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Evening capital. [volume] (Annapolis, Md.) 1922-1981, November 03, 1922, Image 1

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ASSOCIATED press 1
A fti'patrhrs of late
-*r.i if? pubiishri in
jhi* Fining • spitai
Pf pi.t>IIKI EVIBT EVENING EXCEPT BUNDATB
ii. I.W VII No. fi*.
(Navy Downs Penn State- 14-0
; HUES HAPPY 1
ASIHEYOEPfIRT
FOR WASHINGTON!
Kntirr Regiment Of 2,400 Stu-
I j f mh Taken To Nation’s Capi
tal On Four Special Trains On
Steam Railroads Luncheon
Served During Trip Over.
HUNDREDS OF LOCAL
lANS ALSO MADE JAUNT
singing and cheering as they
.tarti-d from the government
.ovation t-t the railway sta
■ .11. t!i<' regiment of midship
, n v, 100 strong, left Annapo
- thi" forenoon on two special
I .mis, two each over the Penn
\i%tiia and Baltimore and Ohio
vuh.iad'. bound for W ashington
-ml the Xavv-Penn State football
.Min. Ilu re was supreme con
.cmv among the students that
::ic Middie gridiron gladiators
M.uld come through the battle
with victory.
Some Mrliij In Getting Oil’
The midshipmen entrained at the
w.si street terminal of the Washing
ton. Baltimore and Annapolis Elec
tric l.im* The special trains of 10
roaches each were booked to pull
jwiiy iron* the station at 10-minute
intervals, but because of the coti
ftuwl conditions, naturally there
•is some little delay. All of the
trains were on their way. however,
v the noon hour. Box luncheons had
• rui prepared for the biue-clnd stu-
Viik and these were served on ihc
trip
I sneheon Served K.ii Route
The trains were scheduled to reach
"Vhiimton along aliout 1 o’clock, so
’.vu there was no lime to partake of
is in the National Capital, as the
)< hetlnle for the trip called for the
ii e in. in m march from I’nion Sta
<cuntimini On Pte S.l
HU. ANNAPOLIS
\rmv-*S’/f?/V-Navy
j . received a full line of Army aml
i* from New York, which it will
•' .it I. .went jirlfen. Hcfore coluy; elne
-. r. -■ i' >* us a trial ami we svill jtmir
'"ti will save money We also liav.
i line oi I . s boots and Army amt
' " shorn, w(ileii we will offer to tin
"•'.l. .it an heard of price*.
HU WNAPOLIS ARMY
wr> \'.\YY STORE
Main St.. Annapolis. Md.
I. Vile* Small Profit*
C. N. HERMAN
( )pt(*metrist--Optician
is'fi MAIN ST
!
1 >es Examined. Glasses Fitted. j
In Jewelry Store of
P. POROSH.
1 LOST
n he evening preceding Hallowe’en.!
I‘ot.h chairs, green, with cane
- and hacks. Were removed from
• Ml >h at 3? Franklin street
" r please advise above address, or
-ephone No. 8.
*.!*?* t' *■•- y • r*
I The Stag
~ 4-#
” A Home For Gentlemen ••
z a
•• 'U conveniences. Hot - water • j
md electric lights. Tre- **
- '•‘ r r * |? cs. ?ltt per month. Only H
... 11 lew rooms left. *4
• M
**. * ~~ H
, rH ATIOX 33 MD. AYE. H
" lose to Academy.) r* Lj
Fti! I i :IH;mt*
<!hmunci #jajM(g(initriL
NAVY TEAM HEAVIER j
THAN RIVALS OF
PENN STATE
Ih* Navy had the advantage
over Penn State in weight in to-
I day’s big gridiron battle in the
National Capital, according to the
figures announced by the rival
coaches this morning. It was in
the line where the preponderance
of avoirdupois centered.
Each team had two forwards j
who tipped the scales at 200 or
more. The middies, front end to /
end. showed an even balance of '*
lh l pounds average, against ■
IK.'I 6-7 for State, or 7 1-7 pounds ,
greater than their rivals
The opposing hack field combi
nations wete more evenly bal
anced, there being a difference of J
but one pound average. Navy’s
average figured at 163 1-4 pounds,
and that of Penn State at 162 1-4 1
Team averages were: Navy,
IKO 10-11, and Penn State, 176. or
a difference of 4 10-11 pounds 1
favoring the middies.
4
-: r - 3 j
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE,
COWING TO BRING i
PACKING PLANT HERE:
* J
The Chamber of Commerce, at its y
meeting held last night in the Globe i
Building, appointed a committee to 1
co-operate with other civic bodies in ‘
an effort to secure for Annapolis the ,
erection of the Booth packing plant i
and other commercial enterprises. <
The committee designated for this ’>
purpose is composed of C. M. White. <
H. Horwiu, Dennis J. Thompson and 1
T. Basil, who are the officers of the
Chamber of Commerce.
One of the crying needs of this
community is enterprises of just such
a sort that will keep and bring
money Into the community instead of
sending it away.
According to the reports of the
dealers, the DEAL AT HOME Cam
paign is meeting with splendid re
sults. The s3()<) contest, which is one
of the features of this campaign, is
causing an ever-increasing demand
for coupons. Most of the people of
\nnnpolis seem to be saving them.
The proposition was advanced to
nrovide for an Increase in dues or an
initiation fee. But it was Telt that
the best interests of the community
would be served by giving the few
merchants who are not yet members
in opportunity to join at the old rates
.dr a bit longer time.
Forget-Me-Not Day Tomorrow
Forget-Me-Not Day is tomorrow.
Persons are asked to wear a sprig of
the flower as a tribute to the services
of men injured in the war. *
Efforts will he made to raise money
tomorrow for the benefit of the dis
abled veterans of the World War.
NOTICE
Farmers National Bank
OF ANNAPOLIS
Tuesday, the 7th of November, be-!
ing Election Day and a Legal Holiday, j
this Bank will not be open. Paper
maturing that day will be payable on
Wednesday, the Bth of November.
L. D GASSAWAY,
6 Cashier.
= “1
Notice, Masons!
II
\ Special Communication
of Annapolis Lodge No. SB. j
A. F. and A. M.. will he held
: i
at the Masonic Temple.
SATURDAY. NOVEM
BER 4. 1922. at * :00 p. m..
by order of the W orshipful
Master,
J. ORVILLE BUSH.
n- Secretary, j
j'--.-, . =r- <y
Hunting Season Will Seor. Be On!
For results. n**
PETER'S SHELLS
They win:
W F. CHILDS & SON
Are headquarter* for £bove. nitj
SIDELIGHTS ON
DIG GAME TODAY
Washingtonians Saw Greatest
Crowd Ever Assembled In
American League Park
WASHINGTON. O. Nov. 3. The
greatest crowd that has ever witness
ed an athletic event in the history of j
Washington 's.ieipbled at National '
Park this afternoon at 2 o’clock to sec
Navy and Penn State clash.
The erection of temporary stands
‘•own the right Held wall and across
center field has completely squared
tlie gridiron with seals and there was)
sufllcient accommodations for 32,mat !
people
So great was the demand for seats
yesterday that a band of speculators
started . their work, hut the police,
were warned, and these outsiders
soon ran to cover, leaving the sale to i
go through regular channels.
Knrtil Camps Confident
If reports from both camps were to
be taken at Tare value, there would le
two winners of today’s game. While
Coach Bexdek deplored the fact that
he did not have a few more days in
which to whip his charges into shape,
following the loss of Dick Shuster! I
who was declared ineligible, and thb
slight .injuries received by Capt.
Bentz and ’’Tiny’’ McMahon, he was
very optimistic over the outcome and
could se e nothing less than a duplica
tion of Pennsylvania's last Saturday’s
feat of trouncing the Navy team. The
midshipmen, on the other hand, were
apparently not worrying Stung by
their loss to Pennsylvania, they were
desperate huntsmen of the Nittanv
Lions, regarding the game as their
one big chance of redeeming them
selves.
Navy’s Aerial Attack
Coach Bob Folwell’s Navy charges
have perhaps the best aerial attack in
(t'nntinneil On Tngr 3.)
CHAMPION fEIIS
PLAYERS ON NAVY
COURTS TOMORROW
Julian S. Myriek. president of the
American Lawn Tennis Association,
and some of the most prominent ten
nis players in the country will spend
the week-end here and play tennis to
morrow afternoon on the midship
men’s courts at the Naval Academy.
Among the players who will come
are: Karl Behr. New England cham
pion. 1905 and 1906. and Middle States
champion. 1914 and 1915; Dean
Mathey, one of the National Doubles
champions. 1914; Watson Washburn,
member of the Davis Cup team, and
Zenzo Shimizu, member of Japan’s
Davis Cup team. (
The following matches will he play
ed tomorrow, starting ht‘ 2 o’clock:
Court 1 (Singles. 2 Sets) Karl
Behr vs. Dean Mathey. (Singles. 2
Sets) —Watson Washburn vs. Zenzo
, Shimizu.
Court 2 (Doubles. 2 Sets)—Julian S.
j Myriek and George W. Wightman vs.
Mdshipmen Heplogle and Hart wig
(Doubles, l Set)—Dean Mathey and
Karl Behr vs. Midshipmen Shoup and
Harshman. (Doubles, 2 Sets) —Zenzo
Shimizu and Watson Washburn vs
Dean Mathey and Kart Behr.
Court 3 (Singles. 1 Set)—sJenzo
Shimizu vs. Midshipman Harshman,
(Singles. 1 Set)—Watson Washburn
vs. Midshipman Shoup. (Singles, 1
Set)—George Wightman vs. Midship
man Lyman. (Singles. 1 Set)
Julian Mvrick vs Midshipman Peflev.
Exhibition matches will be played
on the same courts on Sunday at 2:30.
i In case of rain, the exhibition matches
scheduled for Court 1 will he played
in the Armory.
LITTLE GIRL SAVED
PENNIES FOR RED CROSS
Miss Sara Sutherland, of the Red
Cross, yesterday received a contribu
tion to the Child Welfare RtTef
Fund from a little girl living at the
Hotel Maryland. Marie Virginia
James. The child, who is just five
years old. has been saving her pen
nies for a long time to give to other
sick children and when her treasur
jed savings reached the sum of a dol
j lar she took them to the Rett Cross
i nurse.
A
ESTABLISHED IN 1884.
ANNAPOLIS. MD.. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1922
How Penn State And Navy Teams
Compared In Battle Formation
PENN STATE NAVY
Player Wt. Position Wt. Player
McCoy 165 Left End 182 Parr
Logue 175 Left Tackle 186 Holies
Hamilton 175 ... Left Guard 215 Carney -
Bentz (capt.) 200 Center 186 Mathews
Bedenk 183... Right Guard ...210 Lentz
McMahon 212... Right Tackle ... 100 Walker
Hufford 1-77.... Rii;ht End .... 170 Taylot
Pain) 165 ... Quarterback ... 169 Conr’y (capt.)
Wilson 175... Left Halfback .. 162 McKee i
Kratz 144.. Right Halfback .170 Cullen
Lafferty 165 Fullback 152 Hatchet
Time—2 o’clock.
Referee—E. T. McCarthy (Holy Cross). ,
Umpire—E. J. O’Brien (Tufts). '
F'ield Judge—W. G. Crowell (Swarthmorc).
Head Linesman—E. C. Taggert (Rochester). i
Periods—ls-minute quarters.
J s
POLITICAL TALKS IT
UNIVERSITY CLUB
I
Local "Referendum Bills” And
Other Subjects Discussed
Last Night
Another large attendance marked
the second meeting this season of the
University Club, which was held last
night. The attraction., was an all
around discussion of the political is
sues of the present State and national
campaign.
The first speaker was George E.
Rullman, member of the Maryland
Legislature. His subject was the
’’Referendum Bills.” Of these he
spoke principally of the three which
have an exclusively local bearing.
These are (1) an act to create a new
Seventh district in Anne Arundel
county; as this proposed district is
along the bay front, while the Eighth
district is agricultural, their interests
are widely different; (2) an act to re
duce the number of county commis
sioners from seven to three. This is
urged on the ground of greater effi
ciency. and is in conformity with the
law in most other counties of the
State; (3) an act to provide (or th
election of county commissioners by
the whole county, instead of by dis
tricts. This logically follows the en
actment of nuntl er two.
Greater Itrprcsentation Feared
The question of larger representa
tion for Baltimore in the Legislature
was afterwards discussed, and it was
shown that while Baltihtor e indeed
has 51 per cent, of the State’s popula
tion. the counties fear that political
’’deai3.” under increased representa
tion. would give the political “bosses”
•fo Baltimore a control of the whole
State.
The next speech was of a far differ
ent character. It took a world-wide
scope. The speaker was the Rev.
James L. Smiley. He declared that
the human race is heading toward one
or two great destinies; either a great
brotherhood, proclaimed by prophets
and poets, or else a frightful catac
lysm of destruction. Three social
evils, poverty, political corruption
and war. point to the consummation
of a great social collapse. A new
spirit of optimism is needed to believe
that these three evils can be abolish
ed. To abolish capitalism is the Sn
-1 eialists’ mission. To establish the
public ownership of all natural re
sources and public utilities is the only
hope of the world. Then, with capi
talism abolished, and the people own
ing and governing their own country,
poverty and war will he unthinkable
i and political corrupiiod will be re-
I dueed. at least, to a minimum. In in
ternational affairs, he urged, the
League of Nations can be made a
mighty force for justice and peace, it
given a constitution patterned after
* the Constitution of the United States
j 6. O. P. Weak. Says I)aw
Major John deP. Douw net spoke
f on Democratic party affairs. Alluding
> first to Anne Arundel county, he de
i dared that, while a strryig minority if
a good means of keeping the majority
. party dean, the Republican party ol
r this county is too weak in good ma
. terial to function for that end. in na
. tional affairs. Major Douw declared
j that his observation teaches him tha
(('•■llMUt-4 os Psf 4.)
ROTARY CLUB GIVES j
WELCOME TO PROPOSED I!
NEW PACKING PLANT;
f
- i j
At the weekly meeting of the Ro- 1
tary Club yesterday a resolution was *
unanimously adopted extending a
hearty welcome to the Booth rack- ,
ing Company in their plan to estab-j
lish a plant at or near Annapolis;
and also inviting their representa- j
lives to attend a meeting and dinner
under Rotary Club auspices to beheld)
iat Carvel Hall next Thursday even-'
ing at 6:30 o’clock. On this occas-'
ion representatives from farmers and,
j also from business concerns of An-'
napolis and Anne Arundel county and
particularly of the official life of tlie i i
city and county will be invited to at
tend, in order that an authoritative
expression may he obtained as to how I
.lie new enterprise would be received
in our midst.
As heretofore voted in the columns I
of The Evening Capital, there is a
strong prospect that a $200,000 plant
will be established hereabouts, as out- ;
lined by Charles F. Lee, real estate
broker and member of the Rotary r
Club, provided this community will
give a favorable reception to the
project. The Rotary Club is leading
the movement to extend this welcome
and definite developments are expect
ed to follow next Thursday night's
meeting.
Another feature of yesterday's ses
sion of the Club was the presence
of William H. Moss, President of the
Annapolis Water Company, as a
guest at the luncheon.
SI. JOHN’S ELEVEN ~
NOW APPROACHING
CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES
1 St. John's College football team has
played its last game on home grounds.
1 Tomorrow the squad will journey to
Philadelphia to meet the eleven of
Drexel Institute. It is not expected
the Cadets will have much difficulty
in disposing of the lads in the city
of “brotherly love.” but after that
, they will have rough going until the
close of the season.
Next Saturday, the local Collegians
will face their I iggest test of the sea
, son. and then will follow the tinal
games leading to the State Intercol
. leglate championship. Western Mary
e land will be met at Westminster on
j November 18. and Johns Hopkins on
t Homewood Field. Baltimore, N'ovem
r her 25. and on Thanksgiving Day,
i November 20. the Cadets will have
heir annual argument with Pennsyl
vania Military College at Chester."
p Dickinson, coached by Glenn Kll
- linger. All-American halfback last
’ 'eason, is coaching the Carlisle lads
? ind has turned out a strong eoinbina
> "ion. Realizing this, George Hoban,
1 mentor at St. John’s. ‘ will not take
any chances of having his pupils bang
* ed op wiih the two championship
struggles in the offing. Nor will any
’ attempt be made to pile up a big
score against Drexel tomorrow.
#
Aerial Attack Proved Too
Much For “Nittany Lions”
TODAY’S GAME MARKED
SIXTEENTH BETWEEN
II INSTITUTIONS
The game between Penn State and
•he Navy today is the sixteenth meet
ing on ihe gridiron, and the Nittanv
Lions were firmly decided to raist
their end of the total score for tlm
series of encounters, though they
knew full well that it would be m
easy task. The middies' .points toi
Die games with State now number 12.7
with the latter’s reaching 76. High
games have gone to the Navy, live t<
Penn State and two ended in ties
With keen recollection of the dost
score in the game with the middle!
last fall, which ended 13 to 7 in
State’s favor, gave the Nittanv dev-i
added incentive for work That vic
tory was the first since 1904. wit)
four games having been played in the
meantime, one of them netting i<
scoreless tie. The other tie was ba 1
in 1594, when the two reams first met
After that State lost three successive
games, then came hack with three
straight wins. The next two went to
Navy and the following one. that of
1906, brought a 6-to-0 win for State
Navy won in 1907, State in 1908, and
there was a scoreless tie in 1911 The
last encounter previous to last ye ir
was in 1913. when Navy won, 10 to 0.
RIVAL MARINE CORPS
TEAMS PLAY TOMORROW
f
-
The football team of United States
Marines, stationed at the Naval Acad
emy barracks, will slack tip tomorrow
with an All-Star team of marines
from the Navy Yard barracks at
Washington. D. C The game will he
staged on the grounds at St. John’s
College, beginning at 2 o’clock in the
afternoon. With no game at the
Naval Academy, and the St. John's
cadets playing away from home, the
contests between these rival soldier
sailor elevens should draw a lig
crowd of fans.
, .. . ..... ♦
PRESBYTERIAN PROGRAM
FOR MISSIONARY SOCIETY
Tile Women’s Missionary Society of
the Presbyterian Church will hold its
monthly meeting in the church par
lors on Wednesday, November Bth. at
3 o’clock.
The subject will he India, and will
be treated in the following manner:
Map, Mrs. Paul J. Manners
and Customs, Mrs. Kugeno S. Maver;
Vunditi Ramabni. Mrs W. A. Conrad.
Hostesses: Mrs. Gesner. Mrs Phil
lips, Mrs Gott. Mrs. ICries. Mrs. G >r
tie. Miss Cirault.
Girls’ Friendly To Re-Open
St Anne’s Branch of the Girls’
Friendly Society will open for the
winter on Monday, November 6, at ihc
Parish House. The afternoon branch
will meet at 3:30 p. m. and the even
ing branch at 7^Vc*lock
\\
Removal Notice! I
;4 „ ;*
H M
We have moved from >ur old quarters on Main St, and
I? are now comfortably situated in our new store
H 32 WEST STREET H
H **
tj ( • •
• • Near all the banks, the postofficc, newspaper offices and m fj
j! fact in the center of the business district. . H
p n
♦*ur stock of Books. Fine Stationery. Office Stationery ;j
h and School Goods is practically complete and it will give i*
us pleasure to see all of our old customers as well as new : *
H ones. \Ve carry the latest popular Books. Magazines, it
H Newspapers. Souvenir Goods, etc., as well as a full line of i!
H stationery. Be sure to call and see our new and up-to-date H
H store.
I GEORGE W. JONES 1
JONES’ BOOK STORE ;!
ESTABLISHED ISBO
4 iaa33aiaaiiruaji v: u id
THE WEATHER:
Fair tonight and Sat
urday. Cooler tonight.
OOMPKKIIKNSIVR local AN |l UKNEKAI. NKVf 8.
PRICK TWO CENTS
Outplayed In The First Period,
Navy Came Back Strong And
Scored One Touchdown On
Forward Pass And Another
By Recovering Fumble.
THIRTY THOUSAND SAW
BITTERLY FOUGHT GAME
(Hv Thi* \9*r*o
WAS! 11 N*(T< )\. 1). t \\, v .
’ —Navy s stalwart "lidinui war
riors more than cased up last
'ear's sore spot with Pennsvl
ratiia State t ollope when the)
were defeated in Philadelphia. l.l
to by winning a hittcrlv con
tested panic played in the \nier
ican League Baseball Pari, lure
this afternoon by a score of 11
to 0. Ihe defeat was the first
suffered hv Penn State hi three
seasons.
Aerial Mi.iek Successful
The Navy’s aerial attack. which
proved mich a big factor in the defeat
of Georgia Tech two weeks ago.
brought about their first score today.
After being outplayed by State in the
first period, and getting possession of
the ball on the Pennsylvanians’ JO
(yard line, following an eTch"*"#* of
! kicks, the middies unleashed their btN
I wildering series of forward p. sows,
end finally a shot from McKee to Tay
lor was received by the latter on
State’s goal line *H<i be went across
tor a touchdown. Barchot was suc
cessful in the try for point from
| scrimmage after the touchdown
Navy’s second score came In the
1 third period. The battle nail been
wag4d fiercely, and almost entirelv in
Slate's zone, but a fumble was direct
ly responsible for tin* score The
eagle eye of Cullen, Navy halfback,
caught ilie spheroid as it bounded
from from the arms of Krutz, of
State, and he raced 15 yards for the
I touchdow n. Captain Conroy a'lde-1
the extra point by drop kick.
With the substantial margin of 14
points, the middies played the game
jsafe during the fourth period.
In the last two minutes, mixed long
forward passes, with end runs, by
State resulted in the longest sustain
ed gains of the game Navy held.
I however, within the shadow of its
■goal and the game was over.
Nation's First ( lassie f..mie
The game was the lirst football
' | classic to be played in the national
* capital in many years. American
j league Park had been transferred In*
i to a huge amphitheatre with a seating
capacity of 30,000.
Members of the cabinet, high navx'
and army officers, and many other.
, in official life were hum be red among
the spectators.
I Both Penn State and v
ied their first line st rwnj<it£-~lsenn
State in the hope of maintamirfg its
neeord of not a defeat in 3 years—
and Navy in an effort to “come hack”
after its failure against the
nity of Pennsylvania last Saturday
Naturally the Midshipmen were the
favorites in the sentiment of the
crowd although speculation as to the
outcome of the contest ran high.
(Cnntlnneri n I'ur • *

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