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The daily exchange. (Baltimore, Md.) 1858-1861, April 22, 1858, Image 1

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VOL. I—NO.
THE DAILY EXCHANGE.
PT BLISHED EV ERY MORNING, (SUNDAYS EXCEPTED )
nr
KERR & CO.
OFFICE, CARROLL HALL,
S. E. CORNER OF BALTIMORE AND CALVERT STREETS.
EDITORS AND PRORIETORS.
CHARLES O. KKRK. THOMAS W. HALL, JR.
TERMS:
In the city TWSLVR AND A HALF CENTS per week, paya
ble to the carrier. Mailed to subscribers, out of the city,
at six DOLLARS per annum; THREE DOLLARS forsix months
and ONE DOLLAR for two months. Invariably in advance
for the time ordered.
ADVERTISING RATES.
TABLE:
(SQUARE—EIGHT LINES.)
One insertion 50
Two insertions * 75
" !!si.oo
f,"" r " $1.25
F've " $l5O
One week $1.75
one mouth $4 .00
. -Auvertmements occupying a larger or smaller space, or
inserted for a longer or shorter time, charged for propor
tionately.
THE DAILY EXCHANGE.
PROSPECTUS.
UVDF.II the above title it is proposed to
conduct and publish in the city of Baltimore a first
class Commercial and Political MORNING NEWSPAPER.
1 his enterprise has been prompted by the conviction
that the rapid growth of Baltimore in i>opulation and
wealth, its constantly augmenting trade, and its conse
quently increased commercial and political importance
not only justify but demand an effort to introduce into the
field of journalism that element of competition, which, in
all other branches of business, has so materially contribu
ted to the prosperity of the city,
"THE EXCHANGE." With regard to the name, —if an
apology were needed, for thus introducing what may per
haps be deemed a novelty in the nomenclature of journal
ism,—-it has been adopted, not simply for its peculiar ap
propriateness ill connection with those commercial inter
ests to which a paper of the character proposed must be
largely devoted, but in its wide and more comprehensive
acceptation, as embracing within its scope all those topics
which come within the province of the public press.
Ist. NEWS. —It will, of course, bo the first aim of the
proprietors to furnish the readers of THE EXCHANGE
with the most prompt, full and authentic intelligence upon
all matters of public interest, at home and abroad ; and to
secure the accomplishment of this result, and the perfec
tion of every arrangement required to place THE EX
CHANGE in this particular on a level with the best jour
nals of the country, 110 necessary expense or exertion will
be spared.
2d, COMMERCE.— The commercial department of the pa
per will include, not only the usual daily reports and
weekly reviews of the markets, domestic and foreign, com
piled with fulness ami accuracy, but a frequent editorial
discussion of the leading financial questions of the day,
with regard to which the mercantile community naturally
look to the public press for comment and suggestion.
3d. POLITICS. —The interests of commerce and the state
Ithe markets are so constantly and intimately affected
by the aspect of political affairs throughout the world, that
a journal which aspires to he any thing more than a mere
commercial reporter or daily price current, must necessa
sarily devote a large space in its columns to the dissemi
nation of political intelligence, and the discussion of polit
ical questions. In this department of the paper, which,
apart from its commercial importance, also possesses a
peculiar and exclusive interest of its own, it will te the
object of H IE EXCHANGE to preserve a position of honest
and fearless independence, equally removed from servile
partisanship upon the one hand, and timid neutrality upon
the other.
4th, LITERATURE AND ART. —Candid and impartial re
views of current literature and contemporaneous art tnu
sicalland dramatical criticisms, by competent judges, and
original contributions upon subjects of literary or scientific
interest, will always finil ail appropriate place in the col
umns ot THE EXCHANGE, and it will be the constant
inn of the proprietors to render it a valuable and interest
■•'n journal for the family as well as for the counting
room.
dentation.
PATAPSCO FEMALE INSTITUTE. MARYLAND
'fill? TRUSTEES of the Patapsco Female
. . I ,ls t.itute announce to the public that the additional
huildiugsand improvements commenced by them ayear ago
in accordance with the subjoined resolutions, are now com
plete. These improvements have not been made with a
view to increase the school, but for the greater conveni
ence and comfort of the usual number of pupils.
The new chapel is a handsome and most appropriate
structure, for the exclusive use of the inmates of the In
stitute, and in all its arrangements it is most complete. It
is furnished with a new organ of fine construction and ex
cellent tone.
The administration of Mr. Archer for the past year and
the present has been attended with unprecedented suc
cess, and the Trustees feel themselves fully justified in
recommending the Institute to the continued favor of the 1
South.
It has pre-eminence in health fulness. The pupils avoid
ing, on the one hand, the debilitating effects of a Southern
climate, and oil the other the rigors of the North, have i
few of the interruptions incident to both these climates.
It is sufficiently near to the city of Baltimore to enjoy the
benefits of a city without any f its evils.
As an Institution of learning it has the advantage of a
full organisation, a resident chaplain, and a corps of ac
complished teachers and professors, called together from
time tit time in the long experience of those having charge
of the Institute.
The Trustees of the Patapsco Female Institute, having
been duly notified by Mrs. Lincoln Phelps of her intention
to resign her office of principal at the close of the present
school year, have elected Robert H. Archer as her succes
sor. The eminent success of Mr. Archer in conducting for
many years a School for Young Ladies in the city of Balti
more, entitles him to our confidence as a person peculiarly
qualified to maintain the present high standing, and insure
the permanent prosperity of the Institution; and with this
view we are engaged in the erection of another building in
addition to the present extensive accommodations of the
I nstitute.
CIIAS. \V r HORSEY. PRESIDENT. WM. DENNY M
D . SECRETARY. T. WATKINS LIOON, E. HAMMOND,
JOHN. P. KENNEDY. fe22 dtf.
I AW SCHOOL OF THE UNIVERSITY
-i AT CAMBRIDGE, MASS.
Tlf Instructors in this School arc
Hon. JOEL PARKER. LL.D., Koral Professor.
Hon. TUKOPHELBS PARSONS, LL.D., Dane Professor.
Hon. EMORY WASHBURN, LL.D., University Professor.
The course of instruction embraces the various branches
of the Common Law. ami of Equity, Admiralty, Com
mercial, International and Constitutional Law, "and the
Jurisprudence of the United States. The Law Library
consists of about 1-4,0)10 volumes, and as new works ap
pear they are added, aud every effort is made to render it
complete.
Instruction is given by oral lectures and expositions,
(and hy recitations and examinations, in connection with
them.) of which there are ten every week. Two Moot
Courts are also holden in each week, at each of which a
cause, previously given out, is argued by four students,
and an opinion delivered by the Presiding Instructor.
Rooms and other facilities are also provided for the Club
Courts; ami an Assembly is held weekly for practice in de
bate, and acquiring a knowledge of parliamentary law aud
proceedings.
Students may enter the School in any stage of their pro
fessional studies or mercantile pursuits, and at the com
menement of either term, or in the middle or other part of
term.
They are at liberty to select what studies they will pur
e according to their view of their own wants and at
tainments.
. The Academical year, which commences on Thursday,
six weeks after the third Wednesday in July, is divided
into two terms, of tweuty weeks each, with a vacation of
six weeks at the end of each term.
During the Winter vacation, the Library is opened,
wanned, and lighted, for the use of the members of the
School.
Applications for admission, or for Catalogues, or anv
further information, may be made to either of the Profes
sors at Cambr.dge.
Cambridge, Mass., January, 1858. [d6t law6m.
ggrinrttwiL
RHODES'
SUPER PHOSPATE OF LIME
MANUFACTURED FROM FORMULA OF
HI. FAMES UIGGINS,
> STATE CHEMIST OF MARYLAND
EVERY LOT OFFERED EOR SALE REGULARLY
AN ALYZED IIY DRS. JAS. HIGGINS AND CHARLES
BICKELL AND FULLY WARRANTED.
In introillining this HIGHLY AUTHENTICATED
FERTILIZER to the agriculturist of the United States
for the year 1858, we forbear any lengthened remarks, as
their intelligence is already informed of the value of
BONES TREATED WITH SULPHURIC ACID, producing
the In phospate of lime, and yielding SOLUBLE PHOS
PHOHIC ACID, the efficient and indispensable nutri
ment of plants.
As many preparations are offered to the public styled
"Super Phospate," we have for our own, and the protection
of the agricultural community, surrendered up to I)rs
Higgins and Bickell the entire scientific feature of the
RHODES' SUPER PHOSPHATE OF LIME, and every lot
offered for sale is regularly analyzed by them and reported
to the public, which we conceive will be a proper caution
to the agricultural community to protect them from impo
sition in the many spurious articles now offered in the
market.
PA MPHI.RTS containing a detailed account will be fur
nisbed on application or forwarded per mail.
Packed in barrels and bags.
Price $45 per ton of 2,000 lbs.
Address B. tf. RHODES k CO.,
fe22-3m 141 West Pratt Street. Baltimore.
WHRF.LER & WILSON'S
IMPROVED FAMILY SEWING MACHINE,
, -M9 BALTIMOK* STREET.
Thousands of these MACHINES have been in successful
operation in the hands of
FAMILIES,.PLANTERS AND MANUFACTURERS,
for the past several years, and have thus earned the proud
1" ™™,'"* universally conceded to them. Thus, THE
PR EMU M was awarded these machines at the Fair of the
om'vimra i'iou , A „o°' thc SW ANN PREMIUM (>F
ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS at the same Fair, as one of
••the most practicable inventions adapted to common use.
to be estimated with efereuce to cheapness and general
v■ \ ll', 5 ! " f/t-'l lr ' mmm M the Metropolitan
Fair at Washington, of lebruary, 1855: and the Highest
'rem,urn at the Pennsylvania lan, State Fair, held at
Harrisburg, September, 1 ( u Silver Medal! and the
Highest Premium at the Mechanics' Fair at Cincinnati
the Highest Premium at New York State Fair at Klmira*
September, 1555; and the Highest Premium at the late-
Fair of the Maryland Institute of 1855 (a Gold Med-ill
E. M. PUN PERSON & CO.*
:i|l7-tf 209 Baltimore street.
WM. GRANGE k CO.,
? ▼ 119 WEST LOMBARD STREET,
MANUFACTURERS' DEPOT OF GLUE,
Of every description, from common to the most superior
quality of BONE GLUE, for Printers and Piano Manufac
turers' use.
Also, constantly on hand, a large supply of
RONE DUST,
# FOR AGRICULTURAL PURPOSES.
Both Articles at strictly Manufacturers' prices. fe22 tf
CO LLEC TI O N A G E N C Y~
•T. D. PRATT &. CO.,
f to rec ' iT " and transmit CLAIMS FOR COL
nliV..v. iV '".""y tity °r county in the United States or
„,,„„ r .?, V .'! ICT3 ,. , Bein H in direct and frequent corres
jl.r ) Tellable Attorneys in every city and county,
TIOVS Ire sivh'a e speedy and prompt COLLEC
nmrpnS rum'l}g in entire satisfaction,
n. mn-I .la i NT!I.E AGENCY, corner of
Baltimore and South Charles streets. mrfJ tf
pouts ant) *Jlusir.
m faWILLIAM GAEHLE & '<>.,
I frfTTnfW lrom tl,e Fi ™ "f Knabe, Giielile &Co
! U J V J J MANUFACTURERS OF
I GRAND AND SQUARE EI ANO FORTES,
I North-east corner of EUTAW AND FAYETTE STS.,
TXTU „ Baltimore, Md.
Where may be seen PIANOS, which for elegance of finish
sweetness of tone, combined with an agreeable touch are
second to none in thiscouniry.
Terms and prices moderate, and every instrument war
ranted. Pianos hired, and Tuning att 'nded to promptly
apb-tf 1 1 J '
YORK PIANO DEPOT.
n-J-PFFTI WM F. THIEDE.
UII Successor to PETRI & THIEDE.
x- 11 on'fA the Sto re anil Stock of the old firm.
No. 80 F AYETTE STREET, begs leave to announce that
he has obtained the
SOLE AGENCY
FOR THE STATE OF MARYLAND, FOR
STKIXWAY .t SON'S
GRAND AND SQUARE PIANOS!
He will be pleased to receive culls from his friends and
the public, to examine these celebrated instruments By
purchasing wholly for cash, he is able to offer the works
of tliese well known makers at prices that will nut rail to
please. •
A call is earnestly solicited.
WM. F. TIIIEDE,
mr m No. 80 Fayette street, west of Chai les.
' V - NKILL - W. F. WASHBURN. :
& WASHBURN, |
ffIf"TT~W7I EJRsr premium piano-fortes, !
J J irf J J MANUFACTORY AM) WAREROOMS— |
66 FAYETTE ST., East of Calvert. I
111 ill 2 Sm Baltimore, .Md.
'HUNKERING & SONS,
3" * 31 NUNNS k CLARK'S
CELEBRATED PIANO FORTES,
Constantly receiving anil for sale only by
F. D. BENTEEN,
IS! Baltimore street and 84 Fayette,
third store west of Charles st.
Purchasers will find it to their interest to examine fir
themselves the superior qualities of the aliove Pianos.
Piano Stools, Prince & Co.'s Melodeons from $45 upwards
mr2s tf.
, f 'nM ( ■' >l.l> M F.DAI, PR KM I I'M
hniryni piano fortes.
1/ J y J U WILLIAM KNABE & CO.,
MANUFACTURERS OF
GRAND AND
SQUARE PIANO.FORTES
Nos. 1,3, 5 and 7 NORTH F VIA IF ST.,
Opposite the Eutaw House,
And at our NEW SALESROOM,
207 BALTIMORE STREET,
Between Charles and Light streets.
Tliese celebrated PIANOS have, at different Fairs, for '
several successive years, been awarded the HIGHEST
PREMIUMS for excellence, over all competition.
They have also been pronounced by S. Thalberg, the
most celebrated pianist in the world, and other distin
guished artists, including M. Strakosch, G. Satter kc
kc to be equal if not SUPERIOR to anv in this country'
We have constantly on hand at our extensive Ware
rooms as above, the largest assortment of FIXE PIANO
FORTES to be found in this city, which we will sell
wholesale and retail on the most liberal terms.
In every case we guarantee our Pianos to give entire
satisfaction.
on hand a fine assortment of MELODE
OXS, ~f the liest makers, at prices from $l5 to $2OO.
'V. 1 !' ay ? fur sale a ' HrKe m,n il>er of 0001) SECOND
HANI) 11 A.N OS, at prices ranging from $75 to $2OO.
tt^"PIANOS EXCHANGED, HIRED and TUNED.
mrU tf WM. KNABE fc CO.
fobarto.
M ANUFACTURED TOBA( •< O
M. I.anghurne k Son, Nectar Ilis
Keen & Moorman lbs. Turner, I-owis & Co. D.s,
Scearcefc Martin lbs. E.M.Holland Il,s
11. W. Jones Ihs. J. K. Lea, Kalorama lhs!
A. H. Moorman lbs. do Talula lbs
A.T. Holland lbs. John Thomas lhs'
n in. 11. Cabaniss lbs. Fairfax i|,s
F Beverly lbs. Wm. Rarrett lbs.'
tharl ;s .x ring lhs. L. Laurence lbs
James Harper lbs. D. Noble p> s '
L nion lhs. Samuel Lovell lbs
Geo. Cooper & Co. Twist Melville lbs'
John Wesley lbs.
For sale by JOHN P. PLEASANTS & SONS
a l'- 1 ,f No. 52 South street.
ANUFACTUREI) TOBACCO,—
A. Enos, lbs. Economy, 12's
G. H. Larrence, lbs. Jas. Ilite, 12's.
A. Enos, s's. J. Mason. 12 s.
W. Reynolds k Co., s's. Anthony, 12's
A Johnson. 10's. Wm. Walker, 18's,
G. 11. Larrence, 10's. Economy, 20 s.
G. H Larrence, s's. Uncle Tom's, 20's.
\\. Reynolds k Co., 10's. Planter's Daughter, X lhs
Aragon, 10's. G. 11. Larrence, 4 s.
Jas. Smith, 12's.
Just received and for sale by
COURTNEY & CUSHIXG,
a PO 66 South Gay street.
VIRGINIA MANUF. TOBA< ;< •<
POUNDS*
De Rosa, FIVES and TENS
Continental, Jno. T Lewis
Jas. Rue, I. p. Cook,
Tobacco yueen, HALF POUNDS.
Jas. Williams, National Guard,
J. W. Gait, lllair k Birch,
Leftwicli, (cross,) Uncle Sam,
JNO. TABB, Laurel Branch
FIVES and TENS Forest Rose,
Conqietitor, Olive Branch,
Piid.ly, Jas. Douglas.
Smiley, Hundley,
Turnley, ' shilo.
Jas. Douglas, Phil Primus,
Anna Rice, bright, R. J. Christian's Comfort,
J. C. Brock, do. do. P. Apple
A. E. Crutchfield. do. do. G.F. Rovall
Hewlett ,1„ do. Nat's Pride
Le Grand, PLANTERS' PRIDE
J. Lanes, Il.irk Sweet, lbs.
A. Stewart, R J. Christian's Indomitable
Vl'-'R*son, do. Comfort,
Christian s Pine Apple, do. Pine Apple
do Royal, ,1„. C.S.Pearson
r' ',D L ea " e ' W Stewart,
Jack Robinson, Competitor,
Planters' Pride, Old Bobs,
Zenobia, W H. Smiley.
Alexander,
Fancy Light Pressed and R. R. Twist. Fig, Dougli Nut
and other fancy stylos. Powhatan pipes and Kentucky
leaf
In store and for sale by ARMISTEAD, RIGGS k CO.
ap3-tf. 7 Kl'lare.
MAN UFACTURED TOBACCO.—
POUNDS.
Thus. J. Martin, D. F. Holt
John S. Hall, J. Brook, '
W. L. Saunders, T. T. Saunders,
Harry of the West, C. Davis,
Price Thomas. Davis k Draper,
A. J. Law & Co., Jean Nicott.
Shelton k Clay, Economy,
Gilman, B. White,
C. O'Malley, 8. Mate,
P. A. (-lay, A Ivan Adams,
W. B. Law, P. Hayne.
A Wins, P. Richardson,
J. M. Dillard, Geo. Finney,
Thomas Carbry, Smith,
J. M. Taylor, Mniiticello,'
J W. Murrell, K. Pope,
L. J. Keen, J. p. (Jraham,
Allen k Knight, P. Fry,
C. L. Ellis, Sams,
A. B. Clements, Joe Johnson,
W. Dabney, Meaxes,
M Moor, J;is. Sizer, Jr.,
Wild Rose. Pigs,
A. Turner, A. J. Law k Co.,
J. Mason, Twist,
J. T. Ross, R. Caswell,
Forest Rose, #lbs. 9 Buffalo, s's k 10's,
Lawrence, D. Lyon, 5 s k 10's,
A. k G. Maxwell, s's & 10's, A. B. Clements. 5 s,
Shipping s's, 10's, 12's, 14's, 18's and 20's.
For sale by COURTNEY & CUSHING,
f-22 tf Nu.South Gay giraoi.
"A/I" ANUFACTORED TOBAC<'O,
IvA Fancy Pound Lumps, Twist, Pancake, Balls, Figs, Itc.
Poindexter's Twist, X boxes.Ferguson's Cuba Twist, cad
Crumpton's Rllil A " Delight of the Harem, picture
Carroll's Fig, X u Ferguson's cor. stoned, 1 , bxs.
Murphy's Fig, X " M. G. Anderson's G.
Ferguson's I"ncake,X; " Bars, X "
Ragsdatc's Twist, X " Nutmeg Twist, X "
S. S. Lncke, X ' Jus. Miller's Pancake,X "
Ragsdale's Dew Thomas' Hon. Bean, X "
Drop, X " Witcher's Fan. &Sox. R&RX
Stewart & Walker's 6s, X bxsßerger's Original Jenny
J. Thomas, Jr., "Gholson." I.ind Twist.
POUNDS,
S. E. White, R. M. Harper,
J. M. Cobb, American Clipper,
J. A. Clay, Natural Leaf,
J. M. Arnold, W. C. Morton,
Burton's Cross, J. A. Graves,
H. Lewis. T. Taylor,
Star of Franklin, People's Favorite,
M. T. Anderson, Murrell & Burks,
T. H. Alien, R. D. Burks,
Lee k Bro., Mav Cherry,
Abdel Kader, Red Fox,
Lone Star, Jnu. p a tc,
Tyreana, Piedmont,
L. A. Williams, Jno. S. Clair,
J. L. Clayton's Cross, 11. Walker,
Geo. G. Curie, Jno. Turner
Prentis, Lilly Lee
R Walton, J.P.Hamlet,
Edmund Hale, D. P. Witchus, AAAA
J. C. Ferguson, John Logan.
John Smith, A. E. Saunders,
Leftwitch's Cross, J. C. Breckinridge,
Bluff City, FIVES.
Natural Bridge, Jack Robinson."
Nutmeg, EIGHTS, Ac.
Harry of the West Carter Jackson,
P. Parley, Consoler of Man,
Uncle Sam, Jno. Ainos,
Jew Twang, O. H. Roland,
Fannie Waller, TENS,
I. Ross, J. C. Luce,
W. B. Ryland, Stewart & Walker.
HALF POUNDS,
Consoler of Man, Carter Jackson, X boxes.
SMOKING TOBACCO IN BALES, BOXES AND BULS,
Kentucky I.eaf; Virginia Leaf and Stems.
Powhatan Pipes; Calabria Stick Liquorice.
In store and for sale by
WARWICK, FRICK k BALL,
fe22-tf. No. South street.
JOSHUA WALKER,
GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANT,
AND DEALER IN
FEED, HAY AND STRAW,
No. 110 N. HOWARD STREET.
Family, Extra and Super Flour of the best selected
brands. Corn Oats, Corn Meal, Chop Rye and Mill Feed.
Hay and Straw in bales. Cut Straw. Ac. mrf.27 t
RE M O V A L
TO STRAW GOODS DEALERS, MILLINERS, HAT
-1 fcitS, and the PUBLIC.
P .w„ RICHARD HILL
Respectfully announces to his friends and the public
RFTIII STP/U™W7l. M * WHOLESALE AND
2 .Vn n ~ A T MANUFACTORY from No. 18
Mcllellan s alley to his new and commodious Factorv
corner of SHARP and GERMAN STREETS, where he has
ample facilities for carrying on the above business in all
its various branches, including BLEACHING PREIV/I
and DYEING BONNETS and HATS of all d^cription,
N. B. Constantly on hand a full assortment of fashion
able BONNET FRAMES, CROWNS, Ac. mrlC-Sm
BALTIMORE, THURSDAY, APRIL 22, 1858.
Mtmrnlumpitits.
I FIREMEN'S INSURANCE COMPANY
JOfl.N" REESE, President.
H. P. DTIIURST, Secretary.
I Corner of South' and Second streets. ap6-tf
JOHNSTON'S INSURANCE ROOMS
I *9 PIKENIX BUILDINGS
73 SECOND STREET
AGGP. EGAT E CAPITA I,
EIGHT MILLIONS DOLLARS
STRICTLY FIRST CLASS.
FIRE, MARINE AXD LIFE INSURANCE COMPANIES
THUS. D. JOHXSTOX
i mr 3° Af Underwriter.
INSURANCE AGAINST LOSS OF
RENTS BY FIRE.
I THE NATIONAL FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY OF
BALTIMORE.
OFFICE, NO. 13 SOUTH STREET.
I Will make insurance against loss of Rent l>> lire, on a new
I and most liberal principle Thev also continue to insure
| all descriptions of Property against loss or damage l>v
Eire. " '
JOHN B. SEIDENSTRICKER, President.
DIRECTORS.
Job Smith, | John W. Ross,
i A. A. Chapman, i Henry M. Bash,!
Joseph W Jenkins, Win. Woodward,
-• " eal, V A,lam Denmead,
K. J Church, George Bartlett,
1. 11. Sullivan, j George Small.
I JOHN R. MACRUDER,
I mr 29 'f Secretary.
HENRY A . D I DIE R .
insurance agent
COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS,
CORNER OF GAY AND LOMRAKD STREETS,
I mrlfl-tf Baltimore.
17* QUIT AB L E FIRE INSURANCE
! SOCIETY.
Off A RTER PER /*ETV AL.
OFFICE, NO. 19 SOUTH STREET
THE BALTIMORE EQUITABLE SOCIETY will Tnsnre
HOUSES and FURNITURE from LOSS OR DAMAGE BY
FIRE, at very cheap rates, on the Mutual or Beneficial
plan, and grant Carpenter's Risks, on pleasing terms.
Owners of Property insure<i in the EQUITABLE Office
have no further responsibility than the amount of their
deposits, and on the expiration of policies, they are enti
thjd to receive a cash dividend of twenty-eight per cent.
The public are respectfully invited to call at the office
No. 19 SOUTH STREET, where the principles 011 which
the Society insure will be fully explained.
DIRECTORS:
TIIOMAS KELSO, BENJAMIN DEPORD,
WILLIAM KENNEDY, SAMUEL KIRBY,
HENRY RIEMAX, MICHAEL WARNER"
JAMES FRAZIER, DANIEL BAIL.
CHARLES R. CARROLL, ROBERT A. DOBBIN,
A USTIN JENKINS, DANIEL WARPIELD.
FRAXCIS A. CROOK, Treasurer.
HUGH B. .TONES, Secretary. fe24 ly
r UI JI - CtI!KAT VVKSTRUN (MA RINF.)
JL INSURANCE COMPANY
OF NE W YORK.
Authorized Capital $5,000 000
Cash Capital (already paid in) 1,000,000
Surplus Fund (represented by scrip) 560,000
Assetts Jan. 1,1858 2 276 000
This Cc in pany combines the advantages of the'"mixed
plan (so long and profitably practiced by the best Life In
surance Companies in Europe) blending the desirable se
curity of a large Cash Capital , with a literal return of the
profits to its customers.
All Marine and inland risks insured on most favorable
terms.
RICH'D LATHERS, Prest. J NO. A. PARKER, Ist V. Prest.
DOUGLAS ROBINSON, Sec'y. J. F. Cox, 2d do.
COLIN MACKENZIE, Agent in Baltimore,
" Office Commercial Buildings.
TJMRK INSURANCE AGENCY.
A GEORGE B. COALE,
COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS, GAY STREET,
AGENT WITH FULL POWERS FOR THE
HARTFORD FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY,
Cash Capital $500,000
HOME INSURANCE CO. OF NEW YORK CITY
Cash Capital $500,000.
NORTH AMERICAN FIRE INS. CO. OF HARTFORD
Cash Capitol $300,000.
Property of all kinds in TOWN or COUNTRY insured at
the most reasonable terms.
MARINE INSURANCE.
COL IT MR IA X
(MARINE)
INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW YORK.
Cash Capital $500,000
Cash paid in 200,000
Security notes paid in 300,000
TITOS. LORD, President.
R. C. MORRIS, Vice President
riERRE C. KANE, Secretary.
The undersigned having been duly appointed AGENT of
;,,;1 ™ prepared to receive applications for IN
SLRANCL on all Mar ine and Inland risks.
SOL. B. DAVIES,
, „ „ of llavies & Warfleld,
fe22 6m. No. in Spear's wharf.
BALTIMORE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY.
No- 15 SOUTH STREET,
INCORPORATED IN 1830— Charter Perpetual.
JOIIX I. DONALDSON, President.
'I'HIS COMPANY proposes to insure lives
I°'* on,; or more years, or for life. With their rates
the assured enjoys the benefit of an immediate in lieu of
a prospective and uncertain bonus. He risks neither his
policy nor the premium lie has paid.
These premiums may be made payable annually, semi
annually, or quarterly, at option of the assured.
The Company buys and grants annuities.
Sells endowments for Children.
Makes .'ill contracts in which Life or the interest of Money
is involved. A. B. COULTER,
. Secretary.
Medical Examiner, Dr. DONALDSON, 34 Franklin street.
P22 ly
AND LIFE INSURANCE
. OFFICE, XO. 63 SECOND STREET,
BALTIMORE.
JOHN G. PROUD & SONS,
Representing Companies of the highest standing, with large
Cash Capitals. Policies issued, and Losses paid at
the Agency.
TNA INSURANCE Co., of Hartford, Conn. $1,500,000
PHCENIX 44 44 44 350,000
l^J? G i |, ?S Ll> u Springfield, Mass. 375.000
;T A 1, , 1FE U Hartford, 225,000
JLJ'i EE " New York 400,000
fe22-tf.
VSSOCIATUI) Fill KM EN'S INSUR
„ . , ANCK OFFICE, No. 4 SOUTH STREET,
mi UAIL\ for the INSURANCE OF ALL DESCRIP-
CiTY ° F PROrEUTY WITHIN THE LIMITS OF THE
JOHN R. MOORE, President.
DIRECTORS.
JAMES GETTY, Mechanical , J. C. WHEEDEN, Cohimlnan
GEOROB HARM AX. Union , J. TRUST. First Baltimore, '
v° m H Wawee, Friendship , FRANCIS BURNS, United,
J. T. FARLOW, DPptford, JAMES YOUNG, Franklin,
ALLEN PAINE. Liberty, J. PEASON, JR., Washington,
,VIRK - Independent, LANCASTER OULD, Patapsco,
L. C. MASON, Vigilant, F. A. MILLER, Ifinvard,
t M o' ! ,ArK - Xno JAS. A. BRUCE, Watchman,
JAS. B. GEORGE, SR., Pioneer Jos. C. BOYD, Lafayette..
U*H,k and Ladder Co. No. 1.
JOHN DUKGHABT, Secret**
T MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE
HE SUN MUTAL INSURANCE
w . COMPANY OF NEW YORK,
insures Marine and Inland Navigation Risks, on terms as
ravorahU as those of any other Company. All ]>ersons tak
mg Policies frotn this Company are entitled to a share of
the profits, without incurring any liability, beyond the
amount of Premium. The assets of the Company, liable
for the payment of losses, are over $2,000,000.
A. B. NEILSOX, Press't.
A. BEATON, V. Pres't J. WHITEHEAD. Sec.
f - HLIV KR O'DONNELL, Agent in Baltimore.
f ' -- l v N". M KIOBAW PLACE.
NATIONAL FIRF, INSURANCE COM
PAXY OF BALTIMORE.
Incorporated by the
STATE OF MARYLAND, 1849.
OFFICE No. 13 SOUTH STREET.
THE COMPANY INSURES EVERY
DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY
IN THE CITY OR COUNTY,
AGAINST LOSS OR DAMAGE
N . , . BY FIRE.
frl N daily to eterm 'ne upon applications
JOHN B. SEIDENSTRICKER,
President.
BOARD OP DIRECTORS:
Allen A. Chapman, William Woodward,
Henry If. Bash, 'George Bartlett,
Win lleald, Adain Penniead,
John W. Ross, Joseph W. Jenkins,
Edward J. Church, |Thomas M. Sullivan,
Job Smith, i George Small.
, JOHN R. MAGRUPER,
fe26 ' tf Secretary.
tailors.
S <ll LOSS & LIR(>„
M E R GII A -V T TAILOR S
No. 19 LIGHT STREET,
(Below the Fountain Hotel,) Baltimore.
By keeping constantly on hand a full assortment of
CLOTHS, CASSIMERES and YESTINGS, they are ena
bled to furnish suits at prices that cannot fail to please
Orders filled at the shortest notice. aplS tf
T P. MAR T M ANT
•J • ME R CIIA X T TAILOR,
197 BALTIMORE STREET ABOVE LIGHT,
aplS-lw Baltimore.
HT. ROBERTS;
. MERCER AXD TAILOR,
No. 205 BALTIMORE STREET,
ft' 22 ly. Baltimore.
ML COON AN.
* GENTLEMEN'S CLOTHING
AXD EURXISHING STORE
No. 119 BALTIMORE STREET, SEAR SOOTH,
CLOTHS, CASSIMERES, AND VESTINGS'ALWAYS
ON HAND
Particular attention paid to CUSTOM WORK.
UST A full assortment of BOY S ' CLOTHING.
_apl-3m
PIITENIX SPICK MILLS,
WAREHOUSE 58 SOUTH STREF
WM. H. CRAWFORD & CO., *
PROPRIETORS,
Offer to the wholesale trade of this city the South and Wert
GOODS of equal quality and price on same terms as anv
other house in the United states fe22 tf
TNGERSOLL'S IMPROVED PORTABLE
A HA Y PRESS.
.We call attention to this press which combines qreater
power and durability. requires less labor, occupies less
space, and costs less money than any other Machine for
haling Hay or Cotton, ever offered to the public. For sale
at manufacturer's prices by J. A. WESTON k CO.
fc22 tf 41 South Charles street.
OFFICE MARYLAND GAS COMPANY,
CORNER BALTIMORE AND ST. PAUL STREETS, UP STAIRS
THIS COMPANY is furnishing the most
A complete and only reliable Gas Machine for the use of
Private Houses, Churches, Hotels and Public Institutions
ever offered to the public.
By their comparative small cost and profitable working
results, these Machines recommend themselves to the at
tention of residents of small towns and villages. Thous
ands of certificates, from parties now using ou Machines
can be furnished.
Apply at the office of the Company, as above, by person
or by letter. fe22-6m.
business Carta.
R. IIKOWN. JR. ; j j, y'DONOV Y\ Jit
Brown & o'donovan
DEALERS IN
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC LIQUORS,
I apl6-tf No. 33 CHEAPSIDE, Baltimore
No. stark wether,
• PRACTICAL ARCHITECT
AND
SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC
_ AN,) PRIVATE BUILDINGS.
94 FAYETTE STREET, Baltimore. mr3l-6m
Leonard yanden kerckhove,
A R J* J S T.
STUDIO, Second story, No. 69 SECOND STRICT
nn-31 ly
TYECORMIS & ROGERS W,LUAJI KOUEBS
ras! BRA R N T DcI,GJNS WUOLK3AI ' E DEALERS ' N '
SCOTCH AND IRISH MALT WITISKYS
ENGLISH AND SCOTCH ALE AND PORTER,
mr34 ' tf Vo- 4 COMMERCE STREET, Bait
f | R. CO UPLAND,
FASHIONABLE HATS, CAPS, &c.
J\o. 40 Baltimore. Street
Between FREDERICK and HARRISON STS.
MRLLLY _ BALTIMORE.
DENMEAD,
Manufacturer f RYE AND BARLEY MALT
CITS MALT HOUSE, West Falls A venue,
XT _ _ BALTIMORE.
V H Hops constantly on hand. ft-221v
B. B. '"RANT. j n fIBANT
/'KANT & BROTHER,
O COMMISSION MERCHANTS
R „ NO 61 EXCHANGE PLACE,
_ fe22 AL __ Baltimore.
JOHN 8. WILLIAMS TC BR().,
COMMISSION ME I! CHA NTS,
F 0 ., 52 COMMERCE STREET.
BALTIMOKR.
T L. M'PHAIL & BUG'S
** • V7 HAT, CAP AND FUR STORE,
IY, °-132 BALTIMORE STREET,
Hit wren North mill Calvert street #, (north side.) fc22tf.
TANNEY & ST<)w.
J PRODUCE AND GENERA!,
COMMISSION MERC lIA NT S,
t>oo , No. 101 SOUTH STREET,
e __i^ r Raltunoiv.
JOBEPH CARBON. „ ~ Q VI( . KKRY '
TOSEPH CARSON & CO. ° VI0 " RT '
•" WESTERN PRODUCE
GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
NOS. 43 AND 45 LIGHT STREET,
T „ I , . Baltimore.
' 1 r:i ' MTttcei made on consfgmnents. fe22 tf
jOOURTNEY & CUSHING,
vy TOBACCO COMMISSION MERCHANTS
65 SOUTH GAY STKEET,
E. S. COURTNEY, BALTIMORE.
C. E. CusiilNG,
J. A. COFBTNET. fe22-tf
T LYLE CLARKE &. CO.,
** • . IMPORTERS AND DEALIRS IN
MANUFACTURED AND LEAF TORACCO
SUGARS, SNUFF, ke..
No. 106 WEST LOMBARD STREET,
Baltimore. fe22 t f
CVA K D.
P. C. MARTIN,
DISTILLER AND DEALER
F.XCLUSIVELY IN FINK OLD WHISKEYS,
No. 108 NORTH HOWARD STREET,
111 8 doors South of Mulberry street
RK'TIARDSON & CO..
SHI IT INO AND COMMISSON MERCHANTS
No. 67 EXCHANGE PLACE,
Baltimore. mrl-tf
HALL & LONEY,
SHIPPING A NO COMMISSION MER CIIA NTS
No. 56 BUCHANAN'S WHARF,
.. , BALTIMORE,
VAT? attention to consignments of SUGAR,
o !k AS SF. S :. C " TTON - COFFEE, RICE, FISH, PRIIVIS-
N FLOUR, GRAIN, kc.; also fill orders for same.
fc22 tf
WT. WALTERS IK CO.,
• IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN
WINE S d LIQUORS,
NO. 68 EXCHANGE PI,ACE
LOMBARD STREET,
BALTIMORE.
ICE- A large and very Sue stock of OLD RYE WHISKEY
u " In, c ten it
T. T \ MARTIN WM K MARTIN
R R T. MARTIN FC BRO.,
X • IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN
LIQUOR S— and
General COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
No. 72 CALVERT ST., (one door from Pratt).
maltf _ Baltimore.
RSNOWDEN ANDREWS,
• ARCHITECT AND SUPERINTENDENT,
7 & 8 CAKRULL lIALL,
fc23-lm. BRltimore. Mil.
JJOHJIK PICK HELL, LEWIS WABBINQTON,
OHN F. PICKRRLFi & CO.,
GENERAL
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
40 WEST LOMBARD STREET,
~-n.fi Bultirnoro.
B : v *l.iW;il advances mad>- on fe24 tf
JITTORMGS.
A 1.. KM) TT,
• A TTORXE 1" A T LA >F,
31 LAW BUILDINUS, (Spurrier's Court,)
Lexington street, near St. Paul,
Will practice in the Courts of Baltimore and Howard
Counties. apl4-3t*
TORN G. CURLETT,
• A TTORXE r A T LA IF,
No. 6 LAW BUILDING,
ap7-eo2m (Opposite Record Office )
'FIIO.MAS 11. KK.MI', JR.—
X ATTOKNEY AT I.AW,
BENTON, CAROLINE CO., MD.,
will practice in the Courts of Caroline, Talhot, Queen
Anne and Kent counties. mrl7-2m
R. ST()(.'KKTT MATUEWS,
A TTORXE r AT LA IF,
OFFICE No. 1 COUNSELLOR'S lIALL,
(46 LEXINOTON STREET,)
Baltimore,
ill attend promptly to all kinds of business appertaining
to his profession. fc-22-tf
jMHARLES" E. PHELPS,
XV A TTORXE T AT LA IF
No. 2 LAW BUILDINGS,
Continues to practice in the Courts of BALTIMORE CITY
and HOWARB COUNTY. fe22 tf.
ROBERTD. BURNS,
A TTORXE T A T LA IF,
NO. 5 COUNSELLOR'S HALL,
f-22 tf. _______ LEXINGTON STREET.
I 1 FRISBY HENDERSON,
A • A TTORXE r AT LAW
AND
COMMISSIONER FOR PENNSYLVANIA,
No. 6 COUNSELLORS'HALL,
*' — "• Lexington street.
JOHN PRENTISS POE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
OFFICE NO. 25 LEXINGTON STRF.ETS,
Practices in the Courts of BALTIMORE CITY, and BAL
TIMORE and HOWARD COUNTIES. fe'23 2aw6w.
r J\ JOSEPH ROfißliS,
X ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Has removed to 83 W. Fayette street, above Charles
inrl-tf.
SFTRT)IRINES, IPCTFUMTRITS, £R.
T. PURVIANCE POLK & CO.
J APOTHECARIES,
Corner of Fayette and St. I'aul Streets,
AND
N. HYNSON JENNINGS &. CO.
APOTHECARIES,
No. 88 X. CHARLES STREET,
Baltimore,
Respectfully call the attention of citizens and the travel
ling community to their large and choice assortment of
MEDICINES, PERFUMERT, FINE STATIONERY and FANCY
ARTICLES, which may he confidently relied on as being
what we represent them, as we select none hut of the pu
rest quality. Also, MEDICINE CHRSTB, SURGICAL INSTRU
MENTS, TRUSSES, IHETKTIC PREPARATIONS. AC., AC.
Written orders filled promptly and with care, subject to
be returned at our expense if uot of standard quality
fe22 tf.
SAYING IN GAS.
I" BALTIMORE, Feb. 9th, 1858.
MESSRS. JACKSON A CHANDLER:
Sirs: —We have been using J. H. COOPER'S LEVER
OAS REGULATOR upon our metre for the past six weeks,
and are satisfied that it economises from 20 to 25 ]wr cent!
of Gas. The light is nniform and ample, aud all blowing
and flaring of the flame is obviated, and the escape of un
consented gas prevented.
NOAH WALKER A CO.
As there is now great complaint about Gas bills the public
will find it to their interest to adopt the above apparatus.
All orders sent to
MESSRS JACKSON k CHANBI.ER,
At the office of Messrs. GRATTAN k EVANS,
Jarvis Building, No. 8 North street,
will receive prompt attention. mr29-lmo.
IM P O II T ED CI G A It S
AND CHEWING TOBACCO
Tll OS. N . WEB B ,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MANUFACTURER AND
DEALER IN
CIGARS AND TOBACCO,
CORNER OE GARDEN AND MADISON STREETS, BALTIMORE.
Keeps constantly on hand all tiie Choice Brands of Im
ported Havana CIGARS and Superior CHEWINC TO
BACCO, with Fancy Articles of the Trade. mrlB tf
JAMES M. ANDERSON' & SOX,
ESIGRAVERS,
Xo. 148 Rattimnre Street,
BANK NOTE. STEEL & COI'I'KR Pi.ATE PRINTING
TNVITATION. WEDDING, VISITING
A Cants, etc.. Engraved and Printed in the most fashion
able styles. Corporate and Notarial Seals, Letter Stamps,
etc. Loudon and Paris Visiting Curds, HE La Rue's En
velopes, etc. feSSfcf
I UMBER! LUMBER!!
J All kinds of BUILDING LUMBER and TRUNK
BOX STUFF, together with FRAMES. SASH, DOORS,
SHUTTERS and MOULDINGS, for sale on moderate terms
—also Planing, Ripping and Resawing—by
A. CATE,
apl lm East Falls A venue and Fawn St.
STORAGE AND WHARFAGE—
AT PATAPSCO WAREHOUSES
Storage on ground floor for 5.00(1 tons Guano, and 2,000
Ilhds. Sugar, and Wharfage for Ships of 24 feet draught.
Apply to GF.OBGE A. WILLIAMS,
mv 24 eotf No. 31 Exchange Building.
THE FOREIGN MAILS.
THE ENGLISH IN CANTON.
[From the special correspondent of the Ltmittn Timet.]
THE WAR I V CHINA.
THE BRITISH MARCH TO LUCK.VOW—VICTORIES OF GEN.
OUTRAM AND BRIGADIER FRANKS.
! CAMP CAWVPORE, Saturday, Feb. 27—8 A. M
! The head-quarters camp is breaking up. and in an
! | ,O, ir or t u '° ' shall bo on my wav to our first halt
ing ground at Oonao, in Ou'de, ten miles from this,
and on the road to Lueknow. Walpolc's Hrigade,
1 oralis troop Of Horse Artillery, and the greater
portion of the head-quarters stall; crossed tlTo (bin
ges this morning: and the Commander-in-Chief, who
is anxious to wait here till the last moment, to sec if
the ( alpee enemy really intend to move against
( awnpore, will start with his personal stall' to ISunta
ra (about 45 miles hence) to-morrow mornino- ear
ly, and will ride the whole distance in one march
so as to overtake us before we reach the same camp.
Ihe garrison of I awnpore. strengthened bv the re
mains of the 75th Regiment will he under the com
mand of Major tleneral Inglis. who has received
precise instructions for his guidance in case of an
attack, and a small corps of observation, consisting
ol the SBth and 32d Regiments, some Irregular CM"
airy, and a field battery, under Col. Maxwell, are
patrolling the country between Caivnpore and Cab
pee. The heat is very considerable to-day.
1 have already reported to you that theenemv at
tacked the Alumhagh in the forenoon of Thursday
last. Rut they were not satisfied with the result of
their first essay on the 25tli. Again they came out
in force about 1 o'clock, and animated perhaps by
uncertain liirht of the moon,continued thefr
abortive efforts on our position at the Aluinbagh til!
10 o clock, at night. They came up repeatedly
within range of our guns and rifles, but they fell in
files again and again, and retired quite dishearten
ed, with very heavy loss. Our casualties in the
two engagements were fi killed and 3(1 wounded.
Colonel Berkley is shot through the right arm,
Captain Moorsom has a sabre cut in his left arm,
and Lieutenant H. Cough has a musket ball through
his leg.
Brigadier Franks' last success is most decisive.
The Nazirn, whom lie beat on the 19th, rallied iiis
lorces, and made a forced march to seize on the
strong pass ot liaydiui, but Franks out manoeuvred
him, and seized upon the pass. The Nazi in then,
by a long detour, swept round Franks, and took up
a strong position at Badshah gunge, two miles from
Sultanpore. On the 2:id Franks made the same
manoeuvre, swept round the enemy's right Hank in
a inarch ot 10 miles, attacked them in the rear,
beat their army (which consisted 0f25,000 men. in
cluding s.oooSepoys and 1,100 cavalry,) drove them
off the tield with the loss of 1,800 slain, and captur
ed 20 pieces of artillery out of 2ft, of which 10 were
heavy : one 32-pounder, two 21-pounders, two 18-
pounders, four 12-pounders, and one 9-pounder; and
took all the enemy's ammunition, their ban-gage,
and standing camp. This great success, ""which
leaves the road to Lucknow open from the right, was
achieved at a very small lrtss—two killed and ten
wounded in all the three actions.
It appears that it was the Nona's brother, Tiajeo
Ban, who crossed from Oude into the Doab the oth
er night. As he was followed bv 200 regular cav
alry, by a body of infantry, and by several elephants
and wagons, containing his harem and baggage, be
must have made some noise in his passage across the
"stream: but the policemen who were speciallv sta
tioned at the very point where he crossed, because it
was a likely place to make the attempt, pretended
not to have heard him, and the only information
given to our oflieers in charge of a cavalry detach
ment near liittoor was brought by a chowk'e
dar, who ran in to say that, from the noise at
the opposite side of the river, he thought the
Nona was going to cross. At the time he
brought in this news the Rao had got safe
ly over, and when our cavalry arrived, it
was only to lind * the traces of his pas
sage. On investigation, it became evident that
the policemen were accomplices in the fact, and
that they had been bribed to keep their ears shut;
and so. after due investigation, the whole party,
eleven in number, were liauged. The Rao's party,
continuing their flight across the lloah, cut up the
men of two police stations, which is a strong col
lateral proof of the guilt of the men at the river
side station, and got into Calpee in the morning.—
He is said to have obtained large levees of men,
and to be enlisting Sowars at 30r. a month, and in
fantry at lOr. and lftr. a month. The most painful
effect of our inability to defend those who are faith
ful to us, that they with justice reproach us with
their losses and-with the insults heaped upon them.
These Calpee Sepoys have been enabled to do great
wrong and injury 'to our fast friend, the Uajali of
the little State of Churkaree, south of the Jumna.
1 hey invaded his territories, beat his troops, car
ried off his guns, insulted his Palace, and carried
off three lacs of rupees, or £30,000, from his treas
ury.
REVOLTING REVELATIONS.
1 he special correspondent of the Tlnu-n has fur
nished a graphic account of his peregrinations
about the hitherto virgin city of Canton. We
give below the most interesting portions of his let
ter:
TISIAI. OF AN tRTSH SAILOR.
After comfortable ablutions in the abundant warm
waters of this yatnun, for the water is positively
warm as it comes from the wells, and after a cam
paigning breakfast, we sally forth armed with re
vol vers and stout walking sticks. The commission
ers' court, in the outer quadrangle is already sit
ting. The three commissioners, in their square
open pavilion, are trying a rape case, and hundreds
of Chinese, an orderly crowd, are looking on. The
culprit is a fresh-colored Irish boy, of the marine
force, and the complainant is a little weazened old
woman, who totters upon lier small sheep's feet,
ami talks voluble Cantonese against the erect young
soldier. The English police corroborate her story"
lam afraid there can he no doubt about the fact. —
The boy was drunk and indiscriminatiiig. He had
offered violence to that quaint creature. He is
found guilty, and fifty lashes, write in red letters
upon his back the Cantonese commissioners' version
of the axiom "si son co*/e, tamen eautc."
A RAMBLE THROUGH THE STREETS.
If" we retrace our steps and pass again eastwards
we shall revisit the other great official vamnns.
Twenty times may we go about these great stra
gling places before we become aware of all their
walls contain. Behind the treasury, the portals
whereof seem to be in the centre of an overpeopled
neighborhood, I have counted thirty head of deer,
their horns appearing and disappearing in the
coarse bamboo jungle. There are not five men
besides myself who know that this miniature
deer forest exists in Canton city, or, despite the
prornst-marshall, venison would not be so un
known in our quarters. These little wildernesses
will, doubtless, soon be cleared; and before we leave
they will become parade grounds, or, perhaps, en
campments; but it shows how little our English
residents know of what is just an inch beyond their
noses, that, they, in their northern newspaper, made
pert merriment of my early statement that there
were park-like grounds within the circuit of the
Canton walls. Our rambles are, however, more
usually among the intricately reticulated streets.
As we make our way towards the south-west, bv
aid of our Chinese compass, we pass guests proceed
iiig to marriage, with the wedding presents in long
procession behind their chairs—whole roasted pigs,
cakes and confitures, and baskets whose contents
we can only guess at. Ferhaps—it has happened
more than once —there is a terrific sound of rapid
wheels.
There is an alarm of lire, and the fire brigade, in
their uniform caps, are dragging a lire engine along
the pavement ofblack granite at a tremendous rate.
These firemen are fine fellows. In the heat of our
bombardment we saw them working their engines
under fire, and once at least we blew up engine and
firemen together by a shell. As we near the south
ern parts, passing under the wall of the old city, we
come upon lower neighborhoods, and the shops are
adapted to the wants of the waterside population.—
Here (if you observe curiously the shops which are
tilled with the sun-dried comestibles the Chinese
love) you mav find dried rats with their tails fully
projected, and leaving no doubt of their class and
order in creation.
Look carefully into that finely browned roast pig
and vou will discover it to be a dog. Puppies are
also borne by in open wicker baskets, and their fate
and ultimate destination are not ambiguous. But
these peculiarities are not common) and are not
ostentatiously displayed. You must have an old
hnhitue of the factories with you, or you would not
discover them. The rats are field rats, caught and
dried after harvest, anil the dogs have been care
fully fed upon rice and meal. We do the Chinese
much wrong in the matter of their food. Their
pork is far more white and delicate in flavor than
the pork we see exposed in London, and it is fed
with a care and cleanliness from which some Eng
lish dailies might well take pattern.
THE PRISON HENS.
A Chinese gaol is a group of small yards enclosed
t>y no general outer wall, except in one instance.
Around this yard are dens, like the dens in which
we confine wild beasts. The bars are not of iron,
but of double rows of very thick bamboo, so close
together that the interior is too dark to bo readily
seen into from without. The ordinary prisoners are
allowed to remain iu the yard during the day.—
Their ankles are fettered together by heavy rings
of iron and a short chain, and they generally also
wear similar fetters on their wrists. The low-roof
ed dens are so easily climbed that when the prison
ers are let out into the yard the gaolers must trust
to their fetters alone for security. The places all
stand like the monkey house of a menagerie.
We were examining one of the yards of the sec
ond prison, and Lord Elgin, who "is seldom absent
when any work is doing, was one of the spectators.
As it was broad daylight, the dens were supposed
to be empty. Some one thought he heard a low
moan in one of than, and advanced to the bars to
listen, lie recoiled as if a blast from a furnace had
rushed out upon lam. Never were human senses
assailed by a more horrible stream of pestilence.
The gaolers were ordered to open that place, and
refusing, as a Chinaman always at first refuses,
were given over to the rough handling of the sol
diers, who were told to make them. No sooner
were hands laid upon the gaolers than the stifled
moan became a wail, and the wail became a eon
course of low, weakly muttered groans.
So soon as the double doors could be opened,
several of us went into the place. The thick stench
could only be endured for a moment, but the spec
tacle was not one to look long at. A corpse lay at
the bottom of the den, the breasts, the only fleshy
parts, gnawed and eaten away by rats. Around
it and upon it was a festering mass of humanity
still alive. The mandarin gaoler, who seemed to
wonder what all the excitement was about, was
i compelled to have the poor creatures drawn forth
and no man who saw that sight will ever forget it!
They were skeletons not men. You could only be!
lieve that there was blood in their bodies by seeing
it clotted upon their undressed wounds.
As they were borne out one after the other, and
laid upon the pavement of the vard, each seemed
more horrible than the last. They were too far
gone to shriek, although the agony must have been
great, the heavv irons pressing upon their raw lank
shins as the gaolers lugged them not too tenderly
along. They had been beaten into this state, per
haps long ago, by the heavy bamboo, and had been
thrown into this den to rot. Their crime was that
they had attempted to escape. Hideous and loath
some, however, as was the sight of their foul
wounds, their filthy rags, and their emaciated bod
ies, it was hot so distressing as the indescribable
expression of their eyes; the horror of that look of
fierce agonv fixed us like a fascination.
As the dislocated wretches writhed upon the
ground tears rolled down the cheeks of the soldiers
of the escort who stood in the rank near iliein \
gigantic French Serjeant, who had the little manda
rin in custody, gesticulated with his Imvonct so
fiercely that we were afraid he would kill him. We
did not then know that the single word which the
poor creatures were trying to utter was '•hunger."
or that that dreadful startling of the evcball was
the look of famine. Some of them had been with
out food for four days. Water they had, for there
is a well in the yard, and their fellow-prisoners had
supplied them, but cries for food were answered on
ly bv the bamboo.
Alas! it was not until the next morning that we
found this out: for although we took some awav,
we left others there that night. Since the com
mencement of this year, fifteen men have died in
that cell. Some of those who were standing bv me
asked—"how win you ever be able to tell this to
the English people?" 1 believe that no description
could lead the imagination to a full conception of
what we saw in that Canton prison. I have not at
tempted to do more than dot a faint outline of the
truth, and when I have read what 1 have written
let*! how feeble and forceless is the image upon paper
when compared with the scene upon my memory.—
a his was the worst of the dens we opened, hut there
were many others which fell but few degrees below
it in their horrors.
'1!)t 1 1e was not one of the 0,000 prisoners we saw
whose appearance before any assemblage of Eng
lishmen would not have aroused cries of indigna
tion. "Quelle to eiete," exclaimed Captain Marti
ucau, as in the first yard we visited he saw a little
boy confined here because he was the son of a rebel.
'• Quelle enriete jiuur Hit eufaut de qmtturz< lilt* I"
Alas, we saw many, inanv such cases in our after
experience. In one of the dens of the Poon-yu,
the uoor ot which was open, some one pointed at
tention to a very child—rather au interesting-look
ing child—who was squat upon a board and laugh
ing at the novel scene taking place before him. We
beckoned to him, but he did not come. We went
up to him, and found he could not move. His little
legs were ironed together; they had been so for
several months, and were now paralyzed and use
less. The child of ten years of age had been
placed here, charged with stealing from other child
ren. We took him awav.
THE ritlSON-HOI'SH OF THE EUROPEANS.
It was not until our second day's search that we
were able to discover the prison in which Europe
ans had been confined. Threats and a night in the
guard-house at last forced the discovert* from the
mandarin, or gool inspector in our custody. It is
called Koon kahn, is in the eastern part of the citv,
and is distinguishable from the others only in that
it is surrounded by a high brick wall. Nearly the
whole of our second day was passed in this place.
It has only one yard, and in this the prisoners are
not allowed to come. There is a joss house at one
end ot the court; for, of course, the Chinese mix up
their religion with their tyranny.
ihe finest sentiments, such as "The misery of to
day may be the happiness of to-morrow;" Confess
your crimes, and thank the magistrate who purges
vou ol them;" ''May we share in the mercy of the
Emperor," are carved in failed golden characters
over every den of every prison. Opening from
on 3 rooms, each containing four dens.
The hardest and most malignant face 1 ever saw is
that ot the chief gaoler ol this prison. The prison
ers could not he brought to look upon him, and when
he was present could not be induced to sav that he
was a gaoler at all, or that they had ever seen him
before, llut when he was removed thev alwavs
i ('iterated their first storv, "The other gaolers onlv
starve and ill-treat us, hut that man eats our flesh.'*
llow, step by step, we followed up our inquiries,
and how we cast about hither and thither for a clue,
and at last found one, which was often lost and re
found, would be too long to tell. Mr. l'arkes con
ducted this business with a vigour and intelligence
that cannot be over-estimated. At first they had
never heard of a foreigner, then a heavy box on the
ears, administered by one of the orderlies in punish
ment for a threat to a prisoner, produced a recollec
tion of one European prisoner. Then the gaolers were
roughly handled in sight of the prisoners, and togeth
er with the mandarin were taken out in custody of the
soldiers. Gradually the prisoners began to give
credence to what we said, that we were now the
mandarins ot Canton, and could protect them if they
spoke out. One produced a monkey jacket from his
sleeping place at the hack of the den; another had an
old jersey; all ot them soon had stories to tell. Many
ot the prisoners had been inmates of the place for
many years, and upon reference to the books we
found that they weye all originally placed here for
very trilling crimes. Old stories get mixed up with
new; the difficulties of Chinese dialects come into
play, and we otten fancied we were unravelling
some sanguinary iniquity of yesterday, when we
found at last that it was two or three, or even ten
years old.
It is only by small degrees that the collated evi
dence ot these vermin-bitten witnesses are made to
assume some form and consistency. It appears at
last almost certain that six Chinese were beheaded
last night, their fate being in alt probability precip- J
itated by our visit to the other prisons. It also ap- j
pears quite certain that, within a period dating from I
the commencement of the present troubles, six Ku
ropeans—two Frenchmen and four Englishmen
have found their death in these dreadful dens, i
Many different prisoners examined separately de
posed to this fact, and almost to the same details.
The European victims were also kept here for sev
eral months, herding with the Chinese, eating of
that same black mess of riee which looks and smells
like a bucket of grains cast from a brewerv.
\\ ben their time came—probably the time neees
sary for a reply from I'ekin—the goaler held their
heads back while poison was poured down their
throats. The prisoners recollected two who threw
up the poison, and they were strangled. We asked
how they knew it was poison. There was no doubt
on that score. It is a curious circumstance, illus
trative ot the positive state of terror that exists
here, that the goaler's fowls scratched about un
touched among all the famishing men within the Can
ton prisons, and feed upon the vermin. It was re
marked that the fowls fed upon the vomit of these
two Eui opeana, and died. ■ Only two of these prisoners
had excited much sympathy among the Chinese.—
One ol them was a sailor, who spoke the language,
adapted himself to their habits, and told them sto
ries. He was cheerful, or pretended to he cheerful,
at lirst; hut in a short time he grew sick and cried,
and spoke of his friends faraway. Even the Chi
nese were sorry when his time came, and when the
gaolers poisoned liim. There was another, an old
white bearded man. who was there some months.—
He spoke only Chinese, but the Chinese veneration
for age came to his aid, and they pitied him also.
[ From the Lnrotrm Times, April 7.1
THE LEVIATHAN IN A STORM.
During the course of vesterdav advantage was
taken ol the favorable change in the state of the
weather to secure this vessel against anv further
chance of accident, and in the course of a tew davs
more the whole of the mooring chains which gave
way on Monday will be replaced bv others of the
newest and strongest kind. As most of our read
ers are probably aware, the Leviathan is moored
lore and aft by five powerful inch mooring
chains at each end, each of these chains being
held by at least one, and, in some cases, by two
strong and heavy anchors, deeply set in the river's
bed. The manner in which these are disposed
is, at the stem, two on the point, and two on the
starboard bow. with one carried out straight ahead,
and the length of each chain varies from 100 fath
oms on the Deptford to 100 on the Black wall side
of the river. All these moorings were laid down
early in November last, when the launch of the ves
sel first commenced. On that memorable Sunday
when the Leviathan was for the first time regularly
afloat she was conducted to this berth and made fast
in the way we have already described. Howev
er, in the course of a few days afterwards, during
the prevalence of some very squally weather, one
or two of the anchors of these mooring chains came
home in a manner that necessitated extra precau
tions, and accordingly they were backed by some
of Trotman's anchors in away that guaranteed their
holding under any strain that was likely to come
npon them at that season of the year. But the place
in which (he vessel is moored, in the outer bond of
the river, exposed to the full sweep of both wind
and tide up thestream, occasionally put her holdfasts
to a severe test. On Monday the north-easterly
squalls which broke across the river were most vio
lent, now and then blowing with all the force of a
full gale. Exposed to the same wind in a roadstead,
a single chain anil anchor would have sufliced to
hold the monster ship, which would, of course, have
ridden head to wind; but moored as she was in the
river, stem and stern, with two thirds of her huge
broadside exposed to all the force of the squalls,
all the stem mooring chains were insufficient to
hold her. The worst squall was at 1 o'clock
on Monday; pressed by the whole force of this, j
the ItiO i'athom mooring chain on the port-bow !
rose up from the water, and after remaining
as rigid as a bar of iron under the tremendous
strain, parted about 20 feet below the liawse
hole. The link which gave way went off into the
centrejot the river as if tired from a cannon, and
the vessel, having thus parted its main stay, in
clined towards the Deptford shore, and became still
more open to the sweep of the wind and tide. What !
followed was then a matter of course, and one atter !
another the whole of the four remaining mooring
chains parted like packthreads in the course of a few
minutes. As each went the Leviathan's hows drove ,
nearer and nearer to the Deptford side. Fortunately
there were only a few small vessels inside her, the j
one immediately next her being an old barge for sale !
—which acted as a fender to the vessels beyond. (In
these the big ship pressed until neither wind nor tide
could move her any further, and so she remained
without injury to herself or others. Mr. Prowse, the
chief ollicer in charge of the vessel, immediately took
all necessary steps to prevent her drifting any
further, and Captain Harrison, who was at
PRICE TWO CENTS
Liverpool, was at once telegraphed for, and arrived
on board late on Monday night. Under his direc
tion, three of the principal inooring-chains were re
paired, and a new one of greater strength, and 150
fathoms long, taken out to the centre of the river, and
with these the big ship easily held on till yesterday
morning, when, the weather moderating, the rest
ot the chains were repaired, and the vessel easily
worked back to her old position. It is now intend
ed to lav down, in place of the old mooring chains,
part ot the new cables of the Leviathan herself
which have been manufactured by Messrs Drown
Lenox & ;•. and which were tested, we believe, to
a strain of 150 tons. If these chains had been com
pleted at the tune the moorings were laid down,
none others would have been used.
[From the London Times.]
ORSINI'S LAST LETTER.
That Orsini was no vulgar ruflian is proved by
the letter which he wrote to the Emperor Louis Na
poleon when his last moment was at hand. A man
who could so write when reason had reasserted its
sway must have had within him manv elements of
high and honorable thought which, under other cir
cumstances, would have borne appropriate fruit in
action. 1 bus it was that Felice Orsini, when his
wild delusion had passed away, expressed himself
upon the subject of that foul deed for which he was
just about to suffer an ignominious death: "In a few
hours I shall be no more; but, before drawing my
last breath, 1 wish it to be known, and I declare it
with that frankness and courage which up to this day
I have never belied, that assassination, in whatever
form it may disguise itself, does not enter into my
principles, notwithstanding that, by a fatal mental
error, I allowed myself to be led into organizing the
attempt of the 14th of January." Nothing can be
more complete than this recantation of the dying
man, nothing more earnest than his prayer that his
own death and his penitence may be accepted as
an expiation for the crime into which he had been
led by"a fatal mental error." There w ill not be
found in his letter to the Emperor any contemptible
etlort to prolong a life which could henceforth
be nothing but a burden to himself. Thinking
as rel ice Orsini thought, death to him was mer
cy. There is much that is very worthy of re
spect in the concluding paragraphs of 'his let
ter. The dying man trusts that his memory may
be purged of the ot* his crime, for what'expia
tion he could make he has made, and lie is about to
make. He willingly otfers his own blood as a
sacrifice for the innocent blood which he had
shed on the fatal 14th of January. He trusts that
his countrymen, when the day of their independence
comes, will make such compensation as can be made
to those who suffered injury from his widely-scat
tered missiles. Finally be'asks, not for his own life,
but for the lives of the wretched creatures whom lie
lias induced to become his accomplices. To his
countrymen lie says, with all the energy and all
the conviction of a man who has not" time left
for many words: "Let my countrymen, instead
of putting faith in the system of assassination,
utterly reject it, and know 6y the voice of a dying
patriot that their redemption must be won by self-con
trol, by a constant unity of struggles and sacrifices,
and by the exercise of true virtue." Surely, there
was good in this man, had he not been led astray bv
the wild delusion of political assassination! The
few bequests in his will are irreproachable, and the
arrangements he makes for the future care of his two
little girls such as any good and provident father
would make upon his death bed. Every act and
word seem to denote a man who but for one fatal
error might have lived in honor and fair repute.—
Atrocious as his crime undoubtedly was, it is impos
sible not to draw a broad mark of distinction be
tween Felice Orsini and the rullians who deal in po
litical assassination as an ordinary incident in their
career. Orsini, moreover, bad the courage to exe
cute what he had the audacity to conceive. He did
not, like one notorious conspirator, depute the mur
derous task to other hands, and retire himself into a
position of security, to watch the result of bis own
scheme. In an evil moment lie became an assassin,
but ho was not a coward. Lot us trust that his dy
ing words will not be withoutett'ect upon his coun
trymen. Liberty has never been won, but often
lost, by the side blow of an assassin.
From the Lnndnn .Vennutile Gazette, April C.
I.OSS OF THE AMERICAN' BARK I'ETREA.
PORTSMOUTH, April s.—The American bark Pe
trea, Osborne, from Havre for New York, (217
French and German passengers, and a general car
go,) got. on shore on Sunday morning, at about
'IVi o'clock, on the shoals off the harbor of Chiches
ter, or Chichester's Pool. On the sli'yi being dis
covered in her perilous position by the coast-guard
at East \\ ittering, under the command of Lieut.
Wollaston, I. N., every assistance was rendered by
that officer and his crew. At about three o'clock,
P. M., a boat manned by twelve hands was
dispatched by the captain to the chevalier l'ap
palardo, United States Consul at Portsmouth,
informing liiin of the disaster and asking assistance.
The Consul immediately embarked and returned in
the boat to the wreck, distant about twelve miles
from Portsmouth. On boarding the bark he found
the emigrants in a state of great alarm for their
lives and property, although all had been done by the
captain that he could to calm their fears and in
spire confidence. Mr. Pappalardo at once gave
such directions as were necessary, and en "aged a
■tang of men to man the pumps and endeavor to keep
her free from water, the crew being exhausted. A
steamer had been sent to the assistance of the ship
in the course of Sunday from Portsmouth, by the
French Consul, Chevalier Vandenbergh, a report
having been made to liiin that it was a French ship,
hut the power of the steamer was found too limited
to admit ot her assistance being effected in moving
the wreck, and she returned. Yesterday, at day
break, the wind blowing a gale from E S. E., fear
ing that she would become a total loss, Consul Pap
palardo, acting in conjunction with the Captain,
deemed it expedient no longer to delay attempting
to land the passengers. Accordingly, lie personally
superintended the hoisting over the side all hands,
by means of a barrel and a whip, the women and
children being attended to first. A heavy serf was
beating on the beach: hut another gang of coast
guarduien and others, by ropes, helped to drag the
boats to land, and these combined efforts were so
successful that all landed, to the number of 239
souls, without an accident of any kind.
DOMESTIC.
SHIPWRECK AMI LOSS OF LIFE. —The brig Persever
since, Captain Huberts, at (lalveston sth inst., from
Yew Orleans, reports having fallen in, April 3, with
the wreck winch Sarah Bartlctt, from Tuspan
to Sabine, lat. 28° 30' W., lon. 93° 37'. The Sarah
Hartlett had capsized in a gale tive davs previous.
The Perseverance took from the wreck a boy named
James Van Horn, from New Orleans, and a sailor
known as Charley, in a state of extreme exhaustion
—the last named deranged. Capt. Saunders and
four men were lost.
"The wreck was sunk to the rails. The vessel,
after capsizing, lost her masts, when she partially
righted, though full of water and with the loss of
her cabin.
"She had specie on board, but though divers
were sent down from the Perseverance none of it
could be found. It is supposed to have boon lost
with the cabin. The survivors stated the amount
ol specie at $30,000; but this is more than she would
probably have carried in the trade in which she was
engaged.
"The schooner Sarah Bartlctt was a new vessel,
and was owned by Capt. Sanders, whose wife re
sides in New Orleans. The boy, James Van Horn,
is about 13 years of age. He states that the sailor
in his delirium attempted to throw him overboard,
and that lie managed to tie the madman fast
with a bit of rope. He himself drank sea water,
and appears to thiuk that it strengthened his en
durance."
SERIOUS RAILROAD DISASTER. —We regret to an
nounce one of the most serious railroad disasters
that has occurred in many years. The powerful lo
comotives Dean Richmond and Krastus Corning run
off the track ot the Central Railroad. Before their
headway could be arrested, both of the locomotives
were precipitated into the Erie Canal, and entirely
submerged. The engineer, Comstock, and the tire
man, Randall, are still under the water, and it is
feared have sunk in the mud beyond recovery. At
the time of the accident, both engines were running
at a high speed. Thev hail a heavy load, and were
on a down grade.— Albany Statesman.
The latest accounts from Yieksburg, report the
Mississippi falling. There had been, however, some
pretty severe breaks on the levee. The Rig Levee
at American Bend, the levee at Brunswick Landing,
and Henderson's Levee, below Warrenton, all broke
on the 11th.
Hon. Andrew Jackson Donelson has removed to
Memphis. It is said that Moses White, Esq., son of
the eminent Hugh L. White, of Tennessee, intends
to practice law in the same place.
James Duffy, convicted of "garroting" and rob
bing a gentleman in the street, in Boston, was on
Saturday sentenced to the penitentiary for eleven
years.
Rev. F. Cavo, of the Franciscan order (R.
has been appointed by the minister general at
Rome, of the order visiter for the United States,
with tull powers.
The frigate Susquehannah has been ordered to
Boston, for the benefit of a colder climate in disin
fecting her.
It is reported that John W. Seymour, the de
faulting treasurer from Hartford, is in New Mexico,
working a silver mine.
On the 4th instant a tire occurred at the Clover
hill Cits, in Chesterfield county, Va., destroying
$lO,OOO worth of property.
The Suffolk Savings Bank, of Boston, has declared
an extra dividend of fifteen per cent, for the last
five years —equal to three per cent, per annum.
The Democratic Convention, for the nomination
of a candidate for Governor of Maine, will be held
at Augusta on the 30th June.
The steamer Europa sunk in Toronto harbor, a
few days since, supposed to have been caused by rat
holes.
There is a groat excitement in lowa about the
gold discovered in Clarke countv. Men are said to
bejtaking out from two to five dollars per day.
The New \ ork Senate has passed a bill to pro
vide for a convention to amend the State constitu
tion.
The Albany papers caution people with money, to
beware of the pickpockets who infest the loby of the
House.
The St. Louis papers announce the death of Rich
ard B. Dallam, Esq., an old and respected citizen.
The new depot of the New Jersey Railroad Com
pany, at Jersey City, is about completed.

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