OCR Interpretation


The daily exchange. [volume] (Baltimore, Md.) 1858-1861, February 22, 1859, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Maryland, College Park, MD

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83009573/1859-02-22/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE DAILY EXCHANGE Is published every rooming
(Sundays excepted); price Two CENTS; served in the city
at twelve and a half cents per week, payable to the carri
ars; mailed tosubscribersoutofthe city,at SIX DOLLARS
per annum. The TRI-WF.ERLY edition is mailed to sub
scribers at FOUR DOLLARS per annum. TlKUS—inva
riably cash in advance. OFFICE OF PUBLICATION— North-
East corner of Baltimore and North streets, Baltimore.
Letters to be addressed "To TBI DAILT EXCUANGI,
Baltimore, Maryland."
BALTIMORE.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1859.
The DAILY EXCHANGE enters, with this issue,
upon the second year of its existence, and while
we cannot flatter ourselves that any of our readers
will participate in our own feelings on the occa
sion, it is, nevertheless, due to those who have
manifested, so liberally, their disposition to sup
port us, that we should make projier acknowledge
ment of their past kindness, and renew the pledges
for our future conduct, which we gave at the in
ception of our enterprise. When we say that we
have succeeded, in twelve months, in placing our
journal upon a sure and permanent foundation,
we but state a fact, which must be apparent to
every one who is familiar with our progress, and
which, while especially gratifying to us
in its pecuniary aspect, furnishes, also, the most
positive evidence of the favor with which this
community has looked upon our editorial career.
Wo have, it is true, met with opposition—and our
earnest, and, we hope, not unavailing efforts to
promote the cause of law and order, and good
government in our city, have been attributed, by
some, to partisan hate and political animosity; hut
we have survived these denunciations, and have
the satisfaction of knowing that the sincerity of
our motives and the independence of our position
arc now very generally understood and appreciated.
A\ ith this apology, then, to our readers, for thus
obtruding upon them a matter so purely personal
to ou; selves, we can only repeat our firm and un
alterable detcrmintion to pursue, hereafter, a
course to which the experience we have gained
stimulates us to adhere.
Political revolutions, with their battles of opin
ion and of blood, make a greater impress upon
history and on the imaginations of succeeding gene
rations, than physical changes, however great. We
are accustomed to regard the war of the Revolu
tion, as the one great fact in our career, which
those who took part in it, and lived through it,
must look back upon, as a new birth and a new
baptism, by which old tilings passed away and all
things became new. Yet we doubt whether it was
felt by our fathers, as it seems to us. The great
business of the masses was then as now, private
and personal. In the midst of what we regard as
prolonged convulsion, involving the whole body
of society in terror and excitement, the large ma
jority were quietly pursuing their daily avocations,
taking more thought about the morrow, in con
nection with what to eat, and wherewithal to be
clothed, than with respect to the political results
depending upon it. And when the great end was
achieved, and we had passed from the form of
British colonies to that of independent States, we
doubt whether there was in the general conscious
ness any marked or apparent change. A weight
was removed from the spirit and a cloud from the
sky, but men's principal duties, hopes, fears, toils,
and sorrows, were the same, after as before. The
seven years of the Revolution were to the men of
the day, but seven years of life—more picturesque,
perhaps, and more exciting than others, but tbey
were years in which they plowed and sowed and
gathered; were married and given in marriage;
were sick of fevers and died as now, many more
in bed than on the field of battle. We scarcely
suppose the men of the Revolution realized that
they had passed such a gulf as we feel to separate
us from our pre-locomotive period. The great re
bellion against nature, through which, for the last
twenty years, we have been struggling, at a cost
of treasure, if not of blood, to which that of all
our wars combined is but small, and whereby we
have overturned the tremendous tyranny of moun
tains, and levelled to democratic equality all ob
structions in the path of free intercourse, is a revo
lution which will be found to have left deeper tra
ces not only on the face of the country, but also on
thethonghts of men, than any change merely politi
cal could possibly produce. We have thereby at
tained a consciousness of present, and a vision of fu
ture power, which no development merely social,
could effect. How ridiculously—childishly weak and
helpless we seem to ourselves to have been, before the
song of the locomotive was heard in all the land.
How short the period since, to have seen Niagara,
to have sailed on the great lakes, and to have drunk
of the Mississippi, were events which men made
books of, to be read by such as now read LIV
INGSTONE and B.umi. How significant of the
change wrought in men's feelings when
the word "slow" is becoming the synonym of stu
pid and dull, just as "villain" remained the word to
characterize the base, when villeins ceased to exist
as a political class.
Eight hundred millions of dollars invested in
Railroads in the UNITED STATES, present a stupen
dous financial view of this revolution, and when
it is further understood that this vast investment is
practically unproductive, at least in the sense which
asks for an immediate per centage on the capital
employed, and that other hundreds of millions
will have to follow those already spent, to render
perfect what we have begun—the true proportions
of the "deed we have dared" begin to break in
upon us. It is, therefore, a matter of the deepest
moment, to weigh every suggestion which human
genius, or human experience, may throw out for
the more perfect development of railroad enter
prise in the UNITED STATES. The laws of gravita
tion—the natural obstacles of mountains, rocks
and streams—the conditions of heat aud cold, of
moisture and of drouth—are well understood, and
will not be changed. The resources at our dis
posal have been sufficiently explored, to enable us
to say, with a good deal of certainty—perhaps,
absolute certainty—that the best means of transit
for ponderable bodies, on dry land, are machines,
rotating on a metal track. There is, as yet, no
indication that gravitation will be so investigated
and understood—that its force can be counter
acted, and, by some sort of insulation, matter
may be deprived of weight, and passed through
the air from point to point. Human ingenuity,
therefore, may confine itself to perfecting the loco
motive, the car and the track; and, within the
limits thus assigned, is a field which cannot be
easily exhausted. Hitherto, we think, the efforts
of engineers and machinists, have been too much
kept to the consideration of the locomotive and
the car—while the track has been comparatively
overlooked. Yet, it is to the track we must turn
to discover the causes that counteract the pros
perity of railroads. In fact, the leading idea of
the railroad—the great point of invention, dis
covery, application, or what you will—was the
level iron track. The locomotive was a mere
adaptation of principles already well understood,
nnd completely successful in steam navigation,
to doing upon the land, that which was impossible
before the suggestion of the iron way. It is with
this, however, as with our common roads. We
spare no pains, expense or ingenuity, in getting
up our carriages and wagons—and seem perfectly
content to rush, at a two-forty pace, in these
slight and elegant vehicles, over the roughest and
most dangerous roads and pavements. Just so,
we get up the fleetest and most powerful engines,
and the most expensive and strongly-built passen
ger ears, and send them forth to a violent contest
with difficulties existing in the track—probably,
wholly unnecessary.
We have been led into This view by the perusnl
of a pamphlet, put forth by S. A. BEERS, civil
engineer, with a view to introducing a new plan
of track. On the merits of this plan—which we
cannot describe, without occupying too much of
our space with technical language—we express no
further opinion, than that it seems to be suggested
by a very clear understanding of the defects
in existing tracks. The mode now universally
adopted, of laying down wooden sills on the sur
face of the road, and spiking thereon iron rails of
greater or less weight, is open to the most serious
The track being light and springy,
receives an undulatory motion from the passage
of a train, which, when the speed is great, changes
its movement, from a regular and equable rota
tion to a series of leaps from the crown of one
upward curve to another, converting the locomo
tive into what is happily termed a "flying trip
"hammer"—equally destructive to the road and to
itself. To overcome the resistance, offered by the
continual recurrence of nsctnding grades in this
process of undulation, increased weight has been
found necessary in the engine, and to guaid the
wheels of the whole train from the effects of this
trip-hammer force, increased strength and ponder
ousness must be provided. All the original
difficulties are thus aggravated. A track which
could not resist the shock of the lighter, gives way
still more hopelessly Wfore the heavier train; and
the slight exfoliation of the rail, manifested under
the passage of the ten ton engine, is developed into
its complete lamination nnd crushing together
by the resistless blows of one of thirty tons.
The different sizes of the cross-ties, and the various
qualities of the surface on which they rest, give them
an unequal bearing. The large ones have ac
quired, perhaps, a firm and unyielding foundation,
while the smaller have been driven by the passage
of frequent trains below the right line, and, as may
be frequently seen, are hanging to the rail by their
spike heads. Elevations in the line of the two
rails seldom occur at points precisely opposite each
other—the practical effect of which is to raise one
j side of the engine, thereby causing a thrust on
I the lower rail. If this be strong enough to resist,
; the recoil will throw the engine to the other side,
' and by the action thus commenced, a plunging
and vibratory motion results, with a danger of
greater or less intensity in proportion to the speed.
All these difficulties are aggravated by rain and
frost; and thus, a very slight degree of observation
will enable us to trace almost all the losses upon
railroads to the defects of the track. Mr. BEEKS
proposes a cast-iron sub-rail, with foundations
below the frost, surmounted by a rolled iron coping
rail, easily removable, nnd the two sides of the
track to be connected together by iron ties. Provi
sion is made for due elasticity in the track by wooden
bearings below the surface, and out of the reach
of decay, and by gutta-percha between the wrought
and cast-ir,.n. As we have intimated, we design
to express no further opinion on this plan, than
simply to repeat that its author has turned his
thoughts to the great cause of railroad troubles,
and we hope by calling attention to his proposed
improvements, to lead the engineering mind of the
country into a similar direction.
Apropos to an enterprise, which we hope to see
soon consummated here—the street railroad system
—we may add, that Mr. BEERS has also patented a
cast-iron rail for street use, for which he claims
superior advantages, and which is said to be in
successful operation in Brooklyn.
We are indebted to the Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD
for a copy of his speech in the United States Senate
on the "Thirty Million Bill."
We also acknowledge the receipt of "The Eclectic
Magazine of Foreign Literature," for March, W.
11. BIBWELL, Editor and Proprietor. For sale by
Henry Taylor.
[FIIOM OUR OWX CORRFSJ'ONI)FNT.]
WASHINGTON, Feb. 21, 1859.
The news received from Mexico by the special
bearer of despatches, recently arrived, is of the
highest importance. The Hon. WM. M. CHURCH
WELL, who was sent out by Mr. BUCHANAN to exam,
ine and report upon the condition of affairs in that
country, lias made a full statement of the case, and
exhibits the propriety and necessity for an imme
diate recognition of the JUAREZ Government by the
UNITED STATES. That it is the Government of the
people, as well as the Constitution, is clearly appa
rent. All the leading public men nearly are with
the Liberals, and so are a vast majority of the
masses. But they are without arms and ammuni
tion with which to attack and capture the city of
Mexico, and overthrow the local power of MIRAMON
and the Church party. Meantime European in llu
ences are clearly at'work to sustain the latter, be
cause the Liberals are well known to sympathise
with the UNITED STATUS, and to acknowledge our
policy of maintaining the ascendency of American
influences upon the Continent.
Kecngnition by the UNITED STATES, and the im
mediate conclusion of a treaty with us, would give
the Liberals great moral power, as well as enable
them at once to obtain the Materiel of war so neces
sary to their success. There would seem to be no
longer any reason for hesitation upon the part of
he Government of the UNITED STATES, and iti3 sup
posed here that Senor MATA, the representative of
the JUAREZ Government, will be immediately re
ceived. If he should not be, the probabilities arc
that the Liberals will be overwhelmed by the foreign
influences now threatening their existence as a
political body—for, though fully equal, even in
their present crippled condition, to defend them
selves against MIRAMON and his army, they cannot
resist the combination of England, France and
Spain against them. Mr. BUCHANAN has now in his
hands the opportunity to preserve the immense
stake which the UNITED STATES have in the future
of Mexico, or to cast it away forever. To-day our
MONROE doctrine is practically defied, by the inter
vention European powers. It remains to be seen
whether or no this is to be permitted. If not, the
hour has home in which to give practical effect to
the American idea of excluding the preponderance
of European influences from the Republics upon our
Southern border.
The Old Soldiers' Bill lias probably boon "done
to death" by the Senate Committee on Pensions,who
have made an adverse report upon it. The Com
mittee have come to a proper conclusion on the
subject. They foresee that it involves a gratuity
which must rost the Government many millions of
dollars. If this were to fall into the hands of the
soldiers themselves, who actually served in the
field, or to their surviving widows, the proposition
would be less objectionable. But the provisions of
the bill constitute a vast sweep net, made to in
clude thousands who deserve nothing. Besides, it
is too well known that the Pension agents and oth
er speculators upon public bounty, would get the
lion's share of the benefits to be conferred. The
bill now pending in the Senate look* rather harm
less. Apparently, it would provide for a compara
tively small number of persons; but all experience
shows that no fair estimate can be made of the
number. Tlie popular delusion is that onlv a few
hundred persons participated in the battle of Pitts
burgh, yet an act rewarding the gallant services
there rendered, ha 3 been made to cover upwards of
thirty thousand persons. At least,such I understand
to be the statement of the SECRETARY of the INTE
RIOR.
The NICHOLS' Committee of Investigation are now
in session. It is stated upon the street that the de
fence expected to triumph by invalidating the testi
mony of the witnesses for the prosecution. That
is a stale trick, and will not succeed, if the Commit
tee, remembering the difficulty which must always
attend the effort to expose corruption in high places,
does their duty fearlessly, and exercises ordinary
fairness in protecting tlie witnesses from unjust as
persions. The charges now investigating were
made upon clear and responsible statement of the
facts. If they arc true, public justice demands
their full exposure, and the punishment of the
guilty party; and if not true, the fact that they
have been publicly repeated for some time about
tlie Capitol, and have been very generally believed
bv those who heard them, makes it due to the honor
and dignity of Congress that they should be set at
rest by investigation. The House of Representa
tives and its Committee will remember, however,
that the investigation and the action upon it must
be characterized by fearless independence, and
stern justice to command public respect. The pub
lic verdict upon the testimony adduced will not be
trammelled by interested and unfair efforts to
blacken the witnesses on either side, or by generous
disposition to screen a guilty party.
Some time ago I gave your readers an account of
a terrible conflict at Dragoon Springs. Arizona, be
tween Mr. SILAS Sr. JOHN and three Mexicans, in
which the latter fled after having murdered Sr.
JOHN'S three companions, and wounding himself so
badly as to necessitate the amputation of his arm.
This gallant, feilow has just been appointed Indian
Agent among the Pimas and Maricapa Indians—a
post for which he is peculiarly well fitted.
Wo are looking hourly for the PRESIDENT'S veto
of the bill granting lands to the several States to
aid in the establishment of Agricultural Colleges.—
This measure is a highly popular one in Congress,
and throughout the North. But the Southern De
mocracy demand its veto in deference to their scru
ples against its constitutionality. There is no pro
bability that it ever can be passed by a two-thirds
vote against the veto. Had it become a law, it
would have done more for agricultural science and
its advancement in the UNITED STATES than can be
accomplished through any other agency.
TURKISH FEMALE SCHOOLS.— Letters from Con
stantinople mentioned some time back that the
Turkish Government had resolved to introduce re
forms into the organization of the schools for chil
dren. Th e Pressed' Orient at present contains an
article giving an account of the measures definite
ly decided on by Khair-Oullah Efl'endi, Minister of
Public Instruction. That functionary some time
back presented to the Sultan a complete system of
education for males, in which were introduced a
number of ameliorations adopted from European
establishments. At present the Minister's atten
tion has been directed to the education of girls,
and he has proposed not only to exclude boys from
the girls' schools, but to extend very considerably
the range of instruction given to females in Turkey,
as a preparatory step towards the intellectual
emancipation of the Mussulman women. The Sul
tan has given orders to have the proposed plan
carried into execution with as little delay as possi
ble, so that henceforward Turkish girls will not
only learn all the works executed with the needle,
but reading, wriiing, arithmetic, geography, and
history. In each of the 13 sections of the Turkish
capital six primary schools are to he established at
once; and at a later period one superior establish
ment in each section to complete the education of
the inferior schools.
THE NICARAGUA TRANSlT. —Monsieur Belly an
nounces in the l'qris Joumhl, that his organization
ot the Nicaragua Canal Company is completed, that
the money necessary is secured, that a vessel has
been freighted to carry out the engineering materi
al, and that this vessel, with himself, a part of the
engineers and clerks—sixty persons in all—will sail
from Havre for Greytown in a few weeks. The
chief engineer, M. Thome de Gamond, will remain
a few weeks longer in Europe to organize and send
out the remainder of the scientific corps. The
Prince Jerome asked to have his name placed at the
head of the list for 50,009 francs, as one of the pro
tectors of the enterprise, and the Count de Cham
bord and the Duke de Montpensier have also
subscribed for large sums.
The company have made application to the Grand
Duke Constantine, nnd the Arch-duke Maximilian,
to assume, by liberal subscriptions, a protectorship
in this grand scheme.
THE MISSOURI AND MISSISSIPPI UNlTED. —Agreeable
to expectation and announcement, both ends of the
Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad were made to
meet on Saturday evening last, the 12th inst., and
the first through train from the Mississippi, Father
of Waters, reached here on Sunday evening, thus
uniting by iron bands the two great rivers, and
drawing the Great West into the middle of civili
zation. St. Joseph is no longer in the West—
that mystic region is now somewhere in the neigh
borhood of Pike's Peak and the Rocky Mountains.
The first through train brought legioni of gold
seekers from the North and East, who come as
the pioneers and advance guard of thousands yet to
follow.— St. Joseph Journal, Feb. 14.
THE SPANISH ARMY AND NAVY. —According to a
decree just issued, the effective force of the Spanish
army for 1859 will be 84,000 men, a larger number
than was desired, but which, according to the
Spanish journals, was deemed necessary on account
of the appearance of Cuban and Mexican affairs.—
It is intended as soon as practicable to reduce the
standing army to 75,000 men. The navy of Spain
during the year 1859 will be composed of seventy
vessels, —among them thirty-three paddle and
twelve screw steamers. It is also contemplated to
engage in the service 138 vessels of war of an infe
rior class; gunboats und so forth. The marine
force for 1859 will be 6,500 men.
A HIGH-HANDED OUTRAGE. —Mr. Alexander Au
perie was accosted in Cincinnati on Wednesday
evening by two men, one of whom asked him if he
was noi one of the Grand Jury who had found a
bill against Richard W. Nell. "He replied in the
atlirinative, and received a blow from a pair of iron
knuckles and was slashed at with a knife which cut
his coat and vest. This attempt to murder a grand
juryman in the street, is one that mav well startle
the community. It is an assassin's blow at Law
and Society.— Cincinnati Commercial.
Mr. JEFFERSON AND THE FRANKING PRIVILEGE.—
Mr. Jefferson never franked letters for any mem
bers of his family, and correspondents frequently
enclosed in those directed to him, letters for some
of his family, nut Mr. Jefferson invariably gave
notice of the fact to the postmaster of this place,
and had the postage of all such letters charged to
him. — Charlottesville ( Fa.) Jeffersonian.
The Opposition Convention at Greenville, Tenn.,
on Wednesday last, nominated Mr. Thomas A.
R. Nelson as their candidate for Congress in the
First Congressional District of Tennessee.
We learn from the Honolulu Advertiser that
. attention is being paid to the cultivation of sugar
in that Island. The "Haiku Sugar Company,"
j has been incorporated with a capital of $50,000
; with the privilege of increasing it to $200,000. Tbey
have 2000 acres of land to operate upon.
THE HONORABLE J. MORRISON HARRIS AND THE
TOST OFFICE BUILDINGS IN BALTIMORE.
In a recent speech made by Mr. Harris, in the House
of Representatives, that gentleman thought proper, in
utter disregard of the true facts of the case, which were
within his personal knowledge, to make certain statements
derogating from the integrity of the gentlemen compris
ing the late Administration, and reflecting strongly upon
the motives and conduct of the owners of the site ulti
mately chosen for the Post ollice at Baltimore. A hrief
reply from me rendered it necessary for Mr. Harris topub
lish a correction of the errors of facts—(l deal mildly with
him in thus characterizing his statements) —he had com
mitted, and to publish also a certificate of character signed
by some of the most respectable gentlemen in Baltimore,
whose statements as to any fact within their knowl dge
would he received everywhere as conclusive of the truth
of such fact.
This publication of Mr. Harris raises two issues between
us, which I propose summarially to dispose of. They
are these:
Mr. Harris alleges that the Post-office site was opposed
by nine-tenths of the citizens of Baltimore, and in support
of tills allegation, tie produces the letters of Messrs. Tappati
and Marshall, stating that the site chosen was opposed by
numerous memorialists, in one case numbering from three
to four thousand. I publish now, herewith, the certificate
of the Clerk of the House of Representatives, showing that
all the memorials presented to Congress in relation to the
buildings of a Post-office and a United States Court-house
in the city of Baltimore, both for and against the various
sites offend for both of these purposes, were only six in
number, and were signed only by nine hundred and sixty
(960) individuaisand firms. Now when these six memorials
are divided between the two subjects of them, and those
relating to the Post-office are again divided between those
for and those against any one of the various sites spoken
of; and again between those for and those against the Ex
change site, the public will see how small a number of
individuals and firms constituted, in Mr. Harris' arith
metic, nine-tenths of the citizens of Baltimore.
But the matter of the memorials places Mr. Harris in
an unenviable position in another pointof view. Mr.
Harris applied at the office of ttie Clerk of the House of
Representatives for a certificate copy of one of th e above
mentioned memorials with the exact number of signatures
to all, and obtained the same through Mr. Buck, the Clerk
in charge of the papers, "on Friday the 11th or Saturday
the 12th inst."
On ttie 18th of the same month he published Mr. Tap
pan's letter, written on the 14th of the month, in which
Mr. Tappan erroneously, and, doubttoss,innocent!y stales
as his recollection, that the number of signers to one of
the memorials to have been from three to four thousand.
Mr. Harris, knowing at the time this statement, though
innocently so, to be erroneous, was yet wilting to take
advantage of the error of his colleague to convey a false
impression to the public.
In reference to snch of these memorials as opposed the
Exchange as the best site for the Post-office, and which
proposed the First Presbyterian Church as a better, I will
show, whenever required, that ttiey were all circulated for
signatures by some one or more persons anxious to sell to
the Government the last named property.
So much for the first issue. The second is my allega
tion that Mr. Harris was anxious to dispose of the church
property to the Government for the Post office. To this he
replies by publishing the certificate of Messrs. Taylor,
Brown. Collins and others, to the effect that Mr. Harris
had no pecuniary interest in the sale of the church, and
that to their knowledge he took no part in the promotion
of the purchase by the Government since he went to Con
gress.
I reply to ttie first part of this certificate, tiy saying that
I never alleged that Mr. Harris had a pecuniary interest
in the ssle of the church property, but that his opposition
to the Exchange grew out of his anxiety to sell the
church.
It is admitted, now, on all hands, that Mr. Harris was
a member of this same Committee, of which the signers
of the certificate constitute the rest. That he should
have had no anxiety to promote a purpose which they had
so much at heart will be difficult to he believed.
But in additional to the natural inference froin his posi
tion, that he was anxious to sell the church property, I
state as a fact witiiin the knowledge of ail the members
of the Judiciary Committee of the House of Representa
tives, and of his colleague also, the Hon. Henry Winter
Davis, that Mr. Harris appeared before that Committee
and made a speech in opposition to the Exchange, to
which Speech 1 replied on the day following.
To sell the church, it was first necessary to defend the
Exchange, and Mr. Harris used all his influence, little
enough indeed, to achieve that end.
But his agency in the matter of sale of the church
property will be better shown by the letters of the Hon
orable Henry May, and Bealc H. Richardson, Esq., which
are hereto appended.
I have done with Mr. Harris.
GEORGE P. KANE.
OFFICE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES U. S.,
February 18, 1 859.
1r ■' In answer to your queries of this morning I have
to state:
Ist. That Daniel Buck is the Clerk who has charge of
the files of the office, and has in his charge all the papers
returned to the office by the several Committees of the
House of Representatives, and now lias in his charge six
memorials, signed by 960 firms and individuals of Balti
more, relative to the building fur the Post-office and Court
house in that city.
. 2nd. I have no knowledge of any memorial, or memo
rials, relative to the same subject, other than those
above mentioned.
3rd. lion. J. Morrison Harris applied to this office on
Friday or Saturday last for a certified copy of one of the
above mentioned memorials, with the exact number of
signatures to all, and obtained the same through Mr. Buck,
the clerk in charge of the papers.
4th. The certificate was in the usual form that the peti
tion was a true copy of one on file, aud'signeil by 900 firms
and individuals.
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
(Signed.) J.C.ALLEN,
Clerk House Representatives U. S.
Hon. George P. Kane, Baltimore.
BALTIMORE, 18tli February, 1859.
Cot. George P. Kane:
Dear Sir:—l have just received your note of this date,
in which you request me to inform you "by letter, wheth
er I have any knowledge of Mr. J. Morrison Harris hav
ing interested himself in trying to effect a sale of the
property of the Ist Presbyterian church to the Govern
ment for the purposes of a Post-office."
1 very cheerfully comply with your request, and state
that when President Pierce visited this city for the pur
pose of inspecting and comparing the several sites pro
posed for the Post-office, Mr. Harris requested me to intro
duce him to the President, which I did, in his parlor at
Barnum's Hotel.
Mr. Harris then stated to the President in substance,
that he wished him to consider the advantages of the
Presbyterian church property, at the corner cf Fayette
and North streets, as a site for the Post-office; and that he
was authorized to offer it for that object.
I understood Mr. Harris as representing, in this inter
view, the owners of the property as their counsel.
1 am, very truly and respectfully yours.
(Signed.) 11. MAT.
„ . BALTIMORE, February 19,1559.
Col. George P. Kane:
Dear Sir:—ln reply to your note of yesterday, desiring
me to state whether I have any knowledge of Mr. J. Mor
rison Harris having manifested an anxiety to effect a sale
of the property of the First Presbyterian Church for Gov
ernmental purposes, I state that I distinctly remember Mr.
Harris calling at the office of the Baltimore Republican,
and submitting to my examination plats of the gr nind
on which stands the old building known as tlie First
Presbyterian Church, with the plans of a building suit
able for a court-room; and the pains which he took to sat
isfy me that this was the most eligible site for the pro
posed United States Court-house—not knowing that Mr.
Harris was a member of the church—and knowing tliathe
was an attorney, I naturally supposed he was acting in
the latter capacity, and was to be paid for his services.
A'ery respectfully, yours,
(Signed,) B. H. RICHARDSON.
[For the Daily Exchange.]
♦ CITY PASSENGER RAILROAD.
Few schemes for improvement in the City have ever
met with a more general approbation than that for a City
passenger Railroad. When first suggested ihere was an
almost universal cry against it, hut the sober reflection
of the people has changed the first impression as regards
its usefulness, and now. with here and there a dissenting
voice, there is an urgent demand made for the railroad.—
The fallacy of the objections which the opponents to the
improvement first advanced, and which they still adhere
to, has been proven, and the clamor about depreciated
real estate lias died of its own heaviness. A city railroad
is needed. It is not the interest of a few which demands
this improvement, hut it is the multitude—the great mass
of the people, whose interests are indis-oluhly connected
with all facilities which tend to annihilate distance, or
give comfort and convenience. The same causes which
demanded und secured the establish men t of the omnibus
lines of the city, are now demanding that that mode of
travel shall be dispensed with, and a new system shall he
inaugurated, which will be better adapted to the wants of
the people, and bring into intimate connection the ex
treme points of this growing and prosperous city. The
necessities of the mass are paramount to the wishes of
the few, and the interests of thousands are not
to be sacrificed to the pretensions of the tens. It is a
foregone conclusion that there will be a City Passenger
Railroad.
Conceding that this improvement will be made, the
question arises who shall make it? Several petitions for
grants of right of way through the various streets of the
city have already been presented to the City Council.—
With no desire to disparage the claims of any of those
who propose to undertake this work, we are decidedly of
opinion that the grant should be given to the Company
composed of Messrs. Coleman & Ilailey, William Robert
son and James Mitchell, the proprietors of the present om
nibus lines. The reasons to be assigned why these gen
tlemen should have the grant are numerous and obvious.
The citizens of Haiti more are much indebted to these
gentlemen for the facilities which their omnibus lines
have afforded. The ease with which distant parts of the
city can be reached, and the certainty and exactness
which have characterized the operation of these lines, lias
been the prime cause in extending the limits of the city.
Had there Hern no other means of communication wiih
the extreme points of the city, save by walking,
thousands of lots which are " now graced by im
posing dwellings, in which the wealthy reside, or
adorned by the humbler abode of the artizan and the
man of toil, would he an open common, or carefully
fenced by post and rail, would have yielded a supply of
provender, which fills the barn. But with the institution
of the omnibus tines, with the assurance of the means
of speedy communication, the suburbs grew imm- -
diately into riches, and that giound which for years
had been used as a commons, became coveted sites for
wealth to spend its munificence in adorning, and
honest industry to toil in erecting its cot
tage home. With the organization of the present system
of travel, the spirit of improvement went forth, and an
impetus was given to every class of trade. Every assess
ment of city property shows the gratifying fact, that
while the real estate of the interior of the city was
increasing with an astonishing rapidity, that of the
extremes was enhanced in value to a marvellous extent.
The idea which lias been advanced for the purpose of de
stroying the priority of the omnibus proprietors, that the
owners of the different stage coach lines should have been
indemnified for their loss, by the institution of the rail
road, is simply absurd. The proprietors of those lines did
propose to build railroads. They were aware, as all other
enterprising citizens, that the requirements of the times
demanded improved facilities for communication between
the city and country, but they had no proposition to ofl'er
to construct these lints. Other persons formed themselves
into companies—were chartered as corporate bodies—se
emed the right of way, as well as liberal support from the
City and State, and have accomplished the work. Had
the proprietors of the omnibus lines neglected to offer a
proposition for constructing the proposed City Railroad,
is any man so foolish as to suppose that they would have
been entitled to damages for loss of property, or even the
sympathy of the community? If men do not appreciate
the wants of the community, or if appreciating do not use
their exertions to supply those wants, they are not enti
tled even to the respect of their fellow citizens, for they
exhibit a disposition to sacrifice the public interests for
their pecuniary benefit. Such, however, is rot thecase in
this instance. The proprietors of the omnibus lines are
fully convinced of the necessity for the improvement, and
they propose to make the change—lav the omnibus by the
side of the stage coach as a thing which has answered its
purpose, but which no longer meets the requirements of a
prosperous and growing city, in making the proposi
tions they offer as sponsers for the faithful discharge of
their contract, gentlemen of widely known character, and
give every assurance that so far as responsibility is con
cerned, they stand as high as any of the gentlemen who
propose to form the other companies.
It may be well here to note the fict that it is princi
pally owing to the increase of wealth, of which the omni
bus lines have been the immediate cause, that the city has
been able to contribute so munificently towards the com
pletion of the great works of improvement, which now
send into her lap the products of a thousand valleys.
Without the great increase in the taxable wealth
of the city, the railroads which are now the pride
of our city as well as the sources of prosperity, would
have been in their swaddling hands, a reproacli to the
citizens of Baltimore, and a cause of shame to tiie projec
tors. Happily, however, with the incipient move in the
construction of these roads, a power was instituted which
was to be the great auxiliary in their completion. The
latent wealth and inert greatness of the city was awaken
ed; her means of power and strength were developed, and
the substance which was to produce the facilities for the
construction of these improvements, was augmented to
meet ail requirements. To the omnibus lines are we
therefore indebted to the great increase in the value of
real estate, which lias made our city a power strong with
ill itself. But the great pecuniary advantage which has
arisen from the exertions of the omnibus proprietors is
not tiie only benefit which has been derived from them.
To this rapid extension of the city limits are we greatly
indebted for the excellent health which we enjoy. Con
ceding that the _city would have increased in population
in the same ratio in which it has if the omnibus lines had
not been instituted, will any person pretend to say that
tiie suburbs would have been improved also, and the
population been properly distributed? Would not the ne
cessities of the people have compelled them to live al
most in herds; would not every alley and court have been
to an unhealthy excess with the laborer and me
chanic, and become the hot beds in which malignant dis
eases would have generated and been fostered? The
desire to have healthy locations for residences, when tiiey
had the speedy means of reaching them , has been the
cause of extending the city limits and improving the
grounds. But morally, too, the city has derived immense
benefits. Every person is aware that it is in densely pop
ulated districts where honest industry is com|>e!led to
communicate with abject villainy; that the morals of
those youths whose characters would be moulded by a
good mother's influence are subjected to the example of
the depraved, and they are too often induced to forsake
the principles of Integrity, which have been instilled into
THE DAILY EXCHANGE, FEBRUARY 22, 1859
them, by the glittering allurements which vice presents.
Ihis benefit is not the smallest which has flowed indirect
ly from the services of the ompibuses.
The comparison of the hack and cab with the omnibus,in
the work ol developing the wealth of the city and extend
ing its limits, is so destitute of force, that it is scarcely
worthy of remark. Certainly the poor man ould easily
enjoy the luxury of a cab. to reach his home, when it only
cost him 25 cents or cts. It is very probable that
the extreme points of the city would have been crowded
with the homes of industry, when those who occupied
them had such excellent and cheap facilities as those fur
nished by the hacks and cabs of the city. The com
parison is so absurd, that it is not worthy of atten
tion.
Another question which suggests itself is, what has
been the remuneration received by these gentlemen for
their years of incessant toil? Have they grown rich by
furnishing these means of communication? Any person
at all acquainted with the gentlemen, must know that no
magnificent fortunes have been realized, but on
the contrary they have realized but small profits. The
same amount of capital, labor and attention, invested in
almost any other pursuit, would have amply remunerated
the investors, and after the same number of years of toil,
they would have been able to retire from the active pur
suits of life surrounded with as much wealth as an ex-
President of a Railroad Company.
If the right of way is granted to any other Company ex
cept the proprietors of the omnibus lines, they will neces
sarily be great losers. All their stock in trade will be sacri
ficed without the possibility of them receiving any equiva
lent therefor. The other applicants for the grant have noth
ing to lose if they fail to secure it. They have no interests
that can be injured,with the exception of the prospective in
terest of profits to accrue from the enterprise. They offer no
better names, give no sounder guaranties for the faithful
performance of the contract, than the proprietors of the
omnibus lines. Judging by the past, we have the assur
ance that if the right of way is given to Messrs. Coleman
k Bailey, Robertson and Mitchell, there will be a faithful
discharge of all articles which may he imposed upon the
Company by the Mayor and City Council. There can he
no doubt, that if the sense of the community were taken
on the claims of the different applicants, there would be
an immense majority in favor of the omnibus proprietors.
Petitions are now in circulation, and hundreds of signa
tures attached thereto, asking that the right of way may
be granted to tliern, and the Council, by complying With
their petitions, will only be acceding to the almost uni
versal demand of the citizens of Baltimore. *
MARRIED.
On the 13tli instant, by Rev. Mr. Crever, JAMES W. KIR
BY, of Anne Arundel county, to ELEANORA BRICE, of this
city. *
DI ED.
On the 19th inst, Mrs. CATHARINE WISEL, in the 97th
year of her age. *
On the 19th inst., SARAH AGNES, aged 1 year, 7 months
and 11 days, infant daughter of John and Bridget Regan. *
On the2oth inst., LEVIN HENRY, second son of Levin
and Mary Colbert, in the 16th year of his age. *
On the 20th instant, THOMAS LANAHAN, in the 80th
year of his age.
HKM.TII OFFICE, Baltimore. Feb. 21. IS/. 9
Report of the Death* in City of Baltimore, for the Week end
ing on Monday morning.
Abscess I 1 Inflammation of lungs 4
Burn 1 Intemperance 1
Cancer 1 old age 4
Casualty 1 Organic disease of the heart. 3
Consumption 20 Palsy
Convulsions 1 Suicide 1
Croup 7!Spinal affection 1
Dropsy in the head 2 Teething 2
Fever, hillious 3 Unknown adult 3
" gastric lo;Unknown infantile 13
typhoid 2'
Inflammation of bladder.... 1 Males 52
" " bowels 1 Females 38
" " brain 2
" . " kidneys 1' Total 88
Of which number 13 were colored persons, 10 free and 3
slaves.
Under I year 22 Between 40 and 50 vears 6
Between 1 and 2 years 8 *• 50 and 60 years 1
" 2 and 5 years 13 " 60 and 70 years 6
* 5 and to years 6 44 70 and SO years 2
10 and 15 years 3 44 80 and 90 years 3
" 15 and 20 years 4 44 90 and 100* years... 1
' 20 and 30 years BStill births 8
41 30 and 40 years 6:
By order, J. W. HOUCK,
U"mini--i.'i'T ol 11. .11111
SAVE MONEY AND BUT SLOAT & Co.'s
LOCK STITCH SEWING M ACHINE.
Price SSO ami $65, complete.
Beauty and excellence of Stitch alike on both sides of the
fabric sewed, economy of thread, simplicity of construction,
portability and case of operation, speed, quietness of move
ment, strength and firmness of seam that will not rip or ravel,
applicability to a variety of material, compactness and ele
gance of model and finish.
L. D. CHARE, Agent,
nIC-tfr No. 99 Baltimore street
J AS. W. GEDDESS,
No. 92 MULBERRY STREET, NEAR EUTAW.
METAL ROOFING,
HOUSE GUTTERS AND SPOUTING.
Also, REPAIRING AND BUILDING HOT AIR FURNA
CES, LATROBE STOVES. oS-iy
J. B. T. PIIELPS,
GENTLEMEN'S WEAR,
107 BALTIMORE STREET,
fel7-tf Baltimore.
"ECONOMY IS WEALTH !" a trite but true saying.
In this age of improvement there is nothing impossible--
even to thefUling up of the Basin.' Making a Shakspercan
hyperbole an axiom: that is, "To strive with impossibilities
and outdo them." "DUPONT'S INODOROUS LIQUID
GLOVE CLEANER," is a realization of this fact. Persons
are saved the "trouble" of sending their soiled Gloves to
Philadelphia to be cleaned, as those who are not too lazy
can clean them themselves.
It can be had of D. C. DRISCOLL,
fel7-3tAeod 35 Baltimoro street.
T From the Baltimore Sun.}
ONE DOLLAR ! —lt is too much, exclaims the per
son desiring cheap articles for the restoration of the hair!—
We have, however, in our experience found that articles
which command seemingly exorbitant prices, are 111 the end
cheapest to the purchaser. Precious articles are always put
up in small packages, and efficacious medicines are not con
sidered dear at any price. < hie dollar Ixung the price of J'ro
fessor Wood's I fair /iestorative, for the smallest size or trial
Imttle, is a sufficient guarantee that the trial bottle contains
most precious ingredients. In proof of which its sale has in
creased one hundred fold within the past year.
CAUTION. —Beware of worthless imitations, as several are
already in the market, called by different names. Use none
unless the words (Professor Wood's llair Restorative, Depot
St. Louis, Mo., and New York,) are blown in the bottle
Sold by all Druggists and Patent Medicine Dealers. Also l>v
all I* ancy and Toilet Goods Dealers in the United States and
Cauadus, and by
JOHN C. GIVEN, Chinaman's Tea Store,
fel7-2w 37 and 39 Baltimore street.
JOHNSTON'S INSURANCE ROOMS,
73 SECOND STREET.
FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Companies. Capital and surplus.
Security Insurance Company of New York $267,1100
Plienix '• " " 292JMO
Resolute, " " " " 2t7,tK(o
New World, " " " " 2m,000
Monlauk, " " " 200,000
Charter Oak of Hartford, Connecticut 312,000
Insurance Company of the Valley of Virginia 3.11,000
Albemarle, of Virginia 200,000
Lynchburg, " 200,000
Northern Assurance Company, Loudon 2,194,111
M A RIX E1) EP ARTM EXT.
Mercantile Mutual of New York 1,014,150
Lynchburg of Virginia 200,000
Charter Oak of Hartford, Connecticut 312,000
Marine and Fire Policies issued upon approved risks with
out the delay of consulting the home offices.
Policies issued, losses adjusted and paid.)
THOS. D. JOHNSTON,
feW-tf 73 Second street.
LOOK HF.UE, STRANGER I
If you want either CHINA, GLASS, or COMMON WARE,
goto
JOHN A DOBSON A CO.'S
CHEAP CHINA STORE, Xos. 2 and 4 N. Charles street
they will sell you a little bit CHEAPER than the CHEAP
EST. Give them a call and examine for yourselves, jal-tf
BALTIMORE COAL COMPANY'S COAL,
at the reduced price of
FIVE DOLLARS,
per ton of 2,240 lbs.
In order to run off the stock of Coal on hand before the open
ing of Canal navigation, we have determined to sell this
very superior article of fuel at the very low price of FIVE
DOLLARS per ton of 2,240 lbs., delivered at any point within
the city limits.
TERMS CASH.
DOBBIN A WARFIELD, Sole Agents,
fe2l-tf No. 36 Second street.
CHARLE3 11. CRAFT. LODIS It. D. CLIFTON.
SOUTHERN AND WESTERN
A D VER TISIXG A GEXCF.
CRAFT k CLIFTON,
OFFICE, XO. 9 Second Story Franklin Building, N. E. corner
of Baltimore and North streets.
By Baltimore Merchants, on application as alxjve, can
have their Advertisements inserted at Publishers' Prices in
ANY NEWSPAPER OR PERIODICAL IN THE UNITED STATES, at
a saving to the Advertiser of all commissions, postage,
trouble, &c. fe2l-tniyl
CARD. —WiII those who are indebted come all
and settle their 4 * bills,''as I am very much in want of money,
having large "payments to make." 1 have come to the final
conclusion that if a MAN is not "morally" honest, he cannot
!>e made "legally" so; therefore those that will not pau may
keep it; while others, that may have the "stings of con
science," can address me through the "GOVERNMENT EX
PRESS,'' lately established for their accommodation, iuy
place of business being, perhaps, ''too far down
D. C.
fel9 3t 35 Baltimore street.
THE GROVER & BAKER
SEWING MACHINE COMPANY,
Having greatly increased their facilities for manufacturing
their celebrated FAMILY MACHINES, with all the recent im
provements, have reduced their prices, and offer Ibr sale
A NEW STYLE MACHINE,
PRICE SSO.
It is no longer questioned that these Machines aro the best
in use for family sewing. They
HEM, FELL, GATHER AND STITCH
in the most superior manner, and are the only machines in
market that are so well and simply made, that they may be
sent into families with no other instructions than are con
aiued in a circular which accompanies each machine, and
ruin which
A CHILD OF TEN YEARS
may readily learn how to use them, and keep them in order
They make upwards of
FIFTEEN HUNDRED STITCHES A MINUTE,
and will do the sewing of a family cheaper than a seamstress
can do it, even if she works a, the rate of
ONE CENT AN HOUR.
Is there a husband, father, or brother in the Unitid States
who would permit the drudgery of hand sewing in his fami
ly, when a GROVER A BARER MACHINE will do it better,
more expeditiously, and cheaper than can possibly be done
by hand?
Offices of exhibition and sale:—181 Ba .timore street, Bait
more; 495 Broadway, New York.
K?* Agencies in all the principal cities and towns in the
United States.
Swnd for a circular. nll-tl
BISHOPRICK'S INFALLIBLE BAKING POWDERS, just
received by GREEN L YOE, 88 Baltimore street. fe26-tf
LADIES' FDRS !
Sable, Mink, Stone Martin. Fitch, and all others, manu
factured, repaired and sold at lowest prices. DAVIS, Balti
more street, 9 doors east of the Bridge. fclC tf*
NODRSE & COWAN,
MERCHANT TAILORS,
No. 1 NORTH OALTERT STREET,
527-tf Baltimore, Mil
PnoToouAPHS IN OIL COLORS.
PHOTOGRAPHS— in India Ink.
PHOTOGRAPHS —in Water Colors.
PHOTOGRAPHS— PIain MainmothlSize.
PHOTOGRAPHS— in every style.
PHOTOGRAPHS —made every size.
PHOTOGRAPHIC TEMPLE OP ART.
G. N. BARNARD,
n2-6m No. 213 Baltimore st.
R. P. BAYLEY,
No. 6 HANOVER ST., NEAR BALTIMORE ST.,
Has just opened a fine stock of CHINA, GLASS and QUBENS
WARE, SILVER PLATED WARE, CASTORS, FINE CUTLERT, AC.,
which he intends selling off CHEAP for cash. Persons abou
buying would do well to call at No. 6 HANOVER S nl6 tf
LADD, WEBSTER & Co.'s,
UNRIVALED SEWING MACHINES,
For all purposes where a TIGHT stitch is required.
202 BALTIMORE STREET, (opposite H. Easter A Co'sJ
Samples o work sent by mail.
Every description of work executed to order.
Families supplied with Machines and Operators by the day
or week. jal-tf
THE POINTED YOKE SUIRT
Is manufactured to order by
CONSTABLE, WALKER & Co.,
155 Baltimore street.
This is a pattern of their own invention, which, after many
changes, they are prepared to pronounce perfect.
Give them a call—opposite the Museum. f
NEW ARRIVAL, PER THE ASIA.
GABRIEL D.CLARK,
corner of Calvert and Water sts.,
Now odors for sale Loudon, Liverpool anil Geneva Watches,
of superior workmanship, made to order. Also, the Americau
Watch, Hunting Cased; Fine Gold Jewelry, Silver and Pla
ted ware; Brown's celebrated Gold Pens diamond pointed;
Lecoulter Swiss Razors and Strops, warranted to be the best
in use. Purchasers of the above goods will please examine
the stock. j a i 5 y
OCULIST AND ABRIST.
DR. 10. P. JIOROXG,
SINCE IIIS RETURN FROM EUROPE,
Makes an exclusive speciality of the treatment of
DISEASES OF THE EYE AND EAR,
MEDICALL Y AND SUIIGWALL Y.
OFFICE, 71 N. CIIARI.ES ST.,
dle-tf Baltimore, Md.
DAY & MARTIN'S REAL JAPAN BLACKING imported
and for sale by GREEX & YOIO, 88 Baltimore street. fel6-tf
INTERESTING TO PERSONS HOLDING HOUSES FOR
...... KENT.
Your attention is invited to the propriety of INSURING your
HOUSE RENT.
Females and persons retired from business who depend
mainly upon their house rents for subsistence are specially
interested in this matter.
For a small premium you can be protected from any loss of
rent, should your property be destroyed by lire, at the
NATIOXAI, FIRE IXSURAXCE COMPAXY'S
OFFICE, 30 SOUTH STREET.
At this office, also,
Your HOUSES may be insured;
Or your MERCHANDISE;
Or your HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE;
Or your VESSELS OU the stocks, or afloat in port: on the
most favorable terms, for a year, month or week.
All losses are promptly adjusted and paid.
JOHN B. SEIDENSTRICKER, President,
J. R. MAGUCDER, Sec'y.
OFFICE, XO. ;IO SOUTH STREET.
New Building, opposite Second st.,
022 ootf Nat. Ins. Co. office of Baltimore.
MJLLER & BEACHAM'S
AMERICAN AND FOREIGN MUSIC STOKE,
No. 10 XORTU CHARLES STREET.
Orders for FOREIGN MUSIC solicited. _ ÜB-tf
-- GIRO DAGUERREOTYPES, &C.
Mr. MARSTERS, 117 Lexiugton street, near Howard street,
will furnish his patrons witli pictures on glass, card board,
plates or canvass, life size or in miniature from nature, or
copied in oil, French pastell or water colors, in a style of su
perior excellence. He has on hand a full assortment of plain
anil fancy cases; also, gilt frames, all of the best material
His long experience and attested success enable him to as
sure his patrons complete satisfaction or no charge. s7-ly
CHINA, CLASS, PLATED WARE, CUTLERY, &C.,
At 105 BALTIMORE STREET, two doors below Sun
Building. SELLING OFF THE ENTIRE STOCK AT COST
to close. Citizens, strangers, and all others in want of goods
in this line should call and examine before purchasing, as
this stock must he sold.
W STORE FOR RENT AND FIXTURES FOR SALE.
felOtf ROBERT. T. BANKS.
ROOFING ! ROOFING ! ! ROOFING !! 1
Economy, Durability and Security.
Warren's Fire and Water Proof
FELT AND COMPOSITION ROOFING.
Unrivalled by anything yet discovered for Booting purposes.
PERFECTLY FIRE PROOF,
PERFECTLY WATER PROOF,
UNEQUALLED FOR ECONOMY,
UNRIVALLED FOR DURABILITY,
ADAPTED TO EVERY CLIMATE
For further information address or call on
JAS. 11. JOHNSON,
No. 2 Jarvis Building, cor. North and
iy26-tf Baltimore streets, Baltimore.
KINDLING WOOD ! KINDLING WOOD ! !
SAWED AND SLIT WOOD, OP ANY SIZE.
Sawed and Split by Machinery.
Owing to the constantly increasing demand for this Wood,
I have greatly increased my facilities for preparing and de
livering it. lam now prepared to fill all orders with dispatch
fbr OAK or PINE WOOD, of any length or size, delivering it to
any part of the city free of cartage, guaranteeing the same
quantity that is contained in a cord before leing sawed and
split. JAS. IT. JOHNSON,
Proprietor City Steam Fire Wood Mill.
ti&T Office corner of Baltimore and North streets, over Pa
triot Office.
WHEELER & WILSON'S
SEWING MACHIN ES.
iN'eie and Valuable Improvements.
DIAGRAM OP THE LOCK STITCH.
DQDOCDOQQQS
This is the only stitch that cannot be ravelled, and that
presents the same appearance uion each side of the seam. It
is made with two threads, one upon each side of the fabric
and interlocked in the centre of it. Send for a Circular.
OFFICE—2OS W. BALTIMORE STREET,
sl6-ly Baltimore, Md.
MERCHANTS' ADVERTISING COMMISSION AND COL
LECTING AGENCY. —The proprietors of this old established
agency have located a permanent branchoftheirhou.se in the
city of Baltimore, under the immediate supervision of the
senior mem lie r of the firm. Merchants and others can
have advertisements inserted in any publication in the
country at the publishers' lowest rates. By calling at our of
fice they can examine at their leisure the largest assortment
of papers ever collected in this city.'
CHICHESTER & SANFORD,
Suu Iron Building, second story,
feO-tmyl Entrance on South street.
SINGER'S SEWING MACHINES,
AT IHS RAI.TIMORECSTREET,
HAVE BEEN GREATLY REDUCED IN PRICE.
We are now offering a new family machine at the LOW!
PRICE OK FIPTY DOLLARS.
liy Hemming guages of every width, binding guages o
all sizes, are adjusted to our machines.
Semi for a copy of I. M. Singer A Co.'s Gazette.
oUtf W. E. BRODERICK, Agent
# F. D. BKNTEEN,
SOLE AGENT FOR
N U N X S A c LARK 'S
SUPERIOR PIANO FORTES.
WARE ROOMS,
No. 10 N. CHARLES STREET,
At Miller A Beachani's Music Store,
And No. 80 FAYETTE STREET,
Ist store west of Charles,
( Entrance on tit her street,)
The improvements made in XUXN S k CLARK'S PIANOS
in the last two years have placed them, in every point of cx-
IcncCy as the best and most perfect Pianos now liefore the
public. Pianos exchanged, tuned, repaired and rented.
MELODEOXS from sls upwards. jalO tf
FRY CATHOLIC INSTITUTE
LECTURES.
THE THIRD LECTURE OF THE COURSE,
WILL BE DELIVERED AT THE
NEW ASS E M ELY II 0 O 'M S,
On FRIDAY EVENING, 25th iust.,atß o'clock, by
Prof. ALEXANDER DIM ITRY, of Louisiana.
SUBJECT—
"THE EARTH, AND ITS FITNESS FOR TIIE DESTINY
AND PROGRESS OF MAN."
Tickets 25 cents. For sale at the Rook Stores. fe22-4t
/FP MARYLAND INSTITUTE LECTURES.
*• —The Fourteenth Lecture of the Course will be deliv
ered on WEDNESDAY EVENING, 23d inst., by Dr. 1. I.
HA \ ES, lute Surgeon of the Kane Expedition.
Subject— 44 ARCTIC LIFE AND TRAVEL.*'
Members of the Institute with one lady, free. Tickets 25
(■••in-, for sale .-it the door. fe2l-2t
(PP FREE LECTURE.—REV. B. B. GRIS
WOLD will deliver a Lecture THIS (Tuesday) EVEN
ING in the Lecture Room of St. Stephen's Church,* Hanover
street near Barre, commencing at 7o'clock.
t Subject—"TlU*E YOUNG AMERICA, OR LIBERTY
REGULATED BY LAW."
ttar SEATS FREE. It
N b"L K G T~~U 11 B
IIKFOHE
THE MERCANTILE: LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
THIS TUESDAY NIGHT.
THE TWELFTH ANO LAST LECTURE OF THE COURSE
WILL BE DELIVERED IN THE
UNIVERSAL! ST CHURCH,
BY S. TEACKLE WALLIS, ESQ.
fe!9-3t On TC EBDA E\ EN INC. Ist March, at h " oVfock.
rrp Xo T I (' E.—RESUMPTION OF THE
DAILY TRIPS TO NORFOLK ANI) THE SOUTH.
The steamer LOUISIANA will resume her trips THIS DAY,
leaving the foot of Concord street EVERY MONDAY,
WEDN ESDA Y, and FRIDA Y, and the GEORGIA on TUES
DAYS, THURSDAYS and SATURDAYS, at 5 o'clock, P. M.
fell lm M. N. FALLS,President.
NOTICE.—Notice is hereby given that
NO WHARFAGE WILL RE CHARGED ON GOODS
SHIPPED TO AND FROM NEW YORK.by the Cromwell's
Steamers, ou and after this date.
SAM'L T. PEARCE, Agent,
_ _ . „ . , 116 Spear's wharf.
Baltimore, February 9th. 1.H59. f'9-lm
/pp LECTUREWDAVIirPAUL BROWN"
ESQ., of Philadelphia, FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE
GRAND SECTION, CADETS OF TEMPERANCE OF
MARYLAND, at CARROLL HALL,on THURSDAY EVEN
ING, February 24th, at 7)3 o'clock. Subject, "PASSIONS."
Tickets 25 cents, to be had at the principal Bookstores, and
at the door on the evening of the Lecture. M9-s,ti&th*
P~ IKE GOLL>~M INES.
Persons going to these Mines will find it to their ad
vantage to call and examine our stock of the various styles
OF FIRE ARMS,
manufactured by the most celebrated makers iu the country,
embracing
COLT'S PISTOLS, (with detached stocks,)
ALLEN & WH EE LOCK, DEAN ADAMS & DEAN,
and many others.
Also, MERRILL'S liRKACII LOADING GUN, which can
be loaded and discharged 10 to 15 times iter minute.
MERRILL, THoMAS A CO.,
fe22-tfr No. 239 Baltimore street.
CHOICE CHAMPAGNE WINE.
We have now in store the following celebrated brands,
viz:
"Willow Clicquot Ponaardin."
"Rubin" and La Perle."—Jacques Georg A Co.
"Grand A in Imperial."—Louche, Fils k Drouet.
"Heidsieck A C 0.," and "Chad.- Ileidsieck,"' "Bouzy," "An
chor," Lc.y which we *flerforsalu.
LAURENCE THOMSEX & CO.,
fe2Mf '• i Exchange Place.
WINTER IS NOT PAST.
The best COALS in this market can be procured from
HART k McGOWAN,
CORNER lil I>DI.E AND CATHEDRAL STREETS,
(or through oflice.) Some competent judges, burning
Ixjth kinds this winter, now give a preference to theirs over
Baltimore Company's, notwithstanding which they will also
deliver it for $5, prepaid, in any part of ths titv.
Their free burning Coals are also of the best,"and no decep
tion practiced I) 3* assuming wrong names.
Mines, being the best. f. 23St*
TRL STEES SALE.—In pursuance of :t
![••! jjj decree of the Superior Court of Baltimore city in Kqui-
Jita.rsfc*ty, the sul>scriner, as Trustee, w ill offer for sale by
public auction, on the promises, at 1 o'clock, P. M., on WEB-
A ESDAY, the 9th day of March next:
THE LOT OF GROUND in said city, beginning on the
eastern side of Sharp street at the distance of ninety-one feet
three inches from the northeastern corner of Sharp and Barre
streets, and running thence northerly on Sharp street seven
teen feet three inches; thence easterly parallel with Barre
street one hundred and twenty-five feet, more or less, to an
alle3* twelve feet wide; thence southerly and easterly along
said alley to the point of intersection of the westerly side of
said alley with a line drawn from the In-ginning parallel
with Barre street; and thence with said line one hundred
and thirty-two feet, more or less, to the beginning. Subject
to a yearl3* rent of sixt>* dollars and thirtv-eight cents, re
served on a lease of 25th of September, lb il, recorded Liber
T. K., No. 31G, lb. 22, Ac.
The improvements on this lot are a three-story brick
DWELLING HOUSE, with back building, Ac , now vacant.
Terms of sale —One-third cash on the day of sale; the resi
due, with interest from the day of sale, in two equal instal
ments at four and eight months from that day, to le secured
h3* bonds or notes, witli surety or sureties to be approved
by the Trustee.
WILLIAM J. WARD, Trustee.
__ fe22-2aw3w A GIBSON & CO., Auctioneers.
ROSIN. —lOOJ)bls. Rosin, in store and for sale
by ADOLPIIUS C. SOHAEFER, 74 Bowly's whf. fe22 >t
CIOTTON. —Uplands and Crulf Cotton, of all
'gnidM, constantly receiving and for sale liy AbOI.I'HUS
C. SOU AEI KK, No. 71 Bowly's wharf. f022 tit
SMOKED AND SPICED BEEF.—Put up for
family use and for sale by ADOLI'HI'S C. SCHAEFER,
No. 74 Bowly's wharf. fe22 6t
HAMS. —1,000 new Bacon Hams: 500 do. old,
for sale by JOSEPH CARSOX A (10. fe22 tf
MESS PORK.—IOO bbls. Western packed, just
received and for isle by JOS. CARSON' k CO. fe22-tf
QNLY TWO WEEKS LONGER !
11MUVV RUN U-R EF; N' N "' l BARGAINS* 1 ' 1 "
IIF.KMA.W I I ILEAL K will continue two weeks more to
run oil Remnants and all Cut Stock at a great sacrifice, lie
*™,vi„g the new assortment of Goods, which will arrive
L&- Do not forget the place— Xo. 161 X. GAY ST. fe22-12t
yWLUABLE WHARF PROPERTY
' OJTHURSD 8V A ,' RU, ' LIE SALC
\ ALL ABLE I KOI KRT\ on south side of Outer Basin.
Commencing at the line of property of J. W Ross which is
about 70 feet westerly from 1 lanCrtstrect, on L'ort Ward,', !
line, thence on said line north 63%, degrees west about 175
!'tm ,!n?"!. 0 !v ,a i COal 'r' : the P ce P ar "G with Hanbert street,
still on 1 ort Warden's line, about 100 fret; thence south, 15 3 j
K22MT ,'P 92 . fect ' to centre of Decatur street as laid down,
, P opened; thence along centre of said street
about 420 fret, to north side of Xicholson street, (as now
widened to ninety feet,) thence easterly, binding on said
street; about 85 feet; ttienee northerly, parallel with Hanbert
S rere!' f r' : t, ,' enCe parallel with Xidmlson
lli H? apolnt ""'•way between Hanbert anil Decatur
street, thence parallel with Hanbert street, about 165 f .cf
thence easterly about li feet, to line of other property of New
w, e L n 0, ' l|) i"7'i. a "'r ly V, 1 "' of sa . i<l property and land of Thus.
Coleman and John W ltoss, about liX) feet, northerly to
place of beginning, on Port Warden's Line, subject to certain
grants of privilege of connection with railroad tracks on this
property for benefit of adjoining land: and with right to ex
tend about 50 fret beyond said Port Warden's line" accord
ing to ordinance of May 21,155 G.
• "VJ UL OF about !I1 feet on Hanbert street, extendin"
in depth D) feet, to a line of above described property .Sold
subject to a mortgage to Thomas W'inans, for ten thousand
dollars, due on Ist October, 1861. The wharves and docks are
WIRO R IH Y SE ,X E N LI RAILROAD tracks connecting
A ith Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, the whole now in good
repair and condition, furnishing facilities for a large business
agoo'frcv ufue P UCE ' FOR which purpose it would yield
A (.SO— A lot on Hanbert street, about 2(1 feet front, extend
ing in depth about 76 feet, to tiie line of tiie wharf property—
clear of incumbrance.
lerms of sale One-half of the purchase money in cash, and
the balance on a credit of six months, the purchaser giving
jus negotiable note with endorser or endorsers satisfactory to
the I ompany, upon payment of which a deed will be mide.
1 lan of the property may lie seen at the Auction Store.
fe22-eod k 15th, 16th, 17th mh ' Na st
pOLICY HOLDERS
OF THE
MERCAXTILE MUTUAL MARIXE INSURANCE CO.
OF NEW YORK,
Will please call and receive the Certificates of
THEIR RESPECTIVE PORTIOXS OF THE PROFITS
OF TIIE SAID COMPANY FOR 1858.
THOS. D. JOHNSTON, Agent,
fe22-3t 73 Second street.
C LOSE & BROTHER,
4 GERMAN STREET,
, ~ SOLE AGENTS
for this market for the following celebrated Manufacturers of
WOOLENS:
K ,SONS', CLOTHS AXI) DOESKINS.
0. X EL,LESSEN A SONS, do. DO
J. WUI.FIXG A SONS, do. do'
SCHX ABEL BROS., do. do
JOIIAXXEY'S do. do
F. ERRICKSON .T LITTLE TICKET, do. do.
With afull assortment of other well-known makes of
, , SAXONY CLOTHS,
Black and Colored, NOW IX STORK, and for sale at MANU
FACTURERS' PRICES.
ALSO,
GOODS, in every variety and style.
OODS of a superior make and finish.
With a General Assortment of SPHI.VG GOODS, adapted
to the Clothing and Jobbing Trades, which they offer for sale
011 the most reasonable terms. CLOSE A BRO.,
JML'I-eoHinr 4 German street.
COLLECTION OF CLAIMS,
1 >'QUEEN AXXICS, KEXT A TAI.IiOT CLLUXTIES.
WOOLMAN J. GIBSON, Centreville, Md., respectfully of
fers his services to the Public for the Collection of Claims,
of every description, in the above named counties; in the
recovery of which he will employ the most prompt ami euer
getic means.
mm his r fry extensive knowledge, of the people, his past
success, and his unwearied application to business, lie be
I {eves he shall give entire satisfaction to all who may confide
their business to his care. His charges will be moderate.
REFERENCES:
Philadelphia—Dr. David Jayne; DeCourcy, Lafourcadc &
B<iltimore—\V m. Chesnut, Esq., Wm. 11. Gatcliell, Esq.,
Messrs. Wells A Miller, Messrs. Webb A Hopper, Geo. llar
man, Esq.
CentreinUe— Hon. I*. B. Hopper, Hon. R. B. Carmichael,
Pere W timer, Esq.
Che*tertown—\\ on. J. Alfred Pearce.
Klkton —Hon. Alex. Evans.
Fusion ('ol. Samuel Ha ruble ton. fel4-tf
T O T L KRS.
Pratt street, between Frederick and centre Market,
Where persons visiting the city will find
EVERY DELICACY OF THE SEASON,
1 repared at the SHORTEST NOTICE, and in SLPERIOU STYLE
OYSTER F S A , MILIESSKKVEIIWITU
TERRAPINS,
, , . And GAME,
\\ ith PROMPTNESS, by leaving their ORDERS at No. 40 Pratt
street, or handing them to the drivers of
RINN'S EXPRESS WAGONS,
winch traverse the streets at all hours.
N. B. NORFOLK OYSTERS received daily per Bay Lino
Steamers ja29-tf
DYE WOODS, DYE STUFFS, DRY-SALTS^.
RIES.
3,000 bbls. chipped and ground DYE WOODS;
20 casks Madder, free from sand;
10 44 Bleaching Powders, high test;
100 " Soda Ash, t '• 44
"2imj casks and obis, GLUE, Irish and American.
Acids, all kinds, ; I loud, Cochineal,
Alum, lump and ground, Lac Dye,
. . ! Pot and Pearl Ashes,
Bi. ( mm. Pot Ash, Pruss. Pot Ash,
Blue \ itrol, Pumice Stone,
Paris White,
China Clay, Roll Brimstone,
Copperas, Rel Tartar,
Cream lartar, llb d Lead,
Cudbear, Sugar of Izead,
Cutcli, Sicily Sumac,
Lmery, Sal Soda,
Extr;u:t Logwood, Sand Crucibles,
Gum Shellac, ,Terra Japonica,
Indigo Caraccas, Verdigris,
" Bengal, I Whiting, Ac., Ac.
for sale by R.J.BAKER,
nzO-tf 35 South Charles street.
SOUTHERN AND W'ESTEIiX
O HEMLOCK SOLE LEATHER DEPOT.
AND AGENCY DEPOT
FOR THE SALE OF SHOE L'F.GS,
at Boston and New York prices, from one iteek to a thou
sand barrels, at prices heretofore unsold in Baltimore.
Likewise, just opened a full and complete assortment of
SHOE FINDINGS,
Q ualit y of the most standard
SHOE IJiKhAD.
SHOE TOOLS,
AND NAILS,
T „ , . LASTS.
In fact everything connected with the Shew Finding busi
ness, on my nimble sixpence principle of low prices, together
with the largest assortment of hemlock ami oak Sole
Leather, prime I pper, lvip3, anil Finished Leather to be fount l
in any one house in Baltimore.
K?" Bark Mills, Tanners' and Curriers' Tools always on
hand for sale.
iijT Likewise Ayetiey for the very best
LEATHER BANDING,
at lowest manufacturers* prices. A liberal discount made t
dealers.
Likewise, now in store and for sale,
3,000 GALLONS OF WARRANTED PUKE
. ... . , p AND UNADULTERATED OIL,
by bbl. or in casks, for Tanners and Curriers, at Boston prices.
I urties using or dealing in Oil are hereby notified of the fact
that my assortment of Oils shall always be the best in the
city, and on as accommodating terms.
FRANCIS 11. GRUPY,
. , , 42 .South Calvert street.
And my new warehouse, 23 ,orant street, opposite ltobin
son A Lord's Counting-rooms. ja2U-tf
"VTOTICK.—I will contract to winter 10 or 12
II HOUSES on the following terms: Six dollars per month
on hay. with use ot comfortable stables and regular attention;
all grain given to lie paid for at the current market value,
and the horse at the risk of the owner.
I have a few fine HARNESS HuRSES for sale, and a pair
of Pennsylvania FAMILY HOUSES
Several superior I>KVOX CATTLE, (male and female,) and
a lot ot imported AI.DKRXKYS, (male and female,) with
tiiany Ayrshires fmale and female,) of the highest milking
IAJRHAM STOCK,from thefaincd SALLIE WAI-KEK
For Particulars address or call on
MAIITIN' GOI.nSBOROUfirr,
...Mo. 74 X. Calvert street. Bait.,
dl 4 tf General Agent.
HOUSk KEEPING! DRY GOODS,
CARPETIXGS, &c
ROYSTOX BROS.,
„ , 81 liAI.TI.MOKK STREET,
O'''i I't'"\n ll .V on haild a large stock of TABLE and
/!>•' IJ ■ !'£ f-rt S '"'.TING IJ.vkxs and COTTON'S,
QUILTS, BLANKETS. MADE SHEETS. ITRVI'IFRf!
C'HNTZtmd .OMITYS.LU'E and MUSLIN CURTAIN'S,
and HUUst KEEPING PRY Got>llss generally I
All kinds of CARPETIXGS, OIL CLOTHS, MATTINGS,
Jtc.
HEiVV.Y GOODS for Farm Servants.
Vn nfe iri:'\ U ; DRESS GOODS, GENT'S AXD
i <>l rHJv \V KAR, Ac. fe!2-tfr
OFFINS. COFFINS.
HAYS 4 MORSE,
CARVERS AND MANUFACTURERS OP
COMPOSITION ORNAMENTS.
No. 41 CLAY ST., NEAR PARK.
BALTIMORE.
Having commenced tile manufacture of COFFINS, thev
offer to the trade, Wholesale and Retail, a complete assort
ment (if MAI IOGAN\ AXD WALNUT COFFINS, made of
•he best seasoned materials, and of the most approved pat
erns. rhese Coffins Iwing made so as to Iw TAKEN APART,
offer great inducements W the Country Trade, as they can be
shipped at small expense, and to the city trade, as they will
occupy hut small space, and in case of fire can he saved with
out exposure.
For sale low. For terms, apply ns above. 012 lv
NEW SPRING GOODS,
HOSIERY, Ac.
AMOS I.OVEJOY & CO.'S NEW STOKE, No 195 Balti
more street, second door below Messrs. 11. Easter A Co., has
just received a large assortment of Spring
HOSIERY, GLOVES,
r0.,1 ,r . UNDER SHIRTS and DRAWERS,
of Silk, Merino. ain\ 00l and Cotton. Ladies' ami Misses'
(.an Merino Vests, all sizes; Gents' Silk, Gau Merino and
potion I mler Shirts and Drawers; a full assortment Hosiery
in all varieties Ladies'anil Misses Steel Extension Skirts.
Rest quality Sewing Silks, Needles, Pins, Tapes, Bobbins,
I breads. Root Laces, Knitting Cottons, &c , Ac., wholesale
and retail, at the lowest prices, at No. 105 Baltimore street,
between Light and Charles street. fe2l-tf
£1 LOVER AND
TIMOTHY SEED.
250 BUSIIELS VERY PRIME CLOVERSEED.
100 DO. TIMOTHY SEED.
In store and for sale by
CARR, GIESE A CO.,
fe2llwr 21 Spear's wharf.
N EW GOODS!
SPRING OF 1859.
HAMILTON EASTER A CO.,
N05.199, 201 and 203 Baltimore street,
Opened on
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY Ist, 1859,
A great variety of
IMPORTED DRY GOODS,
HV Adapted to Spring sales.
BEST QUALITY ALUM LIME.
,expressly for Building* purposes.—
lit ltN LD EN lIRELY \\ ITll WOOD, in Robinson's Patent
Pernetual Kiln.
This LIME is from my own Quarries in Texas, Baltimore
county. 1 guarantee the quality to be unsurpassed, contain
ing 97.9 per cent. Carbonate of Lime
lam now prepared to supply LIME in quantities to suit
Purchasers, and for shipment is packed in hhds. and bbls.
I KEbH LIME RECEIVED DAILY, and for sale by
WM. ROBINSON,
, .. 4 Hollingsworth street,
iCll-tfr near Pratt street wlmrf.
W. ROBERTS,
FHI BOOT MAKER.
NO. II NORTH ECTAW ST., BALTIMORE.
Every description of Boots oud Shoes made to order.—
Opera Roots, Cork Soled Boot<, Gaiters, and all other
kinds of work known in the trade, fully equal to any thing
made in this city or elsewhere, wholesale and retail. si My
AGENCY OF THE HAZARD POWDER COM
PANY.—Every variety of this sui>erior POWDER,
from the finest sporting and ducking to cannon and mining,
stored in our own magazine, and for sale by D. J. FOLEY &
HIM., sole agent.-, 5o South street. sr jab-tf
THOMAS M CKKKN. BENJAMIN U. TOL.
GREEN & YOE,
(Suectssrrrs to Jerome C. Vallclte,)
DEALERS IN CHOICE TEAS,
WINES, LIQUORS,
AXI) FINE FAMILY GROCERIES,
fell tf X<>. S- IUI.TIMwKK STREET, Rait.
C" UIA~FKI.NO DISHES, COFFEE URNS, and
/Block Tin Articles of every description, manufactured
anil for sale, wholesale and retail, at very low rates, by
. COKTLAX AGO.,
fe2l-4t Xos. 216 and 213 Baltimore street.
SOLUBLE GLASS CEMENT.—For mending
Obroken parts of Glass, China, Crockery, Stoneware, Por
celain, Wood, etc., believed to be the mot adhesive cement
known. For sale wholesale and retail hv
CORTLAN k CO.,
fe2l-4t 216 and 218 Baltimore street, near Charles.
ICE FOR SALE.—SOO tons ice from 4<V to 5
inches thick, delivered in town or at the house, if applied
for immediately. Appjy atj:- South street. r. fc2ft-tf
CI E.MEM'.
J Best quality Cenientconstantlv on hand and for sale
at the lowest market price by V.\l. Ff MiINSON',
fe2l-6tr 4 Hollingsworth st„ near Pratt st. wharf.
/CALCINED PLASTER OF PALIS, of the best
Wquality constantly on hand and for sale hv
WM. ROBIXSOX,
re'il-fitr No. 4 Hollingsworth St.. near Pratt st. wharf.
SHOVELS, FOKKS, HOES - ANIFRA K ES .
The most complete assortment in the market constantly
on hand, and for sale at manufacturers* lowest m ices by
M. KEITH, JR., & SON,
P~ ARIS CLOCKS OF THE NEWEST STYLES,
JUST IMPORTED by
CAXFIELD, BRO. A CO.,
d- tf 22*9 Baltimore street.
PATENT BALANCE.—One large Patent Bal
ance with dish, can books, Ac., for sale low by
GEO. HARRISON,
____ 6 O'Donnells wharf.
STEAM ENGINE AND BOILERS!
Two second ban 1 Boilers in good oider, and a Thirty
Horse power second-hand Steam Engine, for sale on favor
ble terms. Apply to C. IV. BEXTLEY,
ja29-lm 7 Front street near Baltimore.
GROUND RENT FOR $25,000 well secured and
desirably located, for sale by P. H. SULLIVAN, No. 34
second st
A TLANTIC MUTUAL INSURANCE
COMPANY.
51 WALL STREET, (corner of William,) NEW YORK.
INSURANCE AGAINST MARINE AND INLAND NAVI
GATION RISKS.
RESERVED CAPITAL OVER.. $2,000,(X
ASSETS, OVER FIVE MILLIONS,
Viz:
Stocks of the United States, of the State of New
York, ol New York City Banks ..$1,830,034 50
Loans secured by Stocks, bonds and Mortgages,
iJS'E^ WUe ••••••• 852,260.00
i • "4te"UO (MM) IM)
Dividends on Stocks, Interest on Bonds, and
Mortgages and other Loans, sundry notes, re
insurance and other claims due the Company.
estimated ut es MA r<
Premium Notes and Bills receivable ....... 2Jr29!9U258
Lash in Bank 194,5^9,^3
Total araount;of Assets $5,262,107.41
SURFIT l inHf : ho? 0ITS r ft,, P Compiiny revert to the AS-
Sl RED, and the profits of each year are divided, upon the
1 rem 111111s terminated during that year: for which Certifi
cates are issued, BEARING t\TER&T until redSmed
ri interest on the outstanding certificates of
profits will be paid to the holders thereof, or their legal rep
next VLS ' ' ißer Tuesday, the first day of February
™f. Vin ?- OVER IWOl W0 DOLLARS of pro
fits, the outstanding certificates of the issue of 1656 and 1657,
ill be redeemed and paid to tbe holders thereof, or their re
gal representatives, on and after Tuesday, the first day of
February next, from which date all interest thereon will
ment, and'canceUed be prodUCed M thc timc of
A dividend of FORTY PER CENT, is declared on the t.el
rK.mi.P. r S l ?e 1 ? l ? s I ■ ? c °mpauy 'or the year ending 31st
after Tuesday, the first day of February next.
X lie profits ol tile Company, ascertained from the
i • u -tr to the Ist of January, 1858; for
which Certificates were issued, amount to $7,055,310
Additional profits from Ist Januarv, 1858, to Ist
January, 1850 1,360.000
-p. Total profits for 16!$ years $0,015,310
The certificates previous to 1856, and 50 per cent
of the issue of that year, Jiave been redeemed
b >' casb 5,878,730
Net earnings remaining with the Company on Ist
January, 1850 ..... . s-, 13fi
By order of the Board. '
W. TOW\SEND JONES, Secretary.
JOHN D. JONES, t "CSTEKS t ;
W**l}'^Plll'FSR 18, JOSHUA J.VF.NRY,
TINW' VII L ' - .T' GEO. G. HOBSON,
I HOS. riLh.sTON. , 1UV1I) LW'T
HENRY COIT, 1 JAMES BKYCE
} JfirFi £J CK KRSCILL, WM. STU RG IS JR
W\f S H'mmor i HI ' :N " RY K. lu'iGERT,
)M. S. WFT MORE, a \ LOW
CHAS.H. RUSSELL, | WM. F. DODGE,
LOW EL HO L BRooK, I DENNIS PERKivS
ROBT C. G(M)])HUE, JOS. GAILLARI), j|-.,
xi'vvJJ Pjva ß ' WM. Wool),
MEYER CANS, .1 HENRY RI7RGY
{■•': • OII.LIUN, ' CORN FLICS GRINXELL,
Imvii i>nSt°?P' HENRY O BREWER,
ROYAL PHELPS, WATTS SHERMAN
CALEB BARSTOW, ; KWI). K. BELL, '
A. P. PILLOT, E K MORGAN
LEONARDO S. SUARF.Z, : B. .L HOW LAND
LEROY M. WILEY, BEX J BABCOCIv
DANIEL S. MILLER, FLETCHER WES^RAY
JOHN I>. JONES, President.
CHARLES DENNIS, Vice President.
v v , . MOORE, 2d Vice President.
New York, January 24th. 1859.
Applications received and forwarded by
K4 law3m&lam3m JAS CAREY COALE.
H ARTFORD FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY
HARTFORD, CONN.
GEORGE B. COALE, Agent for Maryland and its vicinity.
Incorporated A D. 1810. Cliarter Perpetual.
Authorised Capital. $1,000,000
Capital Paul in 500,000
Surplus 3U0,U00
ASSETS JANUARY 1, 1859.
Cash on hand and in Bank sl3 455.22
in hand of Agents and in transit .M.SL'TAIO
liu, Ffhite uiieucuinhered, (cash value,) 15,000.00
Bills Receivable. amply secured -3 174 55
2,401 Shares Bank Stock in Hartford 230*413.00
2 '?U J' " " New York 197,750.00
i ,u _. „ Boston 74.620 00
too Shares Bank of the State of Missouri 10.000 00
State and City Bonds, 6 per cents * 74 015' on
Railroad Storks . 16JB0 00
I nited States' Treasury Notes 14,035.00
$803,769.86
DIRECTORS.
11. HUNTINGTON, CALVIN If \Y
ALBERT DAY, JOB AI.LYN,'
JAMES GOODWIN. JOHN P BRACE
CIIAKI.ES J. \tuss.
H. HUNTINGTON, President.
TIMO. C, ALI.YN, Secretarxv' * BOWEUS > Actuar *-
U; C. LYMAN, Assistant Secretary.
tins old and reliable Company, established for nearly
FIFTI $ EARS,continues to Insure against Loss or Damage by
'. "'C on I weUmgs, 1 iirniture. Warehouses, Stores, Merchan
dise, Mills, Manufactories, and most other kinds of proiieity,
on its usual satisfactory terms.
Particular attention given to insuring Farm Property,
consisting of Dwellings, Barns anil Out Buildings connected,
and Furniture. Live Stock, Hay, Grain, Farming Utensils,
Sc., vc., contained in the same, for a term of three or five
years at LOW rates of premium.
Applications for Insurance may be made to the under
signed, the duty authorised Agent for Baltimore and vicinity.
Losses equitably adjusted at this Agency, and paid imme
dlately, u|>on satisfactory proofs in funds current in the
cities of JNcie } ork or Huston , as the assured may prefer.
GEO B. COALE, Agent for
„ ... „ . , Maryland and its vicinity.
Baltimore, February 12th, 1659. fem {f r
MANHATTAN LIFE INSURANCE CO.,
OF NEW YORK.
CASH CAPITAL AND ASSETS,
575 0, 0 00.
.... . OROANISI'.D TS 1856 WITH A PERPETUAL CHARTER.
1 Ins old and reliable Company offers i>eculiar advantages
to those who wish to effect Insurance on their lives. Its af
fairs are conducted by a Board of thirty-six Directors, gentle-
York UI pU integrity, and high standing in New
HUNDRED AND FIFTY POUCIES were issued
Premiums can Im* paid annually, half-vearlv or quarterly.
York* upany " as with the Comptroller of New
ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND DOLLARS,
for the security of Policy Holders generally.
RISKS taken to all parts of the world, and very liberal
travelling privileges granted.
Policies issued jointly on the lives of Husband and Wife
tile whole amount of Policy payable to the survivor.
Military, Naval Officers, and Officers in the Merchant Ser
vice, insured at equitable rates of Premium.
N. D. MORGAN, President.
n ... ... „ 0. Y. WEM PLE, Secretary.
I amphlets containing Rates, with all necessary informa
tion, furnished on application to the undersigned.
. „ E. J. RICHARDSON A SON,
jai3-eo6mr Agents for Maryland.
Q d L L' M I) 1 A N (MARINE) INSURANCE
COMP A N Y .
JY K IV YORK.
CASH CAPITAL PAID UP $500,000
ASSETS NOVEMBER 3ITH, 1858 $1,016,848.33
THUS. LORD, President.
B. C. MORRIS, Vice President.
PIERRE C. KANE, Secretary.
The undersigned respectfully solicits application for Insu
rance in this desirable office.
SOL. B. DA VIES, Agent.
DA VIES & WARFIELD,
BALTIMORE FIRE INSURANCE company
(ESTABLISHED UPWARDS UF HALF A CENTURY
h. H . CORNER SOUTH AN D WATER STREETS.
This Company INSURES AGAINST LOSS OR DAMAGE
d\ t IKE, in the city or country, on the various descriptions
of property.
BOARD OR DIRECTORS.
J. I. COHEN, JR., President.
R. A. Taylor, Win. (iiluior,
\ H ;irr ' s,m ' J. Pennington,
S. T Thompson, Joshua I. Cohen,
''"J;,",) ick.Ts, Francis'l'. King,
|. \V Alncks Henry Carroll,
VV ■ K - S. Stenant,
Wilson, Win. 11. Bruno,
W. F. Worthington.
ft'22-eotfr FRED'K WOODWORTH. Secretary.
"JJNIUN MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY.
NEW YORK,
CAPITAL $1,300,000.
MERCANTILE MUTUAL INSURANCE CO.,
NEW YORK,
CAPITAL $050,000.
EQUITABLE SAFETY INSURANCE CO.,
BOSTON,
CAPITAL s<loo,ooo.
VIRGINIA FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE CO.,
RICHMOND,
CAPITAL S2i 1,000.
Merchants of Baltimore wishing to effect MARINE or IN
LAND INSURANCE with the above Companies, will
please apply to
WILLIAM SPEAR,
~ _ No. 65 Second street,
d3| tf Baltimore.
DELAWARE MUTUAL SAFETY
I.VSUR A N C E CO M P A N Y
OF PHILADELPHIA.
Incorporated by the Legislature of Pennsylvania 1835.
MARINE, FIRE,
AMI
INLAND
INSURANC E S .
ASSETS, November Ist, 1858, $698,501.70.
WILLIAM MARTIN, President
iirvn V TV, nrrnT-"!:^'' HANI), Vice President.
HENPA LYLBURN, Secretary.
undersigned, having been duly appointed Agent of
tins Company, is prepared to receive applications for Insu
rance as above, and is instructed to give notice to all persons
in this city who desire to place risks with said Company,
that their applications for Insurance must lie made at their
agency in Baltimore. HENRY A. DIDIER,
Huildintr. (Jay street.
PERLE AND RUBIS
CHAMPAGNES.
The undersigned have been appointed sole agents, for the
United States and Canada, for the sale of the
CHAMPAGNE WINES
of Messrs. JACQUES GOERG & CO., at Clialons-sur.
Maine, I* ranee. I\ e present their Wines to the public under
two brands, namely:
LA PERLE AND ItUBIS.
The "PERLE" Wine i 9 of exquisite flavor and fruity taste,
and is guarantied to compare favorably with any Wine in
the American market.
The "RUBIS" is a fine Cabinet Champagne, of a beautiful
Ruby color, which is natural to the wine. This wine is un
doubtedly one of the finest Cabinet Champagnes produced in
France, and is
MADE FROM GRAPES OF THE CHOICEST SELEC
TIONS.
From the long experience, extensive possessions, and large
means or the well known house of JACQUES GOERO S: CO.,
and their determination to furnish wines which shall meet
witli the approval of consumers, we feel persuaded that a
trial will fully establish all we claim for the excellence of
these wines.
CRAMER, ABEGG & McCLOSKEY,
No. 19 Broad street, New York.
The above IPt'ties for sale at Wholesale in Baltimorefiy
CUARLES H. MYERS A BRO., Exchange Place"
fel6-3mr LAURENCE TUOMSEN A Co., do. do.
R. JAMES CORRIE, ~~~
DBA TIB T,
IN COMPANY WITH
BRYSON GILL A SONS,
NO. 56 SHARP STREET,
(BETWEEN PRATT AXP LOMBARD STREETS,)
iaS-lv BALTIMORE.
NOTICE.— DR. WM. H. HOOPES HAS RE
MOV ED his Office to No. 88 NORTH EUTAW ST be
tween Saratoga and Mulberry streets, and is now prepared
to perform all operations 111 the Dental profession Teeth ex
tracted hy the Galvanic Process. ja!9-6m
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE
subscriber, administrator, under tlu* laws of Virginia, of
the late TJIOMAS C. ATKINSON, who died iti Alexandria,
in the said suite of \ lrginia, intestate, intends to apply 'to
the V ranklinCoal Company to transfer three hundred shares
ot the capital stock of said Company, now standing in the
name of said deceased intestate. S. F. BEACH,
felG2aw4w R Administrator.
G. WATERS & SON,
• i, 11 . , J£°; 8 ' W 81111/ PINGS.
REAL ESTATK BROKERS AND AGENTS
Continue the SUPERVISION .PURCHASE,
And SALE OF REAL PROPERTY
_ And negotiate Loans on Mortgages.
Commissions moderate. ja-tfr
HPHE PARAGON COLLAR.
, i\i n '. w - , st - vle Garote Collar, just invented, and soar
ranged that it cannot be broken down. For saleonlv hv
CONSTABLE, WALKER & CO.,
" !9 ' t ' JJ 155 Baltimore street
W DAVIS,
AMUROTYPF, AND PHOTOGRAPH
GALLERY.
No. 121 BALTIMORE STREET,
anlfl-fim three dnoraahnve South. Baltimore
HAY AND STRAW.
Prime Timothy Hay and Straw in bale.., for sale by
fcß ~ tf 286 W. Pratt street, i'top ( *.t of 'l low'arc!.
CTo RAGE—Storage for Flour, Tobacco, Ac.,
am^Twn ft i.-le S l. f " r r ,iKllt ? oods on ."i' l "' 1 ' '"f <•' tie'
Wa,eW - CL " KY > NK ™
FRUIT TREET ~—
J. HENRY GUEENWAY A CO ,
, , . . „ 4 S.CALVERT ST.
Agent for A. Saul A Co.'s HIGHLAND NURSERIES.
Newhurgh New A ork, successor, to A. J Downing A Co
MUTTON HAMS—A prime lot, just received
and for sale by GREEN * VOE.BB Baltimore it. fe!6l
I €tottatii)tt.
PRIVATE TUITION.—A GRADUATE OF
S COLLEGE,who gnl.lnuteU in him'rs and is
n to prepare in this city a few
given
r H ( . ji.', \ Kvitaw street fel6-2w'*
MS WASHINGTON COLLEGE FOB
Wmblr Vl'is™ " I t I '; S ~ Tlr ' WINTER SESSION begins
bran. h.N U f I'li^j <,ol V' s V ,lf ""trurtion in the usual
an efficient l J. l "{'" heing under the direction of
nllvsiVrv" •.m !' ,? ab ! e a " d experienced Teachers. Every
I!,™??. ap V! U, l ro f° r female education is at tiie
t !r th 'l is 1 tltut . , ® n - Parents who desire a thorough
, , r i '', r <]au;;liters, with the comforts and ad-
Sciioof. eS * 11 family, are invited to examine tiie
For terms of mlmisslon and further "information,
Rev. GEO. LE\V IS FETA LEY, Principal, Mount Washington
Baltimore Co., Maryland, or Rev. Dr. H FINER. Second st
Baltimore. Catalogues can be had at CUSIIINGS A BAI
LEY'S, Baltimore st. 15-]y
fetts.
W.WTKI) To i:i;.\T.--I\\ ELLING
si 111 fIOUSES in various parte of the city. Persons hav-
JHeilLiiig VACANT HOUSES are requested to leave a de
scription thereof with us, having great facilities for obtaining
responsible tenants. Commission moderate.
F. G. WATERS A SON,
. „ _ Real Estate Agents.
jaß-tf No. 3 Law Buildings.
W AXTRI"'—A"gooif SE('(I.N 11-1 iAN 1) NTEATf
GolLVKß^t's'i'lNS'' I>out 12 15 l'wer. Apply
URI KILRFRN
HAVING TAKEN TIIE WAREHOUSE
No. 45 SOUTH STREET,
(Directly opposite Guilford street,)
IS PREPARED TO SUPPLY
SHIPPERS AND OTHERS
WITH
BUT TEH,
packed in anv sized package,
FOR EXPORTATION.
Having had long experience in this business, he confi
dent that he can give general satisfaction.
U. K. intends to give his special attention to all orders en
trusted to him, and he hereby solicits a share of the trade of
the city.
HOTELS, EATING HOUSES or FAMILIES, wanting a
choice article of BI TTER, can be supplied as above.
URI KILBL'RN, 45 South street,
dB-tfr Opposite Guilford street.
DR. BAAKEE
TREATS ALL DISEASES FREE OF CHARGE.
Dr. BAAKEE will also give special attention to the follow
ing cases: Coughs, Colds, Consumption, Croup, Influenza,
Asthma, Bronchitis, and all other diseases of the Throat and
Lungs, lie will devote particular attention to the treatment
of all skin diseases —Lumbago, Scrofula, Rheumatism, (acute
and chronic.) Neuralgia, Paralysis, Epilepsy, Dyspepsia,
1 lies, and all derangements of the Stomach, Liver and Bow
els; and also to all chronic Female (Ureases. Special atten
tion will be given to the treatment of the
EYE and EAR.
v\ ltliout the use of the Knife or Needle, and he lias constant
ly on hand an excellent assortment of beautiful Artificial
Eyes, and rympanums, or Ear Drums, suitable for either sex
and all ages—inserted in five minutes.
DR. BAAKEE has made a new discovery of a Fluid that
will produce perfect absorption of the Cataract\ and restore
perfect vision to the Eye without the use of the knife. Dr.
Baakee can produce one thousand certificates of his perfect
success in curing Cancer, old Sores or Ulcers, Fistula, Swell
jngs or lumorsof every description, and without the use of
the knife. Special arrangements must >e made with Dr
Baakee for the treatment of the last named diseases, as they
will reouire his constant advice and attention.
DR. BAA KEK is one of the most skillful and celebrated
surgeons and Physicians now living. His fame is known
personally in nearly every principal city in the world.
All letters directed to Dr. Baakee.(enclosing ten cents,)
from any distance, correctly stating the nature or the disease
shall be promptly answered, and the patients treated by cor
respondence FREE OF CHARGE.
Office hours from 8 A. M. to 5 P. M.
DOCTOR BAAKEE.
No. 74 LEXINGTON ST., between Charles and Lllierty sts,
Baltimore, Md. ~• j, t f r
Q as FIXTURES AND FIXINGS.
RliAI U & CO.,
MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN
GAS FIXTURES,
R* . No. 366 W. BALTIMORE STREET.
N. B —Gas Pipe introduced l>y experienced workmen, and
warranted free from leaks.
RF.-GCILMNO, RE-BRONZING, and SILVERING done at the
shortest notice. ap29-tfr
OLDEST ESTABLISHED STAND
IN THE CITY
ANDREW E. WARNER,
No. 10 NORTH CAT STREET,
MA NUFA ('7'URE li OF
SILVER WARE AND FINE GOLD JEWELRY,
SILVER PLATEI) \VA N RE! >EALER
T1 . AND FANCY ARTICLES GENERALLY.
Has in store a beautiful assortment of New Styles and Pat
terns of Rich Jewelry and Silver Ware suitable for presents,
embracing a great variety of Set and Plain Gold BRO< >CHKS:
Mosiac, Carhunkle, Coral, Pearl. Lava. Cameo, Etruscan, &c
EAR RINGS; BRACELETS; FINGER RINGS, set Willi
Lnu ratd, Pearl, Opal. Ate.; Ladies'GOLD
}. est ;in,! (; rd Chains; Miniature LOCKETS;
ftold Humbles; Cuff Buttons and Pins; Signet, < ha<ed and
Plain Gold Rings, Pencil and Pens; Sleeve Bl'TTo\S and
STI DS; Gold and Jet Crosses; Jet Bracelets; Pins and Ear
Rings; Hair Jewelry of beautiful designs, Ac
„ a complete assortment of Best Quality Heavy Silver
Plated TEA SETTS, Waiters, Ice Pitchers.* Calre Baskets,
f/uit. Butter and Salt Stands, Castors, Candle Sticks, Pearl
™!& l^ ssert knives. Spoons, Forks, Ladies' FANCY
ALI ICLKs, Ac., wlych will be sold on the most reasonable
terms. v -,, {J
NEW YORK
STEAM SCOURING
ESTABLISH M K N T ,
OFFICE 142J.EXINOTON STRF.ET,
... 4 , BALTIMORE.
We would beg to call the attention of the public to the fact
that we are prepared to do, in the most superior manner, ev
ery description of
SILK AND WOOLEN CLEANING.
>Y e have no French patent right for covering upspots; but,
by certain improvements in machinery of our own, coupleu
with the chemical knowledge necessary to effect the same,
are now ready to thoroughly cleanse every description of la
dies , gentlemen's and children's wearing apparel, whether
made of \ ELVKT, SILK or WOOLEN GOODS, and do nt re
quire the ripping of the same, excepting in cases where it
would be of decided benefit so to do. Particular attention
paid to CAMEL S HAIR, WHITE CRAPE, and other SHAWLS,
Dace CURTAINS, SILK DRESSES, EMBROIDERIES, Me iii. NOES,
KID GLOVES, AC.
SPOTS OF GREASE, OIL, PAINT. ICE CREAM,
or of any other nature taken out, if possible, without cleans
ing the whole garment. (' nth men's garments will bo pre
pared by a regular tailor, thus insuring a proper finish.
sel4-6mr
TJRAZILIAN PEBBLE SPECTACLES.
PROF. GKIIEON' has returned to this city, unci can bs
foiiiid at the new Store of Mr. J Alfxnniler, ,\n. Kfj KAI.TI
MOKE STRFET. five floors cast of Uatvert street, wliere he
keeps a full supply of these celebrated Spcetjieles.
These Spectacles are used now by hundred, in this city,
and are too well known to require any further recommenda
tion.
Ri-.rrr, i:\cy.s.
,_Prof. X R Smith, M. !>.; Prof. <■ W. Miltenlierjrer, M P.-
I ruf. II U IJaxlev, M. P.: Prof. Joseph Henry, of the Smith
sonian Institute. \\ a-hinu'bui. j : il>7 | mr
QILVER PLATED GOODS.
IJ 811011 AS
Tea Sets, Spoons and Forks,
Liquor and Table Castors,
Fruit Baskets, Ladles,
Butter Plates, Pitchers, &c.
.. . Table Cutlery, fine Ivory and Common,
lable Mate,
Japanned Toilet Sets,
Tea Trays, Waiters,
Coal Hd, Ac.,
At lowest ppices, at PARK'S CHINA IIAI.L,
dll-tf 211 Baltirnon- street.
BLUE INDIA CHINA PLATES,
DINNER SETS and detached pieces,
Rich India China Tea Sets,
Punch Bowls, Vases,
and a variety of separate pieces, at
„ , , PARR'S CHINA HALL,
6t7"(.00ds hired to parties, Ac. 211 Baltimore street.
.11l tt*
MOUNT VERNON CO.,
OFFICE, NO. 94 Lombard STREET,
Manufacturers of
COT TO N CANV AS .
RAVEN'S DUCK, SEINE AND SEWING TWINE
ap3o-tfr
CLOTHIERS.
WASHINGTON BUILDINGS,
BALTIMORE STREET,
011-tfr Between l.ight and Calvert streets.
tJ KATES AMi SLEIGH BEI.LS ut Manu&c
Oturers' prices.
POULTNEY A TRIMBLE,
Successors to
D.B.TRIMBLE,
2fip Baltimore street,
OFFICE OF THE
MARYLAND SRORTMAX'S CLUB,
POULTNEY & TRIMBLE,
Saec€ssoi*s to
D.B.TRIMBLE,
! 2tti Baltimore street.
DEAN, ADAMS AND DEAN a COLT'S re-
YOLVERS, small size.
POULTNEY & TRIMBLE,
D] B. TRIMBLE,
■l'll If 2iIII Baltimore strue
PURDY'S, LANCASTER'S and DEAN
urns' A Dean's HUNS, imported to order, by
POULTNEY 8- TRIMBLE,
Successors to
. „ P. B. TRIMBLE,
Jsl-- 2611 Baltimore street.
C* INGLE AND DOUBLE BARREL DUCK
kJ GUNS.
POULTNEY & TRIMBLE,
Successors to
D.B.TRIMBLE,
Jal-tf 200 Baltimore street
'|3HE CELEBKzVTED Carroll ialand Duck
X GUN, by Wcstl.v Bichards.
POULTNEV it TRIMBLE,
Successors to
D.B.TRIMBLE,
jal-tf 2t*J Baltimore street.
DOUBLE BARREL BIRD GUNS.— By Rich
ards, Manton, Gerener, Moore, and all F.nglish makers;
for sale by
POULTNEY A TRIMBLE,
Successors to
I). B. TRIMBLE,
J&l-tf 200 Baltimore street.
BUYS' SINGLK AND DOUBLE BARRE
BIRD GUNS.
POULTNEY A TRIMBLE,
Successors to
D.B.TRIMBLE,
jtl-tf 2ii Baltimore street.
•PRENCH BREECH-LOADING SHOTGUNS.
A POULTNEY k TRIMBLE,
Succesors to
I). B. TRIMBLE,
ajl tf 266 Baltimore street
EVERY ARTICLE IN THE SPORTING LINE,
to lie lia*l at
THE SPORTSMAN'S WAREHOUSE,
POULTNEY & TRIMBLE,
Successors to
. , D.B.TRIMBLE,
JANUARY IST, 1859.
IMPORTANT REDUCTION IN PRICESI
HAMILTON EASTER d- CO.,
199, 261 AND 263 BALTIMORE STREET,
ARE NOW BSLLIXU THEIR
ENTIRE STOCK
—AT—
G REATLY REDUCED PRICES!
Wecaßspecial attention to our stock of SILKS AND SILK
! onv " Pneed to richest imported WOOLLEN
DRESS GOODS, in nlain and printed M--rinoes and Mousse-
and VALENCIA HOPES
SAAOA Y I LAIDS.
A LARGE STOCK OP
PARIS EMBROIDERIES,
Marked down twenty-five per cent.
A LARGE STOCK OP
SHAWLS AND CLOAKS,
Selling Mow Cost.
HOUSEKEEPING and
FAMILY GOODS,
MOURNING GOODS
* s our - int ° n tion to close out our entire stock as far aa
possible, previous to February Ist. j4-tfr
MANUFACTURED
AND LEA F TOBACCO,
„ HAVANA CIGARS. *e.
*7O(4' 'ACKAGKS MAM : PRF.II TOBACCO, of
• IT Vlia\ (in t,. bi-ands, qualities and Maes, received from
the best faetorios in Virginia and North Parnlina
J-(\ PALPS I.KIP TOBACCO; various v4c" and
r rlii--' l -. of our tmju.rtatmn
9",0 CASKS COXNK.-THTT SEED LEAF TOBACCO,
<Beevr extra wrappers and selections, from some of the
best crops.
100 l ASES do - do.. Fillers.
I •> \ CASES PENN AISEED LEAF TOBACCO, Wrap
X and Fillers.
•70 '"' MASON CO. LEAF, choice quality.
L7O() : OOO,!^^.R44;4^ ING POPULAR
SMOKING TOBAC t O A new article manufactured at Ha
vana, of tbe choicest \ uelta <!• Alajo Ttmcco, exDivsslv for
the citv retail trade, in lb. papers and ease*
IfinHBLS VIRGINIA SMOKING TOBACCO, well
JLvvradapted for the t.roccrs trade.
We are receiving regular supj.lies f the al>ove named arti
eies, and in\ ite the attention of the trade to our stock which
we oiler for sale on liberal terms
CHAS. D. DF.FORP * CO.,
lfr 37 South Gay st.
SHOULDERS. —100,000 pounds in Dry Salt,
to arrive next week. For sale by JOSEPH CARSON A
co ,i:aitr
LACE SCARFS.
A large assortment just received bv
CONSTABLE, WALKER k CO.,
feß-tf _ 55 Baltimore street

xml | txt