA VIES,
of Davies ,V Warfield,
fe22-6m. No. lfi Spear's wharf.
BALTIMORE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY.
No- 15 SOUTH STREET,
INCORPORATED IN 1830— Charter Perpetual.
JOHN I. DONALDSON, President.
HPHIS COMPANY proposes to insure lives
A for one or more years, or for life. With their rates
the assured enjoys the benefit of an immediate in lieu of
a prospective and uncertain bonus. He risks neither his
policy nor the premium lie has paid.
These premiums may lie made payable annually, semi
annually, or quarterly, at option of the assured.
The Company buys and grants annuities.
Sells endowments for Children.
Makes all contracts in which Life or the interest of Money
is involved. A. B. COULTER,
Secretarv.
Medical Examiner, Dr. DONALDSON, 31 Franklin street
a f22-ly
IVIRE AND LIFE INSURANCE
OFFICE, NO. FI3 SECOND STREET.
BALTIMORE.
JOHN G. PROUD A SONS,
Representing Companies of the highest standing, with targe
Cash Capitals Policies issued, anil Losses paid at
the Agency.',
.ETNA INSURANCE Co.. of Hartford, Conn. Ji.5(H) 000
PIUF.NIX - . .. - 350.000
SPRINGFIELD Springfield. Mass. 375.000
-FTNA LIFE " Hartford, 225.000
U. S. LIFE " New York 400,000
fc22tf.
ASSOCIATED FIREMEN'S INSUR
ANCE OFFICE, No. 4 SOUTH STREET.
I OPEN DAILY for the INSURANCE OF ALL DESCRIP
; TIONS OF PROPERTY WITHIN THE LIMITS OF THE
; CITY.
JOHN R. MOORE, President.
DIRECTORS.
J JAMES GETTT, Mechanical , J. C. WHEEDEX. Columbian
< GEORGE HARMAX, Union. J. TRUST, First Baltimore,
NOAH WALKER, EYiendship, FRANCIS BURNS. United,
J. T. FARLOW, Deptford, JAMES YOUNG, Franklin.
I ALLEN PAINE. Liberty. J. PEASOX, JR., Washington,
! SAMUEL KIRK, Independent. LANCASTER OULD, Pata/isco,
R. C. MASON. Vigilant, F. A. MILLER, Howard.
. WM. A. HACK, New Market, JAS A. BRUCE. Watchman,
I JAS. B. GEORGE, SR., Pioneer Jos. C. BOTD. Lafayette
J Hook and Ladder Co. No.'l.
fe22 tr. JO'IIN DTKEHART. Secretary.
MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE.
Thie sun mutal insurance
COMPANY OF NEW YORK,
Insures Marine and Inland Navigation Risks, on terms as
favoraide as those of any other Company All persons tak
ing Policies from this Company are entitled to a share of
the profits, without incurring any liability, beyond the
amount of Premium. The assets of the Company, liable
for tlie payment of losses, are over $2,000,000
A. B. XEILSON, Press't.
A. SEATON, V. Pres't J. WHITEHEAD, Sec.
C. OLIV KR O'DONXELL, Agent in Baltimore.
fe22-ly. No. 51 EXCHANGE PLACE. j
NATIONAL FIRE INSURANCE COM '
PAXV OF BALTIMORE.
Incorporated by the
STATE "OF MARYLAND, 1849.
Office XO. 13 South Street
THE COMPAN Y INSURES EVERY
DESCRIPTION' OF PROPERTY
IX THE CITY OR COUNTY,
AGAINST LOSS OR DAMAGE
BY FIRE
The Directors meet daily to determine upon applications
for INSURANCE.
JOHN B. SEIDENSTRICKER,
President
BOARD OF DIRECTORS:
Allen A. Chapman. William Woodward.
Henry M. Bash, George Bartlett.
W m Heald. Adam Den mead,
John W. Ross, Joseph W. Jenkins,
Edward J. Church, Thomas M. Sullivan.
Job Smith, George Small
JOHN R. MAGRUDER,
fe26 tf Secretary.
ELLICOTT & II E \V E S .
59 Exchange Peace.
PRODUCE COMMISSION MERC HANTS,
( with particular attention paid to the sale of BUTTER.)
At all seasons of the year, we have every grade and
Style of BUTTER, and as we are the Agents of the Dairy
men. receiving it direct from the farms, we think that we
ought to be able to give entire satisfaction in price and
quality. Now in stove and arriving—
-80 Packages of prime Goshen.
50 Tubs and Firkins of New York State.
950 Kegs of Glades.
200 Kegs of Western Pennsylvania.
65 Kegs Virginia.
150 Kegs and 10 Bids. Ohio—3oo very small Kegs for
shipping?, and 30 Bbls. prime fresh Roll.
Also—3oo Bushels DRIED APPLES and PEACHES' 70
Kegs of LARD: 60 Boxes EASTERN CHEESE- 9 000
KNIFE BRICK; 80 Bags GROUND NUTS; 9 Boxes Vir
ginia PIPE HEADS and 3 Bales WOOL. 1E22-tf
C. WEST <f- SON,
MANUFACTU RERS AND DEALERS
IN ETHEREAL OIL. ALCOHOL, (all proofs 1
COLOGNE, SPIRITS, CAMPHINE, LARD OIL LINSEED
OIL, AC
Our facilities for manufacturing being large, we are pre
pared to oiler great inducements to persons purchasing
goods in our line.
Manufactory, 306 West Pratt street, Warehouse and
Counting Room, 115 West Lombard street, between Light
and Charles. fe22-tf
To Advertisers.— ln order to afford tl,e puWc an
opportunity to judge for themselves of the merits cj the Ex
change, large editions wilt be issued for the first few Jays of
its publication, and distributed widely and grutuitoiisli/
within the city, and also in those sections of the country
which are connected with Baltimore, by business relations.
Merchants and others who may propose to advertise in our
columns, will do well therefore to send in their advertise
■incuts at once, and thereby obtain the advantage of the exten
Jed circulation which such gratuitous distribution of the
paper, both in town and country, will afford, an advantage
which none who understand the value of legitimate advertis
ing will fail to appreciate. For rotes of advertising, see
Table elsewhere.
To Rentiers.— By means of the gratuities distribution
above adverted to, it is designed to moke the Exchange per
form in part its own canvassing Persons disposed to en
courage the Enterprise, can continue the experiment at their
own pleasure if residing within the city, by settling from lime
to time with the carrier upon the tcrms'stated elsewhere; if out
of the city by sending their orders to the office of the paper, ac
companied by prepayment for the time specified.
To Correspondents.— Every communication intended
for publication must be accompanied by the name of the
writer. Manuscripts should be written on one side of the
paper only.
BALTIMORE.
TUESDAY. MARCH 2. 185?.
A bill to provide for the security of the public
records at Annapolis has passed both houses of the
Legislature, and is now a law. Mr. Hoffman, the
Senator from this city, deserves the credit of this
measure, and all who appreciate the value and im
portance of the public archives will sincerely thank
him for the energy and perseverance with which
he pushed the measure through. The bill appro
priates fifty thousand dollars, which is to be ex
pended in enlarging the present House of Delegates,
building fire-proof record offices, aud furnishing
artesian wells, by means of which adequate sup
plies of water can be had to protect the public
buildings in case of fire. The enlargement of the
House of Delegates is an indispensable necessity,
for it is next to impossible to transact the public
business, without great confusion, within its pres
ent limits.
The Senate chamber—that classic spot where
Washington laid down his commission, will re
main without it should—for it must lie
come, from its associations, one of the Mcccas of
the land.
The moral effect of imposing, well constructed
and commodious chambers for the meeting of the
General Assembly, ought not to be lost sight of—
and we look forward, in future years, to an im
provement iu the character of our Legislation as
one of the results of the embellishment of the
capitol.
FINANCES OF MARYLAND.
In our paper of the 23d ultimo, we made some re
marks on the present position of the finances of our
State. We now give some details, which we believe
may interest such of our fellow citizens as may de
sire to obtain correct information respecting them.
Of late years the books of the Treasury are made
up to the 30th day of September in each year, and
show the transactions of the fiscal year ending that
day, and it appears by the Comptroller's report;
of that date in 1857, that the balance remaining in
the Treasury on the 30th day of September, 1850.
was ..... $592,930
And that the receipts from all sources
from that date to 30th September,
1857, were .... 1,384,705
Making an aggregate of - SI ,977,041
But a part of this sum was a payment by
the United States for interest accrued
on advances made by it to the General
Government heretofore, which amoun
ted to 275,770
Leaving as the ordinary revenue, includ
ing former balance - - $1,701,871
Which shows that there was received du
ring the year, from the ordinary sources
of revenue, the sum of - - 51.1i)H,935
Of this sum the Direct Tax con
tributed - 8233,303
Licenses to Traders, Ac. 247,273
Auction duties and licenses - 21,232
Passenger tax from 11. AO. KB. Co. 76,038
Interest from same - - 23,500
Dividends from same, and Wash
ington Branch Railroad, - - 90,636
Northern Cent'l R.R. Co., annuity 90,000
Susquehanna and Tide W. Canals 40,560
Maryland Consolidated Lotteries 51,000
State Tobacco Warehouses - 51,652
Bank Stocks, for dividends, 40,215
Taxes on collateral inheritance,
and on commissions of exee'rs,
administrators and trustees, 76,230
Taxes on sundry stocks, - - 35,733
Various otber sources, - 31,563
Amount of revenue accrued, - $1,108,935
While the disbursements for the said year
were, viz:
Interest on the public debt, $670,282
Redemption of State debt, - 236,855
Transferred to the sinking fund, 126,225
Civil officers, - - - 19.950
Their contingent funds, - 6.594
Maryland Penitentiary, - 8.000
Colleges and schools, - - 26,102
House of Refuge, - 10,000
State colonization, - - 10,000
Surplus revenue transferred to
schools, - - - 31,069
Deepening the harbor of Baltimore,
(auction duties,) - - 19,259
Hospital for the insane, - 10,000
Pensions, ... - 2,360
State tobacco warehouses, - 22,427
The judiciary, - 37,240
Various other State expenses, 18,801
51,259,164
Showing an expenditure beyond the col—
lected revenue of - $150,229
But there was a balance in the
treasury on the 30th September,
1856, of $592,936
And the payment of interest due
j State by the Treasurer of the
United States, - - 275,770
5868,706
i Which left an available balance in
the Treasury on the 30th Sep
tember, 1857, of - - - - 5718.477
The estimated receipts into the
Treasury for the vear 1858,
are, - " - - - $1,132,150
i And the expenditures, - 958,844
Leaving an excess over expen
diture of - $173,300
The above table shows that there was actually
disbursed during this period for interest and re
demption of public debt, the Urge sumof $1,033,362.
The debt as stated before, teas 30th
Sep., 1857, $14,919,967
The sinking fund for same, $3,997,276
The Balto. A Ohio R. R. Ca
provides for - 3,000.000
6,997,276
Leaving debt unprovided tor except by
annual income, ----- $7,922,691
The income of the sinking fund was $206,124,
which has since been increased, and the State's
revenue enables her to acd thereto out of her
surplus.
That the debt must be very quickly absorbed un
der these circumstances is very apparent, unless
some untoward and unlooked for events should in
terpose.
The State's capital consists of sundry
Bank Stocks of the State at par - 54G8,406
Stock in the Main Stem of the Balto.
A Ohio R. R. Co., - - - - 685,600
Stock in the Washington Branch R. R. Co. 550.000
Stock in the Turnpike Roads, - - 15.000
Stock (preferred) in the Slain Stem B.
& O. R. R. 3,000,000
Mortgages of the Northern Central R.
R. Co., 1,500,000
Bond for dividend of the B. A O. R. R.
Co., ------- 10,000
Bonds of the Susquehanna A Tide Water
Canal, - - - - - - 1,254,370
Stock in the Union Slanuf. Co., - - 10,000
Due by Sheriffs, Collectors, Inspectors,
Ac., ------- 545,588
Total available fund, $8,038,964
Besides which there is held by the State,
Stock in and loans to the Ches
apeake and Ohio Canal, in
cluding interest, - - 13,692,320
With various other stocks
and debts, amounting to (199,385
• —— -14,391,705
But very little value is attached to these two
items.
From this resume we think it clearly shown that
no community has its public debt better secured to
the creditor than is that of Maryland, nor attended
with greater proportionate means to effect its re
demption at a very early period, and that its rela
tive value is as intrinsically good as that of any
other known in America or Europe.
MR. VANDENHOFF'S READINGS. —The course of
readings by Mr. Vandenhoff, to commence before
the Mercantile Library Association to-morrow even
ing, at Carroll Hall, promises to lie a source of the
most pleasurable eujovment. His reputation as an
elocutionist is well known iu this community, and
no encomium as to his talent is necessary. We
understand that a large number of tiekets has been
sold, and one of the most refined and fashionable
audiences that have graced any of our public en
tertainments this season, may be expected to be
present.
MESSAGE OF BRIGHAM YOUNG TO THE
MORMON LEGISLATURE
DELIVERED IX GREAT SALT LAKE CITY, DECEM
BER 15, A. D. 1858.
Gentlemen of the Counril and Hotter. of Ueprewutativen:
The people, tor the promotion oi' whose advance
ment in correct government you are now assembled
in a legislative capacity, are so remote from the
high-wrought excitement and consequent entan
gling questions common to the populous marts of
national and international commerce, are so little
prone to deem mere property, rank, titles and ottice
the highest prizes for human effort, and through
enlightened choice are so invariably peaceful and
law-abiding, that your duties partake but in a small
degree of tbat varied, perplexing and intricate de
scription so characteristic of the legislation of most,
if not all, other communities. But, however order
ly and upright are a people, the changes and expe
rience incident to transpiring circumstances, and
consequent new views and events, afford ample
scope for the exercise of that candid deliberation
and prudent forethought, without which legislation
is liable to be far more detrimental than beneficial.
Those unparalleled habits of industry, sobriety,
order and respect to the just rights of all, which
so preeminently distinguish the occupants of a region
uninviting to dwellers in more favored climes, have
continued in a rapidly-increasing ratio to advance
Utah to a position in social and political progress
worthy the highest commendation. During the past
year, for reasons well understood, our progress has
not been so particularly marked by improvements
under appropriations from the Territorial treasury
as it has bv unostentatious, persevering and skillful
individual efforts most successfully applied to extend
ing the area of our tillable land, to the gradual in
troduction of a more economical, systematic and ju
dicious cultivation of the various products adapted
to our soil and climate, to the requisite care and im
provement of stock, to the erection of more commo
dious private dwellings, and to a large and highly
encouraging increase in domestic manufactures.
These pursuits and their results, in the compara
tively humble, limited and tardv mode as yet com
pelled by the time, thought and means that can be
devoted to their conduct and attainment, are tame
and uninteresting to those who dwell amid the
whirl of mental and physical energies constantly
taxed to their utmost tension in the selfish, unsatis
fying and frien/.ied quest of worldly emolument,
fame, power and maddening draughts from the si
ren cup of pleasure; but they are laying for us and
our children a foundation broad, deep, strong and
durable, upon which, through the blessings of our
God, to rear a superstructure for the temporal well
being of ourselves and the thousands upon thou
sands who will seek unto us for sustenance and the
enjoyment of the inalienable rights of civil and re
ligious liberty.
Whether our agricultural interests, though so
broadly underlying and essentially upholding all
other avocations, require at present the further aid
of special legislation, may well bo questioned, since
private enterprise has accumulated individual means
until our agriculturists and graziers are abundant
ly able, either singly or by a combination of a few
of the more energetic, to procure those approved la
bor-saving machines, and import those kinds and
numbers of domestic animals that their ripening
experience may dictate. And aside from that
constantly increasing experience and ability,
and a higher tone of energy in their applica
tion, the Deseret Agricultural and Manufacturing
Society have, through the appointment, from time
to time, of lectures upon these and other practica
ble branches of industrial pursuit, and the annual
distribution of prizes for the best specimens of home
products, diffused a laudable emulation for attaining
superior excellence in every department pertaining
to our temporal advancement, insomuch that with
the facilities as vet at our command, it would appear
advisable to still leave those and kindred interests
to the able management and fostering care of that
Society. True, their recurring annual fair, held in
this city in Gctober last, owing to circumstances
beyond their control, was by no means so fully at
tended nor the articles in exhibition so numerous
and varied as would otherwise have been the case,
still the most casual observer could not but noteand
be gratified with the abundant evidence of the in
dustrial prosperity of our Territory.
The mechanical skill of our artisans, so far as ma
terial would permit, has also been assiduously ap
plied to the home supply of those necessaries and
comforts so essential to a well-ordered, civilized so
ciety, thus freeing us in a goodly degree from the
heavy tax of imported goods ; vet there is an ample
and ever increasing demand for the products of their
labor at very liberal rates of compensation, which
will doubtless afford all necessary inducements for
home manufacture, to the full extent of the raw
materials in our possession, except, perhaps, in the
article of iron. They also, in common with all other
classes of our producers, share proportionally in
the benefits arising from the annual exhibition of
their handiwork in our fairs.
In souie instances, especially so in relation to the
sugar cane, cotton, wool, and dye stuffs, the want of
the raw materials has been a serious drawback. It
therefore affords me the greater gratification to be
able to inform you that there is a fair prospect, at
an early date, that our wants in those particulars
will be amply supplied, independent of the burdens
of importation. The Sorghum or Chinese sugar
cane has been generally and successfully cultivated
in small patches in a great variety of soil through
out many of our settlements, and has been proved
to be well adapted to a wide latitude of our climate.
This plant is an almost invaluable acquisition, being
singularly prolific in seed, as well as in a large
amount (if most excellent forage, and affording a
remarkably large proportion of juice, highly
charged with saccharine matter, which can easily
be manufactured into a syrup almost, if not quite
eqnal to the far-famed golden syrup of the sugar re
fineries, thereby relieving us from the necessity of
submitting to a burdensome drain of our circulating
medium or the deprivation of a healthy article of
diet.
A small crop of a very good sample of cotton was j
successfully cultivated in our southern settlements |
during ttie past season; also, a few stalks of indigo, !
and preparations are being made in that region for !
the production of cotton and indigo, to supplv our \
demandc, as speedily as indigo seed can be procured [
in sufficient quantity. Madder can be raised in all 1
our settlements, antl it is a matter of astonishment |
that no seed of so useful and easily cultivated a ;
plant has ever been brought into this Territory, so i
far as I am informed, and it is to be hoped that our j
friends abroad will take the earliest steps to supply I
this want. Our quantity of wool is still far snort i
of an adequate supply, chiefly caused by a measura- j
bly culpable inattention to the care of so valuable a
class of stock as is our sheep, and to depending too ,
much upon foreign supplies which are at anv time I
liable to bo beyond our reach. Your influence, 1
counsels and example can do much toward encour
aging the production of wool and flax, that our spin
ning wheels and looms be not compelled to stand
idle, and the people caused to suffer through their
own improvidence, in affairs within their reach and
comprehension.
The manufacture of iron has not been prosecuted
with that success so fondly anticipated and so much
desired, but an engine having been furnished to the
companv, it is expected that all compatible atten
tion will be given to supplying an article which en
ters so largely into our various daily operations.—
In line, there is no known limit to" the resources
kindly provided in the elements suorounding us, no
trammel upon the skill and energies of the people,
to hinder any from putting forth their talents to the
fullest stretch for enriching, beautifying and mak
ing heavenly the mountain and desert region in
which our lot is cast.
Our schools, to those unaquainted with the facts
and circumstances connected therewith, may seem
not to have received that attention which their im
portance demands; at the same time eacli Ward
throughout the Territory has provided one or more
comfortable school houses commensurate with the
number of pupils to be accommodated; and propor
tionately more has been done in Utah for the true
enlightenment of the rising generation, than has ever
been accomplished in like conditions in any other por
tion of the Union. And aside from the stated hours
and exercises of schools, education is constantly at
tainable from books, from conversation, from re
flection, at home, abroad, in highways and by-ways,
and as its developments implant the desire for still
higher attainments, academies,colleges and univer
sities will arise at the summoning wand of increas
ing wealth and leisure for learned acquirements
until, ere long, we shall as far outstrip the world in
every branch of true science as we now do in that
knowledge which savoreth of eternal lives, in this
great cause, also, your influence and example can
be made productive of mueh good, even though
your judgment should lead you, during your pres
ent session, to waive direct legislation upon this
subject.
Reports from the Auditor and Treasurer, which 1
have the honor herewith to transmit, will furnish
you the requisite information touching the condi
lion of the financial affairs of the Territory.
The parent Government exercises a general su
pervision over the aborigines within its- borders, yet
a brief illusion to the red men within and around
Utah may not here be inappropriate, the more
especially since the expense of their care and sup
port has. from the beginning, fallen almost exclu
sively upon us, and from present appearances bids
fair to do so altogether; and still, after we have in
variably fed and clothed them, and treated them
with the utmost forbearance, in proper considera
tion for their degraded condition, if we do not turn
out and safely, and without charge, escort to their
destination those passers-through who have cheated
and then poisoned and wantonly slain untutored
savages, lying and corrupt presses throughout the
Union will send forth against us a united and pro
longed howl of base slander and false accusations,
charging upon us all the murders and massacres oc
curring between the Missouri river and the Sierra
Nevada Mountains, with the sole intent to excite
to frenzy a spirit for our extermination.
However much we may be disposed to deplore that
savage usage which wreaks indiscriminate von
geance, we still more deeply deprecate that double
dyed villany of fiendish editors and their lie-loving
readers who willfully suppress aud falsely color facts
and subvert truths for the sole purpose of raising an
unhallowed hue and cry against an innocent people,
for those editors and readers have been better taught:
and suggest that if all such characters would organ
ize themselves into patrolling Vigilence Committees
for the purpose of restraining the cruel and outra
geous conduct of a portion of the annual passing
emigration, they would soon learn that the Indians
are Tar oftener, if not always, when difference of
education and habits is included, "more sinned i
against than sinning;" that the most forbearing will
not forever patiently endure a continued tirade of
unjust threats, abuse and vituperation; that kind- :
ness is much more winning than severity, and that |
the inhabitants of Utah, as ever, are at home noise- !
lessly pursuing their peaceful avocations and strug- j
gling to mete out even-handed justice to all, irre- j
pective of creed or party.
But. however Government mavneglect. and how :
ever enemies may rage and falsely accuse, the ex
perience derived from a long observation of the year- i
lv improvement in some of the most degraded In
dian tribes upon the Continent, strongly prompts !
me to again recommend the continuance of that hu
mane policy so uniformly pursued by- Utah toward i
her wild denizens, gradually leading them like chil
dren in the rudiments of civilization, which has so
often resulted and will ever result in saving lives ■
that would otherwise have been and otherwise will
be destroyed; and which my judgment dictates to
me the wisest, most humane and even cheapest pol
icy that can as yet be adopted.
You are already aware that upon examining the j
bids for carrying the mail 011 the route between this
city and Independence, Mo., in the fall of 1850, the
contract for that route was awarded to Mr. Hiram
Kimball, a citizen of this Territory, in compliance
with a rule requiring the acceptance of the lowest
responsible bid. You are also aware that the re
quisite service began to be put upon that route so j
early as February last, upon the lirst unofficial in- I
timation of the acceptance of the bid, and several !
weeks before the arrival of official notification, the I
letter containing that notification having wintered
at the Devil's Gate, in care of a mail conductor in i
the employ of the former contractor.
So soon as that notification came to hand, ar
rangements were entered into for the services of the
requisite number of trusty and efficient men to
transport the mail and select station points at con
venient distances, and erect suitable buildings and
provide grain and forage thereat; animals and ve
hicles were rapidly forwarded throughout the whole
length of the route, and with such liberality and
energy were these proceedings conducted that, in
stead of occupying and often exceeding the sched
ule time of thirty days, as had heretofore been the
custom in the most favorable seasons of the year,
the trips were performed in a less and still lessen
ing number, until Mr. John It. Murdoch and Com
pany took the July mail through in the unpreceden
ted short time of fifteen traveling days, with every
prospect for even that brief period being still furth
er shortened.
This prompt, safe and reliable service, attained
by the expenditure of upward of $125,000 in a few
months, was well understood in the Post-office De
partment in Washington, but instead of even mak
ing punctual quarterly payments at the low contract
rate of $23,000 a year, and extending everv legal
facility and encouragement in their power to tin
contractor, that Department, taking an unjust and
altogether unwarrantable advantage of a clause
wisely designed for the protection of public rights,
tyrannically disannulled the contract, alleging as
cause for such outrageous usurpation, naught but a
failure in commencing the service at the time r<
quired, when they well knew that service was put
upon the route weeks before the arrival of the ac
ceptance of the bid, unduly detained through the
fault of their pet contractor, and bolstering that al
legation with the false and slanderous assertion
"the unsettled state of things at Salt Lake render
ing the mails unsafe under present circumstan
ce?."
To ail human appearance ruoil Oomioot could I, Tll v
have been actuated o> me rel! nc-]'jn In cm
Utah from receiving a single dollar of public monev
for the performance of public service honorably con
tracted for, even though that service were perform
ed in a praiseworthy manner hitherto unexampled,
and to deprive us, if possible, from becoming ac
quainted with the exterminating plans concocted in
Washington against themost loyal Territory known
since the days of the Revolution. Would they have
dared to thus treat any State or any other territo
ry, or to have even suggested such treatment.? —
Ivvery one knows that they would not. What is
obviously the only inference to be drawn from such
tvrannical usage by so important a Department, of
the General Government? That a deep-settled and
pre-determined plan has been agreed upon to de
prive us of every vestige of constitutional rights—
for that usage accords only with the cry, constantly
reiterated throughout the States, "Destroy the in
habitants of Utah," thereby compelling a numerous
portion of the citizens of our boasted Republic to
fall back upon the indefeasible right of self-defence
and adopted lawful measures for their own protec
tion,
It is a matter of deep regret that officers of a
Government, founded at so great a sacrifice by
our forefathers upon "a land choice above all other
lands," have become so sunken in degradation as
to have utterly lost sight of those pure and just
principles embodied in the Constitution, and pre
fer, in the mad pursuit of low, grovelling and sel
fish aims, to adopt and carry out that suicidal poli
cy, a persistence in which can but end in l ending
to pieces a nation that otherwise might become the
happiest and most powerful on the globe. Reck
less otiice-holders and otlice seekers have their poi
soned fangs so deeply buried in the vitals of the
body politic and are so thoroughly organized and
drilled in the defence and attack of the spoils, while
the tradesmen, the mechanics, the husbandmen and
the humble laborers—the real virtue and sound in
telligence of the Republic—are so busily occupied
in their daily toil, and except here and there a few,
are so little aware of the dire potent of the future,
and of the measures necessary for insuring public
tranquility, that it is a discouraging task to attempt
arresting "the turbid current of official corruption
that would sweep every vestige of truth, virtue and
human rights from our unhappy country; hut the
crimsoned satellites of plunder, oppression and
usurpation, may rest assured that every friend of
liberty will resist their destructive progress, and
stand fast by the Constitution and all laws conform
able therewith.
True, all human instituted governments contain
more or less of the weakness pertaining to imperfec
tion, and to this law our Government is by no means
an exception; still, I am not acquainted" with any
man-madc form of government in which are sown so
few of the seeds of its own dissolution. Lovers of
justice, as were the Revolutionary patriots, endowed
as they were in their deliberations and acts with a
goodl v portion of that wisdom which coiueth from
above, and wielding an influence seldom attained by
so small a number, vet they were unable to devise
a republican form of government, without a system
of checks and balances, dividing the federative pow
er into three distinct branches, controllable only
i bv the will of the sovereign people.
Their former experience makes it a matter of no
surprise that in their deliberations and acts thev
leaned so strongly to the side of the largest degree
of individual freedom, nor. having suffered so sorelv
under the cruel rod of religion established by secu
lar power, that they so clearly and strenuously
guarded and guaranteed the widest scope to free
dom of conscience and consequent right of worship
in accordance therewith. But with the sound judg
ment anil experience possessed by those great states
men, it is only another evidence of.the wenkncss in
cident to humanity, even when acting under the
best of motives, that after having so long groaned
under the bitter oppression of British colonial rule
and successfully struggled for the establishment of
the inherent right of each and all to " life
liberty, and the pursuit of happiness," with the
positive guaranty that every one should be priv
ileged with and protected in the blessings flow
ing from a republican form of government, whose
characteristic consists solely in the well defined
and well understood fact that the rulers and laws
shall proceed only from the election and consent of
the governed, they should in April, 1784, pass lies
olutrons, and in duly, 1787, over two months previ
ous to the adoption of the Constitution, pass an Or-
I dinance speciallv legislating for American citizens,
! residing on public domain, directly contrary to
1 the very genius of the Articles of" Confederation
by which they had mutually pledged each oth
er they would be guided. And that very leg
; islatioh, contrary as it was to the authorities and
limitations of tno articles of Confederation ex
isting at the time of the passage of the cele
| brated Ordinance of 'B7 and to those of the Con
! stitution adopted in the same year, as well as to the
' great truth embodied in the Declaration of indepen
dence that governments derive their just powers from
the consent of the governed, could be and was in
i dorsed bv Americans so long as the usurped power
I was exercised in justice; and the portion of that ille
gal legislation copied into "Organic Acts" for Terri
tories could still be endured, were it not so grievously
| abused, as is the case when officers are attempted to
be forced upon a free people contrary to their known
I and expressed wishes. Still, looking as our patriot
fathers measurably did to the governmental experi
ence and example of the mother country, and sur
rounded as they were by so many conflicting views
I and entangling questions, it is not a subject of so
much surprise that they inadvertently took so ille
i gal a course, as it is thai an early Congress, under
| the Constitution, continued to perpetuate and en-
PRICE TWO CENTS.
deavor to make legal that which neither was nor
ever eoulfl be law, without first destroying or re
modeling the very Constitution from which Con
gross derives its power to act. And, again, the
course ot that Congress is by no means so surprising
as that Congress alter Congress, with a lengthening
experience in the workings of the governmental
machinery and a boasted increase of enlightenment,
should still continue to fasten a portion of that un
constitutional relic ol colonial barbarism ujion Amer
ican citizens, whenever a laudable spirit of enter
prise induces those citizens to lawfully occupy and
improve any portion of the public domain. And it
is most surprising of all, that Americans occupying
public domain in Territories have so tamely submit
ted to such long-continued and obvious usurpation.
Ever since the more odious features in the Ordi
nance of 'B7 have been omitted in the organic acts
more recently passed by Congress for territories,
which acts are but illegal patterns after that uncon
stitutional ordinance, officers are appointed to rule
over American citizens in territories, and to have a
voice in the enactment, adjudication, and execution
ot territorial laws; and worse still, those officers
are frequently appointed from a class well known,
through the rightfully expressed wishes of large
majorities, to be justly objected to by those wtujm
they are appointed to govern. Call you that re
publican? It is British colonial vassalage, uncon;
stitutionally perpetuated by tyranny ana usurpa
tion in the powers that be. It is difficult to conceive
how a people so enlightened as are Americans,
should, for so long a period, have suffered themsel
ves to be measurably disfranchised bv usurpations
curtailing their rights, when passing an air line
from a State into a Territory, more especially when
that changing of locality is to result in the improve
ment of regions that would otherwise remain waste.
It is foreign to my present purpose to detail tha
policy which should have governed from the begin
lying in relation to enlightened residents in our Ter
ritories, a policy thai would not have curtailed them
in the least Constitutional right, aud would thereby
have utterly excluded thai odious and suicidal in
consistency existing from the tnnuntil now between
the form and the administration of (Government,
and would have caused the administration as does
the form, to.guarantee equal freedom to all, in Ter
ritory as well as State, but will merely remark, in
passing, that the continued practice of that wretch
ed inconsistency has done and is doing much to un
dermine the fair fabric of American liberty.
Utah, also, like other Territories, saw tit to waive
those Constitutional rights so illegally denied to ci
tizens who cross certain air-lines of a common coun
try to extend the area of civil and religious liberty,
and an act organizing our Territorial goverment
was passed by Congress on the 9th of September,
1850. Fortunately for us a wise and good man then
occupied the executive chair of our nation, a states
man whose sound judgment and humane feelings
prompted him to extend to us our rights, so far as
the "Organic Act" and hungry olliee-hunters would
permit. He appointed a part of the customary ap
pointees in accordance with the wishes of the people,
and no doubt thought that he had appointed good
men to till the remaining offices, but in this he
was partially disappointed, being deceived by
the foolish although very common habit of
recommending men who * are not worthy.
I am also confident that his successor endeavored
to make as good appointments for us, as circuin
stances and unwise counsels and recommendations,
would allow, but during his administration preju
dice began to set in strongly against Utah, and he
was so unfortunate as to appoint, at the instigation
and solicitation of a then influential Senator in
Congress, a person who proved to be as degraded as
his capacity would admit, and who, it is reported,
came, acted, left, and still acted in accordance with
the instructions from the Senator who procured his
appointment, but in a manner outraging morality,
justice, humanity, law, and even common decency.
The members and officers of the last Legislative
Assembly, familiar with the evils visited upon the
innocent by the miserably bad conduct of certain
officials heretofore sent here by Government, know
ing that all republican governments, which both
our General and State Governments are in form,
are based upon the principle that the governed
shall enjoy the right to elect their own officers and
be guided by laws having their own consent, and
perfectly aware that by the Constitution residents
in Territories are guaranteed that great right
equally with residents in States ffor Con
gress has not one particle more Consti
tutional power to legislate for and officer Aineri-
cans in Territories than they have to legislate for
and officer Americans in States,) respectfully me
morialized the President and Senate to appoint ofli
eers for Utah in accordance with an accompanying
list containing the names of persons who were her
first choice for the offices placed opposite to those
names, but if that selection did not meet with ap
proval they were solicited to make the appoint
ments from a list containing other and a larger
number of names of residents who were also the
choice of the people, and if that selection was also
rejected, to appoint from any part of the Union,
with the simple request, in such event, that the ap
pointees be good men. In this matter of appoint
inent of officers, what more rights could the most
tyrannical in a republican government ask a Ten i
tory to waive ? \ t?t up to this date no official in
'yiiaiiuj, concerning " *f anv, taken upon
that memorial ~V rV reaction us.
Time glided by, and the travelers and newspapers
begon to confirm the rumor that the present Kxec-u
ti\e and a part of his Cabinet had yielded to the
rabid clamor raised against Utah bv lying editors,
corrupt demagogues, heartless ofhee hunters and
the ignorant rabble, incited bv numbers of the hire
ling clergy, and were about to send an army to Utah
with the sole and avowed purpose, as published in
almost every newspaper, of compelling American
citizens, peacefully, loyally and lawfully occupying
American soil, to forego the dearest constitutional
rights, to abandon their religion, to wallow in the
mire and worship at the *hrine of modern civiliza
tion and Christianity, or be expelled from the coun
trv and exterminated.
Where now are constitutional rights? Who i
laving the axe at the root of the tree of liberty ?
Who are the usurpers? Who the tyrants? Who
the traitors ? Most assuredly those who are niadlv
urging measures to subvert the genius of free insti
tutions and those principles of liberty upon which
our Government is based, and to overthrow virtue,
independence, justice and true intelligence, tiie loss
of either of which bv the people, the celebrated
Judge Story has wisely affirmed, would be the ruin
of our Republic—the destruction of its vitality.
And ex President James Madison, among other pur
poses, declared it to be the purpose of Government
•'to avoid the slightest interference with the rights
of conscience or the functions of religion, so wisely
exempted from civil jurisdiction."
Has Utah ever violated the least principle of the
Constitution, or so much as broken the most insig
nificant Constitutional enactment ? No, nor have we
theinostdistant occasion forsodoing, but have ever
striven to peacefully enjoy and extend those rights
granted to all by a merciful Creator. Rut so unob
trusive and wise a course does not seem to please
those who live and wish to live by office, and those
who make and love lies; and since those characters
are numerous, and also powerful through well discip
lined organization, and since Utah has yielded right
after right for the sake of peace, until her policy
has emboldened the enemies of our Union, it must
needs he that President Buchanan, if he has order
ed an army to Utah as reported—for he has not of
ficially notified me of such a movement by his order
—has" at length succumbed, either by choice, or
through being overcome, to the eruel and nefarious
counsels of those enemies, and is endeavoring to
carry out a usurpation of power, which of right be
longs only to the people; by appointing civil officers
known to be justly objectionable to freemen, and
sending a so-called army under mere color of law
to force those officers upon us at the point of the
bayonet, and to form a nucleus for the collection
and protection of every gambler, cut-throat, whor*-
master and scoundrel, who may choose to follow iu
their train. Such a treasonable system of opera
tions will never bo endured, nor even countenanced
by any person possessed of the least spark of patriot
ism and love of constitutional liberty. The President
knew,if ho knew the facts in the case as he wasindu
ty bound to do before taking action, that the official
hitherto sent here had been invariably received and
treated with all the respect their offices demanded
and that a portion of them had met with far more
courtesy than elsewhere would have been extended
to them, or their conduct doserved; he also knew,
or had the privilege of knowing, that the memorial
of the last Assembly, as already stated, respectful
i lv informed him that Utah wished good men for of
ficers, and that such officers should be cordially
i welcomed and obeyed,but that we would not again
tamely endure the abuse and misrule meted by offi
cial vidians, as were some who have formerly of
ficiated here. Such being a few of the leading tacts,
what were the legitimate inferences to be drawn
from the rumors that the President had sent a batch
of officials, with an army to operate as their posse''
That lie had wilfully made the official appoint
ments for Utah from a class other than good men,
and placed himself where tyrants often are. in the
| position of levying war against the very nation
whose choice Had made him its chief executive
■ otlicor.
Fully aware, as has been justly written, that
"Patriotism does not consist in aiding Government
in every base or stupid act it may perform, hut ra
ther in paralyzing its power when it violates vested
rights, affronts insulted justice, and assumes undele
gated authority," and knowing that the so-called
army, reported to be on its war to Utah, was an
undisguised mob, if not sent by the President of the
United States, and if sent by him, in the manner and
for the purpose alleged in all the information per
mitted to reach us, was no less a mob. though in the
latter event acting under color of law. upon learn
ing its near approach I issued, as in constitutional
duty bound, a proclamation expressly forbidding all
bodies of armed men, under whatsoever name, or bv
whomsoever sent, to conic within the bounds of this
Territory.
Thaj so-called army, or, more strictly speaking,
mob, refused to obey that proclamation, copies o!
which were officially furnished them, and prosecu
ted their march to the neighborhood of Fort Bridg
er and Supply which were vacated and burnt upon
their approach—where it is said they intend to yv in
ter. Under these circumstances I respectfully sug
gest that you take such measures as voitr enlight
ened judgment may dictate, to insure public tran
quilitv and protect, preserve and perpetuate invio
lable those inalienable constitutional rights which
hare descended to us a rich legacy from our fore
fathers.
A civilized uatiou is one that never infringes upon
the rights of its citizens, but strives to protect and
make happy all within its sphere, which our Go
vernment, above all others, is obliged to accomplish,
though its present course is as far from that wise and

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