OCR Interpretation


Evening capital. [volume] (Annapolis, Md.) 1922-1981, August 18, 1922, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Maryland, College Park, MD

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83009667/1922-08-18/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Associated press
A Dispatches of late
ne ws are published in
I The Evening Capital.
I.VEKY EVENING EXCEPT SUNDAYS.
VOL LXWII No. 84
BIGHT OF MEN
TO IRK IST
BE SUSTAINED
president Also Says All Powers
Of Government Will Be Used
To Maintaining Transportation
In Addressing Congress On In
dustrial Crisis
protkction OF ALIENS
AND TREATY RIGHTS
llty Tli* I’rraa.)
WASHINGTON, I). C, Aug.
Ir President Harding today
told Congress and the nation that
he intended “to use all the pow
rr* ui the government to main
tain transportation and sustain
the right of men to work.”
Tin' President, addressing Con
fess <*n the industrial situation
declared that the right of em
ployees and employers alike to
their business should be
mutilate, and deplored what he
characterized as "warfare on the
union of labor.”
The president declared a na
tional investigation for construc
tive recommendation as to the
conduct of the coal industry to
he imperative atid recommended
that a commission he appointed
fur this purpose.
For Temporary Coni Agency
Immediate legislation to establish
temporarily a ‘'national coal agency,"
•ttii necessary capital to purchase,
Ml ami distribute coal also was urg
ed by the executive. Stating that the
Eich-C’iimmjns act in establishing the
railr<ad labor board was inadequate
Wing with little power to enforce its
decisions .tlie President recommended
action to make the hoard's decisions
"Miforceablo and effective" against
carriers ami employees alike.
Protection Of Allens
Other legislative recommendations
were for “federal protection of aliens
and enforcement of their treaty
nghts," a measure to give Federal
wurts jurisdiction in protecting
ihfns.
In discussing the coal situation the
Pfesulent referred to what he termed
to "shocking crime" at Herrin, 111..
<!ur|) so recently shamed and horri
*l the country and added that the
incident was “butchery of human be
ts** wrought in madness.”
(ronttiiu<><l On I'iiiii |.)
Reward!
fur recovery of Oliver
'ails body. Notify James S.
lay lor and Sous. a-19
---=====
SALE OF
)H ATS
30c. and $1
Mrs. L. P. Musterman
197 Main Street
wanted
h' -' U.D . t iruurane* man as general
i\ ~ ’ r ' iicii'iiUs ami Anne Arumlel
' wi:!i ~i,) tine eom|tan.v selling
1 ’ ' ,I, eni Health ami l.iahtlltv
. MMI KI, 1., WKINHKUU.
t-uuliable HUig.. BalUmore. Mil.
a24
j■i i m
Baseball & Dance
I‘AVIDSONVILLE
V*.
AMp MEADE TANK CORPS
At DAVIDSONVILLE
Saturday, August 19
“ " '"’■k (Standard Time).
“•oi'-e it k o'ckh'k in David
sonville Hall. alh'
NOTICE
is ,0 notify the public that
fouM . r ? U Court for A "ne Arundel
\ handed down a decree on the
t* u , ay of Jl >ne. 1922, divorcing Cor
'r!* n from ,he defendant. Kath
oq ri ' wn > a vinculo matrimonii,
* r °undg of adulterj .
Capital.
“PROGRESSIVE” WING
GIVES INDORSEMENT TO
LEWIS FOR I). S. SENATOR
A group cf Democrats of what is
known as the "Progressive" wing of
the party in Anne Arundel county
will throw their support to former
Congressman David J. Lewis, of Al
legany, in hin fight for the Democratic
nomination for the United States Sen
ate at the primaries to be held on
September 11, it became known today.
The indorsement of Lewis was
given at a meeting held in the city
yesterday. No action was taken as
to indorsing a candidate for the Fifth
Congressional nomination. Major
John deP. Douw acted as presiding
official over the meeting, -which was
attended by James S. Smith of the
Fifth district; St. George Harber, Sec
ond district; Charles L. Tate, Third
•district; W. Meade Holladay, Anna
polis; Isaac S. Nut well, of the Eighth
district, and a number of others. The
Progressives will immediately formu
late plans to further the campaign
of Mr, Lewis.
MRS. MARvTgERACI
DES AT HOME IN CITY
Mrs. Mary E. Geraci, 75 years old,
well-known resident of the city,
widow of Onofrio Geraci, died at 5:30
o'clock yesterday afternoon at her
residence, 165 Green street, death be
ing due to the infirmities of age and a
complication of ailments. Surviving
her are four children, as follows;
Miss Mary Geraci and Angelo Geraci, (
of Annapolis; Frank Geraci, of East- .
port, and Joseph Geraci, of Washing
ton, D. C.
Funeral services will be held from
St. Mary's Catholic Church Monday
morning at 9:30 o’clock and inter
ment will he in St. Mary’s cemetery
Funeral Directors James 8. Taylor
and Sons have charge of arrange
ments for the obsequies.
SEC. DENBY’S VISIT
TO PERRY MONUMENT
Secretary of the Navy Denhy and
the class of ’Bl set the style in Japan
for visiting the Perry monument at
Kurihama Park, a bleak fishing vil
lage on the coast of the Miura pen
insula. not far from Yokosuka, Japan’s
great naval station, for since their
visit there has lean a regular pil
grimage of American residents and
visitors to that historic spot, which,
heretofore, because of its inaccessi
bility, has been overlooked.
The monument, which has been well
cared for during the twenty-one years
of its existence, stands just above
high water mark on a sand dune, hut
Is surrounded by a low stone wall,
which protects it when the sea is run
ning high.
JAMES M. IRELAND
DIES AT McKENDREE
James Milton Ireland, 67 years old.
well-known resident of McKendree
lower Anne Arundel county, died at
his residence there yesterday. Fun
eral services will be held in' McKen
dree Church tomorrow morning at 11
o'clock (standard time), and inter
ment will be in the family burial
grounds. Arrangements for the fun
eral are in charge of Funeral Director
B. L. Hopping, of this city. '
26 AFTER JOB OF
OYSTER INSPECTOR
Twenty-six applicants for a vacancy
as district oyster inspector, under the
State Conservation Commission, yes
terday were given an examination by
Oliver C. Short. State Employment
Commissioner, at the Baltimore Busi
ness College.
The examination was said to be one
of the largest ever held for a single
vacancy. The successful applicant
will be assigned to the Baltimore dis
trict at a salary of $1,200. The du
ties relate to enforcement of laws
governing the soa-food industry.
* : 4'
H. H. Sadler
OPTOMETRIST
and OPTICIAN
a
205 Main St., Annapolis, Md.
Hours: 8:30 to 5:30 Daily.
BUSINESS MEN GO
ON PLEASURE TRIP
Members Of Chamber Of Com
merce Feast At Shady
Oaks, Near Parole
x
Laßt night staid business men of
Annapolis threw dignity and cares to
the winds, both literally and figura
tively, and held the regular meeting
of the Chamber of Commerce amidst
the breezes of "Shady Oaks,” near
Camp Parole.
Assembling in front of the Globe
Building at 7:30 o’clock, they pro
ceeded In aptouiQbiles around the
principal business streets of the city,
each auto decorated with an Ameri
can flag and a large placard bearing
the legend “Chamber of Commerce to
‘Shady Oaks.’Thence the parade
moveu to the appointed meeting ulace.
Here a bountiful dinner had been pro
vided for by the members of the En
tertainment Committee, consisting of
Messrs. L. L. Parker, chairman; A
Moore and C. B. McNeff.
After dinner a short business ses
sion was held. A gratifying increase
'n membership was reported A ten
tative plan was discussed to educate
the public to the advantages of "Buy
ing at Home," and to make it worth
while, in addition to offering better
values than can be gotten away from
town, money awards of several hun
dred dollars will be given away. The
plans will be perfected and finally
launched at the next meeting of the
Chamber on Thursday, September 7.
Ordered To Naval Hospital
Lieut.-Com. Alfred L. Clifton, of the
Medical Corps, has been ordered to
duty at the Naval Hospital.
PRIMARy LISTS TO
CLOSE MONDAY, NOON
Candidates for Congressional and
all other nominations must file their
papers with Supervisors of Elections
in the counties and Baltimore city by
noon Monday.
This ruling was given by Lindsay C.
Spencer, Assistant Attorney-General,
in response to a request from the
Boards of Supervisors. There hart
boen some division of opinion among
politicians as to whether the final
date was August 21 or 22.
The ruling was said to be based
upon a Court of Appeals decision that
there must be 20 full days between
the closing of the lists and the prim
ary election.
LOCAL ELKS TO CLASH ,
WITH MARINES TODAY
Baseball teams of the United States
Marines and the Annapolis Lodge of
Elks will be the contestants in an
other of the series of games of the
"Twilight League” of the citv. The
game will be played on the diamond
at St. John’s College. This will be
the first meeting of these two teams
and much interest ,]as been aroused
The Marines, because.of the fact that
they organized eaxly in the season,
perhaps have a stronger combination,
but the lodgemen are confident they
will be able to give them a stiff game.
FEWER MUSSELS ON
SALT WATER OYSTERS
Mussels, which are said to be dis
appearing in the lower bay, are still
persistent in fresh-water areas o the
State, according to reports to the
State Conservation Commission.
A report from the Upper Eas’ern
Shore yesterday was that the musel
condition about the mouth of the
Chester river was as bad as last year,
when the oyster catch was greatly
hampered. Similar reports have
com® from tributaries of the upper
Potcmac river. Reports from salt
water areas are that no new mussels
are in evidence and the old ones are
practically gone.
TOWN CLOCK SETTING
1 NEW TIME STANDARD
What’s the matter with the town
clock?
Annapolis has frequently been ac
| cused of being slow, but it doesn’t of
ten come out in the open and an
• nounce it to the world from the
! steeple of St. Anne’s Church.
Yesterday one made the time pretty
much what one chose, as there were
three separate noon hours sounded
Today the Academy sireen and the
town one have got their
opinion of the hoar, but the clock is
still holding out for a different
> standard.
ESTABLISHED IN 1884.
ANNAPOLIS, MD.. FRIDAY. AUGUST 18. 1922
STRIKE GAN AND MUST
BE SETTLED, IS WORD
OE BROTHERHOOD CHIEF
(By The Associated Press.)
NEW YORK, Aug. 18.—Heads of
five big railroad brotherhoods,
serving as mediators, today press
ed their efforts to end the nation
wide shopmen’s strike—a strike
which Warren S. Stone, leader of
the Brotherhodo of locomotive
engineers, declared this morning
must stop here and naw.
The brotherhood men put in two
hours with railway executives this
morning and then hastening up
town went into executive session
shortly after 2 o’clock with the
heads of the 16 stationary crafts.
latter In the day the mediators
were scheduled to resume their
conferences at the Broadway
offices of the association of rail
way executives in New York.
NEW YORK, Aug. .18.— Railway
executives and Brotherhood chiefs
went in*o session at 10:30 o’clock this
morning in another effort to end the
nation-wide shopmen’s strike.
Ringing in their ears was the
statement of Warren S. Stone, head of
the Brotherhood of Loc<?tnotive Engi
neers, made this morning at an ear
lier session with the Brotherhood
representatives, that the strike must
be settled here at the session with
executives that began yesterday.
"We are optimistic that it can be
done,” said Mr. Stone and other labor
men reechoed his words.
Mr. Stone left the conference be
tween the Brotherhood men and exe
-1 cutives shortly before 1 o’clock. At
that time he expressed the opinion
that the executives ami Brotherhood
chiefs would reach an agreement, and
that he believed the conference would
have to extend beyond today.
The labor leader, who expressed
satisfaction with the conference so
far, professed himself still optimistic
about the outcome.
The other four railroad leaders
serving on the mediation committee
of the Brotherhood chiefs left the con
ference with Mr. Stone and hurried to
their hotel. It was not announced at
that time when they would return to
the conference
The general impression prevailing
around the conference hall was that
the conferees had come down to
cases and that some definite program
was under discussion. In this con
nection were recalled reports quoting
Senator Watson, at Indiana, as out
lining a proposal for settlement of
the seniority question.
This proposal, which could not be
verified officially, however, was that
loyal employees should head the
seniority list, with strikers second
and new employees third—as many of
the recruits to be retained as possible
FOOTBALLWARRIORS
BACK FROM CRUISE,
START ON VACATION
Thirty-eiiht nembers of the Navy
football squad, headed by Vincent P.
Conroy, of Utah, captain and quarter
back of the regular team, returned to
Annapolis early this morning from
the annual summer practice cruise
and promptly lef. the city on 30-days’
leave of absence. Conroy issued a
call for all candidates to return to the
Academy by September 18, to begin
practice in preparation for ♦*’e fall
campaign on the gridiron. The mid
dies have a busy season ahead of
them, being booked to meet such
teams as Penn State and Georgia
Tech’., in addition to the West Poi. ♦
Cadets.
The gridders were brought up the
bay late last night aboard the torpedo
boat destroyer Barney, which met the
returning ships of the cruising aqua'll*
ron inside the capes of the Chesa
peake. Tanned as a result of nearly
three-months’ cruising along the At
lantic Coast, most of the time having
been spent in sunny climes, the foot
ball warriors are a hardy looking lot
A number of the players picked up
weight during the cruise. It was so
arranged that all of the players were
quartered aboard one ship, and en
gaged in football work of an element
ary nature so as to keep themselves
conditioned.
Plcbes To Give Show Tonight
The Second “Plebe" Battalion will
give its show this evening in the
Navsl Academy Auditorium. If it
comes up to the standard set by the
1 First Battalion show, it will be a good
evening’# entertainment.
SUITS KILL MIN
IN BALTIMORE TOIL
Make Away With Over $7,000
After Shooting W. B. Nor
ris, Contractor
(By The AuMrldn) Pmi.)
BALTIMORE, MD., Aug. 18.—Wil
liam B. Norris, secretary-treasurer of
Hicks, Tase and Norris, Inc., build
ers, was shot to death at Park and
Madison avenues today by unidentified
bandits, who robbed him of the com
pany's payroll amounting to approxi
mately $7,000.
Frederick W. Kuethe, a bookkeeper
of the company, who accompanied Mr.
Norris, was beaten into insensibility
Ly the robbers, who in an
automobile. „ •
The murder and robbery, which was
witnessed by scores of persons occur
red on one of the principal thorough
fares of the city and near the heart
of the business section.
Had Just Left Bank
Norris and Kuethe had Just left a
bank carrying their money in boxes
and were proceeding on foot to their
offices nearby.
At the street corner a man step
ped from an automobile, confronted
them and opened fire on Norris, who
fell with a Lullet in his head and
two others in his body. At the same'
moment two other men armed with
blackjacks sprang upon Kuethe and
heat him to the pavement. One of
the bandits grabbed the boxes of
money and jumped into the car.
The other two, after striking and
kicking Norris’ body, also sprang into
the car which drove away at higli
speed. Norris died a short time latei
at the hospital.
CRUISING SHIPS AT
ANCHOR INSIDE CAPES
NORFOLK, VA.. Aug. 18.—With the
Annapplis midshipmen aboard, Ad
miral McCulley’s squadron of three
battleships and a cruiser is at anchor
inside the Virginia Capes, while prep
arations for the annual target prac
tice of the midshipmen, due to begin
early next week, are completed.
The Admiral's flag flies from the
battleship Florida. Alongside her, at
Lynnhaven Roads, lie the battleships
North Dakota and Delaware, and off
the naval base, is the cruiser Olym
pia. More than 1,000 Annapolis men
are upon the four vessels, and they
have been absent from the academy
sinco June. They have visited the
West Indies and the Canal Zone and
at Halifax, whence they came to Lynn
haven Roads, all hands had the time
of their lives, according to officers
attached to the naval base, who vis
ited friends on the Olympia.
Target practice will be held on the
southern drill grounds by the squad
ron, beginning probably on Monday
During these maneuvers the midship
men will man the guns and will be
practically in control of vessels. Tar
gets, which have been in the making
at the Norfolk Navy Yard for gome
time past, will be towed out frOtfi the
naval base by fleet tenders.
STATE GAME DEP’T.
TO SELL PHEASANTS
Bird fanciers will have an oppor
tunity to buy exhibition stock under
an offer made by E. Lee Le Compte
State Game Warden. The Game De
partment will sell between 40 and 5f
pairs of pheasants of the golden, sil
ver, Lady Amherst and Reeves
species. Mr. Le Compte announced.
Prices, he said, would be $lO a pair,
or $5 each. Current quotations, ac
cording to Mr. Le Compte, range
from $lB to S4O a pair. The birds
were bred at the Gwynnbrook farm
from four pairs bought by the de
partment last year. Those ordered
will not be delivered until after Nov
ember 1. The department will retain
a few for propagation purposes.
LARGE CROWD HEARS
LECTURE AT EASTPORT
The Eastport Methodist Episcopal
Church was crowded to the doors las!
night by an audience that gathered to
hear the Rev. Thomas E. Jones, pas
tor of St. Nicholas’ Church, Odenton.
lecture on the “Faith of the Prot
estant ” The fact that the lecturer is
an exponent of the Ku Klux Klan or
ganization, which has been growing
* in membership in the county lately,
as well as a good lecturer, accounted
for the interest of a certain propor
l tion of the crowd that was drawn to
the church.
FANS ARE EAGER FOR
DAVDSONVILLE-TANK
COUPS BASEBALL GAME
________
Many baseball fans of Annapolis a;
well as the lower part of Anne Arun
del county, and sections of Southeri
Maryland will make their way to
wards Davidsonville tomorrow after
nocti to witness the same between tin
nine of that place and "Buck” Her
zog’s tosser 3 of the Army Tank Corj
team from Camp Meade. The game b
scheduled to start at 3 o'clock (stand
ard time). County enthusiasts ar
virtually baseball mad in anticipation
of the game.
Interest in the outcome of the bat
tie is at a high pitch, and indication*
point to one of the finest contests evei
staged on a diamond in the county
It is expected a large contingent o*
soldiers from Meade will accomnan}
the Tank Corps team.
There will be a dance in the com
munity hell, starting at 8 o’clock ir
the evening.
IILEHi DEiD JEPOHT
<B.v The Associated Preaa.)
DUBLIN, Aug. 18.— Humors wen
extensively circulated in Dublin toda:
that Ramon De Valera. Republics)
leader, was dead. Countess Markie
vie, former member of the Dail Eire
ann, who has been closely associated
with Mr De Valera in championini
the Republican cause, when ques
tioned. said Mr. De Valera was suf
fering from a slight chill, Dirt that hi:
condition gave no cause for anxiety.
TOURNAMENT BENEFIT
FOR ALL HALLOWS
Much interest is manifest in th
tournament to be given August 24 a
the ball grounds for the benefit of A!
Hallows Parish. There will be a bal’
game also and supper will be serve)
on the grounds, consisting of ham
chicken and other good things to eat
There will be good music, too, and af
ter the tournament a dance will lx
held in the hall, where the corona
tion will take place.
JAPANESE BEETLE SAID
TO BE MAKING ITS
WAY INTO MARYLAND
COLLEGE PARK, MD„ Aug. 18.-
The Japanese beetle is on its way tr
Maryland with the time of its arriva’
depending upon whether it hops e
ride in an automobile or wings it*
way more slowly by natural method*
of transportation, according to Ernes 1
N. Cory, State Entomologist, who re
cently visited sections of New Jersey
where the insect has succeeded in es
tahlishing a trans-Pacific colony.
While both State and Federal quar
antines are in force in the heavily
infested areas of New Jersey and
Pennsylvania, the beetle has steadily
been extending its territory since it
was first discovered in 1916, says Mr.
Cory. The spread has been due chief
ly to the rapid propagation of the in
sect, he says, but the chief danger of
its introduction into new territory
lies in the possibilities of its beiny
carried by automobiles from the in
fested areas. It is difficult to see how
Maryland can escape the invasion
even though the Federal, Pennsyl
vania and New Jersey officials are
doing all they can to keep the pest
within the present limits, he declares
"The Japanese beetle is about the
size of the ordinary potato beetle, but
slightly longer,” says Mr. Cory. "Its
head and thorax are shining bronze
green in color. Its wing covers are
brown, edged with green, and two dis
tinct white spots mark the lower part
of the abdomen below the wing
covers. The insect is particularly in
jurious to apple, peach, cherry and
shade trees, but feeds vigorously on
more than 200 different plants. The
grubs, which develop from the eggs
which the beetle lays in the ground,
feed on grass roots and do serious in
jury to lawns, golf courses, alfalfa
and clover.”
‘‘As many as 276 beetles have been
taken from a single apple,” says Mr.
Cory, “which means that a large apple
may be completely covered by the in
sects. They usually remain until
only the core of the apple remains, or
in the case of peaches until nothing
but the seed is left.”
A spray consisting of four pounds
of arsenate of lead to fifty gallons of
water will largely prevent damage by
the beetles, according to Mr. Cory, but
Is not practical for orchard fruits as
i two applications about two weeks
apart would have to be made Just
about picking time. The spray also
results in a concentration of the in
sects on unsprayed foliage, according
to Mr. Cory.
THE WEATHER:
* Thundershowers late
this afternoon or tonight.
Saturday partly cloudy.
COMPREHENSIVE LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS.
PRICE TWO CENTS,
WOMAN IN JAIL i
ON CHARGE Of 1
CADORA MURDER
Mabel Jenkins Arrested By Chiaf
Deputy Sheriff Schramm, Who
Also Has Her Alleged Confes
sion Of Belle Grove And Other
Crimes
DEVELOPMENTS MAY
ASSUME WIDE RANGE
TEXT OF MABEL JENKINS’
ALLEGED CONFESSION
1, the confessed murderess of
Michael Cadora, also my husband,
Elmer Pratt, and also the robbery
of the Glenbrook distillery on
April 4, which Winters is serving
18 years in the Penitentiary for.
He is innocent. Please turn him
louse.
MARY BIX BY.
MABEL JENKINS.
With a confession alleged to
have been written by Mabel
Jenkins, a Baltimore woman, in
which she admits having killed
Michael Cadora, and to being the
principal in other crimes com
mitted in Baltimore city of re
cent date, now in his possession,
md working along other lines of
: nformation gathered by him.
' hief Deputy Sheriff Louis
Schramm hopes to solve the mys
tery surrounding the tragedy of
Belle Grove Inn, Anne Arundel
county, on Inly lfi, when several
persons were wounded, in addi
tion to killing of Cadora.
For Hearing Next Week
The Jenkins woman Is now n
prisoner In the county Jail here, held
*n the charge of murder, and a hear
ing will be held before Police JjfcCxn
I. Roland Brady, of Annapolis, on
either Monday or Tuesday of next
week. Misß Jenkins. In the meantime,
has repudiated the confession to Jerry
L. Smith, whom she has retained an
her attorney. The latter had a con
ference with the prisoner in Jail last
night and again today.
Repudiates Confession
Mr. Smith se.'d today that Miss Jen
kins stoutly denies any knowledge if
•he alleged confession; that ehe never
wrote such a missive, or that she
knows anything whatever of the Belle
Grove affair. However, Deputy
Sheriff Schramm states that he se
cured the confession through the as
sistance of another young woman.
Virginia Pierce, living at 704 West
Lombard street. Baltimore, who was a
companion of Miss Jenkins, who also
went by the name of Mary Bixby.
Miss Jenkins, according to Schramm,
has since admitted that she wrote the
confession. She has also admitted to
Attorney Smith, as well aB th* deputy
sheriff, that she was in C„
with Miss Pierce, where the confes
sion is said to have been prepared, *•.
Pierce Girl Frightened 1
When the story of the alleged con
fession and the investigation being
made by Deputy Schramm became
public last night. Miss Pierce was be
sieged by newspaper men at her Bal
timore address. She afterwards be
came frightened and communicated
with Deputy Sheriff Schramm over
the long-distance telephone, and in
sisted that she be brought to Anna
polis, fearing that she might be at
tacked by parties in Baltimore for as
sisting police officials to unravel the
case. This was 4 o’clock this morn
ing. Schramm promptly assented to
the request, and went to Baltimore by
automobile, returning two hours latr
with the Pierce girl.
Many Phases Te Probe
This 'morning Deputy Sheriff
Schramm held conference with State’s
Attorney James M. Munroe and re
quested that the county authorities
give sufficient protection to the Pierce
girl pending the result of the investi
gation. This, it is understood, the
prosecuting attorney agreed to do.
Mr. Munroe, however, declined to
make any statement concerning the
case until the investigation is over,
other than to say that there are a
number of phases of the matter that
will require diligent inquiry.
Expect Important Developments *
Various reports and conflicting
, statements pertaining to the new turn
. that the case has taken have been go
- ing the rounds today, and it is not
(Ceattsned On Page 44 ■ -gjg

xml | txt