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Evening capital. [volume] (Annapolis, Md.) 1922-1981, October 20, 1922, ODD FELLOWS' BOOSTER EDITION, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83009667/1922-10-20/ed-1/seq-1/

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the
wE ATHER
c tor my at hum**
f„r those hus
bands who
dun’t take
their wives to
the O. K. Min
strel.
Vol. I
Odd Fellows’ Minstrel Show Will Be
The Greatest Ever Given In This Citv
Odd Fellows Promise That Their
Friends Will Have Happiest
Evening In All Their Lives
Press Agent Says "Funny Stuff Will Make Old Birds Cackle
Despite These Day 6 Of Prohibition”—Show One Grand
"Billion-Dollar Extravaganza” Artists
Of Highest Rank
Unhiding with mirth and melody,
costumed like a hilllon-doHar movie
iur on a vamping tour, and with a
u.-t of stars that will make profes-
Amili turn green with envy, the
Odd Fellows will present their flrßt
Frolic and the Minntrel show in a
niinnrr that will be pleasing to all
ho attend on neat Wednesday at
tie Circle Playhouse. Yea. and more
id Those who miss It will regret
it (or the next twelve months.
The patrons will have an unfor
mn treat, when some of the local
ulrnt. which has been steadily climb
nx toward the pinnacle of the burnt
>erk art, appears. During the past
week some of the boys have been
rendering songs in a manner surprls
m* even to themselves.
And when some of them let loose
with the "funny stuff" many of "the
old birds" in the audience, who have
not let out a real healthy cackle in
• dox's age. will see Joy even In pro
bation.
The entire show is replete with
catchy music and snappy dancing.
Yith a wealth of talent to draw
Irom. the local “boys" are making the
*ost of the opportunity. In Its fln
>hed form, the performance will be
iif nearest thing to perfection pos
ftie Notwithstanding the modesty
< the members of the troupe they
iff not backward In saying that this
*lll he the best show that ever hit
lbs neck o' the woods,
lHd You Say Jukest
The end men in the show are su
*rb Some of them have had years
l ’ ! experience. Their Jokes are good
d carry the local flavor which is so
Mcessary for putting across of the
aodern minstrel production.
The go-between and cuffer for the
*ll of these jokesters is E. E. Evans.
*ho will bo interlocutor. What will
done to him by the gat)g of Joke
strrs—well, let us wait and see for
ourselves.
s*>’. man, the town will simply be
iaundated with jokes. Why. they
s o many of them in this show
*1 they had to call on Doc Rowe
paint or revarnish a few' of his
>:c *k that used to make the cracker
•iffls do the shimmy over the gro
***7 floor back in 1890.
Te yarns have been assorted and
'xrefuiiy classified, so dignifled clti
-1,1,5 win be pretty certain of know
"R when to expect a slam at them
‘ad win be afforded plenty of time
1 cave the theatre or stay and load
'd*ir guns.
To forget the ballad singers would
e unfair, indeed. Between the
, * smß of laughter and fun which
keep the Circle Playhouse re
n(*!nK with noise throughout the
11
Premier
Bakery & Lunch
1
Fried Oysters
A Specialty
! %> .
ki] Orders Properly cared for
TELEPHONE 506
249 WEST STREET
Opening (inpitnl.
ODD FELLOWS’ BOOSTER EDITION
IN CONJUNCTION GREAT
FROLIC AND MINSTRELS DE LUXE
CIRCLE PLAYHOUSE-WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY, OCT. 25 and 26-Matinee Wednesday 3.30 P. M.
MINSTREL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
R. C. ROWE, Chairman W. F. FISHER B. GORDON R. W. JAMES JOHN WOODS H. FOZLKER
""" s
evening, there will also be moments
ft sentiment. The men chosen tor
his work are of unquestionably good
selection, and whon voices are sweet.
<ongs are new. and they are put
tcross In a manner distinctively In- j
It vidua 1. there is bound to be appre- j
elation shown on the part of the lis-j*
teners for their work.
But the minstrels will not take up j
the whole evening, so why elaborate t
any further. Unlike all Gaul, the
’light's fun Is divided Into two parts
—the forepart and the hindpart. The
hindpart will remain the hindpart and
‘.he forepart will continue the fore
part.
The Rehearsals
The program will open with a
clever little sketch untitled, "Re
hearsing for the Show." The Odd
Fellows will put on a rapid fire act
vith many of the cast participating.
They will show you how the Odd Fel-,
lows started to rehearse and whatl
took place during the rehearsal.
James Hart, chairman of the talent
committee, will take part in this act
ind there will he a laugh a minute
is the Odd Fellows ’act for the pub
lic. some of the amusing incidents
before the first rehearsal was actually
called by Brother Frank Combs.
There will be the famous Six
Browne Brothers' Saxophone Sextette.
Then comes the famous battle of
Eastport with Capt. Strahorn direct
ing the battle. The amusing inci
dents of this battle will be offered by
Capt. Strahorn and his colored order
ly-
The musical numbers have been
carefully chosen from the latest New
York hits, and each and every one
is a brand new selection which will
be sung with novel choral effects and
few surprises.
The end men have a flock of brand
new Jokes, lively Jazz songs and some j
snappy dancing steps. "Buck" Hyde
and "Slim" Casey are well known In
this vicinity and their stepping Is
;reat. One "Loggie" Mach in Is the
lark horse in this foot work and he
will spring some good surprises. The
music on the occasion will be furnish
ed by the famous Annapolis Jazz Or
chestra. whose membership needs no
introduction to our citizens.
And when the curtain is rung down
on the performance the Odd Fellows
are confident that those in the audi
ence will say that the show was won
derful. a huge success and worth at
least five dollars. The Odd Fellows
are always charitably inclined and are
j going to make a present of five dollars
worth of entertainment to those w>ho
attend, the price of the tickets will
, j be SI.OO and $1.50 plus war tax.
And the big street parade will be a
feature in itself.
The first performance will be given
Wednesday afternoon at 3:15 p. m. j
and will be repeated "Wednesday and: j
Thursday nights at 8:30 p. m. Tick- {j
ets will be on sale at the Clrcle"i?lay- j
house Box Office Monday morning at \
10 o'clock for all three performances.
FRANK CASEY, SINGING
I
/ “I’m Wild About Moonshine”
1 r * "* 4 i* -* 4a£lx-4 *is 4 44444 ‘* * 4 -■*■•** 4=* 4** 4*4 -* a-.** 4-3-4.44 5T5 •££££££ £
1 FIRST ANNUAL |
1 Minstrel and Entertainment I
PRESENTED BY
I Metropolis Lodge No. 17 |
§ I. O. O. F. I
OCTOBER 25th, 26th, 1922 1
ft SPECIAL MATINEE ON WEDNESDAY
Hrt fl-
Direction of Harry Miller Co.. 14TC Broadway, New York City. >
{.I; < Director, Frink Coombs. 7 •
J" ' I
I* PART ONE I
First Spasm .£
; ‘ ' “REHEARSING FOR THE MINSTRELS” *
Scene: Odd Fellows’ Club.
Time: One week ago. ' di"
•£ Chairman ROSCOE "DOC” ROWE I
V Director FRANK COOMBS t
Clarence CHAUNCY BASIL
Janitor "MICKEY” COHEN -
Porter.... "SLIM” CASEY I
During*the action of the sketch the following specialties will be introduced:
- "HAIL! HAIL!” BY THE GANG I
"OH! MOTHER I’M WILD” CHAUNCY BASIL fl
fa..
Mi"
MH iff
**
SECOND SPASM . ft
ff
"THE COTTON PICKERS’ SAXOPHONE SEXTETTE”
LOUIS VIKTOR "BUD” CARON
v "DUTCH” ZEIGLER . WILLIAM PFEIFFER
* CHARLEY CESKA HOWARD FOELKER ft
i *
H •? . i ii>.
3 ;t , ft
Third Oddity
A MILITARY TRAVESTY
“THE BATTLE OF BAY RIDGE”
*t"* ‘ a-4
CAST:
SAn American Officer CAPT. JOHN STRAHORN mm
His Colored Orderly BERT DANIELS ft!
INTERMISSION
ODD FELLOWS’ ORCHESTRA it!
tH Mu
tH Mm
'v • m
$ PART TWO
| fH
i“I N A ROSE BOWER”
* Introducing ft*
E. D. EVANS, As Interlocutor.
END ME N ffl
“BUCK” HYDE, "SLIM” CASEY, "MICKEY” COHEN. JAMES CRANDALL
“LOGGIE” MACHIN,-CHARLES GARRETSON ’ ft;
BALLADISTS ffl
fc JIMMIE RONCHETTI A. L. BOETTCHER !t!
ft * HOWARD FOELJvER CHARLES GARRETSON m
TOHN McALEENAN "JIMMIE” LEDDY
CHAUNCY BASIL HERMAN OLIVE ft
GEORGE CURLOTT FRED. MERRIKEN jjj
BEAUTY CHORUS ft
ft CARL O’BERRY ' "MICKEY” COHEN ft
\m CHARLES CADLE CHARLES GATES ft
ft "BART” KENT BASCOM GORDON
DAVIDSON STALLINGS JOHN NOLTE mm
ft C. A. RUSTEBERG CHAS. E. COOPER ft
ft CLARENCE WOOTEN OLIVER HOLLAND ft
JOHN WOOD "WHITEY” FRIOVED
ft WM. H. SNODGRASS ROSCOE C. ROWE ft
ft I- CHAS. GREENFIELD HYMAN F. ZELKO ft
IfK JAMES LOUIS PHIPPS
L. H. STEPANOWICH WALTER FISHER
with
“BILLY” KING and SONIA VICTORIA MILLER * W
FRANK COOMBS, Director. JOHN HENNING, Pianist.
— ' •-•= : 5
| AMERICAN ODD-FELLOWSHIP
THE Order of Odd Fellows orig
inated in England among work
ingmen. who had been accus
tomed to assembling together, periodi
cally, at public houses for social e:i
Joyment, and although chaotic in
character, at first, it gradually drifted
into a formal organization and th<>
formation pf lodges in imitation of
other existing fraternities, guilds and
trade societies. The first organiza
tion was known as "The Ancient Or
dor of Odd Fellows." and another
was formed soon after called “The
Union Order of Odd Fellows.’ ’ These
are supposed to have been founded
during the latter part of the 17th, or
near the beginning of the 18th cen
tury. These two branches came to
gether in 1815 and organized "The
Manchester Unity,” which still exls's
and extends over the greater part of
the Kingdom of Great Britain.
April 20, 1819, was the natal day of
American Odd Fellowship, for at th:.t
time Thomas Wildley, with his four
coadjutors, John Welch, John Duncan,
John Cheatham and Richard Rush
worth, instituted in Baltimore, Wash
ington Lodge. N’o. 1, at "The Severn
Stars," a public house on the souib
side of Second street, between Fred
erick and Market Space. Thom: s
Wlldcy w’as installed Noble Grand and
’ John Welch Vice Grand.
On March 27, 1819, there appeared
in the “Baltimore American” tha fol
lowing:
[“Notice to Odd Fellows:—A few 1
mmebers of the Society of Odd Fel- '
| lows will be glad to meet their f
| brethren for the purpose of forming a
| lodge on Friday evening, 2d Apr 1, at
| the ‘Seven Stars,’ Second Street, at
i the hour of seven P. M."
| In response to this there assembled
i at the rendezvous the above named
| brethren. They had all been initiated !
I into the Order in England, and so far |
| their qualifications were correct.
I Although the prime movers in this ,
| interesting drama were of limited ,
| education and in an humble sphere (
| of life, yet their personal influence |
| and the tenents of the Order, even at
? this period, were sufficient to attract j
* the attention and curiosity of others,
j for within three weeks their numbers
f had increased to fifteen. However, if
j was not until about the year 1829 that |
|' men of education of all classes enter
i | ed the Order, and infused nito its bo-!
1 ing those moral and progressive prin
* | ciples now well known to all.
| The first lodge formed was honored !
| with the name of the great father of j
[ bis country, other lodges rose as fy {
enchantment, and soon the Indepen 1-
ent Order of Odd Fellows was e.i- !
abled to announce to the world the es
tablishment of the Grand Lodge of j
Maryland. The borders of Maryland
, circumscribed not the growth of Odd
Fellowship. It spread into the neigh
boring States; in Pennsylvania,
\ Massachusetts and New York, more
4 especially it seemed to Itart up. and
j to expand as by enchantment. It pur
| sued its march into other States, and j
i rjas continued to progress until the
• j eye has become satiated in tracing its
4 vast course, until it has become more
.{ difficult to find where it is not, than to
-I discern where it is. Everywhere the
4 temples of Odd Fellowship are rising.
| everywhere her thousands are doing
4 the deeds, and singing the songs oi
charity. It promises to become al
-4 most a universal bond of fellowship
. among men, and like the little stone
i which Daniel saw in a vision cut out
4 of Zion, soon to fill the earth.
4 The mighty growth of Odd Fellow
j ship in America has been the work of
4 a few short years. The patriarchs of
"l the Order now stand amongst their
4 children; their children throng
j around them. Could all their Ameri
-4 can offspring be permitted to join in
|J the concourse, how would the glorious
4 yrospect cheer their hearts,, and fill
3 their souls with enthusiasm! When
|4l this expanding nation shall show
4 forth its millions of Odd Fellows and
its thousands of temples, when we
(3 shall stand as it were in the midst of
THE
BOOSTER
Circulation —The
greatest.
Rates The
highest.
News lnteres
ting to Odd Fel
lows and good
for those who
are not.
posterity, how will our bosoms swell,
not with vain exultation, but with
generous pride, at the spledid con
summation of our hopes.
Such has been the origin, such the
growth, and such are the future pros
pects of Odd Fellowship in America;
and while the exposition raises the
curiosity to know the principles of tho
Order, it powerfully excites the be
lief in the minds of the initiated, that
an institution which could in a free
ind virtuous land in the short space
>f twelve years, from the smallest
beginning, plant Its base so deep and
'road in the nation, and tower so
loftily as this, must have salutary
ariuciples for its government, the
nubile weal for its object and the
great patron of all that is excellent
m earth for its protector and reward.
Like Freemasonry, the great object
which Odd Fellowship has in view is
the practice and promotion of the
practice of charity. Not that charity
that begins at home and stopß there,
but that charity which first circum
scribing home, expands itself abroad,
spreading and spreading until it en-*
‘ompasses the vast family of man
'und. The preservation of individual
vealth and the promotion of Individ
lal credit are not more the essential
bjects of a banking institution, the
xercise of benevolence is not more
he object of a humane society, tho
ulvancement of religion is not more
he object of a church corporation,
than is charity the all-absorbing ob
ject of Odd Fellowship, and if charity,
then all the for charity is the
crowning virtue, the diadem; it is the
apex of the pyramid, the keystone of
the arch of virtue. Without it, vain
are the speculations of the moralist,
without it vain are all the professions
of the religionist, vain the honeyed
phrases of the patriot, aye the patriot
the great champion of the cause of
freedom, and avenger of the people's
wrongs. I pronounce his bosom nar
row if charity be not there; he loves
only his country; he loves but a part
of mankind; he loves not man, for
patriotism is but one of the virtues,
and charity is the highest virtue. It
is the great affiliation bond of univer
sal man, confined in its embracings to
no country, to no quarter of the earth,
'o no hemisphere, to nothing short of
the whole round of human existence,
wherever there is human suffering to
alleviate or human wrongs to avenge.
The advancement of the empire of
this universal charity is the great ob
ject of Odd Fellowship throughout
he Globe. I say universal charity,
ind I say it in the teeth of those who,
admitting that charity is the great ob
ject of our institution and that it is
not confined to any quarter of the
globe, yet slander us by saying that
w e confine its promotion within the
pale of our own Order. We are
bound they say, to be charitable to
one another at the expense of charity
to others. True it is, that Odd Fel
lows are bound to each other by a
fraternal bond, but it is the same fra
; :ernal bond by which they are bound
to all mankind, and the great glory of
the former is that it keeps alive and
nourishes the latter.
Vast has been the influence of this
j institution in the promition of this its
favorite object, multitudinous ths
blessings which it has scattered over
the world. Could all the participants
of its charities be brought to lay their
testimonials,at the foot of this altar,
the last document would crown a high
pyramid of glory in honor of Odd Fel
lowship. Faint would be the evidence
which these would furnish of the
reality; they might point out the
numbers who had been relieved, but
they could not depict the distress
which had been prevented, or thq
moral agonies which bad been al
leviated. They could give no idea of
the tears of sorrow which attracted
| the eye of pity, much less could they,
i estimate the tears of joy which fol
| lowed in the channels which grief bad
! fretted, or pain the ecstatic emotions
■ of gratitude in the instance of deliver
•j ance - -.- •- .
No. I

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