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Evening capital. [volume] (Annapolis, Md.) 1922-1981, August 29, 1922, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83009667/1922-08-29/ed-1/seq-1/

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Associated press
; A Dispatches of late
news are published in
The Evening Capital.
j-rhLISHKI* EVERT EVENING EXCEPT SUNDAYS.
. () | i.XX VIA No. 93.
m SELLS
' BRIDGE BONDS
, IT HOOKE PAR
Frank B. C ihn And Company,
Qf Baltimore, Highest Bidder
• Foi Issue Authorized For Con
struction Of South River Span
-Hearing Held Today
CONTRACT FOR WORK
PREVIOUSLY AWARDED
7h t . firm of Frank U. Cahn and l
Coin pa l1 V' " f ItaHlinore, was the buc
liiddcr foi the $50,000 bond iß
authorized hv an act of the Lcgis
iitatf far the ((instruction of the new
across South river, between
Talers Landing and Riverview.
Bids (or the sale were opened at a|
KffiiiK of the Hoard of County Coin
ifcinmers lield at noon today.
Caho and Company hid 101.68615. |
The other IndderH, all HuKimore I
(rmi. and their bids, follow: Mcr-I
tin:da Trust and Deposit Company.,
|W<d7; Weilepp-Durton and Coin
pnv. 100 98637; .1 A. W. Iglchart and
Company, 101.5074.
The Inch bidding is evidence that |
,: now there is a good market for
count> bonds, and furthermore the I
price at which tliese bonds were soldi
li taken as another indication that!
tbr county’s credit is held in good |
item! The bonds w ill bear interest I
41 t’j per centum., and will be is-j
mol in series of SS,(MM), payable every !
Sve years, making the last scries due!
iml payable in 1!t72.
(cnlract Has Itccu Let
The contract for building the bridge
previously been awarded to the
H'l.e.m Construction Company, of
Baltimore Today a hearing is in
progress hi the wareroom of the '
,h *rf at itiverveiw before an officer
1 the engineer corps of the War De
triment. This hearing was nr
ntiKiil so that all persons interested
" ,h '' ••rcmiseß might express their
views
♦♦ -
Two More New Middies
Two additional candidates have
admitted to tlie Naval Academy
"midshipmen They arc: William
l Evans, Fourth Alabama; Joseph
B Stefanae, Twelflh Michigan.
FOR SALE 1
| Modern dwelling No. 93
! U.ndtiit St., ti rooms, bath,
(itetne lights. - Part cash,
[ balance on time.
B J. WIEGARD
:i School St. Phone 459-J.
a-30
FOR- RENT
'dUJ
'ir tirc-prpyf private garages
“ oMiiplctcd and \vc offer same
lur rent. jt ;,
Hll.i>s & HUNTER.
a-29
OPEN-AIR BAZAAR |
Benefit Loyal Order of Moose
TWO NIGHTS, AUGUST 28 and 29
CITY PARK, FOOT MAIN ST.
t Lating Contest Every Night. Jill Sorts of jUtradions.
Novel Entertainment.
$
\ Why Worry About Your Coal!
B hen you can live so comfortably at the
Maryland Hotel
JOINING ROOM REOPENS SEPT. Ist ] .
Room and Board at Reasonable Rates
Special Apartments f6r Small Families •
€nmm (Unpitnl.
“FLYING SQUADRON” TO
HOLD LAW ENFORCEMENT
I MEETINGS HERE IN OCT.
i
C. C. Morrow, of Indianapolis, has
just completed an organization in
this city to co-operate locally in a
three-day Law Enforcement Cam
paign to be put on by the Flying
Squadron L oundation. Three groups
of speakers known sb the “Flying
I .>quadron" will come here for meetings
to be held during the afternoons and
evenings of Thursday. Friday and
Saturday, October 5, G and 7.
The organization consists of five
speakers, so divided that meetings
can he held simultaneously in three
cities There will be mass-meetings
on the ufternoon and evening of
Thursday, October 5, with addresses
by two speakers of the lirst group.
The second group will come for the
afternoon and evening of Friday, Oc
tober 6. On Saturday, October 7, the
third group of two speakers will hold
I afternoon and evening meetings.
The visit to this city is part of a
I nation-wide campaign for law en
-1 forcement, civic righteousness and
l social and industrial Justice.
Hon. Oliver Wayne Stewart, of
Chicago, who speaks with the third
group, is in charge of the campaign.
He is president of the Flying Squad
ron Foundation. Among the other
speakers are Hon. Frank S. Regan, of
Rockford, 111., fromerly a member of
the legislature of that state and a
well-known lecturer and cartoonist;
Dr. D. Leigh Cohm, of New York City,
widely known in educational circles;
James H. Woertendyke, of Chicago,
who has campaigned in all parts of
the country, and Rev. # Norma C.
Ilrown, of HlooiNingtou, 111., who is
the only woman who ever served as
chaplain of the Illinois Senate.
The meetings here will be held in
the Calvary M. E. Church. There will
be no admission charged, and all are
invited to attend the sessions.
CHILDREN WORKING FOR
EMERGENCY HOSPITAL
The children of the Naval Aciftemy
will itold a lawn fete and sale for the
benefit of the Children’s Ward at the
Emergency Hospital, on Saturday aft
ernoon. September 9, on the lawn ad
joining the Naval Academy armory.
The children have been working for
weeks making fancy articles for the
sale. There will also be cake and
candy on hand, and the band will play
for the affair which promises to be
most attractive and will undoubtedly
draw a large crowd, as it is being got
‘ up for a most worthy charity.
♦♦
FUNERAL TOMORROW OF
ENSIGN S. T. ALLEN
The funeral of Ensign Stephen
j Thompson Allen, who died on Satur
day after a long illness of tubercu
i losis. will take place tomorrow from
' Fort Fitzsimmons, the army hospital,
at Denver, Colorado.
Operated On At Hospital
Mrs. L. S. Perry, wife of Ensign
Perry, and daughter of Mrs. Abson
Stewart, 34 Maryland avenue, was
operated on this morning at the
Emergency Hospital for tonsils and
adenoids. She stood the operation
well and is reported to be resting
comfortably.
—. " f— - - - -
LAST TRIBUTE TO
! ST. GEORGE BARBER
, County Officials And Many
Friends Attended Funeral
Services Yesterday
i
i “
Attended by a large circle of
; friends of the county and city, es
i pecially from the Davidsonvllle neigh
l borhood. in which he lived and In
i which he accomplished much for the
1 benefit of its residents, the funeral
I of St. George Barber, late County
Commissioner from the Second dis
trict, and President of the Hoard
who died Saturday was held from
All Hallow’s Chapel, Davidsonville,
at 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon.
Services were conducted by Rev.
F. E. Alleyne, rector of the chapel,
after which the body was brought
to Annapolis and sent by rail
to Mr. Barber's native home at Engle
wood, N. J., where interment will be
made today. The funeral was among
the largest ever held in the county.
Colleagues Attend Obsequies
Members of the Board of County !
Commissioners, in a body, paid their j
last mark of respect to their col- 1
league and a number of other county
officials also were present at the
obsequies. The following, all em- j
ployees on the farm of Mr. Barber, |
acted as pallbearers:
Samuel and Harry Stallings, Oscar j
Hartge, Harry Duckett, Alvin Owens
and Thomas Dawson. Funeral ar- j
rangements were in charge of Fun- j
eral Directors Jarae3 S. Taylor and
Sons.
Greeks Keep Church Festival
Yesterday, according to the Greek
church calendar, was St. Mary’s Day,
one of the important festivals of the
year, which is preceded by two-weeks’
Lenten observances. Greek residents
of the city celebrated the day by
chicken dinners, which is the usual
custom.
LOCAL MAN LEADS IN
NAVY SAILING RACES
Interest is steadily growing In the
naval officers’ knockabout races,
which are held on Wednesday after
noons. There have been as many as
26 entries of officers and civilian
professors of all grades from com
manders down to ensigns and In
structors.
There' have been six races and
Commander “Abe” Claude is in the
lead so far, proving the yachtsmanlike
, qualities of the Chesapeake Bay
sailors.
The committee in charge of the
i races consists of the Commandant of
Midshipmen and Commanders W. R.
Van Auken and C. C. Soule. Lieut.-
i Commander W. O. Henry will be
, judge of the start and finish of to
morrow’s event and Commander Mac
gillivray Milne will be judge of the
course.
WOMEN VOTERS WILL
ENDORSE MIS. BARBER
:
, FOR CO. COMMISSIONER
No routine business was transacted
this morning at the regular monthly
meeting of the League of Women
Voters, which was purely informal.
The proposed amendments to the
State constitution, which will be
voted on in November were discussed,
and the question of the appoint
ment of a successor to the late St.
George Barber, who was County Com
missioner from the Second district.
The League proposes to endorse
] Mrs. St. George Barber for the office,
and the president, Mrs. Robert Moss,
will Immediately write a letter to
GoVlrnor Ritchie, pointing out Mrs.
Barber's qualifications for the posi
tion, and asking that she be appointed
in her late husband’s place.
i MARK OF RESPECT TO
ST. GEORGE BARBER
Immediately following The opening
of bids for the $50,000 South River
Bridge Bonds today, the Board of
County Commissioners adjourned un
til Tuesday of next week, as a mark
of respect to their president and col
league. St. George Barber, of the Sec
ond district, who died Saturday and
whose funeral was held yesterday af
ternoon. At next week’s meeting of
the Board resolutions upon the death
. of Mr. Barber will be adopted.
ESTABLISHED IN 1884.
ANNAPOLIS, MD„ TUESDAY, AUGUST 29, 1922
HARDING FELLS
\ POWER SHOULD
BE BROADENED
President Assures Spokesmen He
Would Use It In Railroad And
Mining Situation Only In
Event Of Grimmest Necessity
Arising, However
LIVING WAGE MQTION
IS DENIED BY BOARD
(By The Anoclalrd **reee.l
WASHINGTON. D. C. Aug. 29-
President Harding still believes that
Congress should grant him immedi
ately authority to take over railroads
and mining properties, it was said to
day at the White House, but has as
sured congressional spokesmen that
only the grimmest public necessity
should force him ti use the authority
1 should it be granted him.
! If Congress indicates unwillingness
to enact the legislation necessary, the
.President will not press the matter,
■ declared officials, adding that he does
not beileve that there is any present j
'necessity for action under such a
! grant.
I In the light of facts presented to
today’s cabinet meeting the President
j was said to believe that the bitumi
nous coal producing situation had
cleared itself up and that there would
be an anthracite settlement within a
very short time, leaving the railroad
situation and the shopmen’s strike as
the only strike problems confronting
the nation.
It was declared the President had
no doubt but that the representatives
of the Federal government could in
emergency move to control of essen
tial public services without addition
al authority from Congress, but that
for the sake of allaying public ex
citement and clearing the atmosphere,
he was said to feel that Congress
ought to make the powers definite and
certain by enactment of legislation
giving him control of the situation.
At the same time, while he has in
dicated his desire for such author
ization and further has suggested its
immediate desirability, he is not pro
posing to press the conclusion against
opposition which has already cropped
up among some cf the leaders in Con
gress.
(Continued Ou Pace 4.)
ARNOLDSTOO HOLD
DRAWING FOR IMMENSE
EAGLE CAPTURED HERE
With a real, live gray eagle, said to
measure six feet, six inches from tip
to tip. as the main prize to be drawn
for at the athletic carnival to be held
Saturday afternoon at Arnolds for
benefit of the Arnolds Athletic Club,
much added interest has been aroused
in the forthcoming event.
This particular eagle, which species
is rather uncommon in this section, is
said to have been captured last Satur
day afternoon on the Severn river
I near the Baugh estate. C. W. Diller,
i overseer of “Uchllyn Farm.” owned
by Mrs. Edwin P. Baugh, was the
original possessor of the large Ameri
can bird and he generously turned it
over to the management of the Arn
olds Club for Saturday’s drawing.
According to Cliftofl Borneman, of
Arnolds, who now has the eagle all
dolled up and ready for the prospec
tive change in ownership, the eagle
was seen flying over the Baugh estate
Saturday, and when shot at the bird,
although not struck by the load from
the gun, dropped into the water,
where he was picked up unhurt. It is
> believed that the eagle, scared by the
>, report of the gun. sought refuge in
1 the water and then was unable to get
out of its- unaccustomed liquid
• quarters.
At anjt. rate. Mr. Borneman has the
eagle on exhibition jdt at present,
and he stated today that it was being
fed on chicken, duck and other savory
► edibles. So R would seem that the
life of “a eagle” is not such a hard
one. after all. when placed in cap
• tivity in these parts.
; "NETS" WIN IN SWEDEN
-T
(By The AinorlaM Prm.)
STOCKHOLM. SWEDEN. Aug. 29
1 A majority of 44.545 against prohibi
■ tion is shown in the official tabvla-
T tion of the vote in Sunday’s referen
i dum throughout Sweden on what are
believed to be complete returns.
f
ALL MINERS HVE I
PERISHED. BELIEF
But Families And Friends Of 47
Men In Argonaut Shaft
Hold Hope
(Bjr Th Amorlatnl rrm.)
JACKSON, OBLIF., Aug. 29.—V01|
| unies of nauseating gas issuing from
1 j the burning depths of the Argonaut
mine through the Muldoon air shaft
j led to the belief today that the men,
! now said to number 47, who were im
prisoned in the Argonaut mine at
midnight Sunday night by a lire have
all perished. Late yesterday the gas
began pouring out of the Muldoon
shaft and spreading over the land
scape. The heat in the Argonaut shaft
is terrific.
Families and fellow workers of the 1
miners clung stubbornly to the hope
that their fathers, husbands and bud- i
j dies still lived, although the most op
j timistic hope was that they could be
! reached within eighteen hours.
During the night men attempting in
mine “skips" to ride down through the i
flaming levels were dragged back to i
thfe surface their faces blackened
They came to gasp eagerly for fresh
air and to tell of the impossibility of
passing the flames below',
i The tracks on which the skips run
were warped and distorted with heat
and in some cases the metal was even
melted.
Flames which started yesterday
morning a< the 3,000-foot level were
said today to have worked up to the
2,400-foot level.
A half mile below the earth’s sur
face working frantically to break a
concrete barrier which long has seal
ed the shaft of the Argonaut from the ,
shaft of a neighboring mine, the Ken- I
nedy, other miners sought to make a I
possible channel of escape for their
trapped comrades. It was a slim
hope. The trapped men are believed
to be on the 4,500 level, or lower.
city inWesldsto
FURNISH COAL SUPPLY
Notwithstanding the rail and coal
strike situation, the municipal au
thorities are hoping against hope thal
they will be able to get sufficient fuel
to supply the several city buildings
To this end, the Public Property Com
mittee of the City Council is adver
tising for bids for 140 jtons of coal
delivered in the bins of the buildings
or to be supplied whenever needed
Bids will be opened by the committee
at noon on September 5.
It is stipulated in the proposals that
bids be submitted on both hard and
soft coal, indicating that the munict
' pal officials will be satisfied with
whatever fuel they can get, for, as s
‘ general rule, hard coal is used. Undei
existing conditions, however, it would
( appear that the city will find it hard
, to get any.
i funeraTofTorlr
; ST. JOHN’S STUDENT v
; IN BALTO. TOMORROW
—...—.. .. - r\
I• Funeral services for Samuel L.
Trott, 3 York Court, Guilford, Balti
- more, who died as a result of injuries
l received in an automobile accident on
- Reisterstown road late Saturday
night, will be held at St. David's
f Pyotestant Episcopal Church, Roland
l Park, at 10:30 o’clock tomorrow
. morning.
Trott, who was 22 years of age, was
; a former student at St. John’s Col*
t lege and was well-known in Annapo
i lis. Members of Sigma Chapter of
, the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity, of
s which young Trott was a member,
j will act as pallbearers, as follows:
i William G. Totterdale, Edward E.
t Hargest, Jr., Morris C. Turner, Chris
i topher Kriel, Frank B. Robertson and
Charles Russell Todd, of Boston.
? MOTOR BANDITS INVADE'BANK
AND GET AWAY WITH $82,000
fl*jr The AumrhiMl Pretm.)
b LETHBRIDGE. ALBERTA, Aug. 29.
1 —Five motor bandits invaded the town
-of Foremost early today, buond and
gagged employees of the union bank,
blew- the safe and escaped with $82,-
000 in cash and negotiable securities.
John Z. Bayliss 111
John Z. Bayiiss. for many years
- chief clerk in the State Comptroller’s
-office here, is reported quite ill at his
- residence in Baltimore. He has been
- confined to his bed for the past ten
e days, suffering from severe inflamma
tion of the throat and other ailments.
POUT* BUSY
WITH LINEUP FOR
CO. BOARD VACANCY
Today being “County day," and otu
on W’hich politicians from every sec
tion foregather about the Court •
House, the chief tonic' of discussion
was the vacancy in the Board of
County Commissioners caused by the
death of St. George Barber, who was
president of the Board. Under the
law this vacancy is filled by appoint
ment by the Governor for the unex- i
pired term, and the question of se
lecting the president of the Board is a
matter determined by its members.
Both the “Organization" and the
"Progressive” factions of the Demo
cratic party are expected to make *
recommendations to the Governor, i
and each urge the selection of one of j
its own members. It also seems to
be generally taken for granted that
the appointment will be made from 1
the Second district, which was the
one from which Mr. Barber was t
elected. ,
Among the prospective can lid ate.--
mentioned for the “Organization" are
Walter H. Myers, Carroll Worthing- 1
ton, Cornelius Jarboe and C MHto-i 1
Duvall; while among the "Ptygres- t
sives” the names mentioned include <
those of Mrs. St. George Barber, ,
widow of the late president of the
Board; C. Addi Ton Hodges, who also
has strong supporters in the “Organ!- 1
nation" ranks, and John W. Sherbert. i
af the Eighth district. No indication i
has been given as to Just when the
ippointment will be made.
M i
MISS MARIA L C TUCK
DIES AT HER HOME IN
RINGWODD,ENGLAND
News has been received here of the
death at her home in Ringwood, Eng
land, on Saturday of Marla Louiße
Chew Tuck, 70 years old, daughter of
the late Judge and Mrs. William Hal
lanf Tuck, of Annapolis. She was a
sister of the late Philemon H. Tuck, a
Baltimore lawyer, who died several
years ago, and also of Judge Somer
ville Pinkney Tuck, who was judge of
the Mixed Court at Alexandria, Egvpt.
Miss Tuck was a cousin of Dr. W.
Clement Claude, Mrs. Howard, widow
of Admiral Thomas B. Howard, and
others of the Claude family of Anna
polis.
Miss Tuclt’s father was Judge of the
Court of Appeal* of Maryland. Re
cently Miss Tuck* had been making
’ter home in England and France with
her brother. Judge Somerville Pink
tey Tuck, formerly Chief Judge of
’he Mixed Courts of Alexandria,
Egypt.
(•reeks Evacuate Kanthlsfar
(By The AuwlaKd i'mi.)
LONDON, Aug. 29.—The Greeks
have evacuated Afiun Karahisfar un- 1
ler the force of the Turkish national- j
it attack, says a Central News dis
patch received here.
This important central point in the I
Gfieek line in Asia Minor was yield- j
fcd by the Greeks because of the in
ability to withstand the heavy pres
sure of the Turkish nationalists.
CHILEAN SHIP SINKS;
ALL ON BOARD LOST
(By The Associated Free*.)
SANTIAGO, CHILE. Aug. 29.—The
Chilean steamship Itata sank today
off the Chilean coast near Coquimbo.
All the passengers, numbering 150,
and the crew of 72 were lost.
4 CONFESS MURDER IN
MICHIGANJRAIN WRECK
(By The Associated Prfii.)
GARY, IND., Aug. 29.—Confessions
signed and Bwom to of four men held
by the Gary police on charges of mur
der in connection with the wreck of
a Michigan Central express train on
August 20 today were in the hands of
Dwight Kinder, county prosecutor
preparatory to presentation to the
Grand Jury, according to the authori
ties.
The affidavits charging murder bas
ed on the death of the engineer and
> firemen named the defendants as Al
i bino Allesio, Joe Popowitch, Charles
i Usiles and Joe Petrowski, all of Cht
i cago. and all of whom claim union
membership and say they now art on
. strike.
THE WEATHER:
* Increasing cloudiness,
showers late tonight or
Wednesday.
COMPREHENSIVE LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS.
FRICE TWO CENTS.
P.G. SCHOOL -u
WILL REMAIN,;
mm
Head Of Naval Academy Admit
tedly Favors Its Removal To
Some Other Point. But De
partment Sees No Immediate
Chance Of Making Change
INADEQUATE HOUSING
ADVANCED AS REASON
There is no chance of the Navy Post
Graduate School being removed from
Annapolis to some point near Wash
ington. at least in the near future, and
word to that effect has come from
the Navy Department.
This statement was authorized to
day by Rear-Admiral Henry 11. Wil
son, superintendent of the Naval
Academy, in view of reports recently
published in the press, and it has been
the subject of much discussion for
the last several weeks. Admiral Wil
son is. however, admittedly in favor
of a removal of the school to some
other point, largely because of what
he regards as inadequate housing fa
cilities. high rentals, etc., here in An
napolis. Calling attention to this con
lition of affairs. Admiral Wilsop also
recommended to the Navy Department
<.he removal of the school. He planß
to follow this up in his annual re
port.
Question Much Mooted
The proposed removal of the school
has been a much mooted question In
naval and civilian circles as well; so
much so, according to report that it
moved Commander J. O. Fisher, to
ask to be relieved from the duties of
dean of the school. He was relieved
only recently, and assigned to a post
an the Pacific station. His successor
has not as yet been designated.
Meanwhile, the duties of head of the
institution have fallen upon two
younger officers.
Business people of the city natural
ly became greatly aroused when re
ports of the removal proposal seeped
out, because to carry the. plan Into
execution would mean a serious blow
to the city, in view of the large num
ber of officers who pursue post grad
uate studies at the school, coupled
with the clerical force employed there,
who maintain homes in Annapolis.
What Service Paper Hays
Commenting upon the proposition,
the Army and Navy Register, a serv
ice paper, in its issue of Saturday
last, has the following to say:
“The presence of about seventy na
val officers, mostly family men, at An
napolis undergoing the post-graduate
course, has greatly aggravated the
housing situation, and Admiral Wil
: son is quoted as being very desirous
it relieving the situation, even if dras
i tic action is necessary. At the De
j partment it is said that no
tory remedy for the conditions com
' plained of has been worked out. It
! would not serve to improve the hous
ing situation to bring the post-grad
uate school to Washington, where the
scarcity of houses and apartments Is
about as bad as anywhere in the coun
try. The suggestion made that the
school be located at the new naval
laboratory at Bellevue, near Giesboro
Point, below Washington, would make
a bad matter worse, since there are
I no living quarters in that vicinity,
i and the laboratory is still in an un
finished state. Hampton Roads has
been considered, where there Is am
ple ground available, but with the
transfer to the operating base of the
submarine activities and the aviation
station there are no living quarters
in excess, and, indeed, the demand for
officers’ quarters has already exceed- -
jed the available supply. There has
been some consideration given to the
abolishment of the naval post-grad
uate school and in lieu thereof to send
the officers selected for post-graduate
instruction directly to the universi
ties, where they will receive the ad
vanced education; but the advantages
of maintaining the school where a
basic training is given for the first
period of several months, covering
subjects like chemistry, mathematics.
’ etc., which are prerequisites to the
‘ subsequent specialized instruction, are
- sufficient to outweigh the additional
cost of maintaining the post-graduate
• school. This problem is under con
> sideration at Department.
- but with no immediate prospect of a
i solution or of a change, as indicated
-by the fact that only within the past
\ few days additional classes were or
• dered to the post-graduate classes to *
assemble at Annapolis in September,’*

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