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The daily exchange. [volume] (Baltimore, Md.) 1858-1861, March 11, 1858, Image 1

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VOL. I—NO. 16.
THE DAILY EXCHANGE.
PL BUSHED EVERY MORNING, (SUNDAYS EXCEPTED.
BY
KERR & CO.
OFFICE, CARROLL HALL.
S. S. CORNER OF BALTIMORE AND CALVERT STREETS.
EDITORS AND PRORIETORS.
CHARLES G. KERR. THOMAS W. HALL, JR.
TERMS:
In the city TWELVE AND A.HALF CENTS per week, paya
ble to the carrier. Mailed to subscribers, out of the city,
at six DOLLARS per annum; THREE DOLLARS for six months
and ONE DOLLAR for two months. Invariably in advance
for the time ordered.
ADVERTISING RATES.
TABLE:
(SQUARE—EIGHT LINES.)
One insertion 60
Two insertions 75
Three " $l.OO
Four " $1.25
Five " $1.50
One week $1.75
One month I $4.00
Advertisements occupying a larger or smaller space, or
Inserted for a longer or shorter time, charged for propor
tionately.
THE DAILY EXCHANGE.
PROSPECTUS.
UNDER the above title it is proposed to
conduct and publish in the citv of Baitimore a first
class Commercial and Political MORNING NEWSPAPER.
This enterprise has been prompted by the conviction
that the rapid growth of Baltimore in population and
wealth, its constantly augmenting trade, aud its conse
quently increased commercial and political importance,
not oniy justify but demand an effort to introduce into the
field of journalism that clement of competition, which, in
all other branches of business, has so materially contribu
ted to the prosperity of the city,
"THE EXCHANGE." Witii regard to the name, —if an
apology were needed, for thus introducing what may per
haps be deemed a novelty in the nomenclature of journal- j
ism,—it has been adopted, not simply for its peculiar ap
propriateness in connection with those commercial inter- '
ests to which a paper of the character proposed must be !
largely devoted, but in its wide and more comprehensive i
acceptation, as embracing within its scope all those topics j
which come within the province of the public press.
Ist, NEWS. —It will, of course, be the first aim of the
proprietors to furnish the readers of THE EXCHANGE j
with the most prompt, full and authentic intelligence upon 1
all matters of public interest, at home and abroad ; and to
secure the accomplishment of this result, and the perfec
tion of every arrangement required to place THE EX- j
CHANGE in this particular on a level with the best jour- I
nais of the country, qo necessary expense or exertion will 1
be spared
2d, COMMERCE. —The commercial department of the pa
per will include, not only the usual dail3* reports and
weekly reviews of the markets, domestic and foreign, com
piled with fulness and accuracy, but a frequent editorial
discussion of the leading financial questions of the day,
with regard to which the mercantile community naturally
look to the public press for comment and suggestion.
3d. POLITICS.— The interests of commerce and the state
of the markets are so constantly and intimately affected
by the aspect of political affairs throughout the world, that
a journal which aspires to be any thing more than a mere
commercial reporter or daily price current, must necessa
sarily devote a large space in its columns to the di9semi
nation of political intelligence, and the discussion of polit
ical questions. In this department of the paper, which,
apart from its commercial importance, also possesses a
peculiar and exclusive interest of its own, it will be the
object of THE EXCHANGE to preserve a position of honest
and fearless independence, equally removed from servile
partisanship upon the one hand, and timid neutrality upon
the other.
4th. LITERATURE AND ART. —Candid and impartial re
views of current literature and contemporaneous art, mu
sical and dramatical criticisms, by competent judges, and
original contributions upon subjects of literary or scientific
interest, will always find an appropriate place in the col
umns of THE EXCHANGE, and it will be the constant
aim of the proprietors to render it a valuable and interest
ing journal for the family as well as for the counting
room.
dotation.
PATAPSCO FEMALE INSTITUTE- MARYLAND
THE TRUSTEES of the Patapseo Female
Institute announce to the public that the additional
buildings and improvements commenced by them a year ago
in accordance with the subjoined resolutions, are now com
plete. These improvements have not been made with a
view to increase the school, but for the greater conveni
ence and comfort of the usual number of pupils.
The new chapel is a handsome and most appropriate
structure, for the exclusive use of the inmates of the In
stitute. and in all its arrangements it is most complete. It
is furnished with a new organ of tine construction and ex
cellent tone.
The administration of Mr Archer for the past year and
the present has been attended with unprecedented suc
cess, and the Trustees feel themselves fully justified in
recommending the Institute to the continued favor of the
South.
It has pre-eminence in healthfulness. The pupils avoid
ing. 011 the one hand, the debilitating effects of a Southern
climate, and on the other the rigors of the North, have
few of the interruptions incident to both these climates.
It is sufficiently near to the city of Baltimore to enjoy the
benefits of a city without any of its evils.
As au Institution of learning it has the advantage of a
full organization, a resident chaplain, and a corps of ac
complished teachers and professors, called together from
time to time in the long experience of those having charge
of the Institute.
The Trustees of the Patapseo Female Institute, having
been duly notified by Mrs. Lincoln Phelps of her intention
to resign her office of principal at the close of the present
school year, have elected Robert H. Archer as her succes
sor. The eminent success of Mr. Archer in conducting for
many years a School for Young Ladies in the city of Balti
more. entitles him to our confidence as a person peculiarly
qualified to maintain the present high standing, and insure
the permanent prosperity of the Institution; and with this
view we arc engaged in the erection of another building in
addition to the present extensive accommodations of the
Institute.
CHAS. W. DORSEY, PRESIDENT. WM. DENNY M
D., SECRETART. T. WATKINS LIGOX, E HAMMOND
JOHN P KENNEDY. fe22-dtf.
LAW SCHOOL OF THE UNIVERSITY
AT CAMBRIDGE, MASS.
The Instructors in this School are
Hon. JOEL PARKER. LL.D , Roval Professor.
Hon. THKOPUILUS PARSONS, LL.D.. Dane Professor
Hon. EMORY WASHBURN, LL.D., University Professor.
The course f instruction embraces the various branches
of the Common Law. and of Equity, Admiralty, Com
mercial. International and Constitutional Law, and the
Jurisprudence of the United States. The Law Library
consists of about 14.000 volumes, and as new works ap
pear they are added, and every effort is made to render it
complete
Instruction is given by oral lectures and expositions,
(and by recitations and examinations, in connection with
them,) of which there are ten every week. Two Moot
Courts are also holden in each week, at each of which a
cause, previously given out. is argued bv four students,
and an opinion delivered by the Presiding Instructor.
Rooms and other facilities are also provided for the Club
Courts; and an Assembly is held weekly for practice in de
bate, and acquiring a knowledge of parliamentary law and
proceedings.
Students may enter the School in any stage of their pro
fessional studies or mercantile pursuits, and at the cora
menement of either term, or in the middle or other part of
term. ,
They are at liberty to select what studies they will pur
e according to their view of their own wants and at
tainments.
The Academical year, which commences on Thursday,
six weeks after the third Wednesday in Julv. is divided
into two terms, of twenty weeks each, with a vacation of
six weeks at the end of each term.
During the Winter vacation, the Library is opened,
warmed, and lighted, for the me of the members of the
School.
Applications for admission, or for Catalogues, or any
further information, may be made to either of the Profes
sors at Cambr.dge.
Cambridge, Mass.. January, 1858. [d6t-lawBm.
jJtcMciius, |)crfummcs, &t.
BRYAN'S PULMONIC WAFERS FOR
Coughs. Colds. Asthma. Consumption and all diseases
01 the Lungs. For sale at WISEMAN'S Drug Store,
Baltimore and Fremont streets, Baltimore.
f22-dlm
J. PURVIANCE POLK & CO.
APOTHECARIES,
Comer of Fayette and St. Paul Streets,
AND
N. HYNSON JENNINGS & CO.
APOTHECARIES,
N T O. 88 X. CHARLES STREET,
Baltimore,
Respectfully call the attention of citizen* and the travel
ling community to their large ami choice assortment, of
MEDICINES, PERFUMERY, FINE STATIONERY and FANCY
ARTICLES, which may b* confidently relied on as being
what we represent them, as we select none but of the pu
rest quality. Also. MEDICINE CHESTS, SUROICAL INSTRU
MENTS. TRUSSES. DIETETIC PREPARATIONS. tec., Ac.
Written orders filled promptly and with care, subject to
be returned at our expense if not of standard quality
fe22 tf.
WISEMAN'S VERMIFUGE,
OR WORM DESTROYER,
mis remedy for Worms is one of the most extraordinary
ever used It effectually eradicates Worms of all sorts
irom children and adults.
Warranted not to contain Mercury in any form, nor any
other mineral. '
For sale by WISEMAX, Druggist, corner of Baltimore
and Fremont street - Price 25 cents. dlin.
THE BALSAM OF WILD CHERRY,
PREPARED AT DR. OWEAL'S DRUG
Store, Corner of Madison and Eutaw Streets is a reli
able remedy for Coughs, Colds, Hoar-mess, Soreness and
pains in the Chest. Consumptive eases derive much ad
van tape from its use. Wild Cherry Bark. Tar. Bloodroot,
and Indian Hemp enter into its composition. Its taste is
pleasant and its use entirely safe. feh22 3t
THOSE OF SCROFULOUS HABIT,
with Swelled Neck, Tumors, King s Evil. tec , Mer
curial and Syphilitic diseases and affections generally aris
ing from a taint iu the system, requiring an alterative
course of treatment, are recommended to take "THE AT -
TERATIVE SYRl T P." made at Dr. O'Neal's Drug Store,
Corner of Madison and Eutuw Streets. It rids system
of accumulated humors, as Tetter. Boils, Pimples. Ring
worm. tec. feb22 3t
0Q BUILDERS' DEPOT. GG
SASH, DOORS BLINDS, FRAMES, HOT BED SASH.
,om.mxcjs. CASINGS, kc., DRESSED FLOORING
A, E . R .o U X. i ! KK - , IMF " URI J'KS. HAIR. HARD
ni , PA '- > 'TS. and every description of
BUILDING MATKKI VI., at moderate rates anil on accom
\" m ' Particular attention paid to orders and
I™ a l ro: "' Estimates of the entire cost oj
buildings furnished with accuracy and despatch Ship
ments effected promptly to all accessible points by
R. JOHNSON,
° 99 Pratt ,tret . Bowly'i wharf,)
Baltimore, Md.
—■— l
THE MERCANTILE LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. !
(Founded in 1839.)
Occupies the First Floor of the Athenarum Building. X IV.
Corner of St. Paul and Saratoga Streets.
THE ROOMS are large and comfortable, I
well heated and lighted, and qniet.
The Library contains now about 15,000 volumes, care- i
fully selected, of History, Poetry. Drama, Theology, Arts !
and Science, Biography, Voyages and Travels, Essa'vs and
Reviews, and Fiction, and is increasing at the rate of about i
1,000 volumes per annum It is constantly supplied with I
the best publications of all these branches of knowledge, as i
well as a fair representation of the current light literature ■
of the present time.
The Reading Room is furnished with most of the Maga
zines and Reviews of this country and England, as well
as a number of American aud English newspapers.
„. T ™ A? 9c ! ciation was formed for the special benefit of the !
CLERKS OF THE CITY, and is exclusively under their '
control. They alone are eligible for ACTIVE membership, j
Tht* fee for this class is $3 per annum, payable in advance,
but the use of its Books and Kooms is open to all other
classes, as HONORARY members, upon the payment of
u er annum * advance. They may draw books from
the Library, visit the rooms, and are entited to ALL THE j
PRIVILEGES of the Association, except voting and hold
ing office. Ladies may become Honorary members in their ,
own right. The accounts of either Active or Honorary •
members may be transferred for the use of ladies or others.
The Rooms are open from 10 o'clock A.M., till 2 o'clock j
P. M.j for the reception of ladies—and from 2 o'clock till j
10 o'clock P. M., for Gentlemen.
Of persons now using the Library,
84 ACCOUNTS ARK FOR LADY SUBSCRIBERS,
300 44 44 HONORARY MEMBERS.
650 44 " ACTIVE MEMBERS. fe22-tf i
WM. P. WEBB & CO., ~
IMPORTERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS
FOR THE BALE OF
MEN S FURXISHIXQ GOODS,
AND
TAILORS' TRIMMINGS,
SHIRTS, UMBRELLAS. TWIST
COLLARS, SILESIAS, GALLOONS,
CRAVATS, BUTTONS. CORDS,
THREAD, SEWING SILK, MACHINE TWIST.
No 20 SOUTH CHARLES STREETS.
Four doors below German St.,
mrl-lm. Baltimore.
BAILORS.
HT. ROBERTS,
• MERCER AND TAILOR,
No. 205 BALTIMORE STREET,
, fe22l y Baltimore.
READY M A DE CLOTHING.
JOHN 11. RE A, <£■ CO,
NORTH-EAST CORNER OF PRATT AND SOOTH STS ,
Have on hand a large and select Stock of WINTER
CLOTHING, that they are running ofifat a LOW FIGURE
to make room for SPRING STYLES. Persons in want
would do well to give them a call.
Also—A large stock of PIECE GOODS, suitable for cus
tom trade, which will be got up ill good style at low
P"ces. fe22 lm.'
SAMUEL TANEYHILL,
MERCHANT TAILOR,
No. 2 LIGHT ST.. OPPOSITE FOUNTAIN HOTEL,
Will in a few days receive his full SPRING STOCK of
Goods—consisting of CLOTHS, CASSIMERES, NEST
INGS, tic., and will be fpleased to take Orders from his
friends and the public. A fit guaranteed. Prices reason
abl* fe22lm.
lianas an & ftasif.
CHICKERING & SONS,
AND
NUNNS & CLARK'S
CELEBRATED PIANO FORTES,
Constantly receiving and for sale only by
F. D. BENTEEN,
181 Baltimore street and 84 Fayette,
third store west of Charles st. !
Purchasers will find it to their interest to examine fi >
themselves the superior qualities of the above Pianos
Piano Stools. Prince & Co.'s Melodeons from $45 upwards !
fe22-lm. 1
E W MUSI € .—Just Published, by j
MILLER <£ BEACHAM. 181 BALTIMORE ST :
A DAY DREAM—by J. C. Engelbrecht.
AN\ IL CHORUS—from Verdi's Trovatore.
DANCER S QUADRILLES—taught by Ed. Lehmanu
* BOARDING-SCHOOL LlFE—by Chas. Grobe. ' 1
•This beautiful composition, describing a day at a FE
MALE BOARDING SCHOOL, is one of the Author's best
efforts. fe22 lm. I
HENRY M c C A F F R E Y
MUSIC PUBLISHER,
No. 207 BALTIMORE STREET,
MUSIC PUBLISHED and received daily.
MUSIC BOUND in the NEATEST STYLE
fe22 lm. MUSIC FOLIOS at ALI, PRICES
BO UDOIR SE W* ING MA CHINE.
PRICE S4O.—THIS MACHINE IS RE
commended by I. M Singer & Co.. Wheeler & Wilson
and Grover & Baker as being the best single thread Ma
chine in the known world; and the price being low, pur
chasers will find it greatly to their advantage to exam
ine it.
Also, Wheeler & Wilson's superior FAMILY MACHINE,
in Rosewood, Black Walnut and Mahogany cases. Wheel
er and Wilson's Machines are really the best article ever
invented for sewing. A great number of certificates can
be seen at our store from ladies and gentlemen who have
had them in use for a length of time.
E. M. PUNDERSOX & CO.,
fe22-tf. 209 Baltimore street.
I. 0. O. F.
ODD FELLOWS AND MASON'S RE
GALIA, BANNERS, &c.. U. S Bunting and Silk
Flags, Military Goods and Ladies' Dress Trimmings, al
way on hand and for sale by
A. SISCO,
• No. 95 BALTIMORE ST,
fe22-ly. Baltimore'
JL M'PHAIL & BRO'cf
• HAT, CAP AND FUR STORE,
No. 132 BALTIMORE STREET,
Between North and Calvert streets, (north side.) fe22tf.
IMAURANLS.
ELDON HALL RESTAURANT.
No. 78, WEST FAYETTE STREET,
REAR ENTRANCE IN BANK LANE.
THE undersigned have very recently fitted up
the building in Fayette street, between St. Paul and
Charles Sts.,known as "Eldon Hall", as a restaurant of the
first class. Noexpcnse has been spared to make it acceptable
in all its appointments, to gentlemen who may feel disposed
to pay it a visit. There is at ail times upon the "snack"
counter edibles which can be served up at a moment's notice
and at all hours thereare always private rooms for the ac
comodation of gentlemen, who may desire to "exchange"
thoughts over something which may cheer the inner man.
They challenge competition in the matter of CIGARS,
GOOD LIQUORS, and ATTENDANCE BY FAITHFUL SER
VANTS. which altogether make up the comforts of a restau
rant.
DINNERS and SUPPERS served for PARTIES prompt
ly, AND FAMILIES SUPPLIED with TERRAPINS, OYS
TERS he., at the shortest notice.
There are peculiar advantages, in this establishment for
the accomodation of gentlemen. The building has a rear
entrance from Bank Lane, while there is a private entrance
admitiug to ail parts of the house, without passing through
the br. REII.LY & SNYDER
fe22d-lw&2aw2w.
MINN'S EATING SALOON,
No. 40 WEST PRATT STREET,
Between Frederick and Market Space.
THF. PROPRIETOR OF THIS WIDE
_M_ ly known Saloon, having recently made extensive
improvements in several departments of his buildings, is
prepared to furnish DINNERS. SUPPERS, &c.. at as cheap
rates and in a 9tyle which he will not permit of being sur
passed. Families supplied with Oysters, in every variety
of style; also. Terrapins, Turtles, Poultry, Venison and
Fish; the last named he is daily in receipt of by Express
from the South.
All articles delivered free by RINN'S Express Wagon.
(tamts.
( 1 11. REESE & BROTHERS,
207 and 209 Pratt street,
CHARLES REESE &. CO.,
CORNER EUTAW, MADISON and GARDEN STREETS,
Importers and dealers in fine and standard Groceries, offer
: for sale a large and complete assortment of goods, selected
with great care, especially for family use.
Their daily increasing facilities for obtaining direct from
the manufacturers and producers, both in this country and
Europe, the articles on sale, enables them to sell at prices
that will not fail to please.
Sole agents for the sale of Win slow k Co.'g Preparations,
Green Corn, Peas, Beans. Tomatoes, Salmon, Lobster, Ac.,
&c. put up in hermetically sealed cans. fe'22-6t
LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S DRESS
FITTING,
TA UGIIT B Y
MRS. PETTET,
AT
436 BA I.TIJIORE STREET, BKTW EES' GREEN - k PEARL
TERMS— *2.50
Boy's suits ami liress Bodies fitted to give |erfect satis*
faction. Ladies are requested to call and examine the
i plan taught. fe23 3t.
WILLI A M H A R R f S ,
MAKER AND IMPORTER OP
GUNS, RIFLES and PISTOLS
11C West Pratt street,
keeps constantly on hand a large assortment of Bird and
( Ducking Guns, (double and single barrel;) Six bandied
Revolvers; Rifles made to order; Dupont's Guri Powder;
I Powder Flasks, Bird Bags, Shot Belts and Pouches, and
many other articles necessary for Sportsmen. Repairing
done at the shortest notice, and with neatness. [fc22 lm.
JAMKS M. ANI)EUSON~& SON,
ENGRAVERS,
Xo. 148 Baltimore Street,
BANK NOTE. STEEL & COPPER PLATE PRINTING
TNVITATION, WEDDING, VISITING
1 Cards, etc., Engraved and Printed in the most fashion
, able styles. Corporate and Notarial Seals, Letter Stamps,
i etc. London and Paris Visiting Cards, I)e La Rue's* En
, velopes, etc. fe22tf
PHIEMX SPICE MILLS,
WAREHOUSE 58 SOrTH STREb
WM. 11. CRAWFORD A CO.,
PROPRIETORS,
, Offer to the wholesale trade of this city the SoutK and lre.tr
GOODS of equal quality and price on same terms as any
other house in the United states, fe22-tf.
WM. GEAXGK A CO.
SHIPPING AND GENERALCOMWISSION MERCHANTS,
XO LL'J W LOMBARD STREET
BALTIMORE
LARGE STOCKS OF THE PUREST
RYE WHISKEY, OLD VIRGINIA PLANTERS',
ZIEGLF.R S, CONGRESS. BROWNKI.I. S. ami other Cele
brated Brands with every description of Brandies. Torts,
Sherries llo d other Wines, Rectified Whiskey. Ac.. always
on hand at the most moderate prices. White Wine and
Cuter \ inegar of superior quality.
Liberal advances made on Consignments of Mer
chandise generally, Western and other PRODUCE, Hour.
Butter. Cheese, Provisions. Raw Whiskey. Alcohol. Dried
Apples, atul Fruit generally.
Particular attention paid' to the purchase and sale of Clo
ver and other Seeds. Grain. Tobacco, kc
Orders promptly executed for every description of Mer
chandise. Groceries. Foreign Fruit. Packed Oyters, Ac
fe22ly.
BALTIMORE, THURSDAY, MARCH 11, 1858.
Insurance Companies.
INSURANCE CARD.
LOOK WEI.I. TO THE COMPANY IN WHICH YOU
' INSURE.
SAML. W T. HOPPER'S, Insurance A(tenc.v.
No. 67 SECOND STREET
! Being a regularly LICENSED AGENT, I will continue
; to effect INSURANCE AT LOW RATES, WITHOUT BE
LAY, in none other than companies KNOWN TO BE
strictly FIRST CLASS. ALL LOSSES promptly adjusted
and paid by the undersigned.
SAML. W. T. HOPPER,
67 SECOND STREET.
REFERENCES FOR THE COMPANY:
MESSRS. RICE, CHASE & Co., 10 and 12 German street,
" DALE, GIBBONS & Co., 22 Hanover street,
A. L. WEBB & BRO., cor. Pratt and Commerce
streets,
CHAS. W. RIDOELY, ESQ., Attorney at Law , 34 St. Paul
Btreet _ mrT-eolm
EQUITABLE FIRE INSURANCE
SOCIETY.
CHARTER PERPETUAL.
OFFICE, NO. 19 SOUTH STREET.
THE BALTIMORE EQUITABLE SOCIETY will Insure
HOUSES and FURNITURE from LOSS OR DAMAGE BY
FIRE, at very cheap rates, on the Mutual or Beneficial
plan, and grant Carpenter's Risks, on pleasing terms.
Owners of Property insured in the EQUITABLE Office 1
have no further responsibility than the amount of their
deposits, and on the expiration of policies, they are enti- I
tied t* receive a cash dividend of twenty-eight per cent
The public are respectfully invited to call at the office, i
No. 19 SOUTH STREET, where the principles on which
the Society insure will he fullv explained.
DIRECTORS:
THOMAS KELSO, BENJAMIN DEFORD,
WILLIAM KENNEDY, SAMUEL KIRBY.
HENRY RIEMAN, MICHAEL WARNER'
JAMES FRAZIER, DANIEL BAIL,
CHARLES R. CARROLL, ROBERT A. DOBBIN,
AUSTIN JENKINS, DANIEL WARFIELD.
FRANCIS A. CROOK, Treasurer,
j HUGH B. JONES, Secretary. fe24ly*
THE GREAT WESTERN (MARINE )
INSURANCE COMPANY
OF NE IP YORK.
I Authorized Capital. $5,000,000
I Cash Capital {alreadypaid in) 1.000.000
Surplus Fund (represented by scrip) 560,000
Assetts Jan. 1,1858 2,276,000
This Ccmpany combines the advantages of the mixed
plan (so long and profitably practiced by the best Life In
surance Companies in Europe) blending the desirable se
curity of a large Cask Capital, with a liberal return of the
profits to its customers.
All Marine and Inland risks insured on most favorable
. terms.
' Rlcu'n LATHERS, Prest. JNO. A. PARKER, Ist V. Prest.
DOUGLAS ROBINSON, Sec'y. J. F. Cox, 2d do
COLIN MACKENZIE, Agent in Baltimore,
fe23-tf Office Commercial Buildings.
B~A LTIMORE FI RE INSURANCE CO.
(ESTABLISHED UPWARDS OF HALF A
CENTURY.)
NE W RUILDING,
S. W. CORNER OF SOUTH AND WATER STREETS.
This Company INSURES AGAINST LOSS OR DAM
AGE BY FIRE, in the city or country, on the various de
scriptions of property.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS.
J. I. COHEN, JR., President
E. A. TAYLOR, WM. GILMOR,
W. G. HARBISON, J. PENNINGTON,
S. T. THOMPSON, JOSHUA I. COHEN,
GEO. R. VICKERS, J. BIRCKHEAD, JR.,
F. W. ALRICKS, FRANCIS T. KINO.
S. O. HOFFMAN, HENRY CARROLL,
DAVID S. WILSON, R. S. STEUART
W. F. WORTHINGTON,
fe22 tf. FRED'K WOODWORTH, Secretary.
THE HOWARD FIRE INSURANCE
COMPANY OF BALTIMORE,
Make Insurances on every description of Property within i
the limits of the City.
OFFICE—S. E. COR. HOWARD AND CLAT STREETS.
ANDREW REESE, PRESIDENT,
DIRECTORS:
M. Benzinger, Augustus Shriver,
Aaron Fenton, Henry J. Werdebaugh
William Ortwine, Geo. P. Thomas,
Samuel R. Smith, Chas. W. George,
James M. Pouder, Wm. G. Power,
Charles Hoffman, Elisha H. Perkins.
fe22 - lm - SGEO. HARLAN WILLIAMS, Sec'y.
FiRE INSURANCE AGENCY
GEORGE B. Colli. K,
COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS, GAY STREET, !
AGENT WITH FULL POWERS FOR THE
HARTFORI) FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY,
Cash Capital $500,000
HOME INSURANCE CO. OF NEW YORK CITY,
Cash Capital $500,000.
NORTH AMERICAN FIRE INS. CO. OF HARTFORD
Cash Capital $300,000.
Property of all kinds in TOWN or COUNTRY insured at
the most reasonable terms.
JOHNSTON'S INSURANCE ROOMS
PHfENIX BUILDINGS.
73 SECOND STREET.
AGGREGATE CAPITAL REPRESENTED
EIGHT MILLIONS DOLLARS
MARINE INSURANCE,
FIRE INSURANCE,
LIFE INSURANCE,
Companies. Capital and Surplus.
MERCANTILE MUTUAL (Marine) In. Co., N. Y. $931,000
INSURANCE Co. of the VALLEY OF VA. 352 000
SECURITY FIRE INSURANCE Co of X Y. 250.000
PHOENIX " " •• 285.000
WASHINGTON ** ** oqc qnn
NEW WORLD " • 234 000
ALBEMARLE •• Va. 40o!o00
LYNCHBURG '• •• 18 i.ooo
COMMON WEAI.TH " Pa. 178.000
U.S. LIFE " " 1,250,000
And other strictly FIRST CLASS Companies, forming
an AGGREGATE CAPITAL of
OVER EIGHT MILLIONS DOLLARS.
Policies issued; losses adjusted and paid at this office, the
subscriber being fully accredited agent.
THOS. D. JOHNSTON.
Underwriter.
MARINE INSURANCE?
COL U.VBIAN
(MARINE)
INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW YORK
Cash Capital $500,000
Cash paid in 200,000
Security notes jmid in 300.000
THOS. LORD, President.
R. C. MORRIS, Vice President.
PIERRE C. KANE, Secretary.
The undersigned having been duly appointed AGENT of
this Company, is prepared to receive applications for IN
SURANCE on all Marine and Inland risks
SOL. B. DAYIES,
of Davies & Warfleld,
ft 22 (jin No. 16 Spear's wharf.
BALTIMORE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY.
No- 15 SOUTH STREET,
INCORPORATED IN 1830— 6'Aarter Perpetual.
JOHN I. DONALDSON, President.
COMPANY proposes to insure lives
JL for one or more years, or for life. With their rates
the assured enjoys the benefit of an immediate in lieu of
a prospective and uncertain bonus. He risks neither his
policj' nor the premium he has paid.
These premiums may lie made payable annually, semi
annually, or quarterly, at option of the assured.
The Company buys and grants annuities.
Sells endowments for Children.
Makes all contracts in which Life or the interest of Money
is involved. A. B, COULTER,
.... . „ Secretary.
Medical Examiner, Dr. DONALDSON, 84 Franklin street
f22ly
FIRE AND LIFE INSURANCE
OFFICE, NO 63 SECOND STREET,
BALTIMORE.
JOHN G. PROUD & SONS,
Representing Companies of the highest standing, with large
Cash Capitals Policies issued, and Losses paid at
the Agency *
miuvJv SIRA^CR Co ' of ,lartfor( U Conn. $1,500,000
IHCENIX 4 * '• kk " 350 000
S J^yy G r f ?J'J' l> " Springfield. Mass. 3753X10
£a A LIFE •• Hartford, 225.000
fe22-tf " New York 400 000
ASSOCIATED FIREMEN'S INSUR
ANCE OFFICE, No. 4 SOUTH STREFT
OPEN DAILY for the INSURANCE OF ALL. DF.SCRIP
TIONS OF PROPERTY WITHIN THE LIMITS OF THE
JOHN R. MOORE. President.
DIRECTORS.
JAMES GETTY, Mechanical, J. C. WHIZDZX, Columbian
GEORGE II ARM AN, Union. J. TRUST, First Baltimore.
NOAH WALKER, Friendship, FRANCIS BURNS, United.
J. T. FARLOW, Deptford, JAMES YODNO, Franklin,
ALLEN PAINE, Liberty, J. PEASON. JR., Washington,
S A ?. C !, L klllK -• independent. LANCASTER OCLD, Patapsco,
R. C. MASON, Vigdant. F. A. MILLER, Howard
, A. HACK, AETO Market. JAS. A, BRUCE, Watchman,
JAS B. GEORQE, SR ..Pioneer Jos. C. BOTD, Lafayette.
Hook and Ladder Co. Xo. 1.
FE22 TF : _ _ J °HN DUKEHART. Secretary.
MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE
THE SUN MUTAL INSURANCE
. . T , COMPANY OF NEW YORK,
insures Marine and Inland Navigation Risks, on terms as
favorable as those of any other Company. All persons tak
ing Policies from this Company are entitled to a share of
the profits, without incurring any liability, beyond the
amount of Premium. The assets of the Company, liable
for the payment of losses, are over $2,000,000.
A. B. XEILSOX, Press't.
A. SEATON, D . Pres't J. WHITEHEAD Sec
,OO , C OLIVER Agent in Baltimore.
fe^l> No. 51 EXCHANGE PLACE.
RATIONAL FIRE INSURANCE COM
A* PANY OF BALTIMORE
Incorporated by the
STATE OF MARYLAND, 1849.
OEFICE No. 13 SOUTH STREET
THE COMPANY INSURES EVERY
DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY
IN THE CITY OR COUNTY
AGAINST LOSS OR DAMAGE
BY FIRF
661 la ' ly 10 lletfrmine upon tppßcations
JOHN B SEIDF.NSTRICKER.
President.
HOARD OF DIRECTORS :
Allen A. Chapman. (William Woodward,
Henry M. Bash. George Bartlett,
Wm. Ileald. Adam Denniead.
John W Ross. Joseph W. Jenkins,
Edward J. Church, Thomas M. Sullivan,
Job Smith. George Small
JOHN R. HAGRUDER.
fe2B tf Secretary.
PAPER WAREHOUSE, ~
NO. 24 SOUTH CHARLES STREET
JAMES S. ROBINSON
Has on hand for sale, a large assortment of the various
kinds of Paper, such as Printing, Writing, Wrapping, and
Colored Papers, of all sisea and prices, which he ie offering
low to punctual buyers. mal-tf
§tismtss Carbs.
R nORICELOVI! CHARLES V. MARTIN.
T OVF., MARTIN &. CO.
j J-i COMMISSION MERCHANTS
lor the sale of WESTERN PROVISIONS & PRODUCE
5 EXCHANGE PLACE, BALTIMORE
fe22-ly.
I FRANCIS DENMEAD, ~
Manufacturer of RYE AND BARLEY MALT
CITY MALT HOUSE, West Falls Avenue,
„ „ _ BALTIMORE.
N B —Hops constantly on hand. fe22-ly
J. H. STICKNEY. „ Brt -n
STJCKNEY &. CO.,
DEALERS IN
CUMBERLAND AND GAS COAL,
CIO AND BAR IR OX, XAPL S, ct C .
EXCHANGE- PLACE,
tf. Baltimore.
LIND & MURDOCH,
ARCHITECTS AND SUPERINTENDENTS
No. 1, 2, 3, and 4, McEI.DOWNEY'S BUILDING,
__ fe22-lm.
E. B. GRANT. I N QUANT
G RANT &. BROTHER,
T COMMISSIOX MERCHAXTS.
„ M NO. 61 EXCHANGE PLACE,
'-f Baltimore.
JOHN W. BECHTEL,
PRACTICAL PLUMBER
AND
STOVE AND FURNACE MANUFACTURER,
NOS 93 N. EUTAW AND 46 ST. PAUL STREET 9.
fe22-6t. Baltimore.
JAMES WHITEFORD,
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
SPEAR'S WHARF,
! _ . Baltimore.
Receives and sells FI.OUR, WHISKEY, and all kinds of
Country PRODUCE. fe22-ot.
JOHN S. WILLIAMS & BRO.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
52 COMMERCE STREET,
fe-2 tf. BALTIMORE.
... LOUIS STOW.
TANNEV fit STOW,
J ' PRODUCE AND GENERAL
COM MI SSI O N ME R CHANTS,
, . No. 101 SOUTH STREET,
ly Baltimore.
JOSEPH CARSON. U RJ YIPKERY
JOSEPH CARSON & CO.
*9 WESTERN PRODUCE
AND
GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Nos. 43 AND 45 LIGHT STREET,
Baltimore.
.Liberal advances made on consignments. fe2*2 tf
CUMRTNEV STCUSHING,
' TOR A CCO COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
65 SOUTH GAY STREET,
E.S COURTNEY, BALTIMORE.
T. E. CUBHINO,
J. A. COURTNEV. fe22-tf
JLYLE CLARKE & CO.,
• IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN
MANUFACTURED AND LEAF TOBACCO,
SEGARS, SNUFF, Ac.,
No. 106 WEST LOMBARD STREET,
Baltimore. fe22-tf
CRICBAED B. CHENOWETH. WILLIAM J. BOOTB.
HENOWETH &. BOOTH,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS
FORF.IGN;;WINES, BRANDIES, GIN, SCOTCH AND
IRISH MALT WHISKEY,
AND
DOMESTIC LIQUORS,
No. 159 North Gay street,
_ Baltimore.
Lourbon, Mcncngahe.a, Rye and Rectified Whiskeys
constantly on hand. fe22-lw.
CI A U" N .
' P. C. MARTIN,
DISTILLER AND DEALER
EXCLUSIVELY IN FINE OLD WHISKEYS,
No. 108 NORTH HOWARD STREET,
1V22 1 ill 3 doors South of Mulberry street.
RICHARDSON 1TC0.7
SHIPPING AND COMMISSO .V MERCHANTS
No, 67 EXCHANGE PLACE,
Baltimore. mil tf
HALL A LONEY^
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS
No. 56 BUCHANAN'S WHARF,
BALTIMORE,
Give particular attention to consignments of SUGAR
MOLASSES. COTTON, COFEEE. RICE, FISH, PROVIS'
lONS, ILOL T R, GRAIN, AC.: also 611 orders for same,
fe22-tf
WT. WALTERS & CQ~~
• IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN
WINES d LIQUORS,
NO. 68 EXCHANGE PI.ACF.
LOMBARD STREET,
BALTIMORE.
tisf A large and very fine stock of OLD RYE WHISKEY
on hand. fe24-tf
T. T. MARTIN. WM. R. MARTIN.
RP T. MARTIN & 8R0.,'
A • IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN
LIQUOR S— and
General COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
No. 72 CALVERT ST., (one door from Pratt|.
mal-tf Baltimore.
RSNOWDF.N ANDREWS^
• ARCHITECT AND SUPERINTENDENT,
7 & 8 CARROLL HALL,
fe23-lm Baltimore, Md.
JOHN F. PICKRELL, ' LEWIS WARRINOTON
JOHN F. PICKRELL & CO.,
GENERAL
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
40 WEST LOMBARD STREET,
Baltimore.
Ny Liberal advances made on consignments. fe24-tf
JUtoniegs.
. STOC'KETT MATHEWS,"
A TTORNE Y AT LAW
OFFICE No. 1 COUNSELLOR'S HALL,
(40 LKXINQTON STREET,)
Baltimore,
Will attend promptly to all kinds of business appertaining
to his profession. fe22-tf.
CHARLES" E. PHELPS, ~
A TTORNE T AT LAW,
No. 2 LAW BUILDINGS,
Continues to practice in the Courts of BALTIMORE CITY
and HOWARD COUNTY. fe22 tf.
R~ OBERT D. BURNS,
A TTORNE r AT LA W,
NO. 5 COUNSELLOR'S HALL,
fe22-tf. LEXINGTON STREET.
FRISBY HENDERSON,
A • A TTORNE Y AT LAW
AND
COMMISSIONER FOR PENNSYLVANIA,
No. 6 COUNSELLORS' HALL,
fe22 tf. Lexington street.
JOHN PRENTISS POE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
OFFICE NO. 25 LEXINGTON STREETS,
Practices in the Courts of BALTIMORE CITY, and BAL
TIMORE and HOWARD COUNTIES. fe23 2aw6w.
"K'HOWARDT
• ATTORNEY AT LAW,
fe23 eo*l2w* 24 LAW BUILDINGS
. JOSEPH ROGERST
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Has removed to 83 \V. Fayette street, above Charles,
mrl-tf.
stnto anb brokers.
SAMUEL HARRIS & SONS,
BANKERS. STOCK. EXCHANGE AND
NOTE BROKERS.
JVo. 196 B A L TI M O B E STREET ,
COLLECT oil all accessible points in the United States
and Canadas, promptly and on favorable terms.
BUY and SELL CHECKS and UXCURREXT BANK
NOTES, at low rates.
NEGOTIATE TIME PAPER and STOCK LOANS, and
buy and sell on Commission STOCKS and SECURITIES
in this and other markets.
RECEIVE DEPOSITS in Bankable or Uncurrent Funds
and transact the Banking and Exchange Business in every
department. mh4 dly
PURVIS & CO.,
BANKERS
XO. 208 BALTIMORE STREET.
Buy and sell all kinds of UNCURRENT MONEY, I'REAS
URY NOTES, SIGHT and TIME DRAFTS.make COLLEC
TIONS on all parts of the United States, and transact all
other business pertaining to Private Banking on very lib
eral terms. m 2 eotf
McKIM & COT
BANKERS, BROKERS AND EX
CHANGE DEALERS,
CORNER BALTIMORE, AND BT. PAULB STREETS.
Purchase and sell FOREIGN and DOMESTIC EXCHANGE,
negociate Loans and Business Paper, Purchase and sell
stocks and securities. Make Collections on all prominent
points in the United States and Canada, makeadvances. on
Stock, and other' Collaterals, receivedeposita, and transact
Banking Business generally. fe22-3mos.
JOHN S. GITTINOS. BENJ. H. WILLIAMS.
JOHN S. GITTINGS & CO.,
BANKERS AND STOCK BROKERS,
CORNER SOUTH AND SECOND STREETS,
Buy and sell on commission Stocks and Securities of this
and other markets.
Advances made op Stocks; negotiate Time Paper and
Stock Loans.
INTEREST allowed on deposits, and balances on run
ning accounts. fe2B tf
EG. P E R I N E ,
. STOCKBROKER,
feZI-lm. No. 24 SOUTH BTEIT.
C. I VEST & SON,
MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS
IN ETHEREAL OIL, ALCOHOL, (all proofs.)
COLOGNE. SPIRITS. CAMPHINE, LARD OIL. LINSEED
OIL, Ac.
Our facilities for manufacturing being large, we are pre
pared to offer great inducements to persons purchasing
goods in our line.
Manufactory, 306 West Pratt street, Warehouse and
Counting Room, 115 West Lombard street, between Light
and Charles. fc22-tf.
MARYLAND LEGISLATURE.
SENATE.
ANNAPOLIS, March 10, 1858.
Jhlts Passed. —Tn repair the Almshouse of Anne
Arundel county. To amend the charter of the Bla
j densburg Academy. To repeal the 10th section of
i the charter of the Cumberland Coal and Iron Com
! puny. To change the Bridge across the Pocomoke
| at Iron Hill to a pivot or draw-bridge. To enable
A. E. &E. J. Francis to hold real estate. To pre
vent slaves from gaining their freedom in certain
eases. For the relief of Elizabeth Rutledge and
daughter of Baltimore county. To allow churches,
congregations, and religious societies to sell and
convey their property. Incorporating the Chesa
peake Marine Railway company of Annapolis. To
pay T. J. Wilson and Josiah Gordon for legal ser
vices.
To allow Jefferson Division, S. of T., to erect a
story on the public school house in Jefferson dis
trict. To amend the charter of the Somerset and
Worcester Savings Institution. To aid in the erec
tion of a monument in commemoration of the De
claration of Independence. Amending the charter
of the Maryland Lime Company. Extending the
time till 3d Monday in November, for electing
directors in the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Co.
To regulate licenses to ordinaries and traders.
Bills Rejected.' -Regulating the inspection of Gua
no, and for building warehouses in Baltimore for
the Guano trade. Yeas 10, nays 9.
When the Bill concerning the Chesapeake and
Ohio Canal was under consideration, Mr. Kimuiel
submitted the following preamble and order:
Whereas, "An act has been passed to take the
sense of the people upon the call of a Convention to j
frame a new Constitution for the State, and whereas
all the great interests of the State will fall under j
the consideration of the Convention, and a new
Constitution may be so framed as to dispose of all j
the questions of policy now in dispute, it is inexpe- I
dient at this late hour in the session, to act npon !
any measure involving sueli vast public interest, \
as those connected with the Chesapeake and Ohio !
Canal.
Therefore, be it ordered by the Senate of .Mary
land, that the bill under consideration he indefi
nitely postponed;
Which was read.
The question upon its adoption,
Was determined in the affirmative, by yeas and
| nays, as follows :
AFFIRMATIVE. —Messrs. Hoffman, Kiminel, Mc-
I Masters, Nuttle, Stone, Turner, Wallace, Wilkins
! -B._
j NEGATIVE. Messrs. Brooke, Clarke, Daniel,
J Franklin, Miles, Semmes, Smith—7.
j The resolution granting to the Messrs. Weems a
portion of the State's wharf, was passed without
amendment.
The bill to endow the Baltimore Female College
was reconsidered and again rejected.
HOUSE OF DELEGATES.
Bill* Panned.—A supplement to the act of 1856
incorporating the Baltimore and Ohio railroaa.
For running the southern and western boundaries
j of this State. To authorize the Comptroller to set
j tie the accounts of John Saxton, late collector, and
I J. T. Blackistone, late clerk of St. Mary's county.
I For inspecting, measuring and weighing grain in
Baltimore city. Incorporating the Port Hermon
and Delaware railroad company. Incorporating Me
tropolis Lodge, No. 17, I. 0. o'. F. For the relief of
Elizabeth Mills. To prevent the sale of intoxicating
liquors near the Agricultural College. To allow H.iL
Langley to complete collections granting a dona
tion to Brookville Academy, in Montgomery coun
ty. Relating to insolvent debtors. To endow Bal
timore Female College. Incorporating the Hamp
den Association. Requiring suits before magis
trates in Allegany co., to be brought in district of de
fendant's residence. To repair the alms house of A.
Arundel co. Relating to banks of Baltimore city.
Incorporating the Maryland Insurance Company of
Baltimore. For the benefit of Primary Schools in
3d school district, 2d election district" of Caroline
county. Regulating the fees of the Sheriff of Bal
timore county. To prevent filling up harbors in
Somerset county. To amend the charter of the
Cumberland Coal and Iron Company. Incorporating
Baltimore Division No. 1, S. of T. Revising the
charter of the Cumberland and Georgetown Trans
portation Company.
Bills Panned. —lncorporating St. Anthony's Or
phan Asylum. For the relief of R. T. Nell. In
corporating the Ilavre-de-Grace Academy. Incor
porating the Leitersburg Town Hall Company.—
Changing the name of Evelyn Howard to Harvey
C'ontee Bowie Howard. The general appropria
tion bill for 1860 (with 8100,000 for expenses of
Reform Convention.) For the relief of John L.
Stansbury of Baltimore county. For relief of H.
M. Fitzhugh, Administrator, d". b. n., of Col. Wm.
Fitzhugh. Fo require clerks of courts to do cer- i
tain acts in absence of judge.
Relative to trials where parties are empowered to j
appoint a special judge. Relating to the crier of j
Somerset county. Relative to the Register of Wills '
of Somerset countv. Amending the charter of j
the Agricultural College. Relating to Collectors of j
Taxes in Harford county. To sell the poorhouse !
farm of Harford county, and providing another.— \
Refunding a sum of money to J. Campbell and T. j
H. Slaughter a sum of money. Incorporating the |
Windsor Run Turnpike Company. Incorporating \
the East India Trading Company. Better security ;
to persons travelling on railroads in this State. To
incorporate the Oak Grove school in Washington
county. To amend the act to incorporate a com- I
pany to make a turnpike from Hagerstown to \
Smithsburg. To give Countv Commissioners power i
to legislate in relation to public roads. To make j
valid a deed to Wm. H. Hardv. Refunding a sum !
of money to Mary Tabler. To amend the charter j
ot the Cumberland Savings Institution.
Mr. Maekubbin offered resolutions, which were
adopted, to furnish St. John's College with 75
muskets.
Bills Rejected. —For the relief of Thomas R.
Tongue. .Supplementary to the acts relating to the
Chester Bridge Company. To increase rates on the
railroad of the George's Creek Coal Company.
For the better observance of Sunday in Baltimore
city. The bill to restrain drunkenness was indefi
nitely postponed.
Rule passed. —To make valid a deed from John P.
Hartly. To incorporate Uniontown, Carroll coun
ty. To incorporate the Church of the United
Brethren in Christ, in Carroll county.
The bill to regulate inspections in Baltimore city
was taken up. An action to indefinitely postpone
it was lost, and the bill was then considered, and at
V/i o'clock the House took a recess for one hour.
In a difficulty which occurred in this city between
John Lamb, a citizen of this place, and Joseph Ed
wards, a citizen of Baltimore, Lamb shot Edwards,
but not dangerously. Edwards was committed to
jail on the charge of assaulting Lamb.
PROCEEDINGS OF THE CITY COUNCIL.
REQULAR SESSION.
WEDNESDAY, March 10, 1858.
FIRST BRANCH. —Branch met. Present John T.
Ford. Esq., President, and all the members, except
Mr. Wood.
Mr. Maddox presented a petition from Samuel
Smith, Superintendent of Chimney Sweeps for the
second district, asking an enlargement of his dis
trict, by annexing thereto a portion of the first and
third districts. Referred to the Committee on Po
lice and Jail.
Mr. Staylor presented a petition from the Super
intendents of Streets and Pumps, asking that their
salaries be increased to S6OO per annum. Referred
to the Committee of Ways and Means.
Mr. Hamilton presented a petition from several
citizens of the vicinity, to substitute a gas lamp for
the oil one at present at the intersection of Marion
and Eutaw streets. Referred to the Committee on
Police and Jail.
The President submitted a communication from
the Mayor, announcing his approval of the follow
ing resolutions:
In favor of 0. Herring Dr. E. C. Baldwin, Ham
ilton Muir, Dr. C. T. I). Cunningham, Bull A Tut.
tie, and resolution relative to widening Dugan's
wharf.
He also submitted a communication from the
Mayor relative to the McDonough estate, which
was referred to the committee thereon.
Mr. Hampson submitted the annual report of the
Friendship Fire Company, which asks a special ap
propriation of $2,000. Referred to the Committee
on Fire Companies.
The Second Branch returned with its concurrence
the following resolutions : From the Committee on
Markets upon the petition of Jno. O. Megee; from
the Committee of Ways and Means upon the peti
tion of Isam Jordan; from the same, on the peti
tion of D. S. Sweeney; from the same, upon the pe
titions of Jas. Lovegrove and Jos. Ruppert; also,
reports of the Committees on the Register's and Port
Warden's accounts; also, the ordinance changing
the name of French to Front street: also, the ordi
nance to erect a wharf at Spring Gardens.
The President submitted revised ordinance No.
11, entitled "an ordinance providing for Assessors
and an Appeal Tax Court," which was read. Also,
revised ordinance No. 12, entitled "an ordinance
providing for the appointment of a City Commis
sioner and Assistant City Commissioner, and pre
scribing their duties," which was also read.
Mr. Harvey presented a remonstrance from a
number of citizens against the opening of Washing
ton street, between Gav street and Northern Ave
nue. Referred to the Committee on Highways.
SECOND BRANCH. —The Branch met pursuant to
adjournment. John B. Seidenstrieker, Esq., Presi
dent, in the chair, and all the members present.
Mr. Sullivan called up the ordinance granting
permission to John Boyd, and Baker, Brothers A
Co., to extend the port warden's line at the Spring
Garden's Ferry Branch, and to erect a wharf
thereon, which was passed.
Mr. Kelso, from the special committee on the i
application of the Pittsburg and Connellsville Kail- j
road Company, for the assent of the city of Balti- i
timore to issue bonds to the amount of four hundred
thousand dollars, for the construction of that por- ;
tic- oi their road lying between Pittsburg and Port
Perry, presented a lengthy report upon the subject
and an ordinance, which were laid on the table.
Mr. Kirk submitted a resolution requesting the
City Counsellor to inform the Branch whether the
Mayor and City Council have the power to change
the names of the streets, lanes and alleys of the
city. Adopted.
An ordinance to change the name of Register
street to Irving street, was received from the First
Branch and laid on the table.
Mr. Bierbowcr called up the resolution to pay
! the expenses of the committees appointed to visit
Annapolis to secure the action of the Legislature in
relation to the affairs of the corporation. Amended
and adopted.
Adjourned until this afternoon.
[From the Mobile Register, March 4.]
AWFUL LOSS OF LIFE.
STEAMER ELIZA BATTLE BURNED.
! On Monday morning, Ist inst., between two and
| three o'clock, as the Eliza Battle, Capt. S. G. Stone
I was coming down the Tombigbee river on her way
to Mobile, at a point about forty-five miles below
I Demopolis, she was discovered to be on fire in the
j after part. The alarm was immediately given, and
| every exertion made to arrest the flames. But in
j vain, for owing to a high wind and the point at which
the tire first caught, it communicated almost instant
ly with the ladies' cabin, and cut off all access to
the life-boat and yawl. All on board were driven
to the forward part of the boat, where they re
mained until the scorching flames drove them' into
the water. Some were fortunate enough to get bales
of cotton, and some sustained themselves by cling
ing to the limbs of trees for several hours, until res
cued from their perilous position after daylight. It
will be remembered that Sunday night was bitterly
cold, and of the twenty-nine o'r thirty-three who
perished, it is more than probable a majority was
frozen to death. The accident occurred, we learn,
at a point where the river was swollen over its banks]
and spread for half a mile or more into the swampy
lowland, and that when an effort was made to reach
the shore, the boat came in contact with a large tree,
which was broken down by the violence of the con
cussion, and arrested her progress. There were be
tween fifty and sixty persons on board, and of these,
it is stated by some, twenty-nine, and by others thir
ty-three, were lost. Between twelve and thirteen
hundred bales of cotton were destroyed, and the
boat burned to the water's edge.
We append the following fuller account from yes
terday's Evening Nave:
The fire had its origin among the cotton bales on
the after deck under the cabin, and although the
flames made but little progress at first, a strong
north wind (almost a gale) soon spread to all parts
of the boat, and the passengers were compelled to
seek safety for their lives by retreating in their
night clothes.
The boat was headed for the shore, but the river
being high and out of its banks, and the wheel
ropes burned, a landing could not be effected.
She was, however, driven among the trees, where
she lodged until the engines ceased to work, (the
intensity of the heat driving the engineers from
their posts,) when the passengers were enabled to
effect an escape by clinging to limbs and branches
of trees, and by bales of cotton thrown overboard.
After the wheels stopped, the boat swayed round
and was driven across the river by force of the
wind. This fortunate circumstance probably saved
the lives of many of the survivors, as they must
otherwise have perished in the flames of the
boat.
The mate and pilot and some others on cotton
bales floated down the river some four miles, shout
ing for help, before boats could be obtained. These
were then carried across the river and hauled on
wagons to the scene of disaster, when the survivors
on the tree 3 were carried to land.
It is proper to state that all efforts to get to the
yawl were rendered fruitless, as the flames cut off
all means ol access to it. An attempt was then
made to launch the life-boat, but before a sufficient
force could be mustered, the fire again drove the
party away.
It is due to Captain Stone to say, that when as
sistance arrived he gave orders to save the women
and children first, and was himself the last to be ta
ken off. It will be seen by the statement below,
that most of the lost were frozen, having been more
or less in the water, and subjected three or four
hours to the cold northern blast.
The residents of the vicinity, as soon as they
learned the disaster, rendered what service was in
their power.
No cause for the fire is known, unless it was by
sparks from the steamer Warrior, which boat was
met passing to windward, about half an hour before
the flames were discovered.
All of the books and papers of the boat were lost,
and, with the exception of one or two carpet bags,
every particle of baggage also.
The Battle belonged to Cox, Brainard & Co., and
was not insured. What the amount of loss is it is
impossible to ascertain.
The following is a list of those ascertained to have
been lost:
Mrs. B. Cromwell and child, frozen, Sumter coun
ty. Mrs. 11. G. Turner and child, frozen, Wash
ington county. Mr. \\ .T. Smith, frozen, Greene
county. Mr. Willis, frozen, Chickasaw couutv.—
Mr. Augustus Jones, frozen, Columbus, Miss. Mr.
Caradine, frozen, Chickasaw county. Mr. Martin,
frozen, Kv. Mr. John Powell, barkeeper, frozen.
Dr. S. W. Clanton. frozen, Warsaw, Ala. A young
man, unknown, frozen, Fairfield, Ala. Negro man
belonging to B. L. Turner, frozen. Negro man
"Jackson," barber, frozen. Barnett, cook, frozen.
*Nancy, chambermaid, belonging to S. G. Stone,
master'of the Eliza Battle, frozen. Robert, cabin
boy, belonging to Col. T. Buford. Dick, cabin-boy,
belonging to Judge R. C. Torrev. Jim, cabin-boy,
belonging to J. Foster. '-White boy,(3d cook) name
unknown. Sam, deck hand, belonging to J. A. Moor
ing. Peter, deck hand, belonging to J. A. Mooring.
'Jack, deck hand, belonging to J. A. Mooring.
♦Bill, deck hand, belonging to 11. G McMahon.
Allen, deck hand, belonging to John Bowen. Ben,
deck hand, belonging to Dan ltaine. 'Rev. Mr.
Newman, frozen, from Louisville, Ky. *M. A.
Galloway, never seen, Gainesville, Ala. 'Three
white deck hands, never seen. P. Kirkland, died
after getting ashore, Greene county, Ala. Mrs.
Cromwell and her child died from cold, in her hus
band's arms, in a tree. *Dr. S. H. Jones, never
seen, Greene county, Ala.
'The bodies were not recovered of the following
Dr. S. H. Jones, M. A. Galloway, Rev. Mr. Newman; white
boy, 3d cook; Jack, negro; Bill, negro; three white deck
hands; chambermaid.
THE NEW YORKERS AND THEIR TURKISH
GUEST.
The New York Herald, in noticing the attentions
paid to Rear Admiral Mohammed Pacha and suite,
by the corporate authorities of that city, says:
Rear Admiral Mohammed Pacha and his suite,
expressed the greatest satisfaction with their recep
tion on Monday, at the hands of the Mayor, Com
mon Council and the citizens; but as his visit is
more for the purpose of business than for pleasure,
the Pacha desired to remain unmolested yesterday,
in order to have time to despatch to his government
an account of the manner in which he had been re
ceived. The comparatively copious fall of snow,
however, was too great a temptation to be overlook
ed, and so it was determined by the Committee of the
the Common Council and a" few citizens to ten
der to the Pacha and his suite the offer of a
short sleigh ride through the city, for the tre
ble purpose of carrying out the design of giving
the guests an hospitable reception and an oppor
tunity to enjoy the novelty of a sleigh ride,
together with a view of the more desirable portions
of the city. Messrs. Acker A Coylcr kindly tender
ed to the committee the use of their finest sleigh,
With six spirited horses for the occasion, and alter
much persuasion the Turkish guests were prevailed
upon to accept the invitation to take a short ride.
Accordingly, about three o'clock, the magni
ficent turn out drove up to the St. Nicholas; attract
ing no little attention from the large crowd which
soon collected in front of the hotel. The news spread
rapidly that the Turks were going to be treated to
a sleigh ride, and by the time the suite prepared to
enter the sleigh an assemblage of several hundred
persons had collected. The Pacha and his suite were
not long in making their appearance, and as they
took their seats they were greeted with enthusias
tic cheers, which compliment was duly acknowledg
ed by the Pacha in a series of bows and smiles, com
bining Oriental courtesy with American apprecia
tion.
There were among the invited guests, Rear Ad
miral Mohammed Pacha, Hassan Bey, the Turkish
Consul, Mr. Oscanyan, the interpreter, Alderman
Boole, Councilman Van Tine, C. T. McClenachan,
T. S. Xims and others, the remaining two of the
Turkish guests being too much indispo ed to at
tend. As the partv drove off, they were saluted
with enthusiastic cheers, which were duly acknow
ledged by the Pacha and his suite. Along the route
down Broadway, the party attracted the utmost
curiosity; and whenever they were recognized, they
were received with a cheering welcome, which
must have impressed the Pacha with a favorable
idea of American hospitality. Now a full stage
sleigh load would pass, and as the national fez of
the Turk was recognized, a genuine democratic
"hurra" greeted the guests, while the little bovson
the sidewalks threw up their caps, the ladies stared
and bowed, and forgot to hold up their skirts, and
everybody seemed to wish the party a merry sleigh
ride.
HORRIBLE AFFAIR. —We learn from a correspond
ent, that a horrible occurrence was enacted in a
place called the Windham Settlement, eight miles
from Timmonsville, on the 4th inst.
It appears that this place is one which is resorted
to for the purpose of drinking and negro trading at
all times—the Sabbath day not even excepted. A
committee was formed by the citizens of the District
for the purpose of suppressing such places of vice
and iniquity. On the 4th inst., about seventy-five
men, armed, went to this place of resort for drink
ing. The law breakers had been apprised that the
Vigilance Committee, so called, would be there, and
they immediately armed themselves for a defence;
when one of the desperadoes fired, wounding one of
the committee. The fire was returned, killing Oa
leb Freeman and Abraham Windham, and seriously
wounding E. A. Windham and Thomas Windham.
Several others were wounded. Of the Vigilance
Committee, one was badlv cut, and is supposed to
be mortally wounded. Two others are wounded,
but our correspondent did not ascertain whether
they were considered dangerous. Dr. Hunter, of
Timmonsville, was in attendance at the scene of the
dead and dying. A jury of inquest was in attend
ance on the sth, witnesses in relation
to the death of Freeman and Windham.— Washimj
ton (X. C.) Herald, March G.
A Hong Kong correspondent says that Mr. Com
missioner Reed has rented a bouse in Macao, the
Portuguese colony, and that he will probably reside
there until an opportunity offers or entering into
negotiations with the Chinese.
PRICE TWO CENTS.
EXTENSIVE FAILURE AND FORGERIES.— The Lynch
burg Courier of Saturday says: Our community
has been considerably exercised for the last day or
two on the subject of certain developments regard
ing the operations of a citizen of Bedford, whose
business transactions in this city have been of a heavy
j ?|l a . ra ? to ''" ' he party to whom we allude, Mr. Win.
| Gish, has long been a leading merchant and heavy
trader in Bedford, and has heretofore borne the
character of being a man of large means and relia
bility. It has now come to light, however, that he
has for some time been sustaining himself and credit
by species of financial operations and forg-eries which
have brought ruin and dishonor upon himself and
loss upon many others. To meet his engagements
he has had resort to the expedient of a wholesale
forgery of various responsible names on business
paper, which paper he has from time to time passed
to other persons at very enormous discount.
It is presumed that there is not less than $lOO,OOO
worth of his paper, the most of which doubtless
bears forged endorsements,now held by different per
sons, many of them in this city. We hear of vari
ous persons here who hold it in sums ranging from
one up to five thousand dollars. Thepersons whose
names are forged are we believe, all citizens of Bed
ford. The liabilities of this skillful operator are
very heavy—and he leaves no effects—having made
disposition of all his property some time since. He
has left for parts unknown. " When last heard from
he was in Richmond.
HEAVY DEFALCATION IN NEW YORK.— The New
York Herald, of yesterday, publishes the following
account of a heavy defalcation in the Union Bank
of that city:
The particulars concerning a heavy defalcation in
the Lnion Bank, Wall street, involving the sum of
$lOO,OOO, were made public yesterday afternoon.
The first book-keeper of that institution it appears
absconded from the bank on Monday, taking with
him a large sum of money. An examination of the
books showed that a series of embezzlements had
been going on for the last six or eight weeks, and
that the bookkeeper was a defaulter to the tune of
$lOO,OOO. It appears, as far as we have been able
to ascertain, that the attention of the President
and Cashier of the bank was first called to the dis
honesty of the defaulter by detective policeman Jo
seph Keefe.
This officer, it appears, discovered the book-keeper
in the gambling saloon No. 1 Ann street on a cer
tain occasion. He was then betting freely, and lost
a large sum at faro. The officer suspected that all
was not as it should be, and accordingly he watched
the movements of the individual closely, and found
that he frequently visited the gaming table, losing
tens of thousands of dollars in the course of a few
weeks. After carefully weighing the matter, Keefe
decided to inform the President and Directors of the
bank of the discovery he had made concerning the
ways and habits of their book-keeper.
The officers of the Bank were loth to believe their
employee was dishonest, and consequently they de
layed an investigation of the case until it was too
late. Instead of arresting the defaulter on the spot,
they allowed the matter to remain for a few days,
w hen the book-keeper became alarmed at the suspi
cious glances that were cast upon him, and took to
his heels, leaving the Bank in the lurch. On Mon
day forenoon, about lunch time, the book-keeper
slipped out of the Bank, and has not since been
heard of. ,
On finding that the suspected party was nan est,
the President and Cashier examined the books of
the Bank, when they were surprised on finding that
the defaulter had embezzled sums amounting in the
aggregate to $lOO,OOO. They immediately proceed
ed to the Mayor's office, and laid the matter before
the chief magistrate of the city, but no relief could
be afforded them. A warrant was issued for the
apprehension of the accused; but up to last even
ing the police were unable to find any clue to his
whereabouts. There are other parties keeping ac
counts in the bank who are implicated with the de
faulting book-keeper, but their names have not yet
been made public. The accused is a young man of
very respectable connections, named' Benjamin K.
Brotherson. He was a fast liver, and unfortunate
ly for the sake of his welfare was strongly addicted
to gambling.
DecistOKS OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY
UNDER THE TARIFF ACT OF 1857.— Blank Copying
flookx. —The Secretary of the Treasury lias, on ap
peal, overruled the decision of the Collector at the
port of Boston, in assessing a duty of 2 per cent,
on certain imported articles invoiced as "copying
books."
The books in question should, in the opinion of thf
Secretary, be embraced in the classification if
"blank books, bound or unbound," and entered t
a duty of 15 per cent.
Hemp Carpeting. —The Secretary has, on appeal,
also overruled the decision of the Collector at fios
ton, in assessing a duty of 24 per cent, on an article
invoiced as "Dutch carpeting." The Secretary is
of opinion that the article in question should be
charged with duty at the rate of 15 per cent., under
the classiflication in schedule Eof "manufactures of
hemp, not otherwise provided for."
(.'auntie Soda. —The decision of the Collector at Bos
ton, lias, on appeal, been affirmed by the Secretary,
in assessing a duty of 15 per cent, on an article im
ported and invoiced as "caustic soda," in pursuance
of the provisions of the Ist section of the tariff act
of 1857.
THE NAVY LIST FOR 1858. —From the .Naval Regis
ter for the year 1858, about to be issued from the
Navy Department, in accordance with the act ol
Congress approved December 3, 1815, we abstract
the following general statement of the present effec
tive force and condition of the naval service:
Captains : Active list, 76; reserved list, 25. Com
manders : Active list, 106; reserved list, 20. Lieu
tenants: Active list, 319; reserved list, 54. Surgeons
ranking with Commanders, 41; Surgeons ranking
with Lieutenants, 64. Passed Asst. Surgeons, 41;
Asst. Surgeons, 39. Pursers ranking with Com
manders, 36; Pursers ranking with Lieutenants, 24.
Passed Midshipmen : Active list, 23; retired list, 2;
Midshipmen, 45; Acting Midshipmen of the Ist, 2d,
3d and 4th classes, on probation at the Naval Acad
emy, 174; Boatswains, 38; Gunners, 44; Carpenters,
47; Sailmakers, 42; Engineers, 18; First Asst. Engi
neers, 31; Second Asst. Engineers, 21; Third Asst.
Engineers, 54.
Marine Corp*. —l Colonel Commandant; Adju
tant, Paymaster, Quartermaster, and Assistant
Quartermaster, composing General Staff; 1 Lieu
tenant Colonel, 4 Majors, 13 Captains, 19 First Lieu
tenants, 20 Second Lieutenants.
Resignations during year 1857.-1 Captain, 10
Lieutenants, 3 Passed Assistant Surgeons, 1 Assist
ant Surgeon, 3 Pursers, 1 Passed Midshipman, 38
Acting Midshipmen.
Death* during the year 1857.—5 Captains, 2 Com
manders, 11 Lieutenants, 2 Surgeons, 1 Passed As
sistant Surgeon, 4 Pursers, 2 Boatswains, 1 Gunner,
2 Carpenters, 2 Sailmakers.
Diumieeal*from the eervice during the year 1857.
1 Commander, 3 Lieutenants, 7 Acting Midshipmen,
3 Boatswains.
Ve**eU of War.—lo Ships of the Line, 10 Frig
ates, 21 Sloops of War, 3 Brigs, 19 Screw Steamers
of the Ist, 2d and 3d classes, 2 Screw Tenders, 7
Side wheel Steamers of Ist, 2d and 3d classes, 1
Side wheel Tender, 3 Store Vessels, 5 Permanent
Store and Receiving Ships.
Nacy Fords.—Portsmouth, N. H., Captain John
Pope, commandant; Boston, Capt. S. H. Stringham;
New York, Capt. L. Kearny; Philadelphia, Capt.
Charles Stewart; Washington, Capt. E. A. F. La
valette; Norfolk, Capt. T. A. Dornin; Pensacola,
Capt. C. K. Stribling; Mare Island, Cal., Capt. D.
G. Farragut.
THE WEATHER. —The following report of the
weather for March 9th is made from the Morse
Telegraph line to the Smithsonian Institution. The
time of observation is about 8 o'clock A. M. :
liuthtlo, X. Y cloudy, wind NW
New York, X. Y fine. '
Philadelphia. Pa cloudy, cold.
Baltimore, Md clear,'mild.
Cumberland, Md snowing.
Wheeling, Va cool, snowing.
Washington, D. C cloudy, cold, wind NW.
Ku'hmond, Va cloudy, th. 24, wind X.
Staunton, Va snow 12 inches deep.
Lynchburg, Va cloudy, cold.
Bristol, Tenn cloudv. ther 20.
Petersburg, Va cloudy, cold.
Norfolk, Va wind NW., th. 24
Wilmington, X. C clear, cool.
Columbia, S. C clear, cold.
Charleston. S. C th. 30. wind XE.
Augusta, Ga clear, cold.
Savannah, Ga clear, th. 30, wind XW
Macon, Ga clear, cold.
Barometer at the Smithsonian, at 7A. M (corrected for
temperature) 29.600.
Thermometer, on the Smithsonian tower, minimum last
night, 17J4 3 ; near the ground, 18 D .
A NEW "TOBACCO QUESTION."— The important
question of the possibility of poisoning by cigars
impregnated with arsenic has been raised by the
recent death, in France, of a priest named Bottaro,
supposed to have been poisoned by another priest.
An investigation has been undertaken, to ascertain
whether it be possible or probable that arsenicated
cigars can cause death bv the aspiration of their
smoke impregnated with volatilised arsenic, or bv its
admission in the saliva without such change: and very
important are the conclusions arrived at. "There
are four ways," remarked the investigators, "in
which the introduction of arsencie into the animal
economy may be effected through the medium of ci
gars by impregnation with a powerful solution of the
poison; by its introduction into the candescent end,
so that it may reach and mix with the saliva during
smoking; or,'finally in larger quantity, hidden in the
central part of cigars. Poisoning is hardly possible
in the first or second cases. In the third instance it
is inconceivable. It might occur bv a combination
of two or three of these methods. The question of
the formation of arseniuretted hydrogen is not set
tled." In reading this report, we seem to be trans
ported to the days of the Borgias, when the poison
ed taper, falsely bearing the motto, "alii* insert-,
endo coiutumor,'' destroyed other existences in sacri
ficing its own: and when the flowers of the ball room
were scattered with alien and lethal perfumes. It
is well to be assured that those fabled horrors are
also impossibilities. The mere suggestion of this
most "deleterious sophistication " of tobacco must
carry alarm and discomfort to the soul of any rich
uncle in the habit of smoking his favorite nephew's
cigars ; while for our modern blowers of anti-blasts
to tobacco it furnishes a patent and effective insinu
ation. This report, however, practically negatives
the possibility of such crime being successfully per
petrated, since it is only in those cases where the
impalpable powder is made to mix with the saliva
in other words, where detection is almost inevitable
that this detestable expedient could be effectively
employed.— The Lancet. '

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