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Evening capital. [volume] (Annapolis, Md.) 1922-1981, October 31, 1922, Image 1

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associated press
Dispatch** of late
j news are published in
The Evening Capital.
,
_ " 1 !■— ■———
l i BURnKn KVRRT EVENING EXCEPT RCNDATB.
()L. LXXVH No. 40.
JURY PRESENTS
HOLLAND DEATH
Lawrence Thorne Was Driving
Brooklyn. N. Y. Car That Ran
Down And Fatally Injured
Annapolis Bricklayer Working
On Church Circle.
CORONERS JURY ALSO
CHARGED NEGLIGENCE
Tilt; Anne Arundel county grand
Jury has , returned a presentment
HKainxt Lawrence Thorne, chauffeur,
tif Brooklyn. N. Y , in connection with
taming the fatal injuries to Joseph
Holland. 62 years old, h bricklayer,
r Annapolis, who. while working on
l hurt h C'irclo on Wednesday of last
week, was run into by an automobile
driven by Thorne. Mr. Holland died
hi Emergeucy Hospital four hours
after being struck by the car which
was a Packard limousine, owned by
Paul Zelio, also of Brooklyn, who with
his wife, was in it at the time of
the fatal collision.
I 'duchies With Coroner's Jury
The presentment, which is based '
upon the testimony of several eye
witnesses to the accident, charges [
Thorne with "running into nnd kill
ing’ Mr. Holland. A Jury of Inquest [
impanelled by Police Justice William
S Welch, ucting as coroner, which
investigated the circumstances of the 1
collision, previously rendered a ver
dict that Holland's death was due to ‘
"carelessness and negligence’' on the
part of Thorne.
Thorne lias Mot Keen Taken ,
Thorne lias not us yot been taken I
into custody by tho county police uu- 1
tliorlties, ft Is stated. On the day J
th.it Mr. Hollfiud received his fatal *
Injuries, Thorne was driving the lim- I
oitslne, Mr. and Mra. Zehe apparent- 1
ly being here on a sight-seeing tour. '
It was stated they had never before 1
visited Annapolis. The car was pass- 1
Ing around the south side of Church
Circle. Mr. Holland was engaged in' l
repairing the street bed of the circle j 1
l
(Cnnllnned On Page 4A I
DANCE!
Friday Night,Nov. 3rd |
City Assembly Rooms
By Independent hire Co.
Music by Annapolilon Four
, —<S
Let
Mrs. Lovinia White
17 Northwest St., Annapolis •
(Telephone 690)
Shop for )ou at
hutzler mwm> %
BALTIMORE
NOTICE!
The operation of the ferry across
South River at Rlverview will be
discontinued on November 1, 1922.
on account of the construction of
the uew bridge.
By Order of
THE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF ANNE ARUNDEL CO. j
* " ■— - ■ its ]
CHICKEN SALAD
S UPPER
(*|reu hr
Patrons’ Community Club of
Iglehart School
I uesday, October 3!
H'-giuniug 6:;!0 o’clock.
TICKKTS. 30c.
Hus at Vest Street Station.
o3t
_l~ ■ •
Hunting Season Will Soon Be On!
Fv>r reta'.ts, use
PETER'S SHELLS
They wtnf
W. F. CHILDS & SON
Art beadtuarters for rbev*. O o
Benina IgUl QLnpttal.
SOCIALIST SPEAKER.
REBUKES DOMINATION
BV “PARTY BOSSES"
Last night in the Court House a
united mass-meeting was held by the
Farmer-Labor (People's) Party and
the Socialists. A delegation of Bal
timoreans attended the meeting, in
cluding the three appointed speakers
of the People's Party.
In opening the meeting, the Rev.
James L. Smiley, Socialist candidate
for Congress, who presided, stated
that there is no essential difference
between these two parties, both stand
ing for social and industrial democ
racy, that they have ugreed to Vote
as one.
- Miss Aimce Guggeuheimer, Secre
tary of the Peoples Party, was the
first speaker. In a pleasant, conver
sational tone, she illustrated the stat
us of the radical movement by sev
eral apt experiences. “We are not yet
as numerical as our opponents,” slit
said, “but our listeners are the
thoughtful nnd dependable citizens.
Our goal Is in sight. We shall reacn
it in due time.’’
Following Miss tluggcnheimer Wil
liam N. Purdy urgod supporting the
candidates of these combined parties,
as men qualitied tn personal charac
ter and representing the best inter
ests of humanity, lie said they put
personal rights before property in
terests. “The workers.’’ he declared,
"are looking for a new party, alive
to the people's needs and aspirations.
They have tried the old parties, aim
huve been so often deceived, that they
are now casting them aside”
The last and principal speaker was
Mrs. Donald It Hooker, of Itolaml
Park. She pictured the goal of hu
manity in a most beautiful and in
spiring manner. She told how good
missionary work can be done by quiet
persistent effort, citing the fact that
1740 signatures had been secured by
Just 5 persona, for the nomination of
Chestor F. Gannon for Congress. In
great contrast to the Justice for which
true men are now striving, she re
cited quite a number of incidents
showing the political corruption of
both old parties, “in the Maryland
Legislature, for example.” she assert
ed, “the members all must bow to
the big bosses. Through these‘bosses.’
the corporations get practically all
they want. In Baltimore, both parties
are swayed by financial considera
tions, or partisan designs whether in
appointments to office or in court de
cisions. she charged. This corrup
tion will be washed away when capi
talism is dethroned, and human
rights are given the first considera
tion by office holders. This beautiful
world is rich in resources, natural
and Invented ; we have only to utilize
them honestly and efficiently, to pro
vide overy family with a happy home."
she said.
circus peWrmers
KILLED AND INJURED -
IN TRAIN WRECJi TORAY
(By The AciatetJ
NEW ORLEANS. LA.. Oft. 21.
Three persons dead, four seribusly in
jured aud two slightly hurt, was the
toll of the rear-end collision today of
the fast Sunset Express. New Or
ieans-San Francisco, Southern Pacific
passenger train, and a Wortham Car
nival Shows special en route from
New Orleans to New Iberia. La.
The dead and injured were circus
performers. The wreck occurred
near Adeline, La.
The Stag
A Home For Gentlemen
i .V!l conveniences. Hot-water bent
l and electric lights. Pre war rates.
J 4H* |*cr mouth. Only a few rooms
left.
LOCATION 38 MD. AVE.
(Close to Academy.! n<)
' ->
4> "I I ■"■■■■■—■ -■ ■ £
H. H. Sadler!
OPTOMETRIST
and OPTICIAN
(9
I
203 Main St. Annapolis, Md.
Hours: 8:30 to 6:30 Daily.
i * <5
! mrnm
> ■ ■ 1,1
i Teams To Clash At American
League Park, Washington
Friday Of This Week And
Great Crowd Is Going Frorr
Annapolis.
NAVY MEN BATTERED;
HAV4£ J4.QHT WORKOUT
Gloom .that pervaded the Navy foot
hall camp following the defeat at the
hands of the bhiversity of Pennsyl
vania'on Saturday has been greatly
dissipated, and the middms. always
imbued by the "never say die” Hpirit
resumed work on Farragut Field yes
terday afternoon with even greater
determination, especially in view of
the fact that another big baffle is
J ust in the offing that with Tenr
State at American League Park
Washington, on Friday of this week
Still smarting under the defeat ad
ministered by the N'ittany Lions at l
Philadelphia last year, the naval iadf
will be out to avenge that sore spot
aud the contest is being looked for
ward to with as much interest as air
of the season. State's victory las*
vear was due. in grjeat measure, to the
brilliant individual work of Glenn
iviliinger. but the Navy contingent Ir
not Unmindful of the fact that the
Pennsylvanians have a first calibre
•ark field man in Wilson, a heavy
•lunger, and a fw huskies in the firs’
line of defense- men who know the
game from every angle. State is held
In the highest esteem, regardless of
the fact that it failed to subdue Syra
(‘Use last Saturday.
Regulars Hate Lay. Off
Practice of the middies was of the .<
light order. Several of the regulars ,
were pretty well battertyl in the
Peunsy contest, and did not get iut<
scrimmaging at all. their work'being
confined to signal and formation drill
and other limbering up tactics. An
napolis will be well represented at the
game In Washington Friday. The
crowd will le quite as great, and per
haps greater, than many attending
Army-Navy struggles in the past. The
(Cnntlntierf on Hus* f.l
MUSI INSTALL MAIL
RECEPTACLES B¥ DEC. 1
Have you privided your receptacle
•r “pigeon hole" in the doorway for
mail matter. Mr. and Mrs. House
keeper of Annapolis?
If you have not. you had better get
busy ami do so, because the Federal
statute making it mandatory for all
households to have such depositories
;ta a means tn facilitate the delivery
i becomes effective on December 1. !t
is knowff that many persons have
taken time by the forelock in this re
gard, but the large majority of city
folks have not. Some have Installed
metal receptacles just outside of the
front door; others have had holes of
convenient size cut in the doors. The
latter is regarded as the mos. ap
proved method of complying with the
law.
SERVICES AT ST. ANNE’S
J CH. ON ALL SAINTS* DAY
>
All Saints’ Day services toniorrow
morning in St. Aune's Church will be
Holy Communion at 7; Morning
Prayer and Holy Communion at 10.
■ There will be a service also In St
■ Anne's cemetery at 4 if the weather
lis favorable; otherwise, it will be
i held in the church.
j MEETING OF WOMEN S
MISSIONARY SOCIETY.
The Women’s Foreign Missionary
(Society of Calvary Methodist Church
• held its regular monthly meeting last
night. Mrs. Lyous reported that 661
• had been raised at the recent crab
* supper. Mrs. Shenton. Sr.. Mrs.
! Dawes and Mrs. Edward* Jewell made
! interesting reports of the Women’s
i Foreign Mission Convention in Raiti
• more, which they attended as dele
| gates.
After the business part of the meet
ing was ended refreshments were
served.
* '
Meeting Of Calendar Society
The fall meeting of the Calendar
j Society will take place tomorrow at 3
j o’clock in the Guild Room of St.
Anne’s Church
ESTABLISHED IN 1884.
ANNAPOLIS, Ml).. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31, VM2
:"TIP#F" BOY IS
L : SGI 1 GRILL
h _ • * i
Trial Of Harry Wolf On Con-j
spiracy Charge Proceeds
In Baltimore
flty Tli* AnuM’ialwl Frn.)
BALTIMORE. MD.. Oct. 31.—John
Keller. 17-year-old “lip-off" boy of
’he Norris murder bandits, resumed
the stand this morning in the trial of
Attorney Harry B Wolf on charges of
conspiracy to obstruct justice in con
nection with that case.
For nearly two hours yesterday i
Keller w ithstood a severe cross- i
elimination by Samuel K. Dennis, of (
counsel Tor the defense, with his di- i
feet testimony unparently unshaken J
Mr. Dennis resumed his cross ques
tioning of Keller, who answered ques- i
ions freely. At one time Mr, Dennis'!
reatment of little Keller was so re- j
lentlesa that the court interfered.
"Mr. I-each described you as a little j
liar, a thief, a rat. aud incorrigible—is j
that true?” demanded Dennis.-
“The court objects to that ques- j
•ion.’’ interposed Judge Gorter.
“John has hpen a bad boy a very \
had boy, he knows thnt. we all know
it," said State’s Attorney Leach. “We
don't expect to find angels In such a
gang.”
If developed that the Rev Thomas
V Wheeler. Catholic priest cf Thur
mont. Md . had heeq summoned for
he defense, to show that while the
oriest was an assistant at St. Patrick's
hurcit, Baltimore. Kelior was com
mitted to St. Mary's Industrial School
us un incorrigible. *
SENIOR I[MINING
SCHOOL AT CALVARY
The Church Training School of
Calvary Methodipt Episcopal Church,
■State Circle, wKI start on* Wednes
day night of this week. Tills will
he the third year for this highly suc
•e;sful and inspirational experiment
, ; n week-day religious education. In
he former years about two hundred
•eople have registered each term for
he various courses, and this year
promises to be the best of all.
Another innovation is being intro
lucod this year. Heretofore the
ulults and children met on the same
•light—Wednesday. Because of the
crowded conditions and lack of suf
• 'icient rooms the senior school will
continue to meet on Wednesday, but
:he junior school, will be held on Fri
day nights, the kilter not. beginning
until November Iff, The senior
school begins tomorrow night.
Four attractive courses arc being
offered to the adults aud young peo
nle this year. They are: “The
*'hurch and Its Work" for men;
‘Building with India" for women;
'lndia on the march*' for Kpworth
Leaguers: and “The Organization
tnd Administration or the modern
Sunday .School" for Sunday School
officers and teachers. The term of the
school will continue until Wednesday.
December 2<>.
The public is cordially invited to
join this school of /eligious educa
tion.
GHOSTSAND WITCHES 10
COME FORTH TONIGHT
Tonight's the night when witches
ride. Mack cats and spooks come iu
io their own. sheeted figures appear
unexpectedly at dark corners and
lonely places, aud shadows have
ghost-like propensities.
It's a great night for little boys,
but a bad one For doorbells. Little
girls scream more shrilly than usual,
when a little toy appears suddenly
with the news that the “goblins gon
■ n' git you.” and mother doesn't rec-
[ ognize her small son when he appears j
witii'a (ace that isn’t his own. Noth*
1 ing iu the way of fun. pranks, ro
manefr and just, jm ro “devilishness”
ms forbidden on this one night of the
! year. . -
And it’s also the one night of the
year when the veil of the future may
* be torn apart and through mystic in
cantations doubting men and maid
r may read their fortunes in the pop of
* i chestnut or the fall of apple pair
'! ings.
Many a timid man has been inspir
ed to ask a certain question when he
has seen the object of his admiration
J j gaze*anxiously at two chestnuts plac
| M in the lire, burning side by side.
One of them was named for her; one
might have been named for him.
r Many secrets will be rears!ed be
i fore the stroke of midnight sends the
witches back to their resting places
again.
THIRD MIDDIE
! ARRAIGNED ON
! HAZINGCHARGE
Jack Kerans, First Classman, Is
Alleged To Have Thrown
Tumbler At “Plebe” And Also
Compelled Him To Get Under
Table During Meal.
MICHIGAN YOUTH IS
VICTIM OF TREATMENT
There was a brief session at tin*
i Naval Academy this morning of the
j court-martial called for the purpose
•of trying midshipmen charged \vi'’i
j haring.
The midshipman before the court
! was Jack H. Kermis, of Oklahoma !
| charged with hazing Midshipman Neil
| R Campbell, of Big Rapids, Mich
| They belong to the First laid Fourth
I classes, respectively.
The specifications are along Hne
different from previous cas*s end
which have been regarded as particu
lariy reprehensible by Rear-Admiral
Henry B. Wilson. Superin’eudeut of
the Naval Academy. In that thev In
volve allegations of improper conduc*
during meals
Made Him bat ruder Table
Midshipman Kerans is charged with
hazing the plebe hv throwing a glass
tumbler at him and also with requir
ing him to get under the table while
i meal was in progress.
It is evident, however, that a strung
defense is to ho made. Midshipman
Kerans will be represented by three
counsel. Major Harry Leonard, a re
tired officer of Marines, who is prac
ticing law in Washington; Lieut.-
Commander E C. Rogers and Lieut
T. A. Spencer, I>oth of whom are on
duty at tlie Academy.
The accused midshipman asked tlib
morning for a delay of a week in or
der to confer with counsel and pre
pure his defence. The court ad
journed un i! tomorrow morning
when it will consider the request for
further postponement.
Naval Academy Chapel
Tomorrow, All Saints’ Day, there
will be a celebration of the Holy Com
munion at the Naval Academy Chapel
at 10:30 a. in.
SUB POSTOFFICE STATION
ESTABLISHED IN CITY
Keeping abreast of the times, and
especially with the spread of the
city's population, a bran*li post office
station has been opened in the west
ern section of the city, it was an
nounced today by Postmaster Thomas
J. Linthicum.
The sub-station which will be
known as “Station No. I" has been
established in the stationery store of
John F. Martiq, at 2*l West street!
which was opened .a few mouths ago
The Naval Academy is*’of course a
sub-station, but Station No, 1 is the
first sub-depot for the sale of stamps
and depository for mail matter to be
established within the actual corpor
ate limits of the city.
CLASSMATES~OF NAVAL
FLYER ATTEND FUNERAL
The funeral of Lieut. Roger Frauk
Jin Armstrong, of the Naval Academy
. class of 1918. who was killed
i Lieut. K. L. Ericsson, of IDIC. by t’jf
, fall of their airplane on Thursday last
it'Hampton Roads, was held yester
day at Arlington. Many of his class
! mates and others from here at
tended it.
RAISING OF FLAG AT
MILLERSVILLE SCHOOL

Tli** flag-raising at .VRllcrsville |
School, which was held last Friday,
October 27, attracted a large crowd of j
spectators, who manifested groat in
terest in the ceremonies and the new J
consolidated school.
Every pupil ia the school took part
in the splendid program. The flag
drill, which was one of the best fea
tures of the exercises, waa given by
the twenty girls of the Seventh and
! Eighth Grades. The Rev. Leon Vau
jthier. of St. Stephen’s Church present
led 'he children with the dag on behali
jof the Farmers’ and Community Club,
j The speech oi acceptance wai made
jby the Rev. Edward Parrish, of Cross
| Roads Church.
j Members of the Junior Red Cross
of Millersville School sold ice cream.
! cake and candies at the conclusion of
the program, which netted them
J $27.50. _
I CANDIDATE ROBERTS
I TO ADDRESS LOWER
COUNTIANS TONIGHT
1 A party of prominent Deui tcral>
will leave Annapolis a tout 7 o'clocl
this evening for the mass-nieoting ti i
lc hold In the hall at Cedar Grove
i Eighth district, beginning at 8 o'clock
This section of the county is one o
the centers of the oystering and farm
iug interests und with good wealhe*
prevailing, it is expected there wil
he a large turnout for the meeting
Clarence M. Huberts, of Prince
Georse'a county, the party’s candidate
for Congress from the Fifth Congres
sional district,* will be the priuripa
speaker of the evening. Others win
will discuss the issues of the cam
paigu are Frank Scliad. of Haiti mo r
city, and State Senator A. Theodore
Brady, and John deP. Douw. of An
napolis. The speakers will make tin ,
trip down county by automobile.
Saturday night there will I * a big
meeting at Mayo in the First din
trict.
DISTINGUISHED ENGLISH ’
| FINANCIER HERE TODAY
Sir James Leigh Woods, head o
'he noted English firm of lirown
Shipley and Co., und a power in tin
British financial world, was in towi
today to see Governor Hitchle Sit (
James, who is making a combined
business and pleasure visit to this <
country, came to Annupol s with <
Blanchard Handail of Baltimore. The
hrtn of Brown. Shipley and Cottipan)
ire the London correspondent* o. i
Mexamlcr Brown and Co. with whom :
they keep in close touch, and Sii
James is at present stopping in Bui
timore. He was interested in the his |
toric association and colonial land- j
marks of Annapolis.
MIDDIES TO BEGIN h
SOCCER WEDNESDAY
-- - -t
The: midshipmen will ope i theii
season of soccer football on Wcdne*
la s*. meeting Baltimo's Pol.' technic
Institute. Other games scheduled In
tlude: Penn State, November 1i;
Bwa-thmore, November 18, and St
John's (Annapolis). November Zl.
FORMER ANNAPOLITAN
BURIED HERE YESTERDAY
The body of Emanuel Feldmeyer
brother of Mrs. Walter Clark, a for
mer resident of Annapolis, who died
■ in Richmond, Va., on Friday of last
w*eck, was brought to Annapolis yes
terday afternoon and the funeral was
held from the undertaking establish
ment of James S. Taylor and Sons
I Funeral services were conducted by
■ Kev. 11. W. Burgan, pastor of Calvary
5 Methodist Church, and interment was
• in tlie lot of his sister. Mrs. Clark, in
St. Anne's cemetery.
> The pallbearers were: Charles.
Uerotd, Georte Heroin. Charles Feld-]
• meyer. Edward Feldmeyer. William
i j H. Feldmeyer and Antone Stc ner.
! ORCANKCOUNIY
: FARM BUREAU TODAY
As the outgrowth of the recent
drive for the formation of a Farm
Bureau in Anne Arundel county, more
" than 200 farmers representing every
section of the county gathered in An
- uapolis today to effect a permanent
• organization by the election of offi
b cers for the year.
e The meeting is being held 'his aft
f eriKiou in the city assembly rooms on
Gloucester street. The fact that the
i-1 boneiits of such an organization have
been strongly driven home to the ag- '
riculturists, membership in the Anne
Arundel county branch is showing a
steady growth. Men who conduct
farmiug on a big scale, as well as
the small truckers are coming into *
the organization to derive the ben- 1
ettts that will accrue therefrom. *
1 Cadets Celebrate Victory
The St. John’s Cadets celebrated
| t.heir victory over the Mount St.
Mary’s football team by a snake dauce
last night, followed by a bonfire on
the cfllege campus. Most of the popu
lation of the upper section of town
turned out to join in the celebration. *
Father Vaughn Dead
<Bv The .\•seriated Free, t
LONDON. Oct. 31.—Father Bernard
Vaughn, one of the moat prominent
Jesuit priests in the w'orld. and a bro
ther of the late Cardinal Vaughn, died
here today. *
Several years ago he toured the
United States and parts of Canada aud
later lectured in Japan, where he ad
dressed the House of Peers.
r. . ■ -■.. ■.. .“.I"
i THE WEATHER:
* Fair tonight and
Wednesday. Little
change in temperature.
\ .
COMPKRHRNSI VC LOCAL AND GKNRRAL NRWS.
PRICE TWO CENTS.
SIXTH DRIVE
OF RED CROSS
- JFfJTH VIM
Governor Ritchie Delivers Brief
Address And Makes Donation
Of SSO As Starter—Work At
Home As Well As In War
Time Strongly Emphasized.
DR. GREEN TELLS OF
FEDERAL RECOGNITION
With the Naval Academy band,
kindly loaned by Admiral Henry H.
’Vilson. playing its snappiest inusla
nsidp the chamber of the House of
Delegates and the Bt. John's Collegi
um celebrating their las: week's foot
ball Victory over Mount St Mary's
"ollege in a magnificent snake-dance
•utside the historic State Hoiiho, the
Ted Cross rally opened last night
with a dash that if kept up will niske
he sixth annual roll call go over tha
op with all the vim of war-time en
husi&sm.
speakers Of The lAniing
Hidgely P. Melvin, former chairman
if the Annapolis and Antic Arundel
County Chapter of the American Red
Cross, presided at the meeting and In
‘roduced the speakers, the first of
whom w*as Governor Ritchie.
Speaking with his usual simple di
rectness the Governor said how* glad
ho had been to find be was able to
vaive his other engagements and to
ittend the meeting, lie expressed bio
idmiration for the noble work of the
Red Cross in war and peace, atnl
'Poke °f the fine admiiiistration of the
local chapter, commenting on the as
sistance rendered in town ami county
by the home service and nursing
service branches of t.n organization.
Govern®!** Gift To lied Cross
His speech was shorl, practical and
o the point, concluding with the high
ly gratifying statement that in testi
mony of liis good wishes for the
'.access of the coming drive he
•ontribute $5(4 to the Red Cross.
I>r. Thomas Green, the head of the
Red Cross National Speakers’ Bureau,
was the next on the program. A
brilliant talker. Hr. Green held his
audience's interest entirely while he
gave a review of the origin of the Red
Cross society and its recognition as
an official branch of the government
in 1905.
Servlres Of Society
He spoke of the fact that many peo
ple who perfectly realized the value
of the Red Cross In war-time failed to
' recognize its present services, snd
proceeded to give an account of what
j some of these are, mentioning inci
dentally that in the pas* year over sl,-
400.000 bad been spent by the Re,d
Cross in relief work for disasters in
I ibis country alone, and 000,000 had
{been spent in general work.
Dr. Green was followed on the pro
gram by Alfred Jeffers, aselstan' man
ager of the Washington Division of
the Red Cross, who gave a talk on
some of the practicaltbit
would come up during nc member
ship drive. , in vT'JL
In a brief *ctftMsud||ia j~Did
jrely P. Melvin f SipraHers
and emphasized the importance of the
coming drive.
Pamphlet* Distributed
> During the course of the evening a
' pamphlet containing a svnorsir. of the
■ work done by the local chapter was
distributed through the audience.
■ This pamphlet was the subject of ad
miring comment on the part of the
■ ’isiting Red Cross officials, who took
• copies away with them to distribute
! as models for other chapters to copy.
MEETING OF FEDERATED
WOMEN DEMOCRATS
Discussion of the constitutional
amendments to be voted on at the
coming election was the feature of
the meeting this afternoon of the
Women's- Democratic Federation of
Anne Arundel county. Mrs. George
Abram Moss was in the chair, in the
absence of Mrs. Clarence M. White.
The women generally expressed
themselves as in favor of the pro*
posed division of the Eighth district,
as It seemed to be the desire of the
residents of the district to have it sub*
• divided.
There was an animated discussion
on the question of the reduction of
the number of county commissioners
from seven to three, most of the worn*
en declaring in favor of keeping the
present number: though others pres*
ent were equally emphatic in express*
ing their belief that the general in*
iterests of the county could be better
' served by reducing the number ot
commissioners. The otheg amend*
imeets were also discussed, .a,

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