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The daily exchange. [volume] (Baltimore, Md.) 1858-1861, March 08, 1858, Image 1

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VOL. I—NO. 13.
THE DAILY EXCHANGE.
PUBLISHED EVERY MORNING, (SUNDAYS EXCEPTED.)
bt
KERR & CO.
OFFICE, CARROLL HALL,
8. K. CORNER OF BALTIMORE AND CALVERT STREETS.
EDITORS AND PRORIETORS.
CHARLES G. KERR. THOMAS W. HALL, JR.
TERMS:
In the city TWELVE AND A HALF CENTS per week, paya
ble to the carrier. Mailed to subscribers, out of the city,
at six DOLLARS per annum; THREE DOLLARS for six month*
and ONE DOLLAR for two months. Invariably in advance
for the time ordered.
ADVERTISING RATES.
TABLE:
(SQUARE —EIOUT LIVES )
Oue insertion 50
Two insertions 75
Tiiree " $lOO
Four u $1.25
Five u ..$l5O
One week $1.75
One month ..$4.00
Advertisements occupying a larger or smaller space, or
Inserted for a longer or shorter time, charged for propor
tionately.
THE DAILY EXCHANGE.
PROSPECTUS.
UNDER die above title it is proposed to
conduct and publish in the city of Baltimore a first
class Commercial and Political MORNING NEWSPAPER.
This enterprise lias been prompted by the conviction
that the rapid growth of Baltimore in population and
wealth, its constantly augmenting trade, aud its conse
quently increased commercial and political importance,
not only justify but demand an effort to introduce into the
field of journalism that element of competition, which, in j
all other branches of business, has so materially contribu
ted to the prosperity of the city,
"THE EXCHANGE.With regard to the name, —if an
apology were needed, for thus introducing what may per
haps be deemed a novelty in the nomenclature of journal j
ism,—it has been adopted, not simply for its peculiar ap- j
propriateness in connection with those commercial inter
ests to which a paper of the character proposed must lie j
largely devoted, but in its wide and more comprehensive !
acceptation, as embracing within its scope all those topics 1
which come within the province of the public press. :
Ist, NEWS.—It will, of course, be the first aim of the i
proprietors to furnish the readers of THE EXCHANGE ,
with the most prompt, full and authentic intelligence upon i
all matters of public interest, at home and abroad ; and to
secure the accomplishment of this result, and the perfec
tion of every arrangement required to place THE EX
CHANGE in this particular on a level with the best jour
nals of the country, no necessary expense' or exertion will
be spared.
2d. COMMERCE—The commercial department of the pa
per will include, not only the usual daily reports and
weekly reviews of the markets, domestic and foreign, com
piled with fulness and accuracy, but a frequent editorial j
discussion of the leading financial questions of the day,
with regard to which the mercantile community naturaliy ,
look to the public press for comment and suggestion.
3d. POLITICS.—The interests of commerce and the state
of the markets are so constantly and intimately affected
by the aspect of political affairs throughout the world, that
a journal which aspires to be any thing more than a mere 1
commercial reporter or daily price current, must necessa- ;
sarily devote a large space in its columns to the dissemi- i
nation of political intelligence, and the discussion of polit !
ieal questions. In this department of the paper, which, !
apart from its commercial importance, also possesses a
peculiar and exclusive interest of its own, it will be the
object of THE EXCHANGE to preserve a position of honest
and fearless independence, equally removed from servile
partisanship upon the one hand, and timid neutrality upon
the other. * ;
4th, LITERATURE AND ART.—Candid and impartial re
views of current literature and contemporaneous art, mu
sical and dramatical criticisms, by competent judges, and
original contributions upon subjects of literary or scientific I
interest, will always find an appropriate place in the col- !
umns of THE EXCHANGE, and it will be the constant
aiul of the proprietors to render it a valuable and interest- (
ing journal for the family as well as for the counting- !
room.
Cbucatton.
PATAPSCO FEMALE INSTITUTE, MARYLAND
''jPIIE TRUSTEES ol the Patapsco Female
X Institute announce to the public that the additional
building, and improvements commenced by them a year ago
in accordance with the subjoined resolutions, are now com
plete These improvements have not been made with a
view to increase the school, but for the greater conveni
ence and comfort of the usual number of pupils.
The new chapel is a handsome and most appropriate
structure, for the exclusive use of the inmates of the In
stitute, ami in all its arrangements it is most complete. It
is furnished with a new organ of fine construction and ex
cellent tone.
The administration of Mr. Archer for the past year and
the present has been attended with unprecedented suc
cess. and the Trustees feel themselves fully justified in
recommending the Institute to the continued favor of the
South.
It has pre-eminence in healthfulness. The pupils avoid
ing, on the one hand, the debilitating effects of a Southern
climate, and on the other the rigors of the North, have
few of the interruptions incident to both these climates.
It is sufficiently near to the city of Baltimore to enjoy the
benefits of a city without any of its evils.
As an Institution oflearning it has the advantage of a
full organization, a resident chaplain, ami a corps of ac
comptished teachers and professors, called together from
time to time in the long experience of those having c harge
of the Institute.
The Trustees of the Patapsco Female Institute, having
been duly notified by Mrs. Lincoln Phelps of her intention
to resign her office of principal at the close of the present
school year, have elected Robert 11. Archer as her succes
sor. The eminent success of Mr. Archer in conducting for
many years a School for Young Ladies in the city of Balti
more, entitles him to our confidence as a person peculiarly
qualified to maintain the present high standing, and insure
the permanent prosperity of the Institution; and with this
view we are engaged in the erection of another building in
addition to the present extensive accommodations of the
Institute.
CIIAS. W. DORSEY. PRESIDENT. WM. DENNY, M
D . SECRETARY. T. \VATKINS LIGOX, E. HAMMOND,
JOHN. P. KENNEDY. fe22 dtf.
LAW SCHOOL OF THE UNIVERSITY
AT CAMBRIDGE, MASS.
The Instructors in this School arc
Hon. JOEL PARKER, LL.D., Royal Professor.
Hon THEOPHILUS PARSONS, LL.D., Dane Professor.
Hon. EMORY WASHBURN, LL.D., University Professor.
The course ef instruction embraces the various branches
of the Common Law. and of Equity, Admiralty. Com
mercial. International and Constitutional Law, and the
Jurisprudence of the United States. The Law Library
consists of about 14.000 volumes, and as new works ap
pear they are added, and every effort is made to render it
complete.
Instruction is given by oral lectures and expositions,
(and by recitations and examinations, iu connection with
them,) of which there are ten every week. Two Moot
Courts are also holden in each week, at each of which a
cause, previously given out, is argued by four students,
and an opinion delivered by the Presiding Instructor.
Rooms and other facilities are also provided for the Club
Courts; and an Assembly is held weekly for practice in de
bate. and acquiring a knowledge ef parliamentary law and
proceedings.
Students may enter the School in any stage of their pro
fessional studies or mercantile pursuits, and at the com
meneinent of either term, or in the middle or other part of
term.
They are at liberty to select what studies thev will pur
e according to their view of their own wants and at
tainments.
The Academical year, which commences on Thursday,
six weeks after the third Wednesday in July, is divided
into two terms, of twenty weeks each, with a vacation of
six weeks at the end of each term.
During the Winter vacation, the Library is opened,
warmed, and lighted, for the use of the members of the
School.
Applications for admission, or for Catalogues, or any
further information, may be made to either of the Profes
sors at Cambr.dge.
Cambridge, Mass.. January, 1858. fdGt law6m.
BleiJirines, |)erfumerirs, £c.
BRYAN'S PULMONIC WAFERS FOR I
Coughs, Colds, Asthma, Consumption and all diseases
of the Lungs. For sale at WISEMAN'S Drug Store. !
Baltimore and Fremont streets, Baltimore
f22-dlm.
f. PURVIANCE POLK sTcoT
3 APOTHECARIES,
Corner of Fayette and St. Paul Streets,
AND
N. HYNSON JENNINGS & CO.
APOTHECARIES,
No. 8S N. CHARLES STREET,
Baltimore, I
Respectfully call the attention of citizens and the travel- !
ling community to their large and choice assortment of !
MEDICINES. PERFUMERY, FINE STATIONERY and FANCY j
ARTICLES, which maybe confidently relied on as being I
what we represent them, as we select none but of the pu
rest quality. Also, MEDICINE CHESTS, SURGICAL INSTRU
MENTS. TRUSSES. DIETETIC PREPARATIONS, Ac., AC.
Written orders filled promptly and with care, subject to
be returned at our expense if not of standard quality.
fe22-tf.
ISEMAN'S VERMIFUGE,
OR WORM DESTROYF.R.
This remedy for Worms is one of the most extraordinary
ever used. It effectually eradicates Worms of all sorts
from children and adults.
\Varranted not to contain Mercury in any form, nor any
other mineral.
For sale by WISEMAN, Druggist, corner of Baltimore
and r remont streets. Price 25 cents. dim.
THE BALSAM OF WILD CHERBY,
PREPARED AT DR. O'NEAL'S DRUG
Store. Corner of Madison anil F.utaw Streets, is a reli
able remedy for Coughs, Colds, Hoarseness, Soreness and
pains in the Chest. Consumptive cases derive much ad
vantage from its use. \V ild Cherry Bark, Tar, Bloodroot,
and Indian Hera]) enter into its composition. Its taste is
pleasant and its use entirely safe. feb22-3t
THOSE OF SCROFULOUS HABIT,
with Swelled Neck, Tumors, King's Evil, Ac. Mer
curial and Syphilitic diseases and affections generally aris
ing from a taint in the system, requiring an alterative
course of treatment, are recommended to take "THE AL
TERATIVE SYRUP," made at Dr. O'Neal's Drug Store,
Corner of Madison and Eutaw Streets. It rids the system
of accumulated humors, as Tetter, Boils, Pimples. Ring
worm. Ac. feh*22-3t
GG " BUILDERS' DEPOT. QQ
SASH. DOORS. BLI.VDS, FRAMES. HOT BED SASH,
OCLDINGS, CASINQS. Ac., DRESSED FLOORING
AND OTHER LUMBER, LIME. BRICKS. HAIR, HARD
ARE GLASS, OIL, PAINTS, and every description of
BUILDING MATERIAL, at moderate rates and on accom
modating terms. Particular attention paid to orders and
contractu from abroad. Estimates of the entire cost oj
buildings furnished with accuracy and despatch Ship
menu effected promptly to all accessible poinU by
R JOHNSON,
No. 69 Pratt street, (near Bowly's wharf )
f e23 tf Baltimore, Md.
THE MERCANTILE LIBRARY ASSOCIATION.
( | (Founded in 1839.)
Occupie* the First Floor of the Athenaeum Building, N. W
Corner of St. Paul and Saratoga Streets.
f|MIE ROOMS are large and comfortable,
A well heated and lighted, and quiet.
The Library contains now about 15.000 volumes, care
fully selected, of History. Poetry, Drama. Theology, Arts
and Science, Biography, Voyages and Travels, Essays and
Reviews, and Fiction, and is increasing at the rate of about
1,000 volumes per annum. It is constantly supplied with
the best publications of all these branches of knowledge, as
well as a fair representation of the current light literature
of the present time.
I The Reading Room is furnished with most of the Maga
I zines and Reviews of this country and England, as well
I as a number of American and English newspapers.
The Association was formed for the special benefit of the
CLERKS OF THE CITY, and is exclusively under their
I control. They alone are eligible for ACTIV E membership.
The fee for this class is $3 per annum, payable in advance,
but the use of its Books and Rooms is open to all other
classes, as HONORARY members, upon the payment of
!■' per annum, in advance. They may draw books from
; the Library, visit the rooms, anil are entited to ALL THE
i PRI\ ILECES of the Association, except voting and hold
ing office. Ladies may become Honorary members in their
, own right. The accounts of either Active or Honorary
j members may be transferred for the use of ladies or others
I The Rooms are open from 10 o'clock A M., till 2 o'clock
| P. if., for the reception of ladies—and from 2 o'clock till
! 10 o'clock P. M., for Gentlemen,
j Of persons now using the Library.
84 ACCOUNTS ARE POR LADY SUBSCRIBERS,
•TOO " " HONORARY MEMBERS.
| 800 " " ACTIVE MEMBERS. fe22 tf
WM. P. WEBB &CO.,
IMPORTERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS
POIL THE SALE OP
HEX'S FURNISHING GOODS,
AND
TAILORS' TRIMMINGS,
SHIRTS, UMBRELLAS, TWIST,
I COLLARS, SILESIAS. GALLOONS
j CRAVATS, BUTTONS, CORDS,
THREAD, SEWING SILK, MACHINE TWIST.
No. 20 SOUTH CHARLES STREETS.
Four doors below German st.,
""'I l' u Baltimore.
bailors.
H T. ROBERTS,
• MERCER AND TAILOR,
No. 20a BALTIMORE STREET,
| fe22-ly. Baltimore.
Ready ma d e clof hing.
JOHN H. RE A. A CO..
XORTH EAST CORNER OP J'RATT AND SOUTH STS.,
Have on baud a large and select Stock of WINTER
CLOTHING, that they are running off at a LOW FIGURE,
to make room for SPRING STYLES. Persons in want
would do well to give them a call.
Also—A large stock of PIECE GOODS, suitable for cus
torn trade, which will lie got up in good style at low
Vrxces. _ fe22-lin.
CAMUE L T ANEYHILL,
O MERCHANT TAILOR,
No. 2 LIGHT ST., OPPOSITE FOUNTAIN HOTEL,
Will in a few days receive his full SPRING STOCK of
Goods—consisting of CLOTHS, CASSIMERES, VEST
IN U.S. Ac., and will be'pleased to take Orders from his
friends and the public. A fit guaranteed. Prices reason
_ _ _ fe22-lm.
JOHN A. GRIFFITH'S
MERCHANT TAILORING
AND FASHIONABLE READY MADE CLOTHING
ESTABLIS HMEN T.
No. 187 BALTIMORE STREET,
AND I>£ LIGHT STREET.
The advertiser has opened his SELECTION OF GOODS
from this and other markets, which he solicits gentlemen
to examine, confident that his assortment is COMPLETE
both in qualitv and styles.
His READY-MADE DEPARTMENT abounds in variety,
in which any taste can be suited, and where gentlemen
can be accommodated at LOW PRICES, considering the
quality of the Goods offered
Gentlemen selecting goods from bis stock can have
Garments made to orders in bis Custom Department with
dispatch and promptness—two characteristics of his es
tablishment, where he has the best cutters that can be
procured. fe22lm.
pmos ;mi> Ittusif.
CHICKERING &TSONS,
AND
NUNNS & CLARK'S
CELEBRATED PIAXO FORTES,
Constantly receiving ami for Bale only by
F. b. BENTEEN,
181 Baltimore street and 84 Fayette,
third store west of Charles at.
Purchasers will find it to their interest to examine f<,
themselves the superior qualities of the above Pianos.
Piano Stools. Prince K. Co.'s Melodeons from $45 upwards.
fe22-lm.
NE W MUSI C . —.Just Published, by
MILLER if: BEACFTAM , 181 BALTIMORE ST:
A I>AV DREAM—by J. C. Engelbrecht.
ANVIL CHORUS—from Verdi's Trovatore.
LANCER'S QUA DRlLLES—taught by Ed. Lehmann.
♦BOARDING SCHOOL LlFE—by Chas. Grobe.
"This beautiful composition, describing a day at a FE
MALE BOARDING SCHOOL, is one of the Author's best
efforts. fe22-lm.
HEN R V M c C~A t' FKhi Y , '
MUSIC PUBLISHER,
No. 207 BALTIMORE STREET,
MUSIC PUBLISHED and received daily.
MUSIC BOUND in the NEATEST STYLE
fe22-lin. MUSIC FOLIOS at ALL PRICES
BOUDOIB SEWING MACHINE.
PRICE S4O.—THIS MACHINE IS RE
coramendeil by I. M. Singer k Co., Wheeler k Wilson
and Grover & Baker as being the best single thread Ma
chine in the known world; and the price being low, pur
chasers will find it greatly to their advantage to exam
ine it.
Also, Wheeler & Wilson's superior FAMILY MACHINE,
in Rosewood, Black Walnut and Mahogany cases. Wheel
er and Wilson's Machines are really the best article ever
invented for sewing. A great number of certificates can
be seen at our store from ladies and gentlemen who have
had them in use for a length of time.
E. M. PUN PERSON A CO.,
fe22-tf. 209 Baltimore street.
I. 0. 0. F.
ODD FELLOWS AND MASON'S RE
GALIA, BANNERS, Ac., U. S. Bunting and Silk
Flags. Military Goods and Ladies' Dress Trimmings, al
way on hand and for sale by
A. SISCO,
No. 95 BALTIMORE ST,
fe22ly. Baltimore'
JL. M'PHAIL BRO'S
• HAT, CAP AND FUR STORE,
No. 132 BALTIMORE STREET,
Between Xorth and Calvert streets. (north side.) fe22tf.
Restaurants.
ELDON HALL RESTAURANT.
No. 78, WEST FAYETTE STREET,
REAR ENTRANCE IN BANK LANE.
THE undersigned have very recently fitted up
the building in Fayette street, between St. Paul and
Charles Sts., known as "Eldon llall", as a restaurant of the
first class. No expense has been spared to make it acceptable
in all its appointments, to gentlemen who may feel disposed
to pay it a visit. There is at all tirae9 upon the "snack"
counter edibles which can be served up at a moment's notice
and at all hours there are always private rooms for the ac
comodation of gentlemen, who may desire to "exchange''
thoughts over something which may cheer the inner man.
They challenge competition in the matter of CIGARS,
GOOD LIQUORS, and ATTENDANCE BY FAITHPCL SER
VANTS, which altogether make up the comforts of a restau
rant.
DINNERS and SUPPERS served for PARTIES prompt
ly, AND FAMILIES SUPPLIED with TERRAPINS, OYS
TERS Ac., at the shortest notice.
There are peculiar advantages, in this establishment for
the accomodation of gentlemen. The building has a rear
entrance from Bank Lane, while there is a private entrance
admiting to all parts of the house, without passing through
the bar. REILLY & SNYDER
*e22d-lwA2aw2w.
RINN'S EATING SALOON,
No. 40 WEST PRATT STREET,
Between Frederick and Market Space.
RPHE PROPRIETOR OF THIS WIDE
JL ly known Saloon, having recently made extensive
improvements in several departments of his buildings, is
prepared to furnish DINNERS, SUPPERS, Ac.. at as cheap
rates and in a style which he will not permit of being sur
passed. Families supplied with Oysters, in every variety
of style; also. Terrapins, Turtles, Poultry, Venison and
Fish; the last named he is daily in receipt of by Express
from the South.
! All articles delivered free by RINN'S Express Wagon.
| fe22-tf.
(Groceries.
H7REESE~&. BROTHERS, ~
• 207 and 209 Pratt street,
CHARLES REESE & CO.,
CORNER EUTAW, MADISON and GARDEN STREETS,
Importers and dealers in fine and standard Groceries, offer
for sale a large and complete assortment of goods, selected
with great care, especially for family use.
Their daily increasing facilities for obtaining direct from
the manufacturers and producers, both in this country and
Europe, the articles on sale, enables them to sell at prices
that will not fail to please.
Sole agents for the sale ofWinslow k Co.'a Preparations,
Green Corn, Peas, Beans, Tomatoes, Salmon, Lobster, &c.,
&c. put up in hermetically sealed cans. fe22-6t
LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S DRESS
FITTING,
TAUGHT BY
MRS. PETT ET,
AT
436 BALTIMORE STREET. BETWEEN GREEN & PEARL.
TERMS—% 2.SO
Boy's suits and Itress Bodies fitted to give |>erfect satis
faction. Ladies are requested to call and examine the
plan taught. fe23 3t.
ILLIAM HARRIS,
MAKKK AND IMPORTER OF
GUNS, RIFLES and PISTOLS
11G West Pratt street,
keeps constantly on hand a large assortment of Bird and
Ducking Guns, (double and single barrel;) Six banelled i
Revolvers; Rifles made to order; Dupont's Gun Powder;
Powder Flasks. Bird Bags. Shot Belts and Pouches, and
many other articles necessary for Sportsmen. Repairing
done at the shortest notice, and with neatness. [fe22-lm.
JAMES M. ANDERSON & SON,
EN till A VERS,
A 'o. 148 Baltimore Street.
BANK NOTE. STEEL & COPPER PLATE PRINTING.
INVITATION, WEDDING, VISITING
X Cards, etc., Engraved and Printed in the most fashion
able styles. Corporate and Notarial Seals, Letter Stamps,
etc. Isondon and Paris Visiting Cards, De La Rue's En
▼elopes, etc. fe22tf
PHCENIX SPICE MILLS,
WAREHOUSE 58 SOUTH STREP
WM H. CRAWFORD & CO.,
PBOPBIITOHS,
Offer to the wholesale trade of this city the South and West
GOODS of equal quality and price on same terms as any
other home in the United states. fc22-tf.
BALTIMORE, MONDAY, MARCH 8, 1858.
Insurance (tumpues.
INSURANCE CARD"
LOOK WELL TO THE COMPANY IN WHICH YOU
| INSURE.
SAML. W. T. HOPPER'S, Insurance Agency.
No. 67 SECOND STREET
Being a regularly LICENSED AGENT. I will continue
to effect INSURANCE AT LOW RATES, WITHOUT I>F.
LAY, in none other than companies KNOWN TO BE
strictly IIRST CLASS. ALL LOSSES promptly adjusted
I and paid by the undersigned.
SAML. W. T. HOPPER,
67 SECOND STREET.
REFERENCES FOR THE COMPANY:
MESSRS. RICE, CHASE & Co., 10 aiul 12 German street.
IC DALL. GIBBONS & Co., 22 Hanover street,
A. L. \\ EBB & BRO., cor. Pratt and Commerce
streets,
CHAS. W. RIDGELY, ESQ , Attorney at Law , 34 St. Paul
street. mrl-eolm
Equitable fire insurance
SOCIETY.
CHARTER PERPETUAL.
OFFICE, NO. 19 SOUTH STREET.
THE BALTIMORE EQUITABLE SOCIETY will Insure
HOUSES and FURNITURE from LOSS OR DAMAGE BY
FIRE, at very cheap rates, on the Mutual or Beneficial
plan, and grant Carpenter's Risks, on pleasing terms.
Owners of Property insured in the EQUITABLE Office
have 110 further responsibility than the amount of the ir
deposits, and on the expiration of policies, they are enti
tled to receive a cash dividend of twenty-eight per cent
The public are respectfully invited to call at the office.
No. 19 SOUTH STREET, where the principles on which
the Society insure will be fully explained.
DIRECTORS:
THOMAS KELSO, BENJAMIN DEPORD
WILLIAM KENNEDY, SAMUEL KIRBY,
HENRY RIEMAN, MICHAEL WARNER'
JAMES FRAZIKR, DANIEL DAIL,
CHARLES R. CARROLL, ROBERT A. DOBBIN,
AUSTIN JENKINS, DANIEL WARPIELD.
FRANCIS A. CROOK, Treasurer.
HUGH B. JONES. Secretary. fe24-ly
THE GREAT WESTERN fMARINE)
INSURANCE COMPANY
OF NE W YORK.
Authorized Capital $5,000,000
Cash Capital (alreadypaid in) 1.000,000
Surplus Fund (represented by scrip) 560,000
Assetts Jan. 1,1858 2,276,000
This Company combines the advantages of the mixed
plan (so long and profitably practiced by the best Life In
surance Companies in Europe) blending the desirable se
curity of a large Cash Capital , with a liberal return of the
profits to its customers.
All Marine and Inland risks insured on most favorable
terms.
RICH'D LATHERS, Pret. JNO. A. PARKER. Ist V. Prest.
DOUGLAS ROBINSON, Sec'y. J. F. Cox, 2d do.
COLIN MACKENZIE, Agent in Baltimore,
Office Commercial Buildings.
Baltimore firm ixsuram k < •<>.
(ESTABLISHED UPWARDS OF HALF A
CENTURY.)
NE IF BUILDING.
S W. CORNER OF SOUTH AND WATER STREETS
This Company INSURES AGAINST LOSS OR DAM
AGE BY FIRE, in the city or country, on the various de
scriptions of property.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS.
J. I. COHEN, Jr., President
E ; A. TAYLOR, WM. GILMOR,
W. G. HARRISON, J. PENNINGTON,
S. T. THOMPSON, JOSHUA I. COHEN,
GEO. R. VICKERS, J. BIRCKHEAD, JR.,
F. W. ALRICKS, FRANCIS T. KINO,
S. O. HOFFMAN, HENRY CARROLL,
DAVID S. WILSON, R. S. STEUART
W. F. WORTHING TON,
fe'22-tf. FRED'K WOODWORTH, Secretary.
THE HOWARD FIRE INSURANCE
COMPANY OF BALTIMORE,
Make Insurances on every description of Property within
the limits of the City.
OFFICE—S. E. COR. HOWARD AND CLAY STREETS.
ANDREW REESE, PRESIDENT,
DIRECTORS:
M. Benzinger, Augustus Shriver,
Aaron Fenton, Henry J. Werdebaugh,
William Ortwine, Geo. *P. Thomas,
Samuel R. Smith, Chas. W. George,
James M. Pouder, Wm. G. Power,
Charles Hoffman, Elisha H. Perkins.
fe'22-lm. .GEO. lIARLAN W11.1.1 AMS. S. < y
FIRE INSURANCE AGENCY
GEORGE B. COALE,
COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS, GAY STREET,
AGENT WITH FULL POWERS FOR THE
HARTFORD FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY,
Cash Capital $500,000
HOME INSURANCE CO. OF NEW YORK CITY,
Cash Capital $500,000.
NORTH AMERICAN FIRE INS CO. OF HARTFORD.
Cash Capital $300,000,
Property of all kinds in TOWN or COUNTRY insured at
the most reasonable terms.
JOHNSTON'S INSURANCE ROOMS,
PHCENIX BUILDINGS.
73 SECOND STREET.
AGGREGATE CAHTAL REPRESENTED
EIGHT MILLIONS DOLLARS
MARINE INSURANCE,
FIRE INSURANCE,
LIFE INSURANCE,
Companies. Capital anil Surplus.
MERCANTILE MUTUAL (Marine) In. Co., N. Y $931,000
INSURANCE Co. of the VALLEY OF VA. 352 000
SECURITY FIRE INSURANCE Co. of N. Y. 250,000
PHCENIX " " " 285.000
WASHINGTON '• " 288,000
NEW WORLD •' 23L000
ALBEMARLE " Va. 400.000
LYNCHBURG " lBl.OOO
COMMONWEALTH " Pa. 178.000
U.S. LIFE " '• 1.250.000
And other strictly FIRST CLASS Companies, forming
an AGGREGATE CAPITAL of
OVER EIGHT MILLIONS DOLLARS.
Policies issued; losses adjusted and paid at this office, the
subscriber being fully accredited agent.
THOS. D. JOHNSTON.
fe22-ly. Underwriter.
MARINE INSURANCE.
COL VMBIAN
(MARINE)
INSURANCE COMPANY OF NF.W YORK
Cash Capital $5OO 000
Cash paid in "200'000
Security notes paid in iiOO.OOO
THOS. LORD, President.
R. C. MORRIS, Vice President.
PIERRE C. KANE, Secretary.
The undersigned having been duly appointed AGENT of
this Company, is prepared to receive applications for IX
SURAXCE on all Marine and Inland risks.
.SOL. B. DA VIES,
of Davies k Warfield,
fe22-6m. No. 16 Spear's wharf.
BALTIMORE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY.
No- 15 SOUTH STREET,
INCORPORATED IN 1830— Charter Perpetual.
JOHN I. DONALDSON, President.
UPHIS COMPANY proposes to insure lives
JL for one or more years, or for life. With their rates
the assured enjoys the benefit of an immediate in lieu of
a prospective and uncertain bonus. He risks neither his
policy nor the premium he has paid.
These premiums may he made payable annually, semi
annually, or quarterly, at option of the assured.
The Company buys and grante annuities.
Sells endowments for Children.
Makes all contracts in which Lifoorthe interest of Money
is involved. A. B. COULTER,
Secretary.
Medical Examiner, Dr. DGN-ALMOF, 84 Franklin street.
f22-ly
FIRE AND" LIFE INSURANCE
OFFICE, NO. 63 SECOND STREET,
BALTIMORE.
JOHN R. PR* „D k SONS,
Representing Companies of the highest standing, with large
Cash Capitals. Policies issued, and Losses paid at
the Agency.'
NTS A INSURANCE Co., of Hartford. Conn. $1,500,000
PHOENIX " '• * 350.000
SPRINGFIELD " Springfield, Mass. 375;000
.ETNA LIFE " Hartford, 225.000
U. S. LIFE " New York 400,000
fe22-tf.
ASSOCIATED FIREMEN'S" INSUR
ANCE OFFICE, No. 4 SOUTH STREET.
OPEN DAILY for the INSURANCE OF ALL DESCRIP
TIONS OF PROPERTY WITHIN THE LIMITS OF THE
CITY.
JOHN R. MOORE, President.
DIRECTORS.
JAMES GETTT, Mechanical , J. C. WHEEDEN, Columbian,
GKOROE HARMAN, Union, J. TRUST, First Baltimore,
NOAH WALKER, Friendship, FRANCIS BURNS, United,
J. T. FARLOW, Deptford, JAMES YOUNG, Franklin
ALLEN I'AI.NE, Liberty, J. PEASON, JR., Washington,
SAMUEL KIRK. Independent, LANCASTER OULD. Fatapsco
R. C. MASON, Vigilant, F. A. MILLER. Howard,
WM. A. HACK, New Markrl, JAS. A BRUCE. Watchman,
JAS. B. GEORGE, SR., Pioneer Jos. C. BOYD, Lafayette.
Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1.
fe22-tf. JOHN DUKEHART. Secretary.
MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE.
THE SUN MUTAL INSURANCE
COMPANY OF NEW YORK,
Insures Marine and Inland Navigation Risks, on terms as
favorable an those of any other Company. All persons tak
ing Policies from this Company are entitled to a share of
the profits, without incurring any liability, beyond the
amount of Premium. The assets of the Company, liable
for the payment of losses, are over $2,000,000.
A. B. NEILSON, Press'fc.
A. SEATON, V. Pres't J. WHITEHEAD, Sec.
C. OLIVER O'DONNELL, Agent in Baltimore.
fe22-ly. No. 51 EXCHANGE PLACE.
NATIONAL FIRE INSURANCE COM
PANT OF BALTIMORE.
Incorporated by the
STATE OF MARYLAND, 1849.
OFFICE NO. 13 SOUTH STREET.
THE COMPANY INSURES EVERY
DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY
IN THE CITY OR COUNTY,
AGAINST LOSS OR DAMAGE
_ BY FIRE.
The Directors meet daily to determine upon applications
for INSURANCE.
JOHN B. SEIDENSTRICKER.
President.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS:
Allen A. Chapman. William Woodward,
Henry M. Bash, jGeorge Bartlett,
Wm Heald, (Adam Denmead,
John W. Ross, Joseph W. Jenkins,
Edward J. Church, Thomas M. Sullivan,
Job Smith, i George Small.
JOHN R. MAGRUDER,
fa 26 tf Secretary.
PAPER WAREHOUSE,
NO. 24 SOUTH CHARLES STREET,
JAMES S. ROBIN SOX
Has on hand for sale, a large assortment of the various
kinds of Paper, such as Printing, Writing, Wrapping, and
Colored Papers, of all sixes and prices, which he is offering
low to punctual buyers. mal-tf
Carts.
I ft. HORACE TIQVFT. CHARLES V. MARTIN
T OVE, MAIITIN & CO.
! -LI COMMISSION MERCHANTS
I For the sale of WESTERN PROVISIONS Jt PRODUCE
5 EXCHANGE PLACE, BALTIMORE
j fe22 ly.
If RA NI TS 7 DENMEAI)
Manufacturer of RYE AND BARLEY MALT
CITY MALT HOUSE, West Falls Avenue,
| N. B —Hops constantly on hand. fc22 ly
! J. H. STICKNEY. „ p rt „
OTICKNEY &.CO.,
I ij DEALERS IN
CUMBERLAND AND GAS COAL,
PIG AND BAR IRON, N A PL S, d-C
, _ EXCHANGE* PLACE,
| _ Baltimore.
LIN!) & MURDOCH,
ARCHITECTS AND SUPERINTENDENTS,
No. 1, 2, 3, and 4, McELDOAVNEY'S BUILDING,
fe22lm.
E. B. GRANT. J. G GEAMT
G RANT & BROTHER,
T COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
NO. 61 EXCHANGE PLACE,
fe22-tf. Baltimore.
| OHN W. BECHTEL,
•' PRACTICAL PLCMBER
AND
STOVE AND FURNACE MANUFACTURER,
Nos. 93 N. EUTAW AND 46 ST. PAUL STREETS.
ft-22 fit Baltimore.
TAMES WHITEFORD,
J COMMISSION MERCHANT.
SPEAR'S WHARF,
Baltimore.
Receives and sells FLOUR, WHISKEY, and all kinds of
Country PRODUCE. fe22 6t.
TOHN S. WILLIAMS & BRO.,
J COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
52 COMMERCE STREET,
fe22tf. BALTIMORE.
JWM W. JANNEY, LOUIS STOW.
ANNEY & STOW,
PRODUCE AND GENERAL
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
No. 101 SOUTH STREET,
fe22-ly Baltimore.
JOSEPH CARSON. H. Q. VICKERY.
JOSEPH CARSON &. CO.
WESTERN PRODUCE
AND
GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Nos. 43 Aa\D 45 LIGHT STREET,
Baltimore.
Liberal advances made on consignments. fe22 tf
CIOIIRTNEY & ( I SUING.
' TOBACCO COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
65 SOUTH GAY STREET,
E.S.COURTNEY, BALTIMORE.
C. E. CUBHINO,
J A. COURTNRV. fe22 tf
JLYLE CLARKE & CO.,
• IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN
MANUFACTURED AND LEAF TOBACCO,
SEGARS, SNUFF, Sc.,
No. 106 WEST LOMBARD STREET,
Baltimore. fe22 tf
RICHARD B. CHENOWETH. WILLIAM J BOOTH
CHENOWETH & BOOTH,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS
IN
FOREIGN .WINES.BRANDIES, GIN, SCOTCH AND
IRISH MALT WHISKEY,
AND
DOMESTIC LIQUORS,
No. 159 North Gay street,
Baltimore.
Bourbon, Mmongahe.a, Rye and Rectified Whiskeys
constantly on hand. fc22 lw.
C 1 A R D .
' P. 0. MARTIN,
DISTILLER AND DEALER
EXCLUSIVELY IN FINE OLD WHISKEYS,
No. 10$ NORTH HOWARD STREET.
fe22 lui 3 doors South of Mulberry street
RICHARDSON & co~
SHIPPING AND COMMISSON MERCHANTS.
No. 67 EXCHANGE PLACE,
Baltimore. mil tf
UALL N: LONEY,
SHIPPING A ND COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
No. 60 BUCHANAN'S WHARF,
BALTIMORE,
Give particular attention to consignments of SUGAR
MOLASSES. COTTON. COFFEE, RICE, FISH, PROVIS
lONS, FLOIR, GRAIN, &c.; also fill orders for same.
fe22 tf
WT. WALTERS .V CO..
• IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN
WINES <f- LIQUORS,
NO. 68 F.XCHANGE PLACE,
LOMBARD STREET,
BALTIMORE.
A large and very fine stock of OLD RYE WHISKEY
ou hand. fc24-tf
T. T. MARTIN. WM. R. MARTIN.
HM T. MARTIN & 8R0.,'
-1 . IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN
LIQUOR N—and
General COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
No. 72 CALVERT ST., (one door from Pratt),
mal-tf Baltimore.
RSNOWDEN ANDREWS,
• ARCHITECT AND SUPERINTENDENT.
7 & 8 CARROLL HALL,
fe23lm Baltimore, Md.
JOHN F. PLCKRELL, I.EWIS WARRINOTON.
JOHN F. PLCKRELL &. CO.,
GENERAL
COMMISSION' MERCHANTS,
40 WEST LOMBARD STREET,
Baltimore.
lE?""Liberal advances made on consignments. fe24-tf
R. STOCKETT MATHEWS7
A TTORNE T AT LA W,
OFFICE No. 1 COUNSEI.LOR'S HALL,
(46 LEXINGTON STREET,)
Baltimore,
Will attend promptly to all kinds of business appertaining
to his profession. fe22 tf.
CAHARLKS E. PHEI.PS,
A A TTORNE Y AT LA IK,
No. 2 LAY/ BUILDINGS,
Continues to practice in the Courts of BALTIMORE CITY
and HOWARD COUNTY. fe22 tf.
RO B K RTD.LL UR \S~
A TTORNE Y AT LAW.
NO. 5 COUNSELLOR'S HALL,
fe22 tf. LEXINGTON STREET.
RP FRISKY HENDERSON,
A • ATTORXEY AT LAW
AND
COMMISSIONER FOR PENNSYLVANIA,
No. 6 COUNSELLORS' HALL,
ft' 22 tf. Lexington street.
JOHNTRENTISS POE7
ATTORN BY AT LAW,
OFFICE NO. 25 LEXINQTON STREETS,
Practices in the Courts of BALTIMORE CITY, and BAL
TIMORE and HOWARD COUNTIES. fe23 2awGw.
K. HOWARD,
. ATTORNEY AT LAW,
fe23 eod2w* 24 LAW BUILDINGS.
TJOSEPH ROGERS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Has removed to 83 W. Fayette street, above Charles,
mrl-tf.
bankers anil §rokfrs.
SAMUEL HARRIS & SONS,
BANKERS. STOCK. EXCHANGE AND
NOTE BROKERS.
Xo \O6 B A L TI M O R E STREET ,
COLLECT on all accessible points in the United States
and Canadas. promptly and on favorable terms.
BUY and SELL CHECKS and UNCURREXT BANK
NOTES, at low rates.
NEGOTIATE TIME PAPER and STOCK LOANS, and
buy and sell on Commission STOCKS and SECURITIES
in this and other markets.
RECEIVE DEPOSITS in Bankable or Uncurrent Funds
and transact the Banking and Exchange Business in every
department. mh4 dly
PURVIS & CO.,
BANKERS;
NO. 208 BALTIMORE STREET,
Buy and sell all kinds of UNCURRENT MONEY, TREAS
URV NOTES, SIGHT and TIME DRAFTS, make COLLEC
TIONS on all parts of the United States, and transact all
other business pertaining to Private Banking on very lib
eral terms. M 2 eotf
McKIM & CO.,
BANKERS, BROKERS AND EX- ;
CHANGE DEALERS,
CORNER BALTIMORE, AND ST. PAULS STREETS.
Purchase and sell FOREIGN and DOMESTIC EXCHANGE, j
negociate Loans and Business Paper, Purchase and sell !
stocks and securities. Make Collections on all prominent ■
points in the United States and Canada, make advances, on
Stock, and other Collaterals, receive deposits, and transact
Banking Business generally. fe22-3mos. j
JOHN S. GITTINGS. BENJ. H. WILLIAMS.
JOHN S. GITTINGS & CO.,
BANKERS AND STOCK BRSfirtRS,
CORNER SOUTH AND SECOND STREETS,
! Buy and sell on commission Stocks and Securities of this
I and other markets.
Advances made on Stocks; negotiate Time Paper and
Stock Loans.
INTEREST allowed on deposits, and balances on run
ning accounts. _ f*26 tf
G. FERINE,
Li. STOCKBROKER,
fe23 lm. No. 24 SOUTH STREET.
C. WEST & SO N,
MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS
IN ETHEREAL OIL, ALCOHOL, (all proofs.)
COLOGNE, SPIRITS, CAMPHINE, LARD OIL, LINSEED
OIL, SLC.
Our facilities for manufacturing being large, we are pre
pared to offer great inducement, to persons purchasing
1 goods in our line.
| Manufactory, 306 West Pratt street, Warehouse and
I Counting Room, 115 West Lombard street, between Light
and Charles. fe'22-tf.
[COMMUNICATION.]
ANNAPOLIS, March 6th, 1858.
To THE EDITORS OF THE EXCHANGE :
Gentlemen —l have read with some surprise your
comment on my communication in reply to your
correspondent C., denouncing the bill to incorporate
'•The Central African Society," now pending before
the Legislature. As to the character and motives
! of your correspondent you are, of course, better
qualified to judge than I. for you know who he is,
and Ido not. 1 accept your assertion that he
not actuated bv the motives which I imputed tohiui
—but it is apparent that he has grosslv misrepre
sented the purpose and scope of the bill, and, in do
ing so, has grossly assailed me, who am responsible
for the bill, although I am in nowise interested in
it, further than, as a citizen of the United States, I
am interested in any and all measures which will
increase our commerce, or which will aid in ridding
us of free blacks. Whether his representations be
ignorantly or maliciously made, I hold that you, as
the conductors of a free press, are bound to permit
any one who has been unjustly assailed through
your columns to use your paper to repel the assault.
This courtesy is due to any one, however humble,
and in this case it is due to the members of the Le
gislature, before whom the bill is pending, and es
pecially to the committee by whom the bill was re
ported, as well as to Mr. Bowen and myself.
You too, as well as your correspondent, denounce
the bill as a "MONOPOLY." I have too much expe
rience as an Editor, and know too well, that in the
haste of composition, we often use words without
due consideration, and therefore cannot believe that
you will seriously contend that the bill, if passed,
will create a "monopoly."
Webster defines a "monopoly" to be:
"The sole power of vending any species of goods,
obtained either by engrossing the articles in market
by purchase, or liy a license from the government,
confirming this "privilege. Thus the East India
Company in Great Britain, lias a monopoly of the
trade to the East Indies, granted to them bv char
ter."
Now if you will examine the bill, you will see that
it does not propose to give an exclusive, or "xole
potrer" to trade with Central Africa, and therefore
it will not create a monopoly. The legislature have
no power to grant such monopoly. They cannot
.prevent any one from trading with Central Africa,
and a moments reflection must convince you, that
you have done Mr. Bowenandme great injustice bv
charging that he seeks or that I advised him, to ask a
monopoly of trade. He quotes McGregor, tojshow that
the tobacco used by the English in their trade with
Western Africa, is worth $8,000,000 per annum, and
that the trade with Morocco, is worth 510.000.000
per annum. For a Company, of $10,000,000 to
monopolise such a trade is impossible.
So far from wishing to get a monopoly, Mr. Bow
en has urged in lectures, in sermons, in letters, in
essays and in his book, as well as in a memorial to
Congress, the importance of the trade to Central
Africa, as a means of aiding the cause of coloniza
tion and of christian missions, in Africa. He is a
missionary and not a trader. He does not seek to
become a trader in Africa or elsewhere. Nor do X.
But agreeing with him that the trader should go
with the missionary, and believing that under a
charter he could induce others to invest the requi
site funds to open a valuable commerce, I advised
him to ask the charter. He is now in New York,
publishing a Dictionary and Grammar of the " Yu
roba" language, and having been his adviser, I feel
called upon to take upon myself the whole respon
sibility of the measure —not only because he is un
justly assailed during his absence, but because it is
due to him, and to the cause of missions, in which
he is engaged, to denounce as 1 do, as most unjust
and unmerited, the imputation that he has for him
self any other purpose than to promote the cause of
missions in Central Africa.
I trust, gentlemen, that you will recur to his
book on Central Africa, and that you and your cor
respondent will feel it your duty to retract the im
putations contained in your strictures on the bill in
question. Respectfully,
I)I FF GREEN.
[Reported for the Daily Exchange.]
FIRST ANNUAL MEETING
• OF TIIE
EAST BALTIMORE CONFERENCE
OF THE
METHODIST EPISCOPAL CIIIRCII.
FOURTH DAY. —Saturday, March 6.—At 9 o'clock
the Conference was calied to order by the President,
Bishop Baker.
The usual morning services then followed, conduct
ed by the Rev. Philip B. Reese.
The proceedings of the previous day were then
read by the Secretary, and approved.
The relation of the Rev. Noah Schlosser was
changed at his own request, from the supernumera
ry to the effective list.
The Secretary called on the members who were
appointed to collect statistics to make their reports.
The Conference was asked to change the relation
of the Rev. Mr. McKee from the effective tothejsu
pernumerary list, which was done.
At his own request the connection of the Rev.
Henry F. Nicholson with the Conference Was discon
tinued.
The President then called on the Districts for the
recommendations of local preachers suitable to be
elected to Deacons' Orders.
The following gentlemen were elected:
East Baltimore District —Rev. Thomas M. Cath
cart.
Frederick—Revs. Dr. Adreon V. B. Orr and
Samuel Milford.
Carlisle—Revs, .lames 11. McGarra, Charles 11.
Zeigler, Benjamin C. Lippincott, Abraham Sahm
and John Williams.
No candidates from the other Districts.
The President then called the districts for the re
commendations of local deacons suitable to be elected
to elders' orders. The following gentlemen were
elected: Northumberland District, Rev. William
Gebhart; Carlisle, Rev. Archibald G. Marlatt. No
candidates from the other districts.
Bishop Baker then introduced to the Conference
the Rev. Mr. Eddy, Editor of the North Western
Christain Advocate, and the Rev. Mr. French, Agent
of the Wilberforce University. They were invited
to seats within the bar of the Conference.
The Rev. Mr. Dunlap presented the report of the
Irving Female College, which, on motion, was re
ferred to the Committee on Seminaries.
The Rev. Mr. Gere presented a paper to the Chair
containing some questions in relation to discipline
for his decision.
The Rev. Mr. Torrence presented the Report of
the Wyoming Seminary, which was referred to the
Committee on Seminaries.
The Rev. James H. Brown, chairman of the Com
mittee on Memoirs, to whom was referred the sub
ject of preparing a suitable memoir of the late
Bishop Waugh. presented the following:—
The committee appointed to prepare a suitable
memoir on the death of Bishop Waugh. to go on the
journal of the Conference report the following:
That whilst in common with all the conferences
we mourn the loss the church has sustained in the
death of Rev. Beverly Waugh. D.D., its senior su
perintendent, we especially feel it as the largest di
vision of the old Baltimore conference, with which
he stood so long identified, to render an humble
tribute of our regard and affection to his memory,
and to record our testimony for generations to come
to the piety which adorned his private and public
life, to the power and success that attended his min
istrations and to the wisdom that marked his coun
sels in all the various relations he sustained to our
common Zion. Therefore,
Resolved, That whilst this conference deeply de- j
plores the loss the church has sustained in the fleath
of one whose unblemished purity of life, whose zeal j
and fidelity as a minister of the gospel, and the wis- '
dom of wliose counsels as a general superintendent j
contributed so much to her strength and prosperity,
yet bows submissively to that all wise Providence j
that has removed him from labor to reward.
Resolved, That we endeavor to imitate his fidelity
as a minister of the Lord Jesus "doing the work of
an Evangelist," and that being affected and ad
monished Dy his death we will consecrate ourselves
more fully to God, and as Christian ministers "give
ourselves continually to prayer and to the ministry
of the word."
Resolved, That we tender to the bereaved widow
and family of our beloved Bishop, the expression of
our affectionate sympathy, and entreat for them the
continued care and consolation of Him who is "the
Father of Mercies and the God of alt comfort."
Resolved, That a copy of this memoir be sent to
the family of the deceased by the hand of the Secre
tary of the Conference.
(Signed) JAS. H. BROWN,
JOHN MILLER,
SAMITEL KEPLER.
The report was accepted, and ordered to be placed
upon the journal.
The Rev. Mr. Brown, of the Board of Stewards,
then continued the call upon the members for claims
upon the funds.
The claim of the Rev. John Thomas was refused,
bv a vote of the Conference, upon the ground that
he was very well to do in the world, and was not
in want.
I The Rev. Dr. Wise, Agent of the Sunday School
j Union, and editor of the Sunday School Advocate,
was then introduced to the Conference, and spoke
! at some length.
| He referred to the character of the books publish
] ed by the Sunday School Union, and commended
I their use to the brethren, as containing all the tenets
recognised by the Methodist Episcopal Church.—
Such books should be put into the hands of the Sun
day School children, in preference to other publi
cations. He was sorry to see in the libraries or some
thriving schools, almost every volume bearing the
mark of other houses. Ilehoped the brethren would
bear his remarks in mind, lie then gave some in
| teresting statistics, in regard to Sunday Schools,
| and the Sundav School Union.
After Dr. W'ise closed his remarks, the Rev. Rob
ert Cadden moved that it be made a subject of im
peachment for any preacher to introduce into the
I Sunday Schools, other publications than those ema
nating from the Sunday School Union. The motion
was not seconded.
The Rev. Mr. Hildt said the course of the "Sun
day School Advocate" was objectionable to a great
majority of the members of this Conference, on ac
count of introducing into its columns a subject
which could very well be let alone.
The Rev. Jas. H. Brown said that a man must be
I wanting in common sense who would introduce this
j subject into such a paper, designed as it was for cir
I culation in different sections of the country,
j A gentleman called Mr. Brown to order, as being
i personal in his remarks to Dr. Wise, who is now
I upon the floor.
Mr. Brown—Very well, I modify my remark. He
I shows a great want of discretion."
The Rev. A. A. Reese wished to know how it was,
I that in several works contributed to the church lite
' rature by Dr. Wise this subject is not touched upon,
j but now, as editor of the Sunday School Advocate,
| it is his Alpha and Omega.
I Dr. Wise said it was true he had written
i several books, which were published by the
Sunday School Union. He had first given them
titles, chosen the subject and laid the outlines,
and if it had been necessary, in developing the
plots, to have expounded his views in regard to
this subject of slavery, he would have done so fear
lessly, regardless of either pecuniary benefit or loss
to himself. ~ As editor of the Sunday School Advo
cate, he desired to discuss christian themes, and
christian ethics. The subject of slavery he consid
ered under the latter head. Ho therefore intro
duced it mildly and gently, but firmly. He hadta
ken his stand, and his conscience would not allow
him to change his course, if he continued as editor
for the next four years.
Bev. Mr. lteese said that if the course of that paper
upon the subject of slavery was continued, it would
be necessary to discontinue it altogether in his fam
ily, he would not have the minds of his children cor
rupted by reading it.
Rev. Air. Hildt said—Dr. Wise tells us he has tak
en his stand in regard to this subject, and as long as
he edits the paper he will not change his course. If
he persists in doing so, our only remedy is to abol
ish the Sunday School Advocate from our Sabbath
Schools and families, and refuse it our countenance
and support.
Rev. Mr. Torrence said he was sorry this discus
sion had sprung up in the Conference at the present
time. He did not wish it to go abroad. He thought
the papers published for circulation among all the
communities of the Methodist Church should be
confined to the discussion of strictly religious sub
jects. We should all unite upon a paper conducted
on such a plan.
r Rev. Mr. Keppler rose to a personal explanation.
Not in order.
Several gentlemen rose to make remarks. The
chair recognized the Rev. Geo. D. G'henowith, who
moved to refer the whole subject to the Sunday
School Committee. The motion was adopted.
The report of the Preachers' Aid Society was
then presented by Mr. Job Smith. It was read by
the Secretary, approved and ordered to be tiled.—
The report states the amount of funds invested bv
the Society amounts to $26,586.95.
The Rev. Mr. Furlong' asked to be excused from
the Committee on the Education of Preachers'
children. He was excused, and the llev. X. B.
Buckingham put in his place.
The Rev. Titos. B. Sargent, chairman of the com
mittee which was appointed to confer with the Rev.
Dr. Durbin, in regard to the formation of a Mis
sionary Society for the Conference, presented a re
port, and also a constitution for the government of
the same. The society will be called "The East
Baltimore Conference Missionary Society."
A motion was made to continue on trial the Rev.
George \V. Conner, who is now ill at Frederick.—
The motion was adopted.
The Rev. Robert S. McWilliams, a local preacher
eligible to Deacon's orders, not being present at the
Conference, it was moved and adopted that he be
continued on trial.
A paper was read bv the Assistant Secretary
from ISonj. F. Hawks, No". 205 W<-st Baltimore street,
offering to make Photographs ol such of the mem
bers as would call at bis establishment.
After singing and prayer by Rev. Mr. Taylor, the
Conference, at Vl} 4 o'clock, adjourned until Mon
day morning at !i o'clock.
[From the Washington Star, March 6th.]
BALTIMORE ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE
METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH -AT
WESLEY CHAPEL, WASHINGTON, D. C.
Titian D tv— Continued.
When our report closed yesterday, Rev. Mr.
Phelps was addressing the Conference in advocacy of
the resolutions which he had introduced in a former
session, for the establishment of a weekly religious
journal, to be published in Baltimore, under tiie
direction of the two Conferences. After making a
powerful appeal in favor of the project, he sat down,
and was followed by
Rev. Jatnes Sewell, who stated that his con
troversies were always with controversy itself;
it was always conceded that religious quarrels
were the most irreligious quarrels in the world.
Rev. Mr. Wilson had to-day thought he had
found two gentlemen who were just the tnen for the
editors of this paper; for himself he thought one of
these men would not do; one of them was too fiery,
and the other was too briery—both had given in
this meeting specimens of their abilities, and he
thought it would not do to have them at the edito
rial table. If this paper should be ordered, and we
were assailed, we must defend ourselves, and there
by get up a religious argument which would lead
to quarrels. Let us try and conquer by love. It
would conquer every thing but the devil." This [ta
per might do good; hut they must getvery religious
editors.
Rev. Mr. Myers followed, saying that, when this
project was first started, he had been in favor of it;
but, from the report which had been received, it
was apparent that we have got to support the burden
alone. The East Baltimore Conference had drawn
away from the idea very decidedly. Thev had in
their deliberations very coolly laid the whole mat
ter on the table. The speaker thought it best to
defer this matter until the next General Conference.
Ho proposed that, as the minds of all had been made
up, they now take the sense of the Conference at
once, upon the subject. This proposition was after
ward withdrawn and the subject left open for fur
ther discussion, and thereupon the Conference was
addressed by
Rev. John L. Gilbert, who took very decided
ground in favor of the project of starting a paper
at once. He did not like the idea of a controversial
paper: he did not so understand this project. In
the midst of this controversial warfare, if we had
such a paper as is now proposed, we could, through
its columns, let our true position be known to those
who were in a state of doubt as to it.
Rev. George Brooks stated it as his opinion, that
it was our duty to our people and to our God to fur- i
nish the church with this paper. It would be heart
ily sustained, and would effect just the work requir- |
ed. He should vote for this paper, hoping it would ;
meet the requirements of the Conference.
Rev.X. J. B. Morgan also, in a somewhat length\
and very able manner, advocated the proposed
"Christian Advocate." Their people wanted in
formation, and l>y its means could bo informed of
their position. There was a general dearth in the
bounds of this Conference of religious literature. |
Let the work go on, and at once. The establish
ment of this paper would directly tend to the
increased circulation of their books. There were
but few books adapted to the wants of the people in
circulation, and the reason was they did not know
of them. Jf this paper were to be established it
would inform those in want of the proper books
of light on religious subjects and of consequence
increase the circulation of religious books an hun
dred fold.
Itev. Mr. Clemm stated that, as one of the com
mittee who had reported on the pending resolutions,
he felt it his duty to speak. As to the proposed
character of the paper, the committee did not pro
pose to give it a controversial character. It was
not the committee's purpose to provoke controver
sy ; the controversy was already provoked, and it
was with a view to its allayment that the proposed
paper was to be established". They would send out
their paper, in order that good-toned religious read
ing may pervade the minds of their people ; they
must purify the moral atmosphere, and their pro
ject must and would prevail. Of all the religious
papers now published in the country, which one was
a proper exponent of the platform on which they
stood? Xot one. This paper was intended strictly
as a religious paper, for family distribution; and
the speaker believed the Conferences had the ability
and energy to conduct it successfully.
The speaker here suspended his 'remarks for a
motion for adjournment.
The Chair announced the committee on the af
fairs of the Metropolitan Church, as follows :
Rev. E. It. Veecli, ltev. E. X. Brown, and Rev.
E. F. Busev.
The Conference thon'adjourned, after the Doxolo
i gy, and benediction by Rev. Xorval Wilson.
FOURTH DAV.
! The Conference was opened with religious exer
j eises by Rev. Mr. Myers.
• The Conference then went into the regular busi
j ness of the day, Rev. Bishop Ames presiding,
i The examination of the character of effective
j elders was taken up, and the ciders of the Win
chester district being called over were passed as
usual.
| This business was interrupted by the Chair in
j order for the Committee on Missions to make
i their report, which was done through their chair-
I man, Itev. E. I'. Phelps, and the report was
adopted.
The examination of effective elders was then re
sumed, and the Rockingham district coming next
in order, its elders were called over and successively
j passed.
i The Chair here introduced to the Conference Rev.
i l)r. Thompson, of Philadelphia, who, he announced,
: would address the session after awhile on behalt ot
the Xational Magazine.
Rev. Mr. Hatch, of the Xew England Conference,
was also introduced to the session, and invited to a
seat in the Conference.
The Roanoke district being now called, Rev. B.
H. Xadal gave an animated account of the progress
of religion in that quarter. The effective ETders
PRICE TWO CENTS.
of this district were now called over and passed.
Ihe Louisburg district was represented next bv
Rev. Mr. Phelps, who stated that that district had.
during the past year, been very prosperous, some
■even hundred converts having been added to the
Church.
The Conference then went into the cousideratiou
of the first question on the General Minutes, viz:—
''Who are admitted on trial?" and Jno. A. Williams
r rankUn Ward, Samuel V. Leech, Charles Lewis
lorrinson, W m. David Rippetoe, Benjamin Arbog
hast, James F. Been, Wm. Bagelev, Wm. J. Perry,
Benjamin F. Frampton, John Leef, Adam P. Bowd
and James L. Snyder were duly admitted.
The Rev. Mr. Lipscomb, Chairman of the Board
°i Stewards, here gave notice that the Board would
1 k co^ec^ons on Monday morning at 10V£
The Conference then went into the election of
Local preachers to Elders Orders, which business
was occupying the attention of the session when our
report closed.
ONE DAY LATER FROM EUROPE.
ARRIVAL OF THE STEAMSHIP NEW YORK
The steamship Xew York, from Greenock, Feb.
14 at 6P. M., arrived on Friday. She experienced
heavy westerly gales all the passage. On the 18th,
she was struck by lightning, which split the fore
royal mast.
•i • u k r ' n £? Glasgow papers of Saturday evening,
w Inch contain a few hours' later advices from Lon
don. Consols closed at noon of the 13th at
90 1 _> for money and account.
1 he London fAdvertxair' u Paris correspondent writes
that Allsop was in Paris very recently, and was
frightened away by the menaces of his confederates,
w ho threatened to take his li fe because he expressed
doubts respecting the success of the dreadful enter
pi ise. lie has, without doubt, escaped to America.
The Tamar steamer, from Alexandria, arrived at
Southampton on the 13th. She brings the heavy
portion of the Australian mails, and £lOO,OOO in
gold.
The Marco Polo, with £300,000 in gold, wai oil
Holyhead on Saturday forenoon.
The India House had received a long dispatch,
but it merely adds some unimportant details to the
facts already published.
We are indebted to the purser on the steamship
Xew I ork for late English and Scotcli papers.
GREAT BRITAIX.
The Daily Mew lias an indignant leader on the
treatment of the English Engineers of the Neapoli
tan Government, and the inaction of the British
Ministry.
Tlie Time* is glad to pass Mr. Roebuck off against
the vaporing French Colonels, hut protest agaiust
some of his expressions.
LONDON, Friday Evening, Feb. 13, 1858.
Ihe next telegraphic despatches from India will
be due at Malta on Sunday next, with news from
Bombay to the 24th ult.
The Court ot Bankruptcy to-day Mr. Lawrence,
on behalf of the great Xorthern Railway Compa
ny, stated that the total amount of Redpath's frauds
was £'220,000, anil that a special examination had
resulted in the identification of forged transactions
to the amount of £64,350. The whole of the credi
tors had been paid 20s. in the pound, with the ex
ception of the brokers, who, if they had exercised
ordinary discretion, might have prevented Red
path's frauds from getting to the enormous extent
which they had reached. Mr. Lawrence submitted
a proof for £60,000 against Redpath's estate. Mr.
Commissioner Goulburn, at once committed the
proof, and said he quite approved of the examina
tion the company had made, with respect to the
brokers, who will receive only 15s. in the pound.
DUBLIN, Friday, Feb. 13, 1858.
Last night, or early this morning, the Union
workhouse at Atliy was almost totally consumed by
fire. The particulars of the disastrous occurrence
have not yet been learned, but it is to he lamented
that no less than three male paupers and live bovs
perished in the conflagration.
LONDON, Saturday, Feb. 13, 1858.
The Tunes says the India bill merely embodies, in
a few and obvious changes, the conclusions to
which all men have been rapidly approaching as
often as they have had occasion to deplore the
cumbrous machinery and tardy operations of our
Indian government and the want of any real re
sponsibility; it will remove useless agencies, in
terventions and delays. There is not a shadow of
wrong—not a man, woman or child is the worse tor
the bill.
The London Neirs was prepared to find the bill
entirely subvert all those constitutional principles
on which the safety of that empire has been hitherto
believed to depend; but it was not prepared to learn
the utter incapacity of Government to make out
even a prima facie case for destroying the double
Government at any time, and much* less for destroy
ing it at a period of great popular excitement.
I\ bile the country itself is still rent by internal con
vulsions, the most important measure" ever fallen to
Parliament in our time has been incubated in haste,
in ignorance, in confusion; and, instead of solid and
substantial facts and weighty arguments, the pro
pounder of this dangerous and destructive scheme
throws out a couple of flatulent claptraps, and
thinks that he has convinced the nation of the wis
dom of his perilous design.
The Chronicle says there is every prospect of a
protracted discussion, but at present there are no
indications as to its probable political or party lean
ings. Monday will supply this deficiency by dis
closing the line to be adopted by the opposition
leaders.
The Herald thinks, if any charge be needed, it
should be a much less violent one. The blow aimed
by Government at the East India Company will pro
bably recoil on themselves.
The second leader ofYAe London Times is on the
Government of India and Lord Canning's letter,
which The Times considers as a valid defence to the
most popular charges against him.
The third article is on recruiting for the army.—
For the last five months the recruits attested have
averaged very little short of 4,000 a month for the
infantry of the line alone, and 6,000 for all arms of
the service together. These numbers would repre
sent, within a fraction, a total levy of 70,000 troops
a year—a rate amply sufficient, if maintained, to
answer all demands upon us. Our machinery may
be somewhat defective. It would probably be of
material service if persons of iutiuence, in our coun
ties would again bestir themselves, and let the la
boring classes know, from authority above 'suspic
ion, that really good treatment, and in many cases
a vastly improved condition, awaits a lad on enter
ing the*army. The machinery would be more effec
tive, too, if it were permanent, and if some species
of organization were preserved, which might be
exerted with more or less activity, according to the
nature of the demand.
The News thinks our Government ought to take
a stand against the Neapolitan Government in the
affair of the Cagliari steamer.
The Herald says the accusations and criticisms of
Mr. Roebuck last night, afford a painful contrast to
the temperate, yet dignified, language of Lord
Derby.
FRANCE.
Accounts, received in Paris, state that more troops
are required in China, to carry out the intended
operations.
No more addresses from the army are to be pub
lished in the Moniteur, or any other paper publish
ed in France.
One of the Paris correspondents of Le Nord says
that the military addresses in the Moniteur have not
been the only manifestations of feeling against Eng
land on the part of the French colonels; some of
those honored with the Order of Bath having ex
pressed a desire to return their decorations. The
Minister of War, according to Le Nord, speedily put
a stop to these demonstrations.
It is stated by the Paris correspondence of the
Indepcndance that, at the interview between the
new Minister of the Interior and the principal offi
cers in his department, he announces that his ap
pointment was not provisional, but that it was mane
to carry into effect the plans of the Emperor, and
that those who could not give their entire support
to the new policy of the government had better re
sign their posts.
RUSSIA.
The Journal de Frankfort states that the commer
cial crisis in St. Petersburg caused several failures,
with liabilities ranging from 50,000 to '200,000 silver
rubies. Stieglitz & Co. are reported to have lost
largely, and byway of compensation it is said the
Emperor has permitted them to export one million
gold imperials, the ten per cent, export duty being
suspended in their favor. It seems propable that
these particulars involved great exaggeration.
The correspondent of The Times states that, ac
cording to letters from Odessa, the number of Rus
sian sailors in the Black Sea is not to bediminished,
as the vessels of war are not to exceed a certain
number. The Grand Duke Constantine has given
orders that all sailors who were in the service of
the Government shall be sent on board merchant
men, and he suqject to the same discipline as before,
and have the same pay ; and inder that thev may
not forget any part of their duties, mercantile ves
sels are to carry guns. When Russia has completed
her fleet of mercantile steamers in the Black Sea,
its neutrality will exist onlv in name,
It is again stated that Schamvt had submitted to
Russia, but Le Nord, which retrained at the time
from publishing the above news, states that the last
intelligence from Circassia does not confirm the
submission of Schatnyl. The result of the last ope
rations of the Russian troops was the occupation ol
the plateau of Tehechtna, where they had driven
out the Circassians. Schamyi, with a small number
of his band who remained faithful, had found a re
fuge in the remote gorges of the central chain ot
the Caucacus.
TURKEY.
CONSTANTINOPLE, Feb. 6, 1858.
Fuad Pasha will be the Turkish Plenipotentiary
at the Paris Conferences.
The Commissioner of the Porte has sent in an ul
timatum to Prince Danilo oi* Montenegro.
A Vienna letter states that the petition brought
by the Rajahs of Herzegovina to the Turkish Am
bassador at Vienna, is signed by about one hundred
communes. The petition asks for the suppression
of the present tax of one-third, and the re-estab
lishment of the former tax of a ninth. The tax of
p. third is said to be the cause of the discontent
which prevails among the population.
The Porte has sent two Commissioners to make
such inquiries in the state of affairs in Herzegovina
and Bosnia, as will lead to a radical reform of the
causes complained of. The Commissioners are also
ordered to collect all the information which may

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