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Evening capital. [volume] (Annapolis, Md.) 1922-1981, January 18, 1923, Image 1

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PRESS
'published in
" E ,\nie CT>'*'-
rrfKT EVENING EXCEPT SUNDAYS.
i ( hbH’ i'*"* ___________________
1 xxvil No. 101.
if? sum
EFORII! AND
31 "PROS"
Decisive Victory Over
Kington Yankees On Bas
|S] Court —Better Floor
i And Greater Accuracy
[hooting For Baskets.
-1 — “
IcKEE PLAYS
WONDERFUL GAME
w by f.tr better floor work
, Birkert any previous game
kb coupled with greater ac-
Uliooilng 'or the ringed net.
w ,)(etla!l team admlnisfer
,],.|eat to the Washington
L champion’ of the lis*r.et of
u yenierriav afternoon. The
was ll* to 24.
mtton played with great
bi it tmut>, lint the middies
. !(K .,r toes all the while and
>m*lves '< much better ad
#f opportunities. The Wash
pi on the other hand, could
, t rorlnK stride. Their shoot-
Kiliy was*wide and they fall
i\(,% up their tosses quite as
their opponents, the latter
four held goals as the result
wr activity along tills line.
IMirs Took Thirl) I,end
puldies got Die jump on the
1 and early went Into a five
ad. !h ( > result of two field
ii a foul goal, all shot by Me
lt he.> maintained a rapid-fire
ttmghout. many times break
bn dribbling by the Washing
iiui smearing their tosses for
lei The middies led at half
-10 ti', and the second half de
-1 more desperate contest.
1 Nmy'g crack forward, W’S
liid form, scoring eight field
ltd tossing three ou of fi\e
1 circle Some of his court
*r* thrown at disadvantage,
b mate, also put up a stellar
I did buy, who played his first
centre Heddons and Ingley
main point getters for the
, and played an aggressive
Itwghout Shaplev played r.t
It Navy yesterday in place of
*!to sustained a fracture of
•‘how in the game with Penti
on Saturday, the r esult of a
LittMip Vmi Summary
Tos. Yankees
Forward . ..Heddons
Forward Ingley
• ■•Centre Sauter
Guard ('atlin
On i.l
1 mi must
*ms own living!
'••rlt(t l'rrm l
NtvU'.KY .tan. is. Prince
"trk wlo'-o fortune was
6; in a recent bank failure.
10 Morocco to earn a living
*N>f in the French colonial
. Icfore ho departed, dur
•sthias holidays, he said
Mury that he could
l *i'ati active business career
n,r >' Ho had never
■ :n - more he added,
•c once held for several
1 branch of a well
n firm, neither his em
*• other employees
re al identity.
•'■‘si !' HALL
j REIN ’A MKRCKHKS
vs
H ''GHHOI. OF CAMP
I MEADE.
C | this Evening
k Stole ... rmortj
Css: ® •■■ ■ :s CENTS. ;
ftd dance
6 '- January 19, '23
L‘v' r,: ARMORY
j KNl °l: t;ini s
I **£* '"*'-*
i 11 s ttovs
” SCHOOL
•/’■•.l ,!: ‘ n oe- 30c.
Abetting jSa&is: (Lnpttol.
MUDD MENTIONED AS
JUDGESHIP CANDIDATE
Rumored That Congressman
Will Enter Lists In 7th
Judicial Circuit
ELECTION THIS FALL
According to an article printed in
this morning's Maltimore American,
rumor is rife in Southern Maryland
that Congressman Sydney E. Mudd, of
the Fifth Congressional District, may
enter the lists as a candidate for one
of the Judgeships in the Seventh Ju
dicial Circuit at the election to be
held tills Fall, The American’s story
follows:
"From Southern Maryland a report
came yesterday to the effect that Rep
resentative Sydney E. Mudd of
Charles county is seriously consider
ing becoming a candidato for judge
of the Circuit Court. For some time
his cousin, John F. Mudd, formerly
State Senator, has loen mentioned
for the place, but this is the first
time it lias been suggested that the
Congressman instead of the former
State Senator might become Churles
county’s Republican candidate.
"There are three Judgeships to le
filled in Southern Maryland at the
November election. The term of Chief
Judge John P. ltriscoe of Culvert
county expired last autumn and Gov
ernor Ritchie appointed him to serve
till the next generul election. He is
too advanced in years to run for an
other 15-year term.
Three Democrats Mentioned
“Judge B. Harris Camulkr of St.
Mary’s and Judge Fillmore Beall of
Prince George's county both have
passed the constitutional age limit of
70 years and they are remaining on
(Cntlnurl On Par* 4.)
LAW AND ORDER DAY
NAMED BY GOVERNOR
Governor Ritchie has designated
Sunday, January 28 nB Law and Or
der Sunday in compliance with the
request of the Law and Order Union
and various patriotic societies.
The Governor says in his proclama
tion: *
“The purpose of the request is, as
in past years, to provide a day upon
which the people shall consider the
benefits derived from our institutions
and our form of Government, to the
end that propaganda of mistrust and I
sedition, calculated to impair the
home, religious forms of worship and
the Government itself, may be off
set.
He requests that “on that day the
people of Marylund give thought to
the protection and prosperity enjoy
ed under our Constitution throughout
the land."
TEX" KH'KARI> SIGNS
FI KIM) FOR RING BOUT
WITH “BILL** BREN AN
(By The Aeied PrMi.l
BUENOS AIRES. Jan. 18—Luis
Angel Firpo. heavyweight boxing
champion of South America, has ac
cepted an offer made by Tex Rickard.
New York boxing promoter, for a
match with “BUI” Brenan, in Madison
Square Garden on March 16. he an
nounced today.
If Firpo is successful in this bout,
he expects to be matched with Jack
Dempsey within six months^
'Notice, Refcekahs!
All members of Rcbekah Lodge No.
73 desiring to visit Queen Esther
Lodge of Baltimore this Friday eve
ning will please be at West Street
Station, 6 P. M. January 19.
By order
NOBLE GRAND.
For Sale .Cheap
FOUR GREEN - HOUSES AND
LAND. WELL-STOCKED WITH
EASTER BULBS. APPLY 102
COLLEGE AVENUE. j 24
Bread, Rolls, Buns!
Old-Fashioned Doughnuts, Pies and
Pastries.
Finest Quality.— Fresh Daily.
Hotel Maryland Cafeteria
business Established Over Sixty Years!
W. F. CHILDS & SON
Groceries. Fruits. Vegetables.
Tanned and Bottled Goods.
Fresh and Smoked Meats.
Prompt deliveries. Polite service. Orders
solicited. Phone 92.
! STORES: 19 AND 171 CONDUIT ST.
1 no
FOREIGN EXCHANGE TAKES
ANOTHER DROP;MARKET
IS DEMORALIZED
Illy Tlie Ao< lat<-<l Press.)
' LONDN, Jan. 18.—The foreign
exchange market was utterly de
moralized today with interna
tional operations in continental
currency practically at a stand
still, any business transacted be
ing of an unimportant nature.
German marks at noon wore
quote 1 at 105.000 to 110.000 to the
pound sterling. The French
franc stood at 70.75 and the Bel
gian franc at 77.35 to the pound.
PLAYGROUND FUi
GETS OVER 111
American Legion Realizes That
Amount From “Little Johnny
Johes” Shows
Lee Colbert, chairman of the en
tertainment committee of the Guy
Carleton Parlett Post of the Amer
ican Legion, announced this morning
that in spite of the local epidemic
of grip and "flu,” counter attractions
and Musterly nights, that the ner
formances of “Little Johnny Jones”
added to the Building and Playground
Fund of the Legion to the tune of
over one hundred dollars.
The American Legion through its
commander. Louis B. Myers, wishes
to thank the Knights of Columbus
and Catholic Daughters of America
for this opportunity to back such an
excellent shew. The Daughters and
Knights evidently net for the joy of
acting, if the effervescence of perfor
mance and the laughter of the prin
cipals and chorus can be taken as a
criterion, but thanks, as heartfelt as
those of the Legion are always wel
come.
Plan Ollier Entertainments
The officers of the Legion for this
year, who are planning many things
for their own entertainment, and for
the entertainment of Annapolis are
Commander Louis B. Myers, treas
urer Paul A. Lajoye. Adjutant Fred.
I. Myers, chaplain Lee Colbert and
historian Hugh Riley.
The entertainment committee of the
K. of C. responsible for "Little Johnny
Jones” is headed by Chief Pharma
cist’s Mate J. L. Convery.
Monday evening the Woman’s Aux
iliary of the American Legion sold
candy with Mrs. Louis B. Myers in
charge, assisted by Mrs: B. W. Adams.
Mrs. J. C. Flood and the Misses Dor
othy Myers. Elisabeth Taylor. Leonora
I Taylor, Virginia Auams and Master
Richard Myers.
Tuesday evening Mrs. Lee Colbert
was in charge, assisted by Mrs. Lee
Kries. Mrs. Williams, Miss Marion
Jewell and Miss Adele Small.
The president of the Auxiliary for
this year is Mrs. C. B. Parlett, who
is recovering from serious illness at
Tacoma Park. The vice-president is
Mrs. Kells, of Conduit street.
ARMED MEN FRUSTRATED
IN ATTEMPTED RAID OF
NEW HALMTILLERY
(By The Associated Frees.)
YORK. PA., Jan. 18.—Armed men
in a motor van bearing a New Jer
sey license today took 24 barrels of
whiskey from the New Hallam Dis
tillery Company, at Hallam. near here,
after holding up the doorkeeper and
gauger.
Eight of the men were arrested by
revenue officers before they could es
cape.
Benjamin Mundis, the storekeeper
and gauger, also was arrested.
The driver of the truck escaped,
but the vehicle was confiscated and
the liquor returned to the distillery.
An unsuccessful attempt was made
last week to steal liquor from the
place.
RUHR CUSTOMS RECEIPTS
TO BE SEIZED BY ORDER
OF ALLIED COMMISSION
(Bv The Associated Fress.)
COBLENZ. Jan. IS—Th e Inter-
Allied Rhineland Commission today
decided in eonformity with instruc
tions from the French. Belgian and
Italian Governments to take over the
taxes and forests in the occupied sec
tion of the Ruhr.
An order was issued to seize to
night all the receipts on hand in the
customs Offices. _
FOR SALE!
BUILDING MATERIAL
Two store fronts, doors, windows,
radiator*, plumbing fixtures, bricks,
and lumber of all kinds; cheap.
Apply
CARLSON & CARLSON
CHESAPEAKE HOUSE. OU I’HOXE .17.
ESTABLISHED IN 1884.
AXXAPOL
S. Ml).. THURSDAY, JANUARY In, li2:i
(PUBLIC MEETING OF
| UNIVERSITY CLUB TO
BE HELD TONIGHT
The University Club of Annapolis j
is holding the only open meeting of J
• the year tonight in Sampson Hall at j
| the Naval Academy. All of the la- j
j dies and gentlemen of Annapolis iu
j terested in the affairs cf the Univer
sity Club or in the two papers to!
1 e presented are invited to be pres- j
ent.
Dr. H. C. Hayes, of the Experiment- j
al Station, who has earned a world
wide renown in the science of sound
detection, will give an illustrated pa
per on “Depth Soundings by Acous
j tical Methods.”
Dr. C. Alphonso Smith, head of the
'Department of English at the Naval
j Academy, will talk cn “Matthew Fon
taine Maury.” one of the world’s
greatest oceonographers. Dr. Smith
has recently returned from Virginia
whore he delivered this paper sev
eral times, the dally papers being ua
stiuted in their praise of its excel
lence.
BUSINESS MEN ADDED
10 DIRECTORATE OF
CAPITAL CITY B. AND L.
At the annual meeting of the stoc!:-
j holders of the Capital City Building
'and Loan Association, held Tuesday
i night, the board of directors was
strengthened ly the election of four
new menders, mostly prominent rep
resentatives of the business life of
the community.
The new directors are Joseph Lip
man. Louis B. Keene, Charles Bern
stein and George E. Graefe. Those
re-elected aro: Joseph M. Armstrong,
Andrew ftrause, Clarence E. Wil
liams. Hugh R. Riley, Bernard J.
Wiegard, Clarence M. Bassford. A.
El wood Martak and Joseph E. Gris
com.
At a meeting of the directors,
which followed, these officers were
selected: President, Charles Weiss;
vice-president. Joseph E. Grlecom;
secretary-treasurer, Bernard J. Wie
gard. and solicitor, Hueh It. Riley.
The report of the secretary-treas
urer indicated that the Association is
in a very healthy and active condi
tion. This is shown particularly by
the largely increasing amount of stock
issued, loth in the form of purchas
ed stock or deposits and in loans.
Commencing business, January 1,
1920, with an authorized capital stock
of SIOO,OOO, it was found necessary
to double this amount within a year
and a half. Now, after three years
of business, it has become necessary
1 to again increase the amount, as the
i authorized stock of $200,000 has near
ly all l een issued.
The Capital City Association con
ducts un office in Eastport as well asi
its main office, on School street. An
napolis.
WOMEN MACCABEES TO
| MEET THIS EVENING
The Women’s Benefit Association of
| the Maccabees will meet at Odd Fel
1' lows Hall tonight, January 19 at S
■ o'clock. All members are urged to be
! present, as business of importance
■ will come up for discussion.
1 IMPORTANT MEETING OF
CHURCH SERVICE LEAGUE
1 St. Anne's Parish Church Service
• League Chapter will meet at the Par
‘ ish House this evening at 8 o'clock.
‘ The Bishop’s Guild cf St. Anne's Par
ish will be the hostesses of the oc
casion.
Out-of-town speakers will be Mrs.
Julius Freeman, chairman of the Di
i ocesan Chanter of the Church Cervice
League, and Miss Elsie Hutton, chair
man of the Supply of the Diocesan
■ Church Service League.
J U. S. AMBASSADOR CHILDS
CONFERS WITH ISMET PASHA
(By Tli Associated Freon.)
LAUSANNE. Jan. 18—The influ
ence of the American delegation is
? being exercised in a friendly effort
to find a solution of what is consid
ered the gravest problem before the
conference tho question of judicial
privileges to foreigners in Turkey.
Richard Washbuni Childs. Ambas
sador to Italy of the American gov
ernment, had a conference today with
Ismet Pasha and earnestly counselled
him to propose some counter project
on this delicate and vital question.
RUHR COAL MAGNATES
ARE INDICTED BY THE
FRENCH MILITARISTS
'By The A* mm- la ted Preaa.)
ESSEN, Jan. 18.—The French
military authorities here today
declared a court martial against
six Ruhr coal magnates, whose
I names they withheld. The indict
ment charged the magnates with:
“Refusing to obey the orders of
the military authorities in the
territory under state of siege.”
They were not taken into cus
tody.
ST. JOHN'S QUINT
WINSFIIIST GAME
Cadets Display Better Team
Work And Down Silent
Men 25 To 14
Playing their first game on the
home court, St. John’s College basket
ball tossers hung up a victory over
the Gullaudet Mutes of Washington
in the College gymnasium yesterday;
afternoon by a score of 25 to 14.
The Silent Men were completely]
outplayed In the first half which re-j
suited in a count of 14 to 5. but got!
themselves together in the closing j
session and showed much greater r.g- j
pressiveness. Matthews led the at
tack for the Cadets getting five goals]
from court, and turned four shots out i
of 7 chances from the foul line. The i
passing ol the local Collegians was!
superior to that of the Mutes, and j
the several sut stitutions made ini
course of play proved telling on tbei
endurance of the Kendall Green lads. I
All of the visitors got into the scor- |
ing column with the exception of
Steam. LaFountain put up a stel
lar game for the Mutes.
Line-Up And Summary
St. John’s Pos. Gullaudet
Matthews Forward Baynes
Lutz Forward. . .Boatwright!
Rapp Centre Steam
Cain Guard. . .LaFountain
Scott. Guard Bravely
St. John's scoring: Field goals—
Matthews (5), Lutz (1), Scott (2),
Hanson (1). Cain (1); goals from
fouls Matthews. 4 out of 7). Han
son (1). Gallaudet: Field goals-
Baynes (1). LaFountain (1), Bravely
(1). Lain (1). Foul goals—LaFoun
tain (3 out of 8). Baynes (2 out of
3), Bravely (1).- Referee Hclew, of
Baltimore Orioles. Time of halves—
-20 minutes each. Sul stitutions: St.
John’s—Stecher for Rapp, Webb for
Cain, Darley for Lutz, Rapp for
Stecher, Anderson for Scott, Hanson
for Matthews; Cain for Webb. Gal
laudet —Lain for Bravely.
ITALY OPPOSED TO
DRASTIC STEPS BEING
TAKEN IN GERMANY
(By The Aworliittd Preen.)
WASHINGTON, D. C., Jan. 18
Italy has taken definite steps to im
press upon the British and French
Governments that she regards the
present situation in Germany as
fraught with great danger and, al
though not taking the position of an
actual mediator, has earnestly sug
gested that any further forcible steps
towards the collection of German
reparations be taken only after the
. most mature consideration.
DANGER FORESEEN IN
PASSIVE RESISTANCE
NOW SHOWN BY GERMANY
(Bt The A*oclnted Free*.)
i PARIS. Jan. 18.—After a meeting
jof the French cabinet today it was
stated in official quarters that the pol
j icy cf passive resistance adopted by
the Germans was regarded as of great
danger to the reace of Germany.
Continuance of the present attitude
cf the German government and the
coal magnates of the Ruhr Valley,
i it was said, gave rise to fears that
(the nationalist spirit may be arous
] ed to such an extent as to lead to
grave difficulties with the Germans.
BRITISH EMBASSY WILL
NEGOTIATE ABOCT WAR DEBT
(By The AMeriatrri PnM.)
WASHINGTON. D C., Jan 18.—
: Negotiations between the American
| and British Governments. looking to
j the refunding of Great Britain war
i debt to the United States, will be car
ried forward through the British Ern
, bassy here after the return of ti:e
j British debt commission to L .ndon at
. th end of the week
Box Social Tonight
A “box social” will be given by the
■, Aid Society of Trinity Methodist Epis
• | copal Church, South, this evening, be
t j ginning at 7:30 o’clock. Besides
l ( boxes of delicious edibles, “hot dog”
! i sandwiches, coffee, ice cream and
I cake will be on sale.
LOCAL D. A. R. HOLDS
INTERESTING MEETING
Peggy Stewart Chapter Yester
day Named Delegates To
State Conference
TO BE HELD IN MARCF
An unusually large meeting of the
Peggy Stewart Tea Party Chapter
was held in the old Senate Chamlier
at 3 o’clock yesterday afternoon.
Many matters of general interest were
discussed.
Delegates were named to the Stnte
conference, which will be held in Bal
titnore on March 15 and 16. with al
ternates, as follows: Regent, Mrs.
Heiner; Mrs. Robert Dashiell, Mrs.
Emma Gage, Mrs. George Feldtneyer,
Mrs. Henry Robert. Mrs. Ridont.
Alternates: Mrs. Gassawa.v, Mrs.
James Hullard, Mrs. Frank Munroe,
Mrs. Philip Alger, Miss Katharine
Walton, Mrs. W. N. Berkeley.
To Hire Card Party
On February 9, at 2:30 p. m., a card
party will be given by the local chap
ter at the home of Mrs. D. M. Gar-!
I rison. Porter Row, IT. S. Naval Acad- I
I emy. Any wishing to reserve tables
| can do so by communicating with i
| Mrs. R. G. Heiner. 197 Hanover street.
At yesterday’s meeting the Regent.
Mrs. R. G. Heiner, gav e a list of the
| following hooks, which have been
; asked for by the State historian as
! gifts to the Maryland room in -
morial Continental Hall, Washington:
1. Genealogy end Biography of
I Leading Families cf Baltimore City
, and County.
2. Sketches of the History of St.
I Thomas’ Parish, 1742-1852.
3. Garrison’s Church. Baltimore
County, by Rev. Ethan Allen, 1898.
4. General Notes of Chamber Cain
Family by J. B. Kerr. 1880.
frnntlniiori On Png* S.)
{LOOK MEN AT FUNERAL.
OF JAMES WALTER COOK
Attended by a large numler of rel
atives and friends and menders of
raternal organizations of the city, the
funeral of James Walter Cook, re
tired chief yeoman of the Navy, who
lied at his residence 490 Chesapeake
lvenue, Eastport, Monday night, was
'teld from Calvary Methodist Episc t
pal Church at 2:30 o’clock yester
day afternoon and burial was in the
Naval Cemetery here.
Services were conducted by Rev. H.
W Burgato. pastor of the church, as
sisted by Rev. Emmett R. Spencer. 1
of Baltimore, a former pastor of the
old Maryland Avenue M. E. Church,
this city. Members of the local tril e
of Red Men. and Junior Order United
American Mechanics, cf both of whK-h
Mr. Cook was a member, attended the
funeral in a body.
The ballbearers were: W. T. Wil
liams, George F. Quaid. Arthur El
liott, John L. Wood. William G. Brew
er and C. M. Bassford. Funeral Di
rectors James S. Taylor and Sons had
charge of the obsequies.
VICTIM OFACCIDENT
BURIED YESTERDAY
The funeral of John E. Brown, a
resident of Eastport, killed
struck by a car on the Short Line
Railway,' near Marley Station, took
place yesterday afternoon at 2:30
o’clock from his' late residence, ISO
Third street, Eastport. The Rev
James L. Smiley officiated at the fun
eral services and the body w’as inter
red in Cedar Bluff cemetery.
The pallbearers were: Messrs.
O’Connor. Donohue, Hodeck, \yelch.
Mitchell and Kaufmann.
Funeral arrangements were in
charge of B. L. Hopping.
FIREMEN AND ELKS TO
PLAY CARDS TONIGHT
1 Determined to even scores for the
1 defeat which they sustained a week
ago, pinochle players of the Independ
ent Fire Company are all cocked and
primed for a return match with mem
bers of the lodge of Elks to be played
tonight at the firemen’s quarters on
Gloucesetr street. The former con
test, which took place at the Elks’
Home, developed into some close play,
s the lodgeraen winning by the close
■ score of 29 to 27. The fire laddies
- will dispense “eats” following the
i game, the same as did their lodge
’ brothers when they were hosts. Sait-
I water oysters will be the principal
I edible.
THE WEATHER: [
* Cloudy and warmer j
tonight. Friday partly
cloudy and colder.
GOIfPRRHKNBIVB LOCAL AND OINIBAL KIWB,
PRICE TWO CENTS.
EDUCATION IS
i BACKBONE OF
mm.
So Declares Governor Ritchie In
Addressing Conference O f
Public Instruction Officials At
State House Today—Equal
Opportunity To All.
j DR. FITZHUGH GIVES
VIEWPOINT OF CITIZEN
Declaring that education is the
backbone of the State government,
and that it is the greatest object of
•he State government to give to every
hoy and girl equal opportunity to reach
the top in whatever pursuit they may
elect in life. Governor Ritchie de
livered an address before the annual
t conference of the State Board of Rd
j ucation. the Comity Boards of Edn
i .‘aion and county superintendents of
| education in the House of Delegates
chamber at the State House this aft -
ernoon. The Governor spoke upon the
I general theme “Public Education from
•he viewpoint of tlie State’s Execu
tive." Another address that featured
he conference was by Dr. Henry M.
Fitzhugh, president of the State
Board, whose object was “Public Ed
ucation from the Viewpoint of the
Citizen of the State.”
Governor Host At Luncheon
The meeting brought together prac
tically the full complement if edu
cation officials in the several coun
ties and Baltimore city, and was pro
nounced the most successful meeting
of the kind ever held. The party
numbered more than 100, including a
number of women now holding office
on county boards, and all were en
tertained at luncheon at the Executive
Mansion as the guests of Governor
I Ritchie and his mother, Mrs. Albert
Ritchie.
Dr. Fitzhugh presided over the
meeting and prefaced his introduction
>f the Governor with remarks in
which he referred to the great good
hat has I eon accomplished through
holding such business |ml social gath
arings of school officials since the in
uigurution of the custom a few years
igo. He referred to (he County Board
the “shock absorbers" between the
public and the professional end of
the situation.
Important Duty Of Boards
The Governor spoke of his hearty
accord in holding such conferences,
saying that they served to thrash out
differences of opinion on public school
i matters, to develop ideas, and correct
mistakes. He declared that In the
, hands of the county hoards rests the
fulfillment of the highest duty that
can he performed to the State; that
those responsible for the public school
system are charged with developing
that which is highest and loftiest in
character and public duty.
Drawing a comparison of govern
ment and business, the Governor said
that the two are separate and dis
tinct. Business, he said, deals with
the handling of money, corporate in
terests. etc., but that the function of
i State government is that o( Scaling
vith human rights as distinguished
from property rights. Our GovernX
ment, he said, is essentially Amer-* v ,
ican; the one idea being that all '
j should have an equal opportunity to
succeed In life; that the son of a
millionaire and the son of a pauper
may start out hand in hand, and that
the fellow who possesses the real grit
and sand to go ahead is the one who
will be at the top in the end. It is
the duty of the government, he de
clared, to see that human rights and
equal opportunity are equalized. He
said that the laborer working in the
coal mines, and taking all sorts of
chances in life has a job equally as
big as the executive head of a big
corporation or other official. Touch
ing upon the interests of the farmer,
the Governor said that agriculture is
the backbone of prosperity of State
and Nation; that the farming inter
ests need brains, and talent to prop
erly carry on the industry to produce
1 the best.
Dr. FitzhuirliN Address
Dr. Fitzhugh, speaking immediately
following the Governor, began his ad
dress by giving an outline of how he
1 explored in order to acquaint himself
■ with the obligations that confronted
1 him as an educational official. Fol
i lowing a rather extensive recital
- along this line, he summed up his
conclusions on education from the
> viewpoint of a citizen as follows:
Education And Capacity
, “What we call public education is
, simply the effort that the state makes
’ to impress its future citizens by in-
I fluences designed to develop charao
(Continued on rage LI c

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