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Evening capital. [volume] (Annapolis, Md.) 1922-1981, October 20, 1922, Image 6

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ASSOCIATED press
A Dispatches of late
nf ws are published in
T he Evening Capital.
EVKRT EVENING EXCEPT SUNDAYS.
\oi. I.X.W II No. .'IT.
OLDEN TORNADO
IIS ANNAPOLIS
i OHIO. SAME
Georgia Tech’s Speed Kings
Ready For Intersectional Bat
tle Against Midshipmen On
Farragut Field Tomorrow Aft
ernoon.
ABOUT 20.000 PERSONS
WILL WITNESS CONTEST
The "liolden Tornado,” Geor
• j Tech’s football team, swept
a to \nnapolis this forenoon.
ukJv to furnish the opposing
:rre in the first intersectional
'.othall game of consequence
!er staged in Annapolis. The
will l>e played on Franklin
■ rid tomorrow afternoon, bcgin
snu at '! :30 o'clock.
The visitors, .'SO strong, came
rr from Washington by trolley
i the Washington. Baltimore
d Annapolis Electric Railroad,
r.rr traveling all night from At
inta Quarters at Carvel Hall
d been engaged for the visiting
nrriors, by the Navy Athletic
Association. Soon after their ar
•tval luncheon was served, and it
■a* planned by Coach Alexandct
: have a final formation and sig
ul drill on the playing grounds
■wrtlv before •' o'clock.
Folwell Makes ( hamre
instead of a scrimmage an the (Inal
U 1 workout in preparation for the
k intersectiona! game with Georgia
Tat here tomorrow. Coach Bob Fol
*il drove his Navy puptln through a
munition tuol signal drill. A great
Ml of attention wan also devoted to
tether perfecting a defense against
e.tt plays, for end runs and forward
*•■. in which offensive the Yellow
•Art* are said to lie able to gel
i) with some flashy work. A fea
rful the practice was the presence
' i large contingent of the student
■if. who cheered and sang.
FolweU's team, it is expected, will
** a few marked changes as com
■•sl to that which participated in
* gruelling engagement with Buck
' last Saturday. Zuber was again
‘ liiard In place of I.entz, the big
r* from Rutgers; Stoltz remained
<('*ntlnn<l tin Tag* 4.)
Air-Tight Wood
Heaters*
"* have them in twelve styles.
Priced from $2.50 to $12.50
A style for every need.
I Tf •' Henry B. Myers Co.
45 49 WEST STREET.
Annapolis. Md.
FOOTBALL-- DANCE']
October 21, 1922, at 10.30 A.M.
St. John’s vs. George Washington
INFORMAL DANCE IN GYMNASIUM *
AT 8:30 P. M.
r ADMISSION
'j'ME )0c DANTE SI.OO
l|
: oung Men’s Democratic Club
; 0F \NNAPOLIS AND ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
5 B
Reservations are being made for the
DINNER ||
•- at Carvel Hall on Oct. 2(*. at t*:.”o P. M. in honor m
of the Democratic nominees
HON. WILLIAM CABELL BRUCE
and
HON. CLARENCE M. ROBERTS
' , "'Ciin your reservation through anv member of the M
s ' . H
JOHN C. FELL.
Chairman. j-j
*'*** *•-.!* ** *• —f -r-, - T -t -t w-m-m >■* f tm -r -M ~r ~r m .M
"* "•**♦ *4 44-4-4 • ••H ~ . 4-f -f -4 411 ui i -fr T-„ >*
burning (Unpttnl
| ODD FEUOWS TUNING
DP FOR MINSTRELS
Sparkling Show To Be Staged
At Circle Playhouse Wednes
nesday And Thursday
MATINEE FOR CHILDREN
"
The Odd Fellows’ minstrel show la
fast rounding into shape and a great
treat is promised for the people of
Annapolis on Wednesday and Thurs
! day of next week'at the Circle Play
> i house.
A special matinee will be held at
S:3O p. m. in order that the little ones,
who must be In bed early at night,
will be able to see a real minstrel
show, with real end men, good singing
. Hn ‘l dancing The price of the matl
, nee "ill be 25 and 50 cents, no seats
J being reserved for this performance.
The mitiHtrel troupe is composed of
local people only, under the direction
of Frank Combs of the Harry Miller
i Company, of New York, who has been
in the city for the past week direct
ing rehearsals at the Odd Fellows’
Hall on West street. No troupe can
boast of a better pair of end men than
“Slim" Casey and “Buck" Hyde, their
black-face antics, songs and dances
being of the best. Little Billy King
and. Miss Sonia Victoria Miller will
appear in a specialty. Captain Stra
horn will command the “Battle of
Eastport” and his messages to and
from the front will be carried by
"Bert" Daniels, a colored orderly.
New Music And Many Grinds
The music is new and tuneful, the
jokes are great, and many will leave
the theatre wondering how the end
men learned of the particular event
which will be the subject of the
“hits." The costumes and scenery
have been specially designed.
Ticket* wil be placed on sale for all
three performances Monday at 10 a
m. at the box office of the Circle Play
house. the seats for the evening per
i formances being reserved. The even
ing prices will be 50 cents, $1 and
$1.50.
NEW COMMANDER LEGION
(By Th Atnorlftted Prf.)
I NEW ORLEANS, LA.. Oct. 20.—Al
vin M. Owsley, of Texas, was elected
1 National Commander of the American
! Legion for the next year by the con
i
, I ventlcn of the veterans here today,
I; succeeding Hanford MacNider, of
| lowa.
j ff — • === A\
$lO Reward
i $
For return of Red Setter
Dog strayed from home.
White spot on breast; an
swers to name of “Jack.”
JOHN del\ DOUW,
23 Southgate Ave.
• Lj; - - ■ ■■ -
SOCIALIST CANDIDATE
i WIU ADDRESS MASS
. MEETING IN BALTO.
The Rev. James L. Smiley, Socialist
candidate for the United States Sen
ate, will go to Baltimore Sunday night
1 to attend the ratification meeting to
be held in the Third Congressional
District, and to address a mass meet
* ing. which will be held at the same
time,
’ The Rev. Smiley, who has recently
completed a campaign tour of the
western part of the State, will have
for his subject “The Necessity of
Socialism.”
The Socialist party plans to hold its
next meeting in Annapolis in con
junction with the People’s party
(Farmor - Labor party) and will ar
range later for meetings in the
county.
WEST ANNAPOLIS
GIRLS TO GIVE PLAY
The Girl Reserve Club of West An
napolis wil give a play. “Down Among
the Fairies.’’ at the Firemen's Hall of
West Annapolis next Monday night at
8 o’clock, under the diiwction of Mr.
Eugene League. In addition to the
entertainment, there will be a sale of
refreshments.
Mrs. League is an experienced
trainer of amateur performances,
having frequently assisted in getting
up theatricals.
BED tm TO ELECT
OFFICERS ON lUESDM
The annual meeting of the Anna
polis and Anne Arundel County Chan
ter of the American Red Cross Society
will take place next Tuesday. October
24, at 3 p. m. in the Red Cross rooms
over the State Capital Bank, and the
election of officers for the coming
year will he held. All members of (he
Society, that is, all persons who sub
scribed a dollar to the organization at
the time of the last drive, are entitled
to be present at the meeting and to
cast a vote.
FIREMEN ANSWER CALL
BUT FIND ONLY SMOKE
Smoke issuing from the rear of
Martin's Row. on Dock street, caun
’ Pd an alarm of fire to he turned in
just before 8 o'clock this morning.
All the city Are companies quickly
responded to the call, hut soon dis
t covered that the supposed fire w\as
non-existent.
GOVERNMENT FILES SUIT
FOR RETURN OF *I.>I.IKB
IN WAR CONTRACT CASE
(By The Aosoelated Proa*.)
WASHINGTON, D. C., Oct. 20—Re
turn to the government of $454,188 in
connection with war contracts was
asked in a suit filed at the direction of
Attorney-General Daugherty in the
Federal Courts at Cleveland, 0., today
’ against the Cleveland Brass and top
per Mills. Inc., and their sureties, the
Fidelity and Deposit Company, of
Maryland.
U. S. MARINES TO PROTECT
VLADIVOSTOK CONSULATE
(By The Annocl.ited Press.)
VLADIVOSTOK, Oct. 20.—American
and British marines were landed here
today to guard the consulates of the
two nations.
SOCOLOW CASE MAY BE
i GIVEN TJ) JORY TONIGHT;
i DEATH PENALTY ASKED
(By The Associated Preen.)
I BALTIMORE. MD., Oct. 20.—Clos
j ing argument was begun this morn
* ing in the trial at Towson of Wal
* ter Socolow, on the charge of mur
-4 j dering William B. Norris, with the
j prospect that the case would be given
*i to the jury by night. H. Courtney
{'Jenifer. State's Attorney for Balti-
{ more county, opened the summing up
II for the prosecution. He asked either
4 death by hanging, or clear acquittal
alter Socolow. He was to be followed
: by Assistant State's Attorney Herbert
4 R. O’Connor, of Baltimore City, with
1 State's Attorney Robert F. Leach
4 making the final argument for the
{ State.
C. Gus Grason and W. Gill Smith,
1 of Baltimore county, were to present
j the argument on the alibi plea of the
Z defense.
ESTABLISHED IN 1884.
ANNAPOLIS. MD., FRIDAY. OCTOBER 20. 11)22
HDD SCORED
BY OPPONENT !
: AT MEETING
.
League Of Women Voters Hears I
| Clarence M, Roberts’ Arraign
ment Of Sidney E. Mudd Last
Night At State House—Re
publican Speaker Absent.
j GOVERNOR PRAISES
WORK OF WOMEN*
Arraigning the record of his Repub- '
liean opponent, Sidney E. Mudd, par- 1
ticularly as to certain inactivities In 1
1 ehalf of the people of Southern j
Maryland; scoring the Republican
tariff, and making a plea in behalf
of his own candidacy, Clarence M.
RoLerts, Democratic candidate for
Congress from the Fifth District, ad
dressed the meeting arranged by the
League of Women Voters of Anne !
Arundel county in the chamber of the
House of Delegates at the State House !
last night.
The League being composed of both ■
Democratic and Republican women,'
the meeting had teen arranged to take ,
the nature of a joint deLate of cam- (
paign issues, as Congressman Mudd ,
had been invited to speak, but sent
word of his inability to come to An- (
napolis. Then it was expected that
former State Senator Oliver S. Metz
erott, of Prince George's, would act I
as his proxy, but he too. did not put I
In an appearance.
Mrs. Robert Moss, president of the
League, presided. Governor Ititchie.
who was greeted with enthusiasm by
the audience, delivered an address in
which he commended th e activities o
the local League, especially on the
point of its initiative in arranging
such a political gathering and praised
the Anne Arundel women tor their in
terest in political affairs generally.
Governor’s Speech
The Governor spoke briefly on the
importance of the coming election,
mentioning the different constitution
al amendments to be voted on and the
senatorial and congressional candi
dates to be elected.
He particularly commended the
work done by the women voters along 1
; educational lines and said that al
though all state work was important
he felt that perhaps that of improv
ing the schools was of supreme value
to the people of Maryland, and that
he would not rest content until it
was possible for every toy and gir
of the State to get a public school
education equal in vale to that of any
(Continued un l*ng .i
DEDICATiON TONIGHT
AT TRACY’S LANDING
i
f High School At That Place Will
Be Formally Presented To
The County
[ FINE PROGRAM ARRANGED
With A. S. Goldsborough, of the
' Merchants and Manufacturers’ Asso
ciation of Baltimore, and E. Clarke
Fontaine. State Supervisor of High
Schools for the Eastern Shore, as the
* principal speakers of the evening, and
with many other features program
med for the evening that should make
of the occasion a memorable event
the formal dedication of the Tracy's
Landing High School, which will be
held tonight, is expected to draw r
good-sized crowd from Annapolis and
other sections of the county.
To Entertain At Supper
Tonight’s dedicatory exercises will
be under the auspices of the Patron's
Club, and preceding the regular pro
gram the guests of honor will be en
tertained at supper at Claggett’s Hall
An excellent musical program also
e has been arranged, which will be in
a charge of Prof. Gibson, of the State
.. i Department of Education, the soloists
. i being Miss Annie C. Petherbridge and
p Mr. Weidefeld.
r Following the supper, which will
1 start at 6 p. m.. the ceremonies will
d he opened by an orchestral selection
t rendered by the orchestra of the An
ti napolis Grammar School, and then
h community singing, vocal solos and
e several addresses will be the order of
procedure. The school will.be form
1, ally presented to the county by the
t 1 trustees and the response will be
e j made by members of the County
I Board of Education.
ST. JOHN’S TO PLAY
GEORGE WASHINGTON
TEAM HERE TOMORROW
The St. John's College eleven will
clash with the George Washington
j University team on the local college ]
i gridiron tomorrow morning, the game
j being scheduled to start at 10:30
o'clock. It will be the first regular
encounter to be played by the Orange
and Black team since the fray of two
weeks ago in which the cadets hr.nded
Washington College, oi Chestertown,
the better end of defeat.
Owing to the fact that Johns Hop
kins University, the old and time-hon
ored rival of St. John's rolled up a
score of 40-6 against George Washing
ton last week, the local team natur
ally is expecting to lay low the ag
gregation from the Capitol city.
SUCCESSFUL SUPPER
FOR BENEFIT OF SCHOOL
The oyster supper given Wednesday
night at Garden Farms School, on the
Severn, to raise funds for school im
provements was a grbat success, and
was attended by a large number of
people from Annapolis and West An
napolis.
In addition to serving a hundred
suppers, there was a sale of ice
cream, candy and cake, and after the
supper was over the remaining ar- 1
tides were auctioned off. Seventy
dollars was cleared.
GOV. PRAISES SPIRIT
OF ST. JOHN’S CADETS
Stirred to enthusiasm by the near!
approach of the football game with
George Washington University to be
staged here tomorrow morning the
second contest in which the local in
stitution has engaged fhus far. the
Cadet battalion paraded the streets
of Annapolis last night and gave their
favorite yells and sang songs .
Marching into the grounds of the
Executive Mansion, Governor Ritchie
was compelled to respond to repeated
cheers for him. Coming out on the
front portico, he commended the stu
dents for their spirit, winding up by
saying that he is “for St. John’s first
last and all the time.” This broughl
forth another hearty cheer.
INVESTIGATORS REPORT
TRAFFIC IN “WET” GOODS
PROTECTED KY BRIBERY
(By The Asuoriitrd Fretm.)
CHICAGO, ILL., Oct. 20.-Special
investigators authorized by 'he Fed
eral Department of Justice to inquire
! rto the recor.t conduct of the office of
rhe U S. District Attorney at Chicago,
today reported that “there is not the
slightest doubt that since the passage
if the Eighteenth amendment ihcre
has been traffic in intoxicating liquors
organized on a large scale a.id pro
tected by bribery and corruption.
FOUR DROWNED WHEN
STEAM YACHT SINKS
(By The Associated Press.)
ST. JOHN'S. N. B . Oct. 20.—Four
passengers on the steam yacht Dream
were drowned today when the craft
sank during a stiff northwesterly blow
in St. John's river. The crevr,of four
and two passengers were saved.
BONfIRIfIvTisIOHMINE
NEW CABINET FOR BRITAIN,
; HON AGES TO SERVE
(By The Associated Press.)
LONDON, Oct. 0. Andrew Bonar
Law r appeared to be making rapid
progress today in forming a cabinet
to replace the fallen Coalition gov
ernment.
This was evidenced by the an
nouncement that Marquis Curzon and
’he Earl of Derby, both men of in
fluence and experienced
isters. have agreed to serve under
him in any capacity.
Mr. Bonar Law cannot officially
confirm the formation of his minis
j try until he is elected head of the
J Unionist party to succeed Austen
1 1 Chamberlain, but it is generally con
! ceded that this election will Le only
a formality.
The majority of London's morning
I newspapers being anti-coalition, the
II fall of the Lloyd-George ministry, is
1 j mostly welcomed by them as ridding
■ ’.he country cf a government whose
‘' policies they have so long condemn
■ | ed and opening the way for what they
rjhope will prove a saner administra
jtion.
INSTITUTE OF COUNTY
TEACHERS HERE TODAY
About 150 Instructors Attended
Meeting For Purpose Of Out
lining Future Work
GEORGE FOX PRESIDED
About one hundred and fifty Anne
Arundel school teachers were in at
tendance at the Teachers’ Institute
held in the Annapolis Gramma'
School today, and, in consequence of
the meeting, all the school children
in the county enjoyed a holiday.
The teachers’ meeting, which wn>
presided over by George Fox. count;
superintendent of education, assistei
by Misses Theresa Weidefeld am
Ruth Parker, school supervisors
opened at 10 a. m„ and was conclud
ed at 3 o’clock this afternoon.
Session Highly Successful
Today’s session was held in ordc
that the teachers might summarize
the results of the school work al
ready completed and also to maki
plans for the work to lo done durin;
the next two or three months. Mr
Fox made an address in which he out
lined the nature of future work to
le accomplished and Miss Weidefeld
also delivered an interesting talk to
the teachers.
Frank A. Munroe, president of the
County Board of Education, wa>
present at the morning session and
spoke on the subject of general
school administration. Mr. Fox stat
ed that today’s Institute was one of
the most successful ever held here
and expressed himself as being con
fident that it would Le productive of
splendid results.
MRS. PLUMMER BURIED
TODAY IN PORTSMOUTH
The funeral of Mrs. Almira Plum
mer, who died on Wednesday night a
the residence of her daughter, Mrs
Patrick Hill, 33 Franklin street, after
a long illnessr'was held today at her
home in Portsmouth. Va.
Mrs. Hill, whose husband, Lieut
Hill, U. S. N., is at sea, has a son in
the present Piebe class at the Nav? >
Academy. With her mother she came
to Annapolis in August, planning to
remain here for the year.
Mrs. Plummer, who was 68 year:,
old, had been seriously ill ever since
her arrival. Death was due to
Bright’s disease.
Recovers From Illness
After being confined to his home for
more than two weeks with an attack
of bronchial trouble, John K. Sehor
ger, of the Independent Fire Com
pany, again is back on the job and
wearing the same old happy smile as
of yore.
ANNUM ELECTION OF
D. A. R. OFFICERS ON
PEGGY STEWART DAY
Yesterday being Peggy Stewar
Day, the annual meeting and election
of officers for the Peggy Stewar
Chapter of the D. A R. towk place a
’he residence of the Regent, Mrs.
Robert G. Heiner.
The annual report of the officer;
were read, those of the Regent an )
‘.he Historian. Miss Katherine Waltor.
proving of particular interest.
, The new officers elected were Mrs
i Carroll Storrs Alden, recording secre
tary; Mrs. James A. Bullard, corres
ponding secretary; Mrs. Henry Rob
ert, treasurer; Mrs. George T. Feld
meyer. registrar; Mrs. R. D. Tisdale
chaplain.
The business of the afternoon con
3isted largely of the reading of th<
various reports. It was noted will
satisfaction that the Chapter is in i
flourishing condition financially am
I otherwise.
Following the business meeting re
- freshments were served. Mrs. L. Dor
r sey Gassaway assisting the hostess.
LEAPS FROM AIRPLANE
IN PARACHUTE AND
ESCAPES DEATH
i
(By The Associated Press.)
DAYTON, 0., Oct. 20.—Leaping
from his monoplane in a para
’ chute when the plane began to
wobble at a height of 2,000 feet
; above the ground, over North
’ Dayton today, Lieut. Harold R.
Harris. # chief of the Flying Sec
s’ tion at McCook Field, escaped
death while his plane crashed to
earth .
I
THE WEATHER: li
* Fair tonight and Sat
urday. Slightly cooler
tonight, with frost.
COM P KEREN SI VK LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS.
PRICE TWO CENTS
IDE SCOPE OF .
HAZING PROBE
MOOTED
( Testimony In Case Of Bruce
Robinson, Shows That “Piebe”
Was Brutally Hazed Two
Other Seniors Mentioned As
Looking On.
SURGEON DESCRIBES
McGregor s injuries
That the hazing investigation
now under way at the Naval
Academy is likely to assume a
much wider scope, involving oth
er midshipmen of the senior
class, was indicated by the trend
of testimony given before the
Naval C ourt-Martial when it re
sumed its sessions this morning
in the trial of Bruce H. Robin
son, of Chandler, Ariz„ whose
hazing of W illiam H. McGregor,
of Bremerton. \\ ashington State,
member of the fourth class, has
been shown to have been of a
brutal nature.
Corroborate* McGregor
Substantially corroborating the tes
timony given by Midshipman William
H. McGregor, of Bremerton. Wash ,
fourth class, that he (McGregor) was
brutally hazed by Robinson, Kdward
K. Ponvert, fourth class, testified as
a prosecuting witness before the na
val court-martial, when it resumed its
sessions.
Others Intuited In Escapade
Furthermore, tt. must have been a
big hazing party with other upper
classmen looking on and making no
apparent effort to stop it, according
t<; the story told by Ponvert. Wit
ness said he was in the room while
j the hazing was in progress and he
involved Midshipmen Fitzgerald and
Steele of the first class as present.
Ponvert said lie coipd not re.nember
who gave tlie command for McGregor
'to do the three physical exercises
“sitting on infinity," “stoopfall.” and
! “assyinptolo ” yet lie was certain tlio
accused middle gave the orders for
McGregor to stop in each instance.
He said that he and the two other
upper classmen were generally Iti
conversation, and they stopped upon
command of Robinson and waited to
i see “what was going to happen next.”
Surgeon Describes Injuries
Lieut.-Ccm. A. L. Clifton, naval
surgeon, who examined McGregor
when he was brought to the hospital,
described the causes of his disability.
He siad he was suffering from pains
in the left side and thigh, due to
overstretched adductor muscles, and
ialso abdominal pains on the left side;
! that his body was acutely deflexed on
!<he pelvis.
The only other material witness ex
amined during this morning's session
was F. Mackle, Jr., a “Piebe” and
f roommate of McGregor. He told the
I court that he went to Robinson's room
I to get McGregor; that he found him
in a weakened condition, and that his
left leg was stiff, and that he and
Robinson removed him to his own
room. He said that Robinson later
insisted that McGregor be taken to
the “sick bay” because he could lie
properly cared for there, and that he
and Robinson took him there. Mc-
Gregor, he said, protested, against go
’ ing to the “sick bay” because hefear
ed the authorities would start an in
vestigation as to the causes of his
>• physical condition. Robinson seemed
' anxious that McGregor should receive
* proper treatment, witness said.
McGregor Tells H!s Story
That he was the victim of hazing of
brutal nature, and suffered muscular
and ether injuries that compelled his
ultimate removal to the Naval Hospi
tal, where he has been a patient for
the last two weeks, summarizes the
testimony given by McGregor before
the naval court yesterday.
; Entering the courtroom on crutches.
' McGregor stood for nearly three
quarters of an hour, first partly
braced against a chair, and later sit
ting on the corner of a table, being
unable to sit down firmly in a chair
because of his injuries, and told the
court how he had been compelled to
go through three physical exercises,
' until finally be became exhausted,
suffered severe pains; first became
a patient in “sick quarters” front
| which he was afterwards removed to
the hospital on a stretcher, where h 3
became a bed patient.
The young midshipman testified
i slowly, and apparently cautiously.
First, he said, that he had submitted
to the physical “stunts” by reason ot
(Continued on Twi U m

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