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The daily exchange. [volume] (Baltimore, Md.) 1858-1861, July 02, 1858, Image 2

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THE IIAII.Y EXCHANGE is published every morning
is..n.favs excepted); price Two CENTS, served in the city,
(Sunday - I c ,. nts per week, payable to the earn
at twelve . • .j outofUie city, at SIX DOLLARS
er.. mailed to on f n advance. OFFICE
p rannum '^ R _ V orth East corner of Baltimore and
Vnrth streets. Baltimore. Enters to be addressed -To
THE DAILY KXCIIASUE. Baltimore, Maryland.
BALTIMORE.
FRIDAY, JDLY 2, 1858.
Somewhere about the year of Grace 1791, the
celebrated painter, DAVID, undertook to reform the
costume of the French Republicans, and, as it was
the f jt shion during the Reign of Terror, to affect
unbounded admiration of the classical and
„f the heroic, after due Sartorial reflection, Citizen
DWID succeeded in compounding a costume of
mixed Greek and Roman elements, with here and
there a touch of Gallic imaginativeness, and
which, from an inspection of its tout ensemble, an
architect would have described as of the Com
posite order. It was quite a graceful affair, and
took, for a brief season, amazingly. But it
was' soon found that the tunic and the
toga, though very well suited to the climate
of Italy, were by no means the most com
fortable garments that could be worn IU the lati
tude of Paris. Coughs, colds, and rheumatic
complaints abounded; and as the lo\e of life,
even in that reckless age, was yet stronger than
the passion for notoriety, the classic habiliments
were speedily exchanged for velvet and broadcloth
coats, with ample skirts and enormous flaps; for
loose neckcloths in which the whole of the under jaw
might have been immersed, and for knee breeches,
silk stockings, square-toed shoes, and three-cornered
cocked hats. Such was the disastrous termination
of the attempt to revive the old classic costume
during the bloody period of the French revolution.
An equally foolish effort has recently been made
in New York city to resuscitate tlie old Greek
Drama. Under the auspices of a new Institution,
styled the Academy of the Drama, the first of a
series of dramatic representations, divested of all
adjunctive attractions, was given in that city on
Wednesday last. The great feature of the evening
being a new tragedy entitled ELECTKA. This trnge
dv, founded on the old Greek models, and pre
serving a strict regard for the writers, we may
infer, without any very great violation of proba
bility, to be the production of Mr. ISAAC C. PRAY,
who signs himself "Director of the Academy."
But what we chiefly desire to note is, this odd
attempt to restore the purity of Dramatic repre
sentations by resorting to first principles. Alj
but the simplest scenic accessories nre to be
abandoned, orchestral music is to lie dis
pensed with, ns far as possible, and the success
of ttie author is to lie made to depend wholly upon
the literary excellence of his production, and upon
the skill evinced by the actors in portraying the
characters lie has drawn. Mr. PRAY, in his an
nouncement of this novel exhibition, inyPes the
serious attention of the Press, and the public, to
this effort to inaugurate a "reign of IlieDrtunai
often conceived, but never yet practically exem
plified." This, however, is a mistake. The West
minster scholars in London, at their annual exhibi
tions, have long been in the habit of performing
some one or more of the old Roman or Greek
plays—with this simple difference—that their per
formances were in the Greek or Roman tongue.
The French have also sought, more than once, to
revive the ancient Greek Drama, and though they
failed in acclimating so tender an exotic, they have
constructed their finest native tragedies by clas
sical rules. What is called the Romantic Drama
was scarcely known in France until it was popular
ized by VICTOR HUGO. liut whether the Dramatic
Representations announced by Mr. PRAY, be origi
nal or not. we arc perfectly satisfied that the ven
ture will not succeed. The severe simplicity of
the old Greek Tragedy was adapted to the taste of
the age iu which it flourished, but it can never lie
rendered palatable to a modern andience. In
Athens it was native to the soil, and elicited the
applause of the audience, by appealing to the re
ligious sentiment, or by its historical associa
tions. If in the EI.ECTRA as performed at the
Academy of the Drama, the old Greek Cliorusses
arc retained, the aid of music is also requisite, and
the tragedy thus becomes crossed with the opera-
If there are no cliorusses, what remains but solemn
declamation, and those statuesque groupings with
which the public lias already been familiarized
through tlie better appointed tableaux r wants of
the Keller troupe? Clearly, the whole project has
been engendered in folly, and must inevitably
submit to a. finale as foolish as its origin. An old
play tells us that it is "a mad world, my masters."
and that the Bedlamites are occasionally in the
ascendant. But we scarcely needed this informa
tion, to be satisfied of the fact, that in all ages
of the world wisdom and folly have been strange
ly commingled, and that the Fool's bauble lias
sometimes won more respect than the Marshal's
baton. In spite, however, of the contest that lias
been carried on from time immemorial, the prae"
lical has always gained, in the long run, the ad
vantage over the merely theoretical, and we have
been enabled to advance to a high point of civili
zation, though we have still much to learn, and,
perhaps, yet more to unlearn. But the crisis of
the attempt to inaugurate a new reign of the
Drama lias been reached earlier even than we
anticipated. We learn by the New York journals
of last evening, that the first representation of
ELECTIIA sealed its fate. Tlie Tribune says that
"experience of last night shows that the dispens
ing with the orchestra and scenery, and what
"Mr. Pray calls the 'adjunctive attractions' of the
"drama, includes also the dispensing with the
"audience, a modern adjunct which Mr! Pray
"liuist also make up his mind to do without, if lie
"persists in liis Greek delusion. Tlie performance
"is as dreary as can he well imagined; and the
"constant falling away hist night of the originally
"sporadic audience, left the public at the last in a
"bare majority over the actors."
Wc are again under the unfortunate necessity of
calling the attention of our readers to further
"outrages." Lawlessness still holds "sovereign
sway and masterdom" amongst us. So long has
it been suffered to go tinwhipped of justice that it
has now grown over-bold, and is enlarging the
field of its operations. It has heretofore assailed
men's privileges merely; it now liegins to lay its
hands upon their pockets. This is but the result
which we foresaw, when some months since we
began to appeal to public opinion, in the hope that
it would interfere where the delinquencies of the
authorities left men without redress. In another
column will be found some account of the invasion
of the ship-yard of the Messrs. Skinner, by an or
ganized gang of men who seem suddenly to have
determined to do something for a living, and to
whom no more natural method has occurred, than
to make a foray upon the ship-yard in question
and demand of its proprietors §1.75 per diem. We
need not here reiterate the facts of the case. They
are too clear for dispute. They constitute an out
rage that was not committed "by the infuriated
Irish of the Eighth Ward." The injured men who
are complaining, have, we are assured, no desire
to "break down the City Government." The
Police acted, it will be perceived, with that
forbearance which has characterized them for
some time past. They saw the premises
besieged by an infuriated crowd, they heard
the lives of the. workmen violently threat
ened, and they saw these poor laborers pursued by
an armed and hostile party as they left the yard.
Vet, as far as we can learn, they did not take one
single step towards putting an end to so disgrace
ful an affair; nor did the Mayor afterwards put an
end to the brief authority with which they are
clothed, but which they dishonestly neglected to
enforce. The Marshal appears to have had no re
source but to relieve such Policemen from their
disagreeable duty, and replace them by others
from the eastern part of the city, who "do not
sympathize" with the ruffians of Federal Hill.
Where these things are to end, or how a remedy
is obe apphed, are questions that our citizens
must eventually be forced to determine. The re
women and children who are
stricken, from their Utcte pic-n^T'n^d"
monstrances of our ancient .....
sometimes chronicles a shameless uTXI
fight as "only a causeway riot;"_ wl tl) ,
insufficient to correct the evils to wi,;„v '
< j n<i . c " we are
hourly exposed. The men who have somewhat
at stake, and who, if they do not value the good
name of the city, yet desire protection for them
selves and their property, must be upon the move
in this matter. We can do no more than enter
the protest of the press against this continued
toleration of lawlessness on the one hand, and
ollicial inefficiency upon the other. Unless those
whom we have mentioned shall awaken to a
speedy realization of the jierils surrounding us.
and their own consequent duty as citizens, they
may hear that the "Philistines are upon them,"
when it is too laic for safety. We are all paving
for the frolics of the bullies who infest our com
munity, and the sooner we square accounts the
better.
TUN AMERICAN FARMER, for July, comes to u3
iroin Mr. WORTH INUTON, who has recently assumed
its sole editorial management, it appears in a new
and somewhat improved dress, and gives iininis
taken evidence of the ability and energy which have
obtained for it such a well deserved reputation as
an agricultural journal.
We arc indebted to Messrs. JOHN MCRPHV & Co.,
the publishers, for the July number of the "METRO
POLITAN," which contains, as usual, many interest
ing and instructive articles, upon historical and
literary subjects.,-''
DETAILS OF EUROPEAN NEWS.
Arrival of the Borussia and the Ara
bia's Mails.
INTERESTING FACTS ANI) ITEMS.
The Royal mail steamer Arabia, Captain Stone,
arrived at Boston yesterday in time to permit the
mails to bo forwarded by the morning express train
to New York. We add to the extended telegraphic
summary, given on Tuesday, various extracts and
details of great interest. The dates arc to the 19th
ult.
The steamship Borussia, from Southampton on the
18th. arrived at this port last night.
The Indian Empire sailed from Southampton oft'
the 13th ult., and after a favorable run arrived off
Arran a little before midnight of the 15th. The
only licensed pilots belonging to the harbor of Gal
wav were one Bubbege, an Englishman, and Mr.
Wallace, who boarded the steamer ofl' Arran. The
vessel was placed in their charge, and only a few
minutes after 12 midnight she ran upon a rock
called the San Marguerite, the only obstruction in
the channel, where she remained for more than an
hour, when she was floated oft' by the rising tide
without material injury. The Captain was oil the
deck at the moment the vessel struck, and had only
a few moments before pointed out the buov mark
ing tlie rock to the pilots, who however insisted it
was only a boat. This fact, and the circumstance
that the ordinary ship channel was a mile and a
half distant from the rock, excited suspicion that
the disaster was the result of design, and the pilots
were placed in confinement. The Indian Empire
was announced to sail on the 18th, and is therefore
full v due.
The Sardinian Government is said to be annoyed
that the Cay liar! was given up to England rather
than Sardinia. The preference is ascribed to tlie
wish of the King of Naples to make the concession
to a Power of the first ratlier than of the second
rank.
A pleasant incident, during the Commemoration
week at Oxford was the conferring of honorary
degrees. Of the candidates Lord Stratford de
Kedcllfl'e was the tirst, and obtained a cordial wel
come, while Lord Eversley and Sir Lawrence l'eel
had certainly no cause to complain of the coldness
of their reception. But when General Inglis ap
peared, with the effects of indisposition still tracea
ble upon liis pallid features, thunders of applause
burst from area and gallery, anil for some time the
proceedings were at a stand still. Again and again
the acclamations were renewed, and it was not until
the hero of Lucknow had taken his seat for some
time that silence was restored. Mr. Thomas Ac
land was then presented, and the list was
closed bv Mr. Justice Haliburton. The author of
Sam Slick was welcomed with great cheering and
cries of "Now then Sain, give us a story," with
similar good humored apostrsphes.
The Constitutionnel looks unfavorably at the Eu
ropean polities of England. "The influence of Eng
land," it remarks, "in the general business of tlie
world is maintained by the alliances she is able to
contract on the Continent. It is with the aiil of
allies that she has founded her power, and that she
maintains it, even now, where so many elements of
decay reveal themselves in her interior organiza
tion. and in licr remote territories. If, then, it
should he proved that this power, long considered
the safeguard of European interests, exists only to
impair them, will they not he liable to witness the
loss of those sympathies of which she has such im
mediate need? Great Britain, surrounded with a
circle of governments, civilized, hut unsvmpathiz
ing, may end by being isolated in all diplomatic
questions; and the world may cease to believe in
her influence."
The J'ressc discovers matter of reflection on the
European relations of England. After epitomizing
the State of her foreign intercourse, it refers t" the
termination of the entente cordiale with France, ob
serving, "it cannot be otherwise than that this event
will have the most disastrous consequences to Great
Britain, chiefly because it must oblige her to con
tract an intimate alliance with Austria. England
in order to exert her due influence in European
polities, has never been able to dispense with a Con
tinental alliance. Not daring to count on Russia,
to whose animosity she has just established new
claims, and voluntarily alienating herself from
France, she has no choice; the Austrian alliance is
a matter of necessity."
Glancing at the weakness and instability of the
Austrian Empire, its want of cohesion, and its in
ability to prove of any use to an ally because of the
perpetual necessity of maintaining its own exist
ence, the Presse denounces the alliance as the nega
tion of all the previous liberal policy of the En
glish Government, and stripping the mask from her
hypocritical pretencesin that regard. It concludes :
"It will go hard but this alliance will prove fatal to
England. A people cannot, with impunity, set
itself up as the antagonist of all the living ener
gies, the auxiliary of all effete influences. If the
peace of Europe he not disturbed, England will
onl v peril her reputation in the game.
•But if any unforeseen event give occasion to war;
if a general insurrection of the rajahs imperils the
existence of Turkey; if Italy, urged to despair,
rise once r.orc against Austria; if France, obser
vant of the universal discontent, seeks to provoke a re
construction of the Eurojtcan balance, ujwn foundations
more equitable and less fray ite, what part will Eng
land play, encumbered with the mischievous hag
gage of her Indian Empire in revolt, and entering
the lists to enforce the authority of the Sultan
over a Christian population, and of the Austrian
Emperor over Italy, an authority equally valid in
either case?"
A Dr. des Brulais, who was a surgeon on the ship
Regina Ca-li, whose capture, with a cargo of mu
tinied African Apprentices, by an English vessel,
we have already recorded, writes, among other in
teresting particulars, that the whole cargo, consist
ing of 205 negroes, were ''taken from Liberia tcith
the consent of the President of that Stale, and inrtst of
them hail received some education, being able to sign
th eir engnp, ment.''
A private letter, from a French gentleman to a
friend in Paris, states: "In spite o'f the oflicial and
unoflieial denials in the French journals, the activ
ity in maritime armaments does not the less contin
ue. A sum of 75,000,000f. is applied to the blinihii/e
( sheathing with iron plates) of the ships, and 12,-
000,OOOf. to the construction of steam machinery of
150, GOO, and 900 horse power. A naval man. of
high standing in his profession, and of high official
rank, said, a few days back, that France wanted
about IS months more to transform the whole of her
fleet, and to finish the ships in the docks. Then, he
said, France may dispose of a maritime force such
as she has not had since I.ouis XVI."
The weekly Bank returns show' a decrease ot
£191,494 in the bullion, and of £333,210 in active
circulation; hut an increase in the reserve of notes
of £28.,110, and of i.2,59G in rest. The increase of
reserve notes is £315,110.
An interesting anecdote is in circulation, con
nected with the charming fete recentlv given at
Etoilles by Count Walewslci, in honor oi'tlie visit of
their Majesties. A tine little bov, son of the Count,
attracted great notice, and the Emperor calling the
child to him, asked: "What is your name, my
boy V The child replied : "Charles Walewski"
—"Count D'Etiolles," adding the Emperor, com
pleting the answer. Ilis Majesty desired apparent
ly, bv conferring this title on the son, to express
how highly he esteemed the services of the father
as Minister of Foreign Affairs.
French agents are buying up horses for artillery
service in Germany.
The Pntric, after expressing a hope that the note
in the Moniteur on the reported military prepara
tions of France will put a term to the sinister ru
mors circulated on the subject by one or two Lon
don papers, says : "Thank heaven, the cruel neces
sity of war, to which the most powerful nation
must abandon itself with regret, does not exist;
and we detect no motives for any rupture. It is,
however, absurd to expect a peace without any dif
ficulties.
"If difficulties now exist, it is because we are still
on the morrow of a war; the political horizon lias
not been entirelv cleared, and secondary questions
have to be solved. That this state of things should
give rise to certain misgivings is to be understood,
but we must beware drawing the gloomy conclu
sions predicted by certain ill-disposed minds.
France has nothing to conceal or to disguise. After
having waged war with resolution, she desires a
sincere peace."
An extraordinary and affecting scene occurred in
the Court of Queen's Bench on the 12th. After
the business of the day had been concluded, the
Attorney-General rose, and, on behalf of the bar
of England, expressed their regret at the retire
ment of Mr. Justice Coleridge. The learned Judge
replied, and then took his final departure from the
Court. A reporter says: "We have seldom seen
such a scene; most of the judges and many of the
bar were in tears during this most affecting cere
mony—the judge of 23 years taking leave of his
fellow judges and of the bar of England, but still in
the vigor ofhis mind, and in possession of the sound
est intellect."
Gangs of pickpockets have adopted the plan of
taking excursions to Staten Island, X. Y. One who
is a good swimmer falls overboard to gather a svm
pathising crowd,so that his accomplices can operate.
This was tried last Sunday week on board the
steamboat Hunchback The captain having heard
ot the dodge, let the fellow remain in the water till
he was nearly drowned, and then dragged him out.
A few days since, Lewis and John, sons of the
Hon. A. H. Marshall, of Kentucky, had an alterca
tion with the German bar-tender of a lager beer
saloon in St. Louie, Mo., which resulted in the bar
tender shooting John Marshall, it is supposed
fatally. Lewis, thereupon, drew a revover and
shot the bar-tender, who is not expected to live.—
Lewis Marshall was then arrested, and, after ex
amination, admitted to bail.
THE DAILY EXCHANGE, JULY 2, 1858-
HORSE FLESH.
A Frenchman was one day blandly remonstrating
against the supercilious scorn expressed by English
men for the beef of France, which he, for his part,
did not lind so inferior to that of England. "1 have
been two times in England," he remarked, -but 1
licverc find the bif so sttperieur to ours. 1 lind it
vary conveenient that they bring it you ori leetle
pieces of stick, for one penny, but I do not lind the
bif superieur." On hearing this, the Englishman,
red with astonishment, exclaimed. "Good God, sir!
you have been eating cat's meat."* It is very true
nehad been eating cat's meat; but had he not, at
the same time, been eating meat as succulent, savo
ry, and wholesome as the marbled beef of which
the 11 ri ton is so proud?
Let the resonant shouts of laughter subside a lit
tle, and while yon are wiping the tears from your
eyes, listen to the very serious exposition we shall
make of the agreeable and nutritive qualities of
horseflesh. We are- not going to press into the ser
vice of our argument the immense mass of evidence
collected by M. Isidore Geoffroy St. Ililaire.f re
specting the tribes and nations which habituallv
dine nil' horses; nor will we lay much stiess on
the fact, that in the Jardin des Plantesthe carnivo
ra are habitually fed on horseflesh, which keeps
them healthy in spite of many unfavorable condi
tions. The skeptic might not unreasonably ask
whether our digestive power be quite as good as
that of the lion; and he would remark that the
condor is known to devour, with relish, food which
Mr. Brown would sturdily refuse.
Unhappily no dietetic rules for men can be de
duced from condors and lions! We must rely on
the experience of human stomachs. Nor is this ex
perience wanting. Without alluding to the ru
mors which attribute to the Paris restaurateurs a lib
eral employment of horse-flesh among their filets de
been/, M. St. I lilairc collects an imposing 'mass of
evidence to show that horses have been eaten in
abundance, and without suspicion, as without evil
consequences. Huzard, the celebrated veterinary
surgeon, records that during the revolution, the
population ot Paris was fed for six months on horse
flesh.
It is true that when the beef was known to he
that of horses, some complaints were made; but,
in spite of the strong prejudices, and the terrors
such a discovery raised, no single ease of illness
was attributable to this food. Larrey, the great
army surgeon, declares that on very many occa
sions during the campaigns, he administered horse
flesh to the soldiers, and, what is more, he admin
istered it to the sick in the hospitals. Instead of
finding it injurious, he found it powerfully contrib
uted to their convalescence, and drove away a
scorbutic epidemic. Other testimony is cited, and
M. St. Ililairc feels himself abundantly authorized
to declare that horse-flesh is as wholesome and nu
tritious as ox-flesh.
Is horse-flesh as palatable as it is wholesome ?
Little will it avail to recount how there are tribes
of hippophagists, or how soldiers during a cam
paign, and citizens during a siege, have freely ea
ten of the filet tie cheval: under such extremities
an old shoe has not been despised, which is. never
theless, not generally considered a toothsome mor
sel. Feeling the necessity of having this point tie
finitely settled, the advocates of horse-flesh have
given banquets, both in Germany and France, at
which the comparative merits of horses, cows and
oxen were appreciated.
In 1825, the prefect of police chose a commission
of eminent men to inquire into the quality of the
llesh taken from horses which had died, or had been
recently killed, in Paris and its environs. These
commissions all shared the general prejudice; yet
in their report they avowed that "we cannot but
admit this meat to be very good, and very savory;
several members of the commission have oaten it,
and could not detect any sensible difference between
it and beef. In 1841, horse-flesh was openly adopt
ed at Ochsscnhansen (what irony in this name!) and
Wurtemburg, at both of which places it continues
to be publicly sold, under the surveillance of the
police; and five or six horses arc weekly brought to
market.
A large quantity is also sold at the Lake of Ton
stance. In 1842, a banquet, at which a hundred
and fifty persons assisted, inaugurated its public
use at Konigsbaden, near Stuttgard. In 1840 the
police of Baden authorized its public sale: and
SchafThauscn followed the example. In 1847 Weiin
er and Detmold witnessed public banquets of the
hippophagists, which went off with eclat; in Karls
bad and its environs the new beef came into gen
eral use: and at Zittau two hundred horses are eaten
annually. The innovation gained ground rapidly,
and the public sale of horse flesh is now general in
Austria, Bohemia, Sa.vony, Hanover, Switzerland
and Belgium. In 1855 Berlin counted no less than
five slaughter houses, where three hundred and fif
ty horses were sold. In Vienna, during the same
year, there was a riot to prevent one of these ban
quets; yet, in 1854, such progress had been made in
public opinion, that thirty-two thousand pounds'
weight were sold in a fortnight, and now at least
ten thousand of the inhabitants are hippophagists.
These facts arc very striking. When we con
sider, on the one hand, how strong is prejudice, and
on the other, how unreasoning the stomach, we
must admit that horse-flesh could only gain accept
ance in virtue of its positive excellence. Nor will
it suffice to meet these facts with a sarcasm on Ger
man beef, in comparison with which horse-flesh
may be supposed to hold no dishonorable rank; we
have the testimony of men accustomed to the Cafe
de Paris and P/iilijijtc'x, invited expressly to pro
nounce judgment, and proved, on trial incapable
of distinguishing horse-beef from ox-beef. M. lien
ault, the director of the great veterinary school at
Alfort, had a horse brought to the establishment
with an incurable paralysis. It was killed; and
three days afterwards on the Ist December, 1855,
eleven guests were invited to dine oil' it; they were
physicians, journalists, veterinary surgeons and
em pi o]/t>* of the government.
Side by side were dishes prepared by the same
cook, in precisely similar manner, consisting of
similar parts of the meat from this horse, and from
an ox of good quality. The horse-soup was flanked
bv an ox-soup, the bouilli of horse by a bouilli of
beef, the fillet of roast beef by a fillet of roast horse.
The guests unanimous!// pronounced in favor of the
horse-soup; the boniUi , on the contrary, they
thought inferior to that of the ox, though superior
to ordinary beef, decidedly so to cow-beef.
The roast fillet, again, seemed to them very de
cidedly in favor of the horse. Similar experiments
have been subsequently repeated in Paris and the
provinces, under varying conditions; the guests
have sometimes been informed what they were go
ing to eat; sometimes they have been totally un
suspecting; and sometimes they have been simply
told that they were going to eat something quite
novel. Vet in every case the result has been the
same.
It is on this evidence that M. St. Hilaire calls
upon the French people to turn their serious atten
tion to the immense mass of excellent animal food
which lies within their reach, and which they annu
ally suffer to waste, merely because of an absurd
prejudice. Difficult as it may be to overcome a
prejudice, no array of ignorance can prevent the
establishment of a truth which is at once easily de
monstrable and immediately beneficial.
Prejudice may reject horse-flesh, as it long re
jected tea and potatoes, the latter of which, Mon
taigne tells us, excited Vcstonucment et lc dei/ont f but
ha nevertheless become European food. If horses
are eaten, why not donkeys? The Greeks ate don
keys, and we must suppose they had their reasons
for it. Has any modern stomach been courageous
enough try?
*Saturday Review, 27th April, IS.">6.
f Lett res sur l\s Substances Alinientaires, et particulier
einent sur la Viande de Cheval. 1556.
THE FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH.
A correspondent of the New York Courier and
Enquirer, writing from Florida, thus describes the
famous fountain of Wakulla, which has been ren
dered historical in the annals of Spanish adven
ture:
A few days since I returned from a visit to this
• famous fountain. 1 can vouch for its existence. I
suppose that the efficacy of its miraculous virtues
has long since vanished. But its beauties are so
extraordinary, and its whole nature so anomalous
as to excite in the beholder no little admiration and
wonder. "Wahalla" Springs, for so the Indians
christened them, are situated sixteen miles south
from Tallahassee. They form the sources of the
Wakulla Kivcr, which, flowing directly south
twenty miles, mingles with the waters of the great
Gulf.
The springs, covering an area of some two hun
dred yards in circumference, are entirely embosom
ed in a dense forest of oaks and cypresses, whose
limbs are hung with banners of gray moss, which
give a solemn, sombre appearance to* the surround
ings. From the shore you remark at once the sin
gular clearness of the waters and the distinct colors
of blue and green which cover in patches its sur
face. By means of a rough scow and a stalwart
negro at the sweeps, our party was soon afloat. Not
a ripple curled the smooth surface.
Stretched at length upon the boards, we gazed
down in# the limpid depths. By actual measure
ment the bottom was two hundred and eighty feet
below us, yet we could distinguish the minutest ob
ject there with the utmost precision. A bit of silver
in gentle undulations, slipped to the bottom, and
appeared undiminished in size. At times the white
sands were flecked with dancing shadows, or when
at rest were tesselated with hues of every variety
of shade. Shells and flakes of mica radiated like
prisms.
In pome places immense trees were reclining upon
beds of inoss like giants at rest. There were eleva
tions and depressions, huge ranges of a coral-like
rock, "and valleys stretching in pensive quietness
between." There were abrupt precipices and top
pling crags which overhung abysses which noplum
inet has yet sounded. Mosses and water plants cov
ered other places like forests of ferns. They waved
their tops as if fanned by a gentle breeze. And
there were vast troops of "fishes whose home life wc
could look in upon without breach of etiquette.
They seemed entirelv unconcerned, looking up at
us with perfect indifference and moving silently
on into the mossy forest beneath. A dozen yards
distant was an uglv looking alligator who eyed us
wistfully. On a nearer approach he gradually sank
into the water and disappeared from view in a bed
of rushes. While skirting along the borders we
came over the bones of a mastodon which we judged
to be about eighty feet below the surface.
They consisted of portions of the jawbone, with
several of the teeth in good preservation. Several
years since, a gentleman in this vicinity, by means
of a marine armor, succeeded in recovering a large
quantity of these bones. They are very calcareous,
and crumble easily by exposure to the air. These
Springs are no ordinary curiosity. To the natural
ist and the man of science they afford a subject for
investigation and interesting exploration. The
sombre forest, the cloudless heavens, the strange
water-fowls, associated as they are with the enjoy
ments and pleasantries of a delightful party, will
not soon fade from my memory.
The Santa Fe Gazette announces the arrival in that
city of Capt. McComb, T. F., and Major Smith, pay
master, from Fort Cantonment Burgwyn, Lieut.
Cpok, from Fort Stanton; ami Gen. Garland, Major
Mckols, and Lieut. Cogswell, from Fort Union.—
Capt. Laston, of the Quartermaster's Department,
had been ordered to St. Louis, and Major Donald
son selected as his successor.
We learn that the steamers Water-Witch
Commander Rodgers, and Arctic, Commanded
Hartstene, have been ordered by the Department
irom the Gulf Squadron to the Navy Yard at Wash
ington.
"A DAUGHTER OF THE REGIMENT."
We believe there is but one case in America of a
real incident which somewhat approximates to that
of '•Marie," in the Opera by Donizetti. This is in
New ork, where the National Guard (one thous
and strong) have a fair orphan protege, familiarly
designated as "The Daughter of the Regiment."
The National Guard, under Col. Duryea, is the
best regulated and appointed militia company in
the I nited States. In drill, esprit de corps, organ
ization, and general appearance it will bear close
comparison with the "regulars" even of the mod
ern military government. Some years ago an offi
cer of the New York National Guard committed
suicide.
. This act, according to military discipline, is con
sidered one of cowardice, but the deceased was well
Known to be one who in active service stood amid
Die bravest of the brave. He bad been through the
Mexican war, and stood high in esteem as a soldier.
Rut other matters, when quietly at home, prompted
him to become a suicide. He left an orphan child,
a bright and promising little daughter. She was
alone in the world, and as it were, friendless. The
Regiment of her father adopted her, and she be
came thus "a Child of the Regiment," and that
regiment the gallant National Guard of New \ ork.
A tax of two dollars per annum was levied on
each member for the orphan's support and educa
tion. This amounted to $2,000 a year, and what
was not expended was dulv put away in investment
for a dowry for the Daughter of the Regiment.—
The young lady, now about sixteen years C.W. has
grown up beautiful, intelligent, and accomplished,
and is well oil': and doubtless she looks upon her
gallant guardians with all the love, honor, and en
thusiasm that Marie did on the brave Sulpice, and
the gallant 21st in the opera. Such companies as
the New York National Guard reflect honor on the
country. — Suvaninth Daily Georgian.
MR. DICKENS.
Mr. Charles Dickens, having gone through the
more popular of his Christmas books, lias now
adopted the expedient of making extracts from bis
larger works for bis "Readings" at St. Martin's
Hall. On Thursday he read from "Dombey and
Son" the portions occupied with the brief life of
little Paul, and truly marvelous was the state of
suspense in which he held his audience as lie ap
proached and recounted the last moments of his ju
venile hero. So minutely, indeed, were the in
crease of physical debility and the gradual advance
of death represented by the mere force of voice and
facial expression, that the last gasp came to the
hearers as a relief from an almost painful state of
tension.
The good natured, stupid Toots was the humor
ous contrast to the sad incidents ol the tale, and in
uttering his brief platitudes Mr. Dickens, assuming
a vacant look and a thick lubberly style of utter
ance, became quite another man. Changes that
other artists eflect by a variety of dresses are pre
sented to the imagination of Mr. Dickens' hearers
by a look or modulation of voice. Mrs. Gamp will
be the chief personage of a miscellaneous reading on
Thursday next. — London Times, June 11.
M AK R IED ,
On the 29th ultimo, by Rev. Mr. Hilt, THOMAS DOW
LING, of Georgetown, I). C., to Miss AMAXDA ELLEN
WIXXEY, of this city.
On the 29th ultimo, by Rev. Dr. Fuller, HENRY i\
GAKIILE to Miss ALMA GRAESEII, both of this city.
I) I E D ,
On the 29th ultimo. JOHN EVANS, in the 70th year of
his age.
(in the 30th ultimo, MARK HORGAX, aged 73 years.
On the 30th ultimo, PATRICK GA LAG HER in the 58th
year of his age.
On the 30th ultimo, SOPHIA ELIZABETH, aged 7
mouths and 16 days, daughter of John ('. and Margaret
Medinger.
COOKING COAL.
The best in the world. Prepared especially for family
use by the Baltimore Coal Company. It burns freely and
leaves no clinker.
DOBBIN k WARFIELD, Sole Agents,
je23tf 36 Second street.
COOKING COAL
For sale by Janne.v k Jewett, Baltimore street, one door
west of South, and 69 Second street, opjiosite the town
clock. The celebrated Lorberry Coals, unequalled for cul
inary purposes. They have also a large supply of Balti
more Company Coal, preferred by some for furnaces.
je29 2w
COAL NOTICE.
We would here respectfully inform our friends and consu
mers of coal generally, that we are receiving and prepared
to deliver the Locust Gap and Coal Mountain coals, which in
appearance, quality and durability, cannot be surpassed
by any brought to this market. We merely desire parties
to give these Coals a trial to convince them of this fact.
If taken at once and in quantities often tons and upwards
we are enabled to furnish them at $5.25 per ton of 2.240
lbs. We also keep constantly on hand, Lykens' Valley
Short Mountain and Cumberland Coals.
WASHBURN k HOUSE,
jel9 tlO Office S9 Lombard St., 2d door west of South
JOHNSON'S SEWING MACHINE,
PRICE S6O, S7O, and SBO,
For BEAUTY and durability of stitch, finish and design
is not excelled by any other MACHINE.
GIBB'S SEWING MACHINE,
PRICE sls, $23, and $25.
The above MACHINES are SPEEDY in their MOVE-
M EXT, and male a new strong elastic stitch , that will not
rip or break if every fifth stitch is cut.
Salesroom, No. 99 BALTIMORE ST.
pl9-tf L. I). CHASE, Agent.
'■A Friend lo Improvement" writes thus :
WILTON. X. 11.. Sept. 10. 1557.
Having had an opportunity to test the value of Prof. O.
J. Wood's Hair Restorative, I am prepared to say. that
it fully makes good its recommendations, by restoring to
more than its original lustre, hair that has become gray,
or faded from age or disease. It will give the hair a soft
and pliable texture, and what is of still great r import
ance than that, it is restored to health; it imparts to the
whole system its renovating, healing properties, and has
a tendency to restore health and prolong life, and give to
the aged the appearance of youth. Its unequalled proi>er
ties ought to recommend it to every family. Try it, ye
who labor uuder any disease of the head, and you will
never have cause to regret its application.
CAUTION.—Beware of worthless imitations, as several
are already in the market, called by different names. Use
none unless the words (Professor Woods's Hair Restora
tive, Depot, St. Louis, Mo., and New York,) are blown in
the bottle. Sold by all Druggists and Patent M dicine
Dealers. Also by all Fancy and Toilet Goods Dealers in
the United States and Canadas, and by
JOHN C. GIVEN, Chinaman's Tea Store,
je292w 37 and 39 Baltimore street.
GIFTS! GIFTS!! GIFTS!!
GIFTS. GIFTS. GIFTS.
GIFTS. GIFTS. GIFTS.
GIFTS. GIFTS. GIFTS,
GIFTS. GIFTS. GIFTS.
GIFTS. GIFTS. GIFTS.
GIFTS. GIFTS. GIFTS
GIFTS. GIFTS. GIFTS.
GIFTS. GIFTS. GIFTS.
GIFTS. GIFTS. GIFTS.
GIFTS. GIFTS. GIFTS.
GIFTS. GIFTS. GIFTS.
At the GRAND GIFT BOOK SALE, No. 41 Baltimore
street, corner of Frederick.
mr-25-dtf EVANS k HOYT.
WHEELER WILSON MANUFACTURING GO'S
IMPROVED SEWING MACHINES,
For Families, Manufacturers and others.
"In our own family we use one of Wheeler k Wilson's
machines, and we cannot imagine anything more perfect."
—Ed. X. Y. Evangelist.
126 BALTIMORE STREET, American Building,
fe22-tf. W. MERRILL, Agent
I. M. SINGER Go's,
IMPROVED SEWING MACHINES,
THE BEST EVER OFPEUEB FOR FAMILIES AND
MANUFACTURING.
SOUTHERN SALES AND EXHIBITION ROOMS,
105 BALTIMORE STREET.
ffy To Clergj-mcn of all denominations, and Sewing
Societies attached to Churches, we oiler our Family Ma
chine at half-price.
W. E. BRODERICK,
fe24-tf Agent,
RILHE AMERICAN FARMER.
A FOR JULY.
THE FARMER for July, the first number of a New
Volume, contains an unusual variety of interesting AG
RICULTURAL MATTER. By the Editor, there are In
troductory Remarks. Directions for the Month on the
Farm, including a valuable article on the Time and
Method of Cutting Timothy Hay. Directions for the
Month in the Garden, llow to apply Guano to Wheat.—
Destruction of Garlic. High Pressure Farming : Lime
vs. Guano. A Day at the College Farm, and at Rivers
dale. Agricultural Education. The Earth Worm an
Agricultural Laborer, dc. Communications on The
Marl Formations: Infusorial Organisms, by Hon. T. G.
Clemson. Matters and Things, by a Patuxent Planter.—
A visit to Florida, by Major L. Giddings. The Proper
Time to Cut Wheat, by Major John Jones, of Delaware,
kc. There are also. Principles of Manuring, by Dr. An
derson. Chemist to the Highland Agricultural Society of
Scotland. Vine Culture on the Rhine, by 11. F. French,
Esq., of Massachusetts. Salt as a Manure, by John John
son, of Geneva. A valuable article on The Improvement
of the Breed of Horses. Saving Clover Seed Giant
Clover. Use of Water in Vegetation. How to Keep a
Hone's Legs and Feet Sound. Gardening and Flowers.
How to Manure Trees in Grass Land. How much Milk
for a pound of Butter; and many smaller articles, inak
iiig thirty-two full pages of reading matter, besides forty
two pages of every variety of advertisements interesting
to the farmer, including the Xew Premium List of the
Maryland Agricultural Society.
Single copy 10 cents. Price j>er annum sl.
Address X. B. WORTHIXGTON,
jy2 It American Fanner (Hlice. Baltimore.
FJ* TRUSTEE'S SALE.— I will HY vir-
Jfillil tue of a decree of the Circuit Court for Baltimore
Wrrki Cily, sell, by public auction, at the Exchange Sales
Room, No. 19 S. Gay street, Baltimore, on FRIDAY, July
23d, 1858. at 1 o'clock, P. M..
ALL THAT LOT OF GROUND AND IMPROVEMENTS
situated in said city on the south side of Fawn street, be
tween High and Exeter streets, having a front of 20 feet,
and a uniform depth of 70 feet. Subject to an annual
ground rent of $37, payable half yearl v.
The improvements are a TWO STORY BRICK DWEL
LING, No. 43, about 16 feet wide and 28 feet deep, with
side alley and usual appurtenances.
Terms of sale— l One-half cash, and balance in six months;
credit payments to bear interest and be secured by notes
endorsed to the satisfaction of
L. M. REYNOLDS, Trustee,
je2 2awts _ WM. HAMILTON. Auct'r. __
POTATOES.— 300 BUSIH'IS M E lit' Eli
A POTATOES, culled, dry, free froin sprouts, and in
excellent condition.
400 Second-hand GUNNY BAGS.
B. T. ELDER, Commission Merchant,
No. 120 South Eutuw Street,
jyl-tf Opposite B. k O R. R. Depot.
JOISTS AND FLOORING BOARDS.—
28,000 feet assorted Y. P. JOISTS.
4.000 feet inch steam sawed FLOORING BOARDS, bright
and handsome, per schooner Justina Baudel, for sale by
PENDERGAST BROTHERS,
jy2 tf 77 Smith's wharf, (up stairs.)
30 HHOS. PRIME BA-
O CON SHOULDERS for sale by
jy2 2t JOSEPH CARSON k CO.
MESS PORK— 2OO BBLS. HEAVY
MESS PORK. D.J.FOLEY & BRO.,
Jy2-5t 50 South street.
ft—G EO LOGY.
I)R. BOYXTON respectfully announces that in com
pliance with the invitation of a number of distinguished
citizens of Baltimore, he will give his course of
EIGHT ILLUSTRATED LECTURES ON GEOLOGY,
AND
THE NATURAL HISTORY OF CREATION,
AT INSTITUTE HALL.
Commencing on FRIDAY EVENING, July 2d.
Second Lecture—TUESDAY EVENING, July 6th, and
continue three evenings per week till closed.
i'ROOR A M M E:
j 1. Mechanical Astronomy, in which will be illustrated
' by experiments in Natural Philosophy, the laws which
govern the formation.form, motion and situation of the
heavenly bodies with the earth.
2. Ingenious condition of the interior of the earth, causes
j of volcanoes, earthquakes, and the elevation of Continents
: and Islands.
•'- Composition and position of rocks, gold deposits,
, quart/, veins and formation of California.
! *L First creation of animal life. Classification of rocks
by fossil remains found in them.
5. Coal beds: lio\v s the coal was produced; with proof that
all Coals, Graphite and Diamond are of vegetable origin.
Difference between the bituminous and anthracite coal,
and how caused.
6. The period of reptiles, organic remains of myriads of
animals that existed on the earth and in the seas, millions
of years before the creation of man.
7. Warm blood animal—difference between the animals
that exist with man. and those that were on the earth be
fore man was created. Mastodon and Mammoth period.
i 8. The present order of animals, with the human race.
Age of the Earth. Agreement of the Biblical and Geo
logical Chronology. The harmony of Geology with the
Mosaic account of the Creation.
Allusion will be made anil some interesting facts stated
with regard to the Geological formation of the copper re
gions in Lake Superior, with remarks on California, its
Geology.Mineral worth. Gold and Mureury Mines, from
one year s Geological observations in that country.
I he above subject will be illustrated by a series of more
than FIFTY PAINTINGS.
The paintings cover over 3,000 feet of canvass, and were
executed at a cost of over $4,000. Among them is a splen
did production, by Healge. or Niagara Falls.
The Middletcwu .Yews says of this work : "It is a beau
tiful picture as well as a beautiful painting and a sight
ol it alone is worth the price of a ticket to the course. s '
EIGHT TICKETS for the course $1,50. Sixteen tick
ets $2. Single admission 25 cents. For sale at the Insti
tute. at the Bookstores and Ticket Office.
I he sun being excluded during the day, and the win
dows on both sides thrown open at night, the hall is ren
dered quite cool and comfortable.
To commence at 8* o'clock. jyl 2t
DISSOLUTION OF CO-PARTNER
—CIiAS. 1, KEMP, having <]is|iose<l of his
interest to OEO. n. KOo'KRS, the firm of Rogers .St Kemp
is this (hiy dissolved. GEO. H. KOGERS,
Baltimore, July 1, 1858. CHAS. 1,. KEMP.
GEO. H. ROG ERS will settle the business of the late
linn, and continue the COMMISSION BUSINESS at 14
linvvlv's Whff jv'Jeuilt
KENSEY JOHNS & CO..
MANUFACTURERS OP TIIE
SILVER SPRING, FAMILY. EXTRA & SUPER FLOUR.
Also, keep constantly on hand
The Patapscn lira ml, and the heat grades of Howard Street
and City Mills, Extra and Sujter, and Eye Flour.
Xos. 22 and 24 COMMERCE STREET,
BALTIMORE. MD.
Successors to DUER k JOHNS. jj2-3m
J.- ; I'OK CAPE MAY.
—-•-■-f-e Commencing SATURDAY. July
3d, 185 S. Pers ns desirous of visiting this celebrated
BATHING PLACE, are respectfully informed, that ar
rangements have been made with the PHILADELPHIA,
WILMINGTON AND BALTIMORE RAILROAD COM PA
NY. by which passengers leaving President street Depot,
daily (except Sundays) at 7.300"c10ck. A. M.. will connect
at New Castle with the steamers of New York line, arriv
ing at Cape May during the afternoon. Fare, including
carriage hire on the Island, $4 Children and servants $3.
jV2 tf WM. CRAWFORD, Agent.
; rjHHIS I S TO ti l VK NOTICE, that the sub-
JL scribers have obtained from the Orphans' Court of
Baltinfore City, letters testamentary on the estate of
HANNAH F. WILLIAMS, late of said city, deceased.—
All persons having claims against the said deceased, are
hereby warned to exhibit the same with the vouchers
thereof, to the subscribers, on or before the sth day of Jan
uary next; they may otherwise, by law, be excluded
from all benefit of said estate. Given under my hand
this Ist da \ of July, 1858.
jy2 law4w R JOHN S. WILLIAMS, Executor.
"DHCENIX STEAM MARBLE WORKS,
J ESTABLISHED IS2O.
CORNER SHARP AND GERMAN STREETS.
Persons owning family lots in public cemeteries or pri
vato burial grounds, are respectfully invited to call before
purchasing elsewhere, and examine the stock of
MONUMENTS, TOMBS, HEADSTONES, kc..
Of the best American and Italian marble, now finished
and for sale at the above establishment. The assortment,
which is large, embraces original designs and of choice
selections from the most appropriate and beautiful artistic
structures in modern use Also, MARBLE STATUES,
GARDEN VASES, FOUNTAINS, and other ornaments
appropriate for Gardens, Dwellings, or Grave lots, con
stantly on hand.
ALEXANDER GADDESS. Proprietor,
Steam Marble Works.
IO BACON SIDES, for sale by
jy2-2t JOSEPH CARSON & CO.
BACON— 5,000 SMALL SIZED CAN
VASSED HAMS.
ISO HHDS. PRIME WESTERN SIDES AND SHOULD
EES. D. J. FOI.EV A BRO ,
jy2-lw 50 South street.
Rl< 'E.—SO tirrres strictly prime, for sal* 1 by
/ GEO. L. HARRISON,
jy2 tf 6 O'Donnell's Wharf.
TjTLEK >N HALL RESTAURANT.
.1 J NO. 78 WEST FA V ETTE STREET,
REAR ENTRANCE ON BANK LANE.
The undersigned have recently added a number of im
provements to their well appointed restaurant, and desire,
at this time especially, to call to it the attention of gentle
men whose families are absent from the city during the
summer season, and who seek a convenient and private
resort for the purpose of enjoying tlieir meals.
Every delicacy our own and tin* neighboring markets af
ford will be found in season at ELDOX HALL.
Meals will be furnished at ALL HOURS during the day
and night, and our accommodations for the entertainment
of large DINNER and SL I'PER PARTIES cannot he sur
passed.
At the Bar will be found the best of LIQUORS and CI
(JARS. MIX URAL WATERS from the Fount, and the best
brands of SPARKLING CATAWBA.
The "SNACK"' counter will always ho supplied profusely
with every delicacy, ready to lie served at a moment's no
tiee.
Thankful for the patronage we have heretofore received,
we will endeavor to merit a continuance of the same.
Jelß eo4w RBILLY & SNYDER.
I XTOTICE is hereby given that application
1 4 will lie made to the Mayor and City Council of Bal
timorc, at its present session, to condemn and widen I.ipht
street, at its intersection with Baltimore street,
.jyl -lawiiw*
! gUMMER (;LOTHIN< i.
XO 197 BALTIMORE STREET
On hand a complete assortment of READY MADE
CLOTHING, suitable for the season.
J. P. HARTMAX,
jyt-3t 197 Baltimore street.
C-RRR MAN X'S HOTEL,
I ILL (LATEGII.ES',)
No. 124 WEST BALTIMORE STREET,
Baltimore, Md.
Hie subscriber having? leased the above Hotel, and
thoroughly renovated and refurnished it. now otl'ers its ac
commodations to the Traveling Public-. Tin- house will
he conducted on the European plan, for Gentlemen only.
His Bar and Restaurant will contain all the delicacies, as
well as the substantials, usually found in a well kept
house, whilst his Chambers and Beds. f or comfort and
cleanliness, shall compare favorable with any other house
in the city. Jlc, therefore, respectfully solicits a call.
C. H. MANN,
je24-lm Proprietor.
£& McMAKINS' NEW ATLANTIC
Pill! HOTEL,
CAPE ISLAND, N. J.,
_ls NOW OPEN' for the reception of visitors. The loca
tion of the house is unequalled ly any on the CajHt, and it
is the determination of the proprietors not to he excelled
in any particulars which may give pleasure and satisfac
tion to their guests. Superior accommodations, obliging
and attentive servants. Board $2 per day, or sl2 per
week. Children and servants half price
JOSEPH McMAKIN,
_ _ IiE.V J A MIX McMAKIX,
Je22 2w* Proprietors.
WES T~ & J E V EN s ,
IMPORTERS, MANUFACTURERS,
AND DEALERS IN'
GAS FIXTURES,
Of every Descriptor,
iVo. 206 Ralt.more Street,
BALTIMORE
Gas Pipes introduced into p uhlic and private buildings
in the best manner arid on the most pie; sing terms,
mrll-tf
Removal.
B. T. ELDER.
PRODUCE COM.WISSIOX MERCIIAXT,
HAS REMOVED from No. SI Smith's Wharf, to
Xo. 120 SOUTH EUTAW STREET,
eD-tf opposite Camden Station of the B. A- <>. K. R.
CIUSTO.M not SE, COI.I.Ki 'TOR'S
2 OFFICE, BALTIMORE, 10th June. 1858.
SEALED PROPOSALS will he received at this Office
until WEDNESDAY. 00 inst.. at 12 M.. for furnishing the
Revenue Cutter on this station with RATION'S, for one
year, commencing on the Ist of July. 1 Are. and ending on
the doth June, 1559. The rations to lw delivered monthly
on board the Cutter at this i>ort, according to the schedule
nnexed :
, .t: T Either I
j i l' c
' Pounds. Ounces. Fractions
|or a pint.
Sunday. 1 i; 14 2 1| 1|
Monday. 11l , I*i ii K 1 1 I i %
Tuesday 1 >. 14 2, H II 1 2 2
Wedn y. | L j I *l4 2, K 11; . %
Thursd. h k i, 14 21 A 1 1
Friday.. 1 % 14 2 X 1 1' 2 2 %
Saturd.. 1 *I42X Ilj X X
Weekly. 4I! 1 1 .V XPA 14 11, 77 4 4 13$ 3$
The contractor will he bound to furnish, on reasmable
notice, as often as may be required Dy- the Captain, not
exceeding one day for each week, an equivalent of fiesh
meat and fresh vegetables, in lieu of the corresponding
parts of the ration above mentioned.
JOHN THOMSON MASON,
Jels-law3w Collector.
rpo THE FARMERS OF THE MID-
I DLE AND SOUTHERN STATES.
THE AMERICAN FARMER—the oldest Agricultural
Periodical of the United States, and so well known in its
past career as a Journal of Practical Agriculture—will
commmence in July a new volume.
The undersigned having been for three and a half years
a constant contributor In the Editorial department of the
FARMER, and identified in a measure with its prosperous
condition and established reputation, has become sole pro
prietor. and urill devote himself exclusively to the duty of
making it more worthy still of the confidence and support
of the community.
He thinks that his early and constant familiarity with
Southern farm life, and an experience of nearly twenty
years as a grain grower and tobacco planter, has given
hi in a practical knowledge of the especial wants of the
grain and tobacco growing'country, which, with his ex
perience as a writer, and whatever capacity he may have,
will enable him not only to make The Farmer the repre
rentative of the advance and progress of Agriculture gen
erally, but to adapt it to the peculiar circumstances of the
very important region in which it has its largest circula
lation.
Being assured of the cordial co-operation of many lead
ing Agriculturists in Maryland, Virginia and other States,
as contributors to THE FARMER, the proprietor expects
to make this journal a medium for the discussion of inter
esting questions in Practical Agriculture, a source of ju
dicious instruction and a depository of useful information
in farming, gardening, agricultural education, and all
that relates to the improvement of country life. He re
spectfully asks of the farming community the support due
to a publication devoted exclusively to their interests,
THE AMERICAN FARMER will be issued monthly- as
heretofore—thirty-two pages octavo, and a large advei
ing sheet, at $1 per annum in advance; six copies for so,
thirteen copies for
Office of American Farmer,
je!6-2aw2w No. 6 North street, Baltimore.
j
"PALTIMORE MUSEI M.
RfeXOYATF.D, CARPETED AND WEI.I, VENTILATED.
FRIDAY EVENING, JULY 2.
MISS ELLIOTT awl I'ROE. CHURCHILL
in t!ie great drama,
ROSE OK W'ISSAHIKON;
<IR, TII E TIMES OK 1770.
To conclude with
UNCLE AT RICHMOND.
In which KATE Lum.ow and Mrs. HEXUI appear. It
HOLLJDAY STTTHEATRE,
SATURDAY, JULY 3il.
BEXEFI T
OF
S. W. OLEXX
When the charming comniedienne,
MISS M A ((11E MIT CIIE LL,
And her beautiful sister,
MISS M. A. MITCHELL,
V II appear in three great pieces, sustained by
MR. GLKNN
Aral a full Company.
Remember, this is the only night that Miss Mitchell and
her sister can appear. je3o-tf
§aitfe potters.
BANK OP COMMERCE, BALTIMORE,
Julie 30th, 1858 —A dividend of FOUR I'ER CENT,
for the last six months was this day declared, pavable on
and after MONDAY, the 12th tlav of.lulv next. By order
j.vl ti.'.jy GEO. C. MILLER, Cashier.
MER( JHANTS' li \M\. BALTIMORE, June
- 20. 18a8.—Tlte President and Directors have de
clared a dividend of FOCR AND A HALF I'ER CENT.,
payable on and after Wednesday, tlte 7th proximo.
This Bank pays the City and State taxes,
•i'tf D 9PRIGG, Cashier.
PIITIZENS' BANK OF BALTIMORE,
/ June 23d, 1858.—The President and Directors have
this day declared a dividend of FOl'R PER CENT. for the
past six months, payable to Stockholders on ami after
Till US PA \ . the Bth day of July. State tax paid by the
Bank. Transfer Books closed.
IV. L. RICHARDSON,
Cashier.
/ 111 F.SA I'EA k E HANK —! \ LTIMORE,
June 2~itb, 1858.—The President and Directors of this
Bank have declaied a dividend of FOUR PKR CKXT. for
the past six months, payable on and after the sixth day of
July. ]{ CHAMBERLAINK. Jr.,
Jc26 eo2w Cashier.
MEC HANICS' SAVINGS HANK OF
BA LTI MURE.—The following gentlemen have been
elected DIRECTORS of this Institution for the ensuing
year, vis :
WM. G. HARRISON, ROSS WIXANS.
I)R. WM. S. WOODSIDE, E. YATES REESE,
JAMES MURRAY, (Vulcan JOHN W.ROSS,
Works.) JOHN MURPHY,
MILES WHITE, SAM L KIRK,
GEORGE ROGERS. RICH D B. DoRSEY
ROBERT M. PROUD, CLARK COTTRELL,
DR. JOHN J. CRAVES, JOHN MORROW
At a subsequent meeting of the. Board. DR. JOHN J.
CRAVES was unanimously elected President in place of
Richard B. Dorsey. who declined a re-election. At the
same meeting RICHARD B. DORSEY was unanimously
elected Treasurer, and THOMAS DOXALOSOX, Esq., At
torney for the Institution. je3o-eo4t
BANK OP COMMERCE,
BALTIMORE, June 18th, 1858.
The Stockholders are hereby notified that the an
nual election, for Directors of this Institution, will be held
at the Banking house on MONDAY, the 12th day of July
next, from the hour of eleven o'clock, in the forenoon, till
one o'clock in the afternoon. By order,
elB-law3w. IR GEO. C. MILLER, Cashier.
(Lo-jJartnfrsbijJ potters.
DISSOLUTION OF CO-PARTNER
SHIP.—The co-partnership heretofore existing be
tween the subscribers, under the firm of Duer k Johns,
is DISSOLV ED this day by mutual consent. Kensey Johns
will attend to the settlement of the business, and use the
signature of the firm in liquidation. SAMUEL DI'ER.
Baltimore, July 1,1858. KENSEY JOHNS.
R JMIK UNDERSIGNED, IIA VINO PUR
A chased the entire interest of Samuel Duer, in the bus
iness heretofore existing under the firm of Duer & Joints,
will continue the PLOCJR AND MILLING BUSINESS,
under the name of KENSEY JOHNS k CO., for his own
account, at the old stand. No. 2- and 24 Commerce street.
KENSEY JOHNS.
Unitimore, Jul)/ 1,1858.
R PHE SUBSCRIBER HAVING SOLD
A his interest in the firm of Duer & Johns to Kensey
Johns, who is authorized to settle the business of the said
firm, and having leased Mt. Royal Mill, for the purpose of
manufacturing FAMILY, EXTRA AND SUPER FLOUIt.
and removed to warehouse No. 38 Commerce street, for
merlv occupied by Bttchwaiter A: Wright, where he offers
for sale a supply of FAMILY. EXTRA AND SUPER
FLOUR, by dray load or single barrel, on accommodating
terms, warranted to give satisfaction.
Baltimore, July l. 1858 lw* SAMUEL DUER.
DISSOLUTION OF GO PARTNER
SHIP.—The co-partnership of OA RLE, McDOWKLL
& CO. EXPIRES this day hy limitation. Either of the
late partners will attend to the settlement >f the business,
and sign in liquidation. R. McDOWKLL,
A. ROBINSON.
Baltimore, July 1,1858. WM. M. SPERRY.
The subscribers have this day formed a co-partnership
under the name of McDOWELL, ROBINSON A: CO. They
propose to conduct the CARPET BUSINESS in all its
branches at the store lately occupied hy Cable, McDowell
& Co., where they solicit a continuance of the favors so
liberally extended to that firm. R. McDOWELL,
A ROBINSON,
WM. M. SPERRY,
Baltimore, July 1 1858-4t E. C. McDOWELL,
THE IIUSINF..SSOFM. KKITM Jr. & SON
JL will he continued under the safe-name by the sur
viving partner EDWARD M. KEITH. ' jyMni
A SSOCRATED F 1 IIE MEN 'S INSU
-1 V RANGE COMPANY, JUNE 23, 1858.—' Tlie President
and Directors of the Firenu n's Insurance Company have
this day declared a DIVIDEND OF SIX AND ONE
ARTER PER CENT, for the six months, ending 30th
in. st., payable on and after 2d proximo. By order,
JOHN DUKEHART,
Je24-8t Secretary.
\V ANTED TO PI to 20
! T U'KES OK I.A\l>, on the CHARI.EB STREET
AVENUE. 3 to 4 miles from the city, improved or unim
proved. Address B<>\ Post Office. j fit*
| JOHN SHANAMAN
• " HAS REMOVED FROM SNOW HILL,
And commenced the Manufacture of
EVERY DESCRIPTION OF TIN k SHEET IRON \C.\RE,
AT
No. 15 S. CALVERT STREET.
BALTIMORE,
Where every article connected with his busmcss may he
found, and which will be disposed of at the lowest prices.
Special attention paid to
ROOFING AND SPOUTING.
orders from the Eastern Shore ami elsewhere
will receive prompt attention. mrfi ly
STORAGE AND WHARFAGE.
FJ PATAPSCO WAREHOUSES, CANTON.
STORAGE on ground floors IN FIRE PROOF WARE
ID H SES, for 10.000 tons Guano, Salt or Sugar at inoder
ate rates and WHARFAGE for largest ships with 25 feet
water. Apply to
GEORGE A. WILLIAMS
j JeS-tf No. 5 Dugaa's Building.
OFFICE OF THE GAS LIGHT COM
PA NY OF BALTIMORE, JUNE 15,1858.— C0ke at a
| Reduced Price. —This Company has on hand, and is con
stantly making Coke of the very best quality, which will
be sold at the reduced price of Six Cents per bushel.
It will be found to be a very cheap and excellent article
of fuel for Cooking Stoves, Ranges, and other family uses
during the summer season. Give it a trial.
JOSEPH BROWN,
'elfi 2aw3w Secretary
PARASOLS, PARASOLS, PARASOLS
In such variety that the taste of every purchaser can
I be suited. Children's PARASOLS and SHADES; Para-
I sols of extra large size for elderly ladies, in Brocade,
I Moir Antique, and Poul de Soi, we have an endless assert -
i ment. Tlie ladies' Paragon, Sun and Rain UMBRELLA
I has become quite popular, and is certainly very desirable,
j Also a large and varied assortment of Paris FANS of
recent importation.
E. M. PUNDERSON & CO.,
209 Baltimore street, Agents for
J sp7 tf Wheeler ft Wilson*B Family Sewing Machines
r BALTIMORE & OHIO ROAD ITK
9 CEIPTS— WITH THE NEW CONDITIONS
! AND STII'CIATIONS— for sale in Books of 100 and
upwards, or unbound bv tin-100 or 1,000, or pr ntcd to or
di r. with tin- names 'of Firms, &c., AT VERY LOW
PRICES.
BJ-Sbippors can rely on the CORRECT.VESS of these
Receipts, as they are the SECOND REVISION, just ap
approved hy the Company. MURPHY K CO ,
Printers, Booksellers, Stationers. AR.,
je2 lea. L v.! Baltimore street.
I JOSEPH ROGERS,
X ATTORNEY AT LAW,
8.3 West Favette street, above Charles,
i Practices in the courts of BALTIMORE CITY, ANNE
[ ARUNDEL, and neighboring counties. All matters apper
! taining to the profession promptly and carefully attended
to.
XT E WELL'S PATENT SAFETY LAMP
IN AND LAMP FEEDER.
| Warranted to prevent all accidents from the use of Etlie
| rial Oil or Burning Fluid; or any other explosive com
i pound- used for the production of light. This invention
I is applied to ell common Lamps and Lamp Feeders, and
| also to the Solar Lamps, Lanterns, Binnacle Lamps, kc.—
! 1 invite the attention of the public to NEWELL'S IM
PROVED SOLAR FLUID LAMP, for families, in the
Argand form, which burns with a clear, steady light, and
consuming less fluid than any other Lamp, as it consumes
not only tlie fluid, hut all the vapor arising from it while
ourning. These lamps are applied to Chandeliers for par
lors. and are particularly adapted to Churches, Factories,
Hotels, Saloons, Ships, kc. Oil Lamps can be altered to
safety; using the same shade and chimney. Over 1,000,000
! of these Lamps and Cans have been sold since 1852, and no
accident has occurred from their use. For sale wholesale
and retail only by ALFRED 11. REIP,
337 Baltimore street.
Also, BURNING FLUID at the market price, LAMP
j SHADES and CHIMNEYS.
' Please read the following certificate of the entire safety
; and efficiency of these devices:—
MR. A. H. RF.IP, Bear Sir—l have carefully examined
| nd tested the Patent Safety Lamp and Feeder, invented by
Mr. John Newell, of Boston, and am satisfied that in this
: application of the principle of the "Davy," Mr. Newell has
| urnished the public with a perfect safeguard against all
1 langer from explosion in the use of the ordinary burning
, fluids. With this Lamp an explosion is impossible, even
i with the most careless treatment.
Respectfully, yours,
WILLIAM E. A. AIKEN. M. D .
Professor of Chemistry, University of Md.
j Baltimore Feb. 26,1858.
I I have similar recommendations from Dr. Lewis 11.
; Steiner, Prof, of Chemistry, Maryland College of Pharma
; cy; Dr. A. Snowden Piggott, Analytical and Consulting
! Chemist; Professors B. Silliman, Sr., Charles T.Jackson,
, Aug. A. Hayes, John Torrey,and many others of equal
I _ ap2o-tf.
WELLS, FARGO & CO.
i YORK k CALIFORNIA EXPRESS
I A > y/) YNCHANGE COMPANY
' Company —Capital $600,000
OFFICE— B2 BROADWAY, NEW YORK.
I Boston office— I San Iran, office I Phil, office—
-1 39 k 40 Court cor Montgomery k 400 Chesnut st.
i Square I California sts. |
i Agents for P. C. Bambalier k Co., Island of Cuba Ex '
Pr 'l fx PRESS to California, Sandwich Islands, Oregon and '
South America.
sth and 20th OF EACH MONTH—Express to Havana
bv all regular steamers.
Goods must le accompanied by invoices.
EXCHANGES on California, Oregon, Sandwich Islands
and Havana, in sums to suit.
Agents in Baltimore—
PEXDERGAST BROS ,
CALIF,, R N 'IA BOND-HOHDERS! 111 *
i, TJ J ARGO kCO , are now prepared to receive the
old Bonds of the State of California, transport the same to
Sacramento City, and procure new ones, in accordance
with the Act of 28th April, 1857, and return same to this
city
e2fi eoly Office—B2 Broadway, New York*
(Stcursions.
- _ TWO EXCURSIONS,
7 THE THIRD AM> FOURTHOE JVL R,
(ONLY FIVE DOLLARS FOR THE ROUND TRIP.)
TO NORFOLK, POIPTSMOUTH, AND OLD POINT
COMFORT.
H i th the privilege of having the tickets extended to re
turn any day during the week.
The splendid steamers NORTH CAROLINA and LOUS!
ANA, commanded by Captains Cannon and Russell, hav
nig unsurpassed state-room and berth accommodations for
upwards of 400 persons.
The NORTH CAROLINA will leave the foot of Concord
street, on SATURDAY EVENING, July 3d, at 6 o'clock,
arriving at Old Point Comfort and Norfolk the next morn
ing.
K(-turning, will leave Norfolk on SU XDA Y EV EN ING,
the 4th inst ,at 0 o'clock, and Old Point Comfort at 7
o clock, arriving in Baltimore early Monday morning,
without the loss of any business day.
-,,-v'r leave the foot of ('uncord street on
oL NDA i EVENING, the 4th of July, at 0 o'clock, re
turning on Monday.
Persons wishing io spend a few days out ofthccity cannot
do better than to avail themselves of these trips, having an
opportunity of visiting Fortress Monroe, the most ex ten
Bive fortification in this country.
Tickets to he hail at the office or on hoard the boat. —
State ROOIIH and Berths may he secured at the office anv
time on the 3d.
. „ .. M. X. FALLS,
J'- 1 t4 J.V Agent.
. , ,v SEA BATHING
J L AT
OLD POINT COM FORT AND HAMPTON.
One of the BALTIMORE STE.V.M PACKET COMPA
NY'S STEAMERS will leave Union Dock. ft of Concord
street. DAILY (Sunday excepted) at 5 o'clock P. M., for
Old Point Comfort ami Hampton.
Fare there and hack $6, giving the passenger the privi
lege to remain the whole season.
M. X FALLS. Agent,
jell tJO Baltimore Steam Packet Company.
FOR THE SPRINGS:
JTBH:„ ,
jja i. tin ore axd omo railroad.
BERKELEY, BEDFORD. CAPON. JORDAN'S, SHAN
NONDAI.K. and the CENTRA I. VIRGINIA SPRINGS.
FOR BERKELEY SPRINGS (Morgan county, Va.) take
the through Mail train, leaving Camden Station. Balti
more, at (5. A. M., except Sundays, stopping at Hancock
Station. 122 miles from Baltimore, and five miles from the
Springs, by a good stage road. Fare to Hancock, $4.30.
Arrive at Hancock before noon, and at Berkeley before 1
P.M. The Express train leaving Baltimore at 505 P. M.
daily, connects with the stages for Berkeley at Sir John's
Run Station, miles distant, at 10.20, P M., by which
passengers reach the Springs before midnight.
For BEDFORD SPRINGS.. Bedford county. Pa.,) by the
Mail Train from Baltimore, at 6, A. M., the Express leav
ing at 5.05, P. M., or Through Accommodation at 10, P.
M., for Cumberland. (ISO miles.) and thence by stages 28
iniles to Bedford. The stages leave Cumberland every
morning at 6 o'clock, arriving in time for dinner at the
Springs. Fare by through ticket $6.50.
For JORDAN'S SPRINGS, (2S miles from Harper's
Ferry, and near the Winchester Railroad.) and
For SHANNON DA LK SPRINGS, (13 miles from liar
per's Ferry on the same road.) passengers will take the
Mail Train (at 0, A. M.) to Harper's Ferry and connect
with trains on Winchester Road.
FOR CAPON SPRINGS, take the 6, A. M . train from
Baltimore to Winchester, thence by stages for 23 miles,
arriving at Capon for early tea. Fare to Winchester,
$4.50.
For the WHITE SULPHUR and other Springs in the in
terior of Virginia, through tickets are now sold at Camden
Station via the Washington Branch of the Baltimore and
Ohio Railroad.
Tickets to be had at the Ticket Office. Camden Station.
W. P. SMITH,
je3o-eo6w Master of Transportation.
year 1853 ' y Eugene Dupuj. in th© Clerks 1
OI
= T'nsurpaxtct] ivFtrrrar.ee. M
; J I • tannenen. f I
V And Ftah.it** < Jjrnllevee j~ I
KISS-ME-CUICK:^
i: •- ;J
p IMstiliod from Fratrrant Tulips. ' }
~ E. DTTPUY, CHEMIST,
i COO Broalway.
I'or ilie Southern District oi w York. J
KISS-ME-QUICK POMADE FOR THE HAIR.
KISS MK QUICK SACHEI. FOB THE BUREAU.
KISS-ME-QUICK SOAP FOR THE TOILET.
A G E X TS .
CARY, HOWARD & SANGER. New York
SCUIEFFELLIX BRUS.. .A CV,
JAMES T. MAXWELL,
F. C. WELLS & Co., "
J. W. NORCROSS .A Co., Boston and New York
SI'HI EVERYWHERE.
IOHNSTONS' ifNSURANC T. ROOMS,
73 SECOND STREET.
MARINE INSURANCE.
THE MERCANTILE MUTUAL
MARINE
INSURANCE COMPANY,
NKW YORK,
ELI.WOOD WALTER, President.
Assets Januurv 1. 1 .
NINE IIU N DRE D A N D TIIIRT Y T HOUS AND DOLL A RS
Scrip and Cash Dividend
TWENTY-EIGHT A ND ONE H \ LF PER CENT
OPEN AND SPECIAL POLICIES
ISSUED o\ TIIE MOST ADVAYTAGEOUS TERMS.
PREMIUMS LIBERALLY CREDITED
Tims. D JOHNSTON.
73 SECOND STREET.
THE SECURITY FIRE
INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW YORK.
CASH CAPITAL AND SURPLUS. $260,000.
POLICIES ISSUED. LOSSES ADJUSTED AND PAID DY
THUS. D JOHNSTON.
FULLY ACCREDITED AGENT.
THE I'll EX IX FIRE
INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW YORK,
CASH CAPITAL AND SURPLUS. $280,000
POLICIES ISSUED. LOSSES ADJUSTED AND PAID BY
THOS. D. JOHNSTON.
FULLY ACCREDITED AGENT.
THE NEW WORLD FIRE
INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW YORK,
CASH CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, $234,000.
POLICIES ISSI ED, LOSSES ADJUSTED AND PAID UY
Tllos. D JOHNSTON,
FULLY ACCREDITED AGENT.
THE RESOLUTE FIRE
INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW YORK.
CASH CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, $240,000
POLICIES ISSUED, LOSSES ADJUSTED AND PAID BY
THOS. 1 JOHNSTON,
FULLY ACCREDITED AGENT.
THK ALBKMARLF. FIRE
INSURANUK COMPANY OF VIRGINIA.
CASH CAPITAL AND SURPLUS,
POLICIES ISSUED. LOSSES ADJUSTED AND PAID BY
Tllrs. h. JOHNSTON,
FULLY ACCREDITED AGENT.
THE LYNCHBURG
INSURANCE CO. OF VA.
CASH CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, SIBI,OOO.
POLICIES ISSUED. LOSSES ADJUSTED AND PAID BY
THOS. D. JOHNSTON,
FULLY ACCREDITED AGENT.
TH E INSURANCE COMPA N V
OF
THE VALLEY OF VIRGINIA.
CASH CA PITA LA ND SCRPLUS, f&M.000.
POLIC IES ISSUED. LOSSES ADJUSTED AND PAID BY
THOS. D. JOHNSTON,
FULLY ACCREDITED AGENT.
The stork of the above Companies ranges from "0 to 00
percent, above par. and they pay annual dividends of 10
to 20 jer cent.
Their assets are invested i : the most reliable and availa
ble securities, and are ample for any emergency which
could arise under the sagacious jurisdiction which controls
their operations.
JOHNSTON'S INSURANCE ROOMS,
je4 tfr 78 SECOND STREET.
JAMES M. ANDERSON A SON.
ENGRAVERS,
No. 14S Baltimore Street,
BANK NOTE, STEEL Jc COPPER PLATE PRINTING.
INVITATION, WEDDING, VISITING
JL Cards, etc., Engraved and Printed in the most fashion
able styles. Corporate and Notarial Seals, Letter Stamps,
etc. London and Paris Visiting Cards, De La Rue's En
▼elopes, etc. fsSStf
BALTIMORE FIRE INS! RANCE CO.
(ESTABLISHED UPWARDS OF HALF A
CENTURY.)
NF. it- nriLDixa,
S W CORNER OF SOUTH AND WATER STREETS.
This Company INSURES AGAINST LOSS OR DAM
AGE BY FIRE, in the city or country, on the various de
scriptions of property.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS.
J. I. COHEN, JR., President
R.A.TAYLOR. WM. GILMOR,
W. G. HARRISON, J. PENNINGTO
S. T. THOMPSON, JOSHUA I. COHEN,
GEO. R. VICKERH, FRANCIS T KINO,
F. W. ALRICKS, HENRY CARROLL,
S. O. HOPPMAN, R. S. STEUART
DAYIDS. WILSON, WM. H. BRUME.
W. F. WORTHINGTON,
fc22-eotfr. FRED'S WOODW4 >BT 11. Secrctarjr.
■ /AAS FITTING AND FIXTURES.
BLAIR & CO.,
MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IX
GAS FIXTURES,
St). .T> W. Butnmi STREET.
K B. GAS PIPE LVTRODUOKU 6y exjierienced workmen,
and warranted free from leaks.
RE oiLDixa, KE BROXZINO, and SILVERING done at the
shortest notice. ap29 tfr
I IVFEW STYLES HAIR PINS, fee.
J.N CAN FIELD, URO. J: CO.,
229 BALTIMORE STREET,
Have received direct from Paris, an invoice of Hair Pins
and MICA I' DRESSES, of the newest styles, some of which
are very beautiful. lnyll tf
4S&t WANTED. A comfortable two-story
i iiif. ' 1 i.1.1 VI, with passage and hack building,
west of and not more than fifteen minutes walk
from Calvert and Baltimore Streets. Rent not to exceed
S3OO. ADDRESS I*. T., OFFICE OP DAILY EXCHAN'GE,
my22tf
DUFFIELD'S SUPERIOR AMERU AN
WE S T P HAL! A 11 A M S
\\ are now receiving the above celebrated Hams, which
we offer to the trade, believing them to be equal, if not
superior, to anything in this market. Those who want a
choice Ham can rely on these. We guarantee them to be
as represented. DUVALL A- IGLKHART,
128 Light street Wharf,
apls-tf Corner <>f Conway s
MOUNT VERNON < O„
OF PICE, NO. 94 LOMBARD STP.EET,
Manufacturers of
COT TON VA N V A S.
ALSO
RAVEK'S DUCK, SEIXE AXP SEWIXG TWIXE
ap3o tfr
TO TRAVELERS.
CAN FIELD BROS. <f- CO.,
229 BALTIMORE STREET,
Have on hand a great variety of articles, such as PRF.S
SIVG CASES, TRAVELING BAGS, SOAPS PER
FUMERY, RAZORS, TOOTH BRUSHES, FANS, PORT -
MOXXOIES, CIGAR CASES, &c., &c., all of the hest
quality ____ my29-tf
QTAVES AND LUMBER.
k5 STA\ ES OF ALL SIZES, up to fl2 inch largest
Pipe, on hand, and Bills of Lumber of WHITE OAK in
eluding SHIP TIMBER and FIXE, HICKORY and' WAL
NUT, cut to any dimensions ordered
Apply to GEORGE A. WILLIAMS.
. 5 Pugan's Building,
j e3-tf or Camden Station.

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