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Evening capital. [volume] (Annapolis, Md.) 1922-1981, August 28, 1922, Image 4

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ANNUAL ROUND
RAY GARNII
DREW THRONG
Entrants From Sherwood Forest
Garnered Greatest Number Of
Points In Events On Severn
River Saturday And Com
• munity Won Cup
SWIMMING. SAILING
ANI) OTHER CONTESTS
The third annual water carnival, I
under the auspices f the Round Hay I
community. Saturday afternoon was
highly successful and interesting, the
attendance being larger than ever be
fore. the interest keen und the affair
conducted with notable smoothness.
The entries we re open to clubs and
communities along the Severn river
and Sherwood Forest succeeded in
winning the largest number of points.
4. r >. closely push* d by Hound Bay,
which made a total of H7.
Sherwood Forest became the Ural
custodian of the cup presented by
Georg* H. Glenn, of Round Hay
which will lie the permanent posses
sion of the elub or community win
ning It three years in succession
Time of the different events was not
taken, interest centering in the com
petition Itself Most of the perform
ances were of a high order, the fancy
(living being especially notable.
Sallltoats Handled Well
Tin sailing race called for the
same highly expert handling of small
craft, though the wind was light, and
the winner was barely five yards
ahead of the next boat at the finish
Indian handing made up the third
highest tot al of points largely through
the line work of the Noon and Obrerht
Brothers in canoes Different com
binations from these families took
Jirst and second place In the doubles
and tirst place in the fours.
1). V. Wonders was the chairman o
the general committee with these
special chairmen for the water
events: William \i. Passapae; swim
ming races, Melvin Shaw; boat
races, P. C. ('haniplish.
The judges were A. K. Hawkins
Severna Park; William H. Oil, Round
Hay, and Howard J. Campbell, Sher
wood Forest.
Miiinniar} Of Carnival
Points Scored Sherwood Forest.
45; Round Hay, 37; Indian Landing
28; Karleigh Heights, 10; Severnc
Park. 6; Severn Heights, (5; Water
bary, 3.
Canoe Single Won by Dr. Knich
laus, Sherwood Forest: second, W
George, Round Hay; third, Lieuten
ant Stodter, Sherwood Forest.*
Evinrude Scramble-Won by 11. B
David, ,lr„ Sherwood Forest; second,
R. K. Raleigh, Round Hay; third, W
5. Wright, Round Hiy.
Fifty-Yard Crawl Stroke for Wo
men Won by Miss Gladys Bowen
Sherwood Forest; second. Miss Marit
Obrecht. Indian Landing; third. Miss
Mildred Belt. Sherwood Forest.
Fifty-Yard Crawl Stroke for Men—
Won by Robert Welch. Indian Land
ing; second, W. A. Raleigh, Round
Hay; third, L. Ixird. Indian Landing
Canoe Double Won by W. F
Obrecht and T. K. Nona, Indian Land
ing; second. C. F. Obrecht and M. A
Noon, Indian Landing; third. Jack
Laynd and W. M. Hampson, Round
Bay.
Sailing Boats Won by L. 11. Ileu
beok. Sherwood Forest; second. F. D
Kseh. Sherwood Forest; third. H. B
Davis. Sherwood Forest.
* Twenty-Five Yard Swim for Hoys
of 12 and Under Won by Jack Mar
ston. Karleigh Heights; second. Nel
son Samuels, Severna Park; third.
John Chew, Round Bay.
Twenty-Five Yard Swim for Girls
of 12 and Under-- Won by Doty Lavng
Round Bay; second, Miss Ruth Kit
chen. Round Bay; third, \fl*s Ikiro
thy Derd, Sherwood Forest.
Special 25-Yard Swim for Boys IS
to 15 Won by Van Ml, Severn
Heights: second. W Wcldfe, Indian
landing; third, H. R. Schroeder
Round Bay.
Canoe •'Four"—Won by M. A. Noon
T K. Noon, W. F. Obrecht and C. F
Obrecht, Indian Landing; second
Kitichloss, Archer. Blodgett and Stod
ter. Sherwood Forest; third. Morti
mer. Laws, Creighton and Roberts.
Sherwood Forest.
Fifty-Yard Breast Stroke (Women)
Mon by Miss Catherine Desam
bourgh. Earieigh Heights; second
Miss Marie Obrecht, Indian Landing;
third. Miss Marguerite Carter, Severn
Heights. # *
Fifty-Yard Back Stroke (Men)
Won by W. A. Raleigh. Round Ray;
second. Landis. Severna Park; third
John Archer, Sherwood Forest.
Fancy Diving (Boys and Girls Un
der 12)—Won by Master .Hanway.
Sherwood Forest; second. Henry k
Kyle. Waterhury; third. Wetheroll
Crocker, Sheruwod Forest.
Fancy Diving (Women)—Won by
Miss Gladys Bowen. Sherwood For
est; second. Miss Katherine B. Smoot.
Hound Bay; third. Miss Katherine
Desambourgb. Karleigh Heights.
Fancy Diving (Men)—Won by W. A.
Raleigh. Round Bay; second. George 1
P. Hemmeter, Round Bay; third, W.
Mossis Hampson, Round Bay.
| SEEK ANOTHER
BOAT FOR BAY
FERRY SERVICE
______
(Contlnurd I rum Page 1.)
as that which the company now has
in view would greatly, if not entirely,
relieve the congestion of automobile
traffic, which has broken all records
during the present summer, because
the local ferry is of far greater con
venience to persons traveling to and
from the Eastern Shore, especially to
Maryland’s only ocean resort. Ocean
City. As previously told in these
columns, the ferry company has
greatly reduced its financial indebted
ness, and by selling the General Lin
coln. the expense of getting the New
York boat would not be much. Fur
thermore, with the big increase in
business this year, there is every
prospect for a successful future for
the ferry line. This makes the fourth
I summer that the ferry has been In
operation.
Former Governor Harrington states
that the boat under consideration will
be examined further before final de
cision as to its purchase is made.
COMPLETE PLANS FOR
ROAD MONUMENT SHAFT
(Continued From Pair !•>
-vho is planning a chorus of Southern
Maryland voices. (
Among those who will take part in
he ceremonies are Kllison I). Smith.
United States Senator from South
Carolina, who will make the principal
iddreas; Governor Ritchie, Mayor
iroening, of Baltimore, the Itt Rev.
fohn Gardner Murray. Protestant
episcopal Bishop of Maryland; the
lev. Francis Edward McMahon,
Rabbi Morris S. Lazaron, the Rev.,
•'rands J Loughran and the Rev.
lesse R. (’airier.
In charge of the program arc A. S.
loidsborough, general chairman; M.
lampton Magruder, Prince George’s
county director; Edward Mcl).
Thomas, Baltimore, city director, and
t. Keith Compton, president of the
Southern Maryland Society.
Green Olive And Egg Salad
This recipe serves live and its prep
i rat ion requires twenty-five minutes.
Ise 1 cup diced and stoned Spanish
dives. 1 cup diced celery. 1 teaspoon
ul onion juice, 1 teaspoonful chop
ped parsley, 2 tablespoons French
Iressing. 4 hard-cooked eggs. 1 tea
spoonful (hopped capers or chopped
tickles, salt and pepper, lettuce and
boiled salad dressing.
Combine the olives, celery and
>nion juice with a measure of French
iressing. Hard cook the eggs, cut
lie in into halves crosswise, mash the
•oiks and season with salt, pepper
ml the chopped capers or pickles.
)lvide the olives in five mounds on
ettuce leaves, refill the cavities in the
vhites of the eggs with the seasoned
oiks, place half an egg on top of
*ach mound of olives and serve with
oiled salad dressing passed in a sep
irate dish.—Washington Star.
The lest way to be contented with
/our lot is to build a house yn it. —
tshville Times.
f
Call 330 When You
Are in Need of
W
El Job digh-Grade I
(ffe- PRESS 4a=)
Printing
Reasonable Prices!
Excellent Service!
.
Office, Church Circle, Opp. Postoffice
V
* 9 .
THE EVENING CAPITAL, ANNAPOLIS. MARYLAND. MONDAY. AUGUST 2?. 10??.
PROPERTY TRANSFERS
IN CITY AND COUNTY
RECORDED IN COURT!
From The Upper Ashburton Realty
Company to Wilhelmina Schotppler,
tract of land on the Magothy River,
Third district.
From William G. Williams and
wife and others to Adam 4 Boschert
and wife, tract of land in the Second
district, containing 2 28-100 acres.
From Albert Retowsky and wife to
Salvatore Micciche, tract of land in
the Third district, on the Magothy
River.
From The Workmen's Co-Operative
Realty Company. Inc., to Frederick J.
Barr and wife, lot of ground in Third
district.
From The Workman’s Co-Operative
Realty Company, Inc., to William
Schultz and wife, two lets of ground
at Glen Burnio Heights, Third dis
trict.
From John K. Culver and wife to
Alverta I*. Weston, two lots of ground
at Brooklyn Park, Fifth district.
From John K. Culver and wife to
Mary T. Laager, two lots of ground
at Brooklyn Park, Fifth district.
From George M. D. Meek and wife
and others to Israel E. Meyers and
wife, tract of land near Rock Point,
Third district.
From Upward # M. Pumphrey to
Thomas E. France and wife, three lots
of ground at Riveria Beach, in Third
district. •
From David Scarlett Ross to Wil
liam H. Yeakle and wife, tract of land
•i at Rivcrdale, Third district.
Frohi Charles A. Knorr to Thomas
{Jacobson and wife, two lots of ground
; at Outing Park, Fifth district.
From Howard M. Pumphrey to
i Ruth A. Shaw and others, two lots
|of ground at Riveria Beach, Third
district.
From Carey L. Meredith and wife
to Ell G. Gross and others, lot of
ground at Camp Parole, Second dis
trict.
From J. Clinton Mewshaw to Otto
Elbert Miller and wife, three lots of
ground at Brooklyn Heights, Third
district.
From Anton Braun and wife to
John Braun and wife, lot of ground
in Fifth district.
From Frida Koch and husband to
Nicholas H. Green, trustee, tract of
land in the Second district, contain
ing 5% acres.
From Nicholas H. Green, trustee, to
Frida Koch and husband, tract of
land in the Second district, contain
ing 5% acres.
From Frank Gosnell, executor and
others to William G. Williams, tract
of land in Fourth district, contain
ing 17 acres and 12 perches of land.
Will some one please explain why
a girl may wear knickerbockers and
call herself ‘‘Billie” or "Jack” with
out losing face, while a young man
wearing a skirt and calling himself
“Ann” or "Angela” would be laughed
out of town. —Wheeling Register.
American History | i
DAY BY DAY
By T. P. Greta
I __
AUGUST 2S
New Jersey elected William
Livingston first Governor on
August 2S. 1776.
First oil struck in the Unit
ed States in well driven at
Titusville, Pa., on August 2S, i
1559.
General Hope's base of sup
plies taken by Stonewall Jack
son at Mannassas Junction.
Va.. on August 28, 1862.
New York Harbor placed un
der cholera quarantine; public
excitement; militia called out,
on August 28. 1892.
Operations of American
troops and allies for eight
weeks resulted in capture of
102.000 German prisoners and
1,300 guns, by August 28,
1918.
NAVY “PLEBES” LEAD
ARUNDEL EIGHT BY
LENGTH AND HALF
i In a mile race on the Severn Satur
day afternoon, the Naval Academy
I Plebes defeated the Arundels. of Bal
’ timore, by a length and a half. There
is much satisfaction over the victory
1 of the Navy lads over an older and
more experienced crew.
1 Richard Glendon, Jr., also scored a
1 triumph, as this is the first race of a
representative crew coached by him
1 since his appointment as chief coach
to succeed his father.
1 George Van Vliet, of New York, a
well-known young coach, was judge
f at the finish.
The race took place at the mouth of
the river, directly opposite the Naval
( Academy, the start being near the
f ships wharf, and the finish near the
I county bridge.
The Arundels gained the lead at
j the start and held it to the half mile,
I when the midshipmen gradually
passed them, winning decisively,
j The winning crew covered the dis
j tance in 5.06, and the losers in 5.12.
The crews, with weights. Naval
Academy—Bow. Pederson, 165; 2.
, Lee. 160; 3. Elliott. 160; 4. Rule. 163;
f 5, DeWolf, 165; 6, Lambert, 178; 7.
. Todd, 170;. stroke. Sylvester, 165;
coxswain. Trafton, 111.
j Arundels—Bow. Rhodes. 103: 2.
t Dippoldsman. 15S; 3, Scharfe, 172; 4,
- Short, 180; 5, Gerhardt, 168; 6,
Schaefer. 185; 7, Carrigan, ISO;
stroke, Caldwell, 160; coxswain, Ken
r neday, 115.
, -
- AT THE CIRCLE PLAYHOUSE TO
i NIGHT AND TOMORROW
f
1 For tonight and Tuesday the Circle
Playhduse will offer Irene Castle in
her latest and greatest production.
“Slim Shoulders.”
This picture proves that the same
finenesse, the identical appeal and
general w’orth more often acompany
ing the pretentious production, can
be incorporated in what is popularly
known as melodrama, -identified by
rapid action, thrills, suspense and the
happy ending.
"Slim Shoulders” includes these
worthy attributes, is devoid of cheap
ness and evidences painstaking cirec
tion and good photography. The pro
duction is colorful and offers Irene
Castle, the star, in a role especially
fitted to her style of statuesque beauty.
It permits the wearing of rich ap
parel and requires an actress who can
portray the role of an American girl
of birth and breeding, as well as look
it and incidentally held her own, sur
rounded by capable screen favorites.
In addition to £he special feature
a laughable two-reel comedy, Snap
i shots of Famous Movie Stars and a
travelogues will be shown.—(Adv.)
WOMEN GIVE OUT
Housework is hard enough when
healthy. Every Annapolis woman who
is having backache, blue and nervous
spells, dizzy headaches and kidney or
bladder troubles, should be glad to
heed this Annapolis woman's experi
ence:
Mrs. John T. Sherlock, 30 Holland
St., says: “For the last four years
I have suffered from a very bad case
of kidney trouble. I had terrible
oams across the small of my back
They were often so bad, I couldn’t
bend over or do my work at all. My
feet would swell and my eyes became
so bad. I could hardly see. My kid
neys were irregular in action and 1
, knew they were causing the trouble
One of the family who had used Doan’s
Kidney Pills, recommended them to
i me and I secured a supply at Green’B
! Drug Store. They helped me imme
: diately. I used only two boxes of
I Doan's at that time, but they helped
me wonderfully. I still take this rem-
I edy whenever I think it necessary and
! find it A-l.” (Statement given Aug
! ust 12. 1916.)
On February 9. 1921, Mrs. Sherlock
said; “The first thing I think of
when my kidneys trouble me is
Doan s Kidney Pills. They have never
failed to help me and I can't praise
j them too highly.”
Price 60c. at all dealers. Don’t
simply aak for a kidney remedy—get
Doan s Kidney Pills—the same that
Mrs. Sherlock had. Fostgr-Milbyrn
II Co., Mfrs., Buffalo N. Y.
ATTACKS OF CHIGGERS
MAY BE REPELLED
BY USE OF SULPHUR
Popular belief to the contrary, it's
only in a figurative si use that chig
gers get under your skin. The little
kill-joys of the summer picnic in the
woods are right there on the surface
all the time, and it’s just because they
are too small to be readily seen with
out a magnifying glass that the vic
tim thinks lie has been burrowed into
or entered byway of his pores.
This is one of the new lights
thrown upon the pest by Department
Bulletin 986, Studies on the Biology
and Control of Chiggers. prepared by
H. E. Ewing, specialist in mites, and
now issued by the United States De
partment of Agriculture.
The chigger doesn’t make his pres
ence felt at once. He first scurries
about on the victim so fast that even
when he is spotted under a magnify
ing glass it is almost impossible to
catch him. Evidently, he tries to see
how far he can go, for it has been de
termined that tight pieces of dress,
such as garters and belts, limit the ;
altitude of operation. Almost total
immunity has been secured by wear
ing top shoes and tightly wrapped
leggins. Low shoes are particularly
favorable to the acquisition of chig
gers. When a chigger finally decides
to attach himself, he ckitnps down by
inserting bis feet under the skin, and
then the trouble begins.
Much protection can be had from
chigger attacks by properly clothing
the legs or by the application of re
pellents either diro'-Uy on the skin or
on the under garments. For this pur
pose. sulphur has been found to be a
sovereign remedy. Dusting the legs
with sulphur has resulted in total im
munity in most instances, and a simi
lar treatment of the stockings has
proved equally effective in keeping off
the mites. Infested areas may l>e
freed of chiggers by dusting with sul
phur. For this the use of r >o pounds
to the acre is recommended. On
lawns the use of sulphur is unneces
sary. as chiggers will disappear of
themselves if the grass is kept cut
short.
Chiggers can be best destroyed pn
humans before they become attached
or very soon afterwards. After an
exposure to chigger attacks the skins
and ankles should be examined with a
hand lens, even before any itching is
felt. Applications of a thick lather of
soap, commercial alcohol, or any of
the lighter oils have been found to
kill the larvae quite readily. Sulphur
acts slowly, but if applied with soar
and allowed several minutes to act
should give good results.
SOY BEAN TAKING ITS
PLACE AS MAJOR CROP
The soy bean is rapidly taking a
place as a major crop in the farming
systems of the corn belt, replacing
oats to a considerable extent and tak
ing part of the corn acreage, says the
Department of Agriculture. Although
primarily used for forage, pasture and
ensilage, the growing of seed during
the last few years has become a very
profitable industry. The production
of seed has now increased to the
point where the supply greatly ex
ceeds the demand for planting.
County soy bean associations, grow
ers. county agents and extension of
ficials, notably in Illinois and India-j
na. have concerned themselves in the
development of a commercial outlet
for the seeds, it is noted.. Several
mills in Illinois are interested in the
possibilities of that bean as a source
of oil and meal. T#o mills in Illi
nois have planned to use about 750,-i
000 bushels this season, it has been
reported to the department, w’hile
other mills are planning on a smal
ler scale:
The department inspectors have
found considerable acreage put to
growing of the soy bean in the north-j
ern and corn belt states, showing a
considerable increase. Ttie possibili-1
ties of using the bean for oil and!
meal are ascribed by as the
reason for the increase. Such a com-i
mercial outlet affords the grower an
other cash crop as corn and wheat, it
is said.
The various ways in which the soy
bean and its product are utilized in
the United States indicate a ready
market for the commercial production
of soy bean seed, the department cir-j
cular declares. Soy bean oil is large-!
ly used in the manufacture of soaps
and paints, and it is also used in the
manufacture of lard and butter sub-!
stitutes, linoleum and printing ink,!
and as a salad oil. The cake or meal ;
is a superior cattle feed and of high
value for human consumption.
CIRCLE B&KyS TONIGHT
R SIMM: “SUM SHOULDERS”
C The >. Y. Morning Telegraph Say*: “It’* the kind of a picture the public will thorouzhl) <j '• 1
* picture that eclipses anything in which the star has ever appeared.”
J: “ “ A " W •*• Byxvsw^
■ ’*** ' * r- rw —w—■ .*•** . .
JUST BASEBALL
Daily Scores, Schedules, And
Club Standing Of The
Major Leagues
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Score* Of Yesterday
Cincinnati. 9-7; Boston, 0-6.
New York. 12; St. Louis. 8
Chicago. 3; Philadelphia. 1.
Brooklyn-Pittsburgh (rain').’]
Tudst’i Schedule
Boston at Cincinnati.
Brooklyn at Pittsburgh.
Other clubs not scheduled.
Standing Of The Club*
W. L. P C.
New York, 74 46 .617
Chicago 68 f 4 .557
St. Louis 67 54 .554
Cincinnati 68 56 .548
Pittsburgh 65 55 .542
Brooklyn 58 61 .487
Philadelphia. . .. 41 73 .360
Boston 38 80 .322
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Scores Of Yesterday
Washington, 7; Detroit, 2.
St. Louis-New York (rain).
Other clubs not scheduled.
Today's Schedule
Cleveland at Philadelphia.
Other clubs not scheduled.
Standing Of The riuba
W. L. P. C.
New York 73 50 .593
St. Louis 73 51 .589
Detroit 68 57 .544
Cleveland. 63 61 .608
Chicago 59 62 .488
Washington. . . . 58 65 .472
Philadelphia ... 49 69 .415
Boston 46 74 .383
INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE
Scores Of Yesterday
Baltimore, 6-5; Syracuse. 3-5. *
Buffalo, 10; Jersey City, 6.
Rochester, 6; Reading, 5.
Other clubs not scheduled
Today’s Schedule
Baltimore at Syracuse.
Jersey City at Buffalo.
Heading at Rochester.
Toronto at Newark.
Standing Of The Clubs
W. L. P. C.
Baltimore 96 39 .711
Rochester 81 54 .600
Buffalo ~ 78 61 .561
Jersey City .... 73 63 .537
Toronto 67 69 .493
Heading 56 80 .412
Syracuse 53 85 .384
Newark 41 93 .306
Never criticize a man’s clothes. H
may be supporting an auto.— Nash
ville Tennessean.
r-ffi
Star : Theatre
t'P-TO-I)tTR COLOREP
thlathe in annapolis:
TODAY AND TOMORROW
UNITED ART I NTS PRESENT
DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS
In Hi* Famoii* Picture:
“The Three Musketeers”
AND A WOOD COMEDY
Hrit Show. 7:30. Second Show, 9:3fl
Admiulon: Adult*. 2Ke.; Children. lo<-
Thnrsday, Friday and Saturday
RIO-TIME
Vodavil Show
Gasoline Oils Accessories
*■
West-End Auto Repair Shop
All Work Guaranteed!
Car Space for Rent
v .
A. J. LEE 277 WEST STREET H. KILLER I
STATE LEGIONNAIRES
ELECT NEW CHIEF
HR WARM EIGHT
Arthur Renauf of R
j elected department i
! American Legion tn a
1 ticn held at the State < •
; the American Ixgion
, Saturday. Renauf- el.-, t
{the seventh ballot, ait
contest, in which t >:
I Sweezey. warden of t
; Penitentiary, and Ma
1 michayl, commander of n
Post. Hagerstown, h •’ | i
| deadlocked for -i\ t v< t
demonstration l v d<
Western Maryland j
chael was one of tin
election.
Other officers were <
lows: First vice-conun.i
I vitc.h. HyattsviUe;
Inlander, Dr. A I’ Dixon t
I third vice-commander. I
jris,' Crisfield; State ti
Johnson Poe. Halßn.o,
i Rabbi Morris Lazar >a
j Avenue Synagogue. R<
geant-at-arms, 11. .1 !..
more; national committee
. Findlay French, Paitim. i
j Washington Bowie. Jt i;
State executive committ..
! Whipple. Lee Coblent z. A
1 den. Hodgson. Black. Mori .w,
i Parlett, Lloyd, Noonan
Frederick was select! I r
ing place of the 1923 < >im
Lots of peopl * travel firs: r
evidently are not. Altoona M
| REPUBLIC
* TODAY
KATHERINE MacDONAI.I)
“THE INFIDEL"
Added attrsietion:
I* A T II K \ I \\ s
I.
TOMORROW
ALICE LAKE
“KISSES”
A* the Kiri who made ■
husiitcH* of them.
Added nttritrllon:
A t. OO l> CO M I It V
V ■—
[ SAMUEL W. BROOKS & CO.
CIIAN. NELSON HKOOKS
PAINTING BHOimiNU
PAPER IIA.M.I.Mi
F*tlmate* Cheerfully FuruDlied.
® Color aohome* for furniture tuilntlng*
|-! CpliolHteriiiK mid t.olil l.lne Work.
18V4 DEAN ST. PHONE :;ll IV
. V:
I MILK!
One trial of oar (Iratle A
Guernsey raw milk produced
under highly sanitary cninii
tions, will convince you of its
superior quality; Hie per quart.
Special Milk I'nr llaMes
Pleasant Plains Dairy
Phone 1818-K-13.
4. D. HAKKIH Crop.
On Side at lta-.il - Meat Store.
COPPERSMITHING AND
ACETYLENE WELDING
Aluminum Soldering and M.-Mine
m|mm ialty.—Tinning. Kooliutt. *>puuliitz
and Plumbing Kejuilr.
ALL WORK .l \KANTf H
RINNESS AND JONES
lAS Compromise SI.
J *l7 _

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