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Evening capital. [volume] (Annapolis, Md.) 1922-1981, January 22, 1923, Image 1

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ISSOCWTED PRESS
l f' S f re published in
Capital.
b
KVII y rVKNINO EXCEPT SUNDAYS.
N". !"!•
IfBSSKETEfiS
IGOODFORM.
Him
fiVf Store Registered
.~f Kastoruatis Though
t vVas Desperately Con
.{. Throughout McKee
Vi For Locals.
rgES HAD EASY
TIME WITH SEVERN
p ,-ii; 0 rs again were
i,. ; rai S.it ,:Mav and t ripped the
f j jf. haf.iv* .’<• College quint
„„ r( . if ni Its The game was
fiMight i hrnughout. de
:jf fa t that the margin of vic
(rraido-e won through generally
,' r work and a stronger <ie-
Tlie I’ftinnylvanians exhibited
p.,r' hiyie "f elii iißive play than
k , ;l here this season, especially
hard, driving parsing. The
M noun began In solve this and
I up the attack and thwarted
pffiirts nf the Kastoniuna. The
*< cat aft :o a four point lead in
lira Manes of pluv and wore
■ overhauled The score al half
i’ mil :i in lit in their favor,
nt mid-time of the second half
■At maioon team staged some
offensive am! for a time began to
aji on the sailors, scoring four
piilo in rather quirk suecesaion.
nr 'he middies soon got thetn
i n>g**th*r, cheeked the assault,
nled up more to their own ac-
Hrhff In (■real Korin
the Navy. McKee played his
wonderful game, getting live
foals and a ■ lean slate of nine
from the point of freedom
Mills and Simpler also did great
For the visitors, Brennan, of
111 fame, who played at guard,
f'•plcnilid contest in every de
#nt, ami one of his five goals
Nr past centre court Sharing
* with him were I) Crate and
The latter substituted tor Me
lt! at centre, who was compelled
life a'lout mid way of the soc
ial! after a middy accidentally
I a Hager in his eye, causing
line-l |i \ml Nunimarj
Bos Imfavette t2B).
la>ngac'ker
B B Crate
f McDonald
Brennkn
• B Heppa
-'"u’mns Navv Parrish for
Triiii for Parrish. Walshe for
*V' for Walshe; Lafayette:
■r 1-oiiß.uker, Longaoker for
~f .1 Prate for B Crate, West
Hald. B i rate for West,
'ring Field goals: McKee
D' c Simple) CD. Craig (2).
L, T shC Ban cs. Mills Goals
Djli i\U'Kre 10 rpjtljof Y.
1 'adJ 1 goals:
P i iate <4l. West (21.
I oul i is l.ongacker <4
J Prate Referee. C Col -
-1 rgt >:. umpire, Derby,
halves, l’o
HcWs |(,i ( | I ns, Time
Plebea," or
had an easy
’h fee of Severn
Antu \rundel coun-
F'ti ..i. i ount was 33
c l v ,ebe c . while
'•wemifO on 4.)
& CHILDS & SON
- Vegetables.
* Meats.
, ' I ■' *•'■viw. Orders
, 1 ■:• ttJ. |
AXi ' t I'OMHIT ST.
BASKET-BALL.!
company -\\r
' K Ht • -K COMPANY
‘ uescia >'. January 23
f" Stale Armory
L ‘8 p m.
y Sale. Cheap
Wo S'; KV ;J iOI 'SES AND
p,. L ' STOr KED WITH
•Uficr S - apply 102
EAXENT E. J 24
Gening
HEALTH COMMISSIONER
i FLAYS LIMITATION ON
MEDICINAL LIQUOR
"i Coincident with publication of fig
! tires showing that influenza again is
j becoming epidemic throughout Mary
land, Health Commissioner C. Hamp
-1 j on Jones yesterday bitterly criticised
_ the prohibition regulations which
llace a limit on the number of whis-
: ikey prescriptions allowed individual
; physicians.
He voiced the protest despite the
j fact that Acting Prohibition Commia-
I sioner Jones, of Washington, has an
. j nounced that in sections where in
fluenza is widespread physicians will
j he permitted to exceed their quota of
s 100 prescriptions each three months,
j “There should he no limit," de
• I dared Dr. Jones. “If members of the
i medical profession cannot he trusted
i not to abuse their prerogatives, their
I licenses should he taken away from
' them.
"1 am not passing upon the ques-
I tion of the medicinal value of whis
key. That is aside from the point. 1
I consider any attempt of that nature to
i limit the prescription powers of phy
r sicians as unwarranted and a reflec-
tion on the profession.”
1 Edmund J. Budnitz, prohibition di
-1 rector for the Maryland district, re
• vealed that there is “plenty of liquor"
i in local bonded warehouses to fill any
• | extraordinary demand.
to colTectcloing
FOB NEAR EAST RELIEF
HERE AND EASTPORF
Bundles are now being received for
, “Near East Heller’ at the Red Cross
rooms and at Trinitv Methodist
Church, West street Clothing for
women, children and babies is par
. ticularly needed. Second-hand ar
ticles In good condition will gladly he
’j received.
! Wednesday of this week will be
"Bundle Day" at the Methodist Epis-
I copal Church in Eastport. On that
j day there will be some one at the
I church to receive bundles for the suf
'firers in the Near Hast regions.
■ ♦
WIFE OF ANNAPOLITAN
BURIED IN LEXINGTON
Mrs. R. L. Hughes* who djfed last
Friday. January 19. in Washington. D.
C., was the wife of It. L. Hughes, a
I former resident of Annapolis. Mrs.
i Hughes was 44 years old. She is sur
i vtved by three children, two of them
. by a former husband and the third a
. child of two years. The latter is now
with its grandmother, Mrs. A. M.
. Hughes, of Market street.
The funeral of Mrs. Hughes took
place in Lexington, Va.. on Sunday,
, January 21. at 2 p nt.
COST of”proposed
' METHODIST BIDING
vi ■ * 1 I** i *
The official launching of the ftnan-
I fial campaign for the new building
of Calvary Church took place at the
r I supper given on Thursday night by
1 the ladies’ Aid to the members of
i ; the official board The pastor said
- j that the preliminary estimate showed
? : the cost to 1 e as follows:
. j Building. $65,000; ground. $4,500;
equipment for building. $5,000. Total.
1 $74.500. Against this cost there is
!! the di nation of $30,000 from Reeon
j struction Fluids of the denomination.
This means that $44,500 must be se
-1 cured locally. The meeting was an
enthustustie-*one. and a number of the
s njeinters, in brief addresses, declar
jed their l elief that Calvary Church
'•j could meot this amount “It can be
! done" was the unanimous verdict of
J j those present.
CLOCKS STOPPED OF
| CALIFORNIA 'QUAKE
ißy The Asuortatefl Free*.)
SACRAMENTO. CAL.. Jan. 22—An
| earthquake, which lasted for several
seconds, shook Sacramento and towns
I in the Sacramento Valley this morn
ing.
t At Sacramento, according to M. A.
- Taylor, meteorologist of the U. S.
Weather Bureau, the tremor stopped
j the clocks in the Bureau's office. A
report received here said the shock
damaged a gas tank at Willows.
Calif.
The quake was felt in Sacramento
between 1:06 and 1:08 a. m.
ESTABLISHED IN 1884.
ANNAPOLIS, Ml).. MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 1J23.
[IMSTOM i
j AUTOMOBILE SHOW
Local Dealers Launch Plans For
Exhibition In College Gym
nasium In February
Annapolis is to stage an automo
bile show all its own. Formal an
nouncement to this effect was made
today by officers of the Annapolis
Automobile Dealers' Association, and
William N. French has been appointed
chairman of a committee to make the
necessary arrangements for the event
The other members of this committee
are R. Malcolm Hunter and Andrew
Ktause.
Discussing the plans for-the show, j
Chairman French stated ‘ today that j
the dates would be February 24, 25 j
and 27, and that arrangements have
been made to us e the St, John's Col- !
lege gymnasium for the purpose. A j
meeting of the committee will be held
at the Colonial Garage, West street,
tonight, when further plans will be
outlined. The committee, as well as
automobile dealers in general, have
entered into the project with the
keenest interest, and nothing will he
left undone to make the initial exhi- j
bition a great success.
Louis B. Myers is president of the t
local association and W Morris Feld
j meyer, secretary-treasurer.
MRS. HARRY EPHRAIM
DIED EARLY TODAY
*
j Mrs. Helen Matilda Ephraim. 32
years old. wife of Harry F. Ephraim,
i died early today at the home of her
i mother. Mrs. George H. Fieseler, 17
Cathedral street, this city, following
ja protracted* illnes* of tulerculosis.
Mrs. Ephraim, who was formerly Miss
Helen Fieseler, a native of this city. ■
was well known here. Mrs. Ephraim 1
went to California about two years j
ago tecause of her health and was j
under treatment at a hospital there I
almost continuously. About six!
months ago sho returned to her home
here Besides her husband, Mrs.
Ephraim is survived by cne child, a i
daughter of 7.
WOOLWORTHS TO BUILD
5 AND TO-CENT STORE ON
CHESAPEAKE HOUSE SITE
Another Main street landmark is |
fast disappearing. The Chesapeake
House hotel. purchased several '
months ago by the F. W. Woolworth !
Company, of New York, is being razed j
and upon the site will rise a modern I
brick structure which will he an ad- j
dition to the big chain of 5 and 10
cent stores conducted by that firm |
throughout the country.
-The hotel building is a four-story ;
structure of brick and was formerly
owned by G. Clifton Sunderland, who!
Isold it to the Woolworth interests for J
; $23,000. A force of workmen under j
I the employ of Charles M. Carlson, lo
cal contractor, is now engaged in j
. tearing down the building. The type
i of building to be erected by the Wool
! worth people has not been deter-
j mined, but plans and specifications!
I will be drawn within the next few j
days, it is stated.
The erection of the Woolworth
building and remodeling of the Re
public Theatre property, directly i
across the street, that was badly dam- !
aged by fire and water two months
ago. will be a decided improvement to
that section of Main street.
CONFERENCE OF COUNTY
AGENTS BEGAN TODAY
George VV. Vvrris. County Agent of I
’ i Agriculture, left Annapolis for Col
lege Park. Md., this morning to at-1
tend the annual State-wide conference ;
of county agents. This year's con- S
ference is being held jointly with the |
, j women agents for Home Economics j
, demonstrators, for the first time in
. the history of State extension work j
The conference w ill continue to, and ]
including Friday.
i *"*
1 PARIS NEWSPAPER OFFIC IAL
5 SHOT BY WOMAN ANARCHIST
(By The AsKOctated Press.)
PARIS. Jan. 22.—Germaine Perch
. on, 20-year-old woman anarchist, en- i
! tered the office of the Royalist news
i paper “Attion Francaise" and fired
i two revolver shots killing Marius {
. Plateau, one of the officers of the pa
per. She then turned the weapon up-
on herself anil was taken to the hos
pial with a wound in her bredst.
FIVE LOSE LIVES IN
PITTSBI RGU HOTEL
EIRE TODAY
(Mr The Awitted Free*.)
PITTSBURGH. PA, Jan. 22.
Five persons were burned to
death in a tire of undetermined
cause wiiich destroyed the Davies
Hotel at Homestead, near here,
today. The property los3 was es
timated at $15,000.
The dead are: Mrs. John Win- j
nie. her twin son. aged 6 years,
and her daughter. Catherine. 13 1
years, and Thomas W. Davies, j
proprietor of the hotel.
Davies was so badly burned
while trying to save others, that i
he died a few hours after the lire.
ST. JOHN’S FIVE WINS
FIRST OF TITLE GAMES
Western Maryland Quint Defeat
ed After Stubborn Contest
Saturday 22 To 18
CADET MATTHEWS STARS
) In the first of the State intercol
l legiate lasketlall games hero St.,
John's defeated Western Maryland;
College Saturday night, 22 to IS. The
contest, though lacking in play > f the j
I rilliant order, was nevertheless ex-j
citing iron* start to finish and kept.
the gallery of fans keyed to a high 1
pitch.
The Cadets took the lead on the*
Methodists at the outset and were four J
points to the good for the first few j
minutes. Soon, however, they were;
overhauled ly the up-States, an I the
first half ended. 13 to 9. favoring
Western Maryland. The Cadets came:
back stronger in the second half and j
! managed to overtake, and go to the!
front of their arrivals.
Vatthrws Cadets’ Big Gun
The visitors by some clever work !
i pulled up to a tie at 17, but could not j
; again get in the lead. The victory of
| the Cadets was due almost entirely I
| to the all-around work of Matthew s,!
' who threw four goals from court, and |
| turned eight of 17 chances from the '
! circle into counters. Stanley played
; a hangup game for the visitors until j
j lie was disqualified for the limit of I
1 personal fouls.
The game, though hotly fought, was j
devoid of unnecessary roughness.
St. John's 22 Pos. West. Md. 18 j
Matthews Forward Davis J
Lutz Forward. . ..Williams!
Rapp Centre Stanley;
1 Scott Guard Kinsly
j Cain Guard. ~ ..Flanniganj
St. John's scoring: Field goals
Matthews (4), Rapp (2). Scott. Goals!
from fouls Matthews (8 out of 17).!
Western Maryland scoring: Field;
j goals—Stanley (3). Davis (2), Hines.
Kinsey. Foul goals Stanley (3 out
|of 6), Davis (1 out of 2). Referee —|
Holew. Baltimore Orioies. Time of
j halves 20 minutes. Substitutions—
| St. John’s. Hanson for Lutz. Lutz for i
j Hanson. Hanson for Rapp; Western
i .Maryland. Hines for Williams. Mat
i thews for Hines. Williams for Stan
ley. Dorsey for Williams.
r
Sickness Prevents “Vag” Game
The basketball game between teams
of the Vagabond Athletic Club of this
; city, and the Sparrows Point Steel
Company, of Baltimore, scheduled for
Saturday night, was called off because
of illness of two of the Vagabond!
| players.
snowstormTrom
I NORTHWEST. BRIEF;
MERCURY TO DROP
* -
In the wake of a day so mild and
springlike that a few intrepid canoe
ists were seen in tiie coves and creeks
about the city, the first real snow
storm of the season arrived this morn
ing.
For all the slush and bother that it
| causes, there were many who greeted
the change with approval, inasmuch
as it broke the chain of mild and
rainy weather which has resulted in
soch an epidemic of colds, grip and
“flu" that the doctors and druggists in
this locality have been kept on the job
almost incessantly for several weeks
Because of the rain which preceded
j *L ‘he snow melted as fast as it fell,
and the storm clouds cleared away
; shortly after noon. The Weather Bu
reau foretells "cloudy and unsettled
weather for tonight and Tuesday;
colder tonight with freezing tempera
ture." |
IHY GAME i
j FIXED FOR NOV. 24
Forma l . Announcement Made By
Academy Athletic Officials
4-Year Agreement Waits
That the annual Army-Navy foot
-1 all same will le played on Novem
. 1 er 24, instead of December 1, is the
definite announcement made by ath- 1
I letic authorities of the Naval Acad
emy. Selection of the date comes aft- '
er several conferences and much cor- J
respondents letween representatives j
of tho rival service schools. The
Polo Grounds. N. Y.. will 1 e the scene 1
,of the 1 attle, Army officials having j
. the choice as to site, having pie- j
I viously selected the grounds of the
ij New York National baseball field.
The athletic representatives of the
rival service schools have not as yet
entirely reached an ugreeiHent yn the j
proposed four-year contract coverifig
i the next four vears. the principal stip- •
j ulation of which is that next year's ,
game shall not he played north of New
i York or south of Baltimore.
The officials, it is expected, will get
together on this phase of the agree- j
, ment some time next week. It is gen- j
erally Accepted here that the 1924 |
game will l e played in the Baltimore :
j stadium, as local naval people favor)
' it. The only provision in this re
spect is that the playing field must
j have seating accommodations for at
! least 50,000, and each school to re-
I ceive 22,000 tickets.
'INCLEMENT WEATHER FORCES
HARDING TO STAY INDOORS
!
<H? Til* AMorlgtfd Press.)
WASHINGTON, O. C.. Jan. 22.—In
i clement weather prevented President
Harding from venturing from the
White House to the executive office !
today, after having been confined to j
his led for several days because of
i an attack of grip.
The President was said to have vir
tually recovered and was able to do
some work on important papers, i ut
his physician. Dr. Sawyer, thought it
inadvisable to take any chances. The
day was chilly and the atmosphere
muggy and although all of the stretch
to the executive offices is roofed over,
there is a space of a hundred feet
or so exposed to the open air.
MRS. iIISHIL
. DIES AT CHESTNUT
HILL, PHILADELPHIA
Mrs. Mary Thornton Dashlell, wid
ow of the Kev. Dr. Julius Matthias
Dashiell, died yesterday morning at
Chestnut Hill. Mrs. Dashiell was 85
years old and had leen in failing
health for some time. She was born
| in Rappahannock county, Va., and was
I the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Rolert
j Somerville Voss. She is survived by
three sons. Julius M. Dashiell, of
Baltimore; Commander Paul J. T>a
-1 shiell, U. S. N. (Math ), of the Naval
Academy, and Philip Thornton Da
; shiell, of Chestnut Hill. Pa: a daugh
| ter, Mrs. J. M. Whitham. of Philadel
) phia. and a daughter-in-iaw. Mrs.
Robert B Dashiell. of tlris city. w ; th
whom she made her home for the
; year previous to last June.
Surviving grandchildren are Lieut.-
Commander G. W. D. Dashiell. son of
'Julius Dashiell; Lieut. Robert Da
shiell. son cf Mrs. Robert B. Dashiell.
Dr. Lloyd A. Whitham. of Baltimore,
and Dr. J. D. Whitham. of New York;
Mrs. Julian Hatcher. Mrs. Thomas
Lee Gatch. Mrs. Claude Howard. Mrs.
Thom Williamson and the Misses
i Alice and Virginia Dashiell. She al
so leaves a number of great-grand
children.
The funeral will te tomorrow aft
ernoon at 3:30 frohi St. Stephen's
Church, Millersville. The Rector of
| the Church, the Rev. Leon P. Vauth
j ier. and the Rev. Thom Williamson,
will officiate. Burial will be in the
parish cemetery, beside her husband.
Mrs. Dashiell was well known in
Annapolis, where she lived in early
years, while her husband held the
{professorship of Greek and Latin at
j St. John's College and again recent
ly for several years until she went
last June to Chestnut Hill to stay
i with her son and daughter-in-law, Mr.
[ i and Mrs. P. Thornton Dashiell.
1 ST. CECILIA’S*GUILD
TO PRACTICE CANTATA
i j
. There will be a meeting of the St.
Cecilia’s Guild tonight at 7:45 o'clock
! in St. Anne's Church to practice the
. | music of the Cantata “From Olivet to
■ j Calvary.*’ by J. H. Maunder, which
• will be given during Lent by the
! combined boy choir and St. Cecilia's
Guild, under the direction of George
■ A. Webster, choirmaster and organ
ist of the churc4*~
NAVY DAMN Will
NOT DEFEND TITLE IN
POUGHKEEPSIE CLASSIC
The Naval Academy crew, two
years in succession winners of the
Poughkeepsie race, loth times lower- <
ing the records for the course, will
stay out of fie big event this year.
This has been stated emphatically by
j Rear-Admiral Henry B Wilson, s ,p
--i erintendent of x the Academy, apropos
jof the fixing of the date for the r. ce
as June 28.
It is pointed out that the Naval
Academy is an occasional entrant in
the race, rather than a regular one
! In 1921. it entered and won. and there
! was no intention of entering the m xt
year. However, the Navy was urged
to send its crew, and Admiral Wilson
consented that it should do so in or
der to defend its honors, but made i)
! dear that they were not to be expect
ied another year.
j The objection on the part of the
i Academy authorities is that the eiury
makes it necessary for the oarsmen tr
lose a considerable portion of the
summer practice cruise, and, in many
I cases, the same youths would lose i
two or. more summers.
LEHIGH MS WITH ,
COLGATE; LATTER MAY
FACE NAVY ELEVEN
“Due to the controversy arising out
of the cancellation of the Lehigh-Col
j gate foe tball game, scheduled for
i Noveml er 3, 1923. Lehigh I'nlverslty
• has severed athletic relations with;
i Colgate, a dispatch from South Beth
lehem states.
“It is likely that Colgate will play
the Navy on that date.” the dispatch
adds. •
authorities of the Naval l
Academy stated this morning that no
definite action has leen taken as re- !
gards playing Colgate. As hitherto
told in the columns of the Evening
Capital, the game had been tentative
ly arranged for November 3. but when
the Nayy people learned of the Col
gate-Lehigh contract, further ne<otla
tiot* for the game were held in abey
ance, at least until both Colgate and
Lehigh could settle their differences
Now that the break letween the
Pennsylvania and New York institu
tions has come, it is felt in local cir
cles that the Colgate game will be •
arranged.
• •
i IRISH NATIONALISTS CAPTURE
SOFTHERN IRREGULAR FORCE
(By The Associated Cress.)
DUBLIN. Jan. 22.—The staff of the
first Southern division of the irregu
lar military forces together with al’
its records for the last six months !
have? leen captured by nationalist
troops ( Derating from Macoon, county '
Cork.
NAVY MRSIWE
ROUGH GOING AHEAD
Excepting only the final game
against the Military Academy, the
'most interesting period of the basket
■' ball season at the Naval Academy is
.; at hand, the games against Penn Uni
! versity. on Wednesday, and G<*orge
-1 town, on Saturday, promising real
! treats to sport lovers. There are
! j special reckons for expecting the
■j hardest kinds of battles in both of
; these contests.
After the Navy's one-point defeat in
; Philadelphia, in connection with the
>! circumstances of the game, the inid
f] sfcipmen are keen to reverse the re
• ] suit of the first contest. And l y the
. i steady improvement the team has
: shown, their hopes probably w ill be
. | realized.
i j Georgetown appears on the Naval
>' j Academy schedule for the first time in
i i a number of years. Considerable feel
-15 ing attended the most recently played
-, games, and it wa3 the general feeling
t that the teams could not get along to
•' j gether and ha<j better not meet. It is
'• believed that a better spirit pervades
both teams and their friends now, and
that the game, though expected to be
a hot one. will be played in a sports
manlike manner.
. HOUSE REJECTS PLAN FOR
k RETURNING ALIEN PROPERTY
?
0 (By The Associated Press.)
t WASHINGTON. D. C., Jan. 22 A
e proposition for legislation authorizing
s immediate return to their owners of
e all trusts held bi the Alien Property
- Custodians wag rejected today by the
House Commerce ConmUHee.
rIE WEATHER:
Cloudy and unsettled
tonignt ana 'luesday.
Colder tonight.
1
COMPUKHKNBIVB LOCAL AND ÜBNBRAL NIWL
BERLIN TURNS
DOWN FRENCH
, HIS
Since Occupation Of Ruhr Peo
ple Of Two Nations Are Boy
cotted By Hotels—Wine Shops
And Barbers Join In Taboo
Move.
,~
BREACH OF TREATY IS
DENIED; BANKS RE-OPEN
(By The Associated Press.)
BERLIN, Jan. 22.—Frenchmen ami
Belgians find no welcome in Berlin
since the occupation of the Ruhr dis
rict. The hotels all display the sign
i French and Belgians not admitted"
and the hotel clerks and waiters re
fuse to speak French. French wines
have been crossed off the menus and
cannot be obtained even from the
wine dealers.
The displays in the wine shop wln
iows comprise California. Spuuish
and German wines only.
Barbers and chemists have laid
aside all French cosmetic and toilet
preparations.
The hotels and cafes are doing lit
tle business and many of them have
released most of their staff since the
exodus of tourists and the threats of
general strikes
Essen Hanks Re-Open Today
ESSEN. Jan. 22.—The Essen branch
of the Relchshand and the other hanks
in this city, it whs announced short
ly before noon, will be re-opened for
business between three and
o'clock this afternoon.
Berlin Denies “Force" Report
BERLIN. Jan. 22,—The report that
the German government was contem
plating the re-introduction of mili
tary service, forbidden under the
Treaty of Versailles, was denied this
afternoon.
Miners Hi Ruhr Valley Strike
ESSEN, Jan. 22 Strikes, either
partial or complete, were in progress
today in all the Ruhr valley mines
whose directors have been arrested by
| the French.
The state mines resumed operation,
i the troops having Leen removed from
them.
Train Service Interrupted
DUSSELDORF, Jan. 22.—The rail
roads in tills region were running de
sultorily this morning, operated by
French crews. The service was
about 10 per cent, of the normal
; schedules.
Duesseldnrf Hank Mesonies
j DU ESS EL DO RF. Jan. 22. Tho
(Continued On Par* 4.) „
i HARDING SIGNS NAVAL
mopßims bill
(By The Aasoelated Preie.)
WASHINGTON, D. C.. Jan. 22.—The
annual Naval appropriation bill,
which includes a request by Congress
that President Harding negotiate with
the other powers for further limita
tion of naval armament was signed
today by the President.
The President simply affixed his
signature without comment on the
limitation request, or indicating whe
ther he would have anything to say
to Congress later on the subject.
He is left free under the provision
to decide whether he will comply with
the request and it has been indicated
in administration circles that he does
not regard It as advisable to do so.
PLEA OF “NOT GUILTY”
MADE BY CROWELL TO
CONSPIRACY CHAR6E
(By Th® A**oclat®d >•*••.)
WASHINGTON. D. C., Jan. 22 -
Benedict Crowell, war-time assistant
Secretary of War, pleaded not guilty
| in the District of Columbia Supremo
Court today to the indictment recent
ly returned against him and six oth
ers charging conspiracy to defraud
the government in connecion with the
construction of army camps .
In a public statement issued Upon
his appearance in court the former
Assistant-Secretary declares he had
been given no opportunity to present
i the “facts" in the case to the grand
; jury which indicted him and added
f that such a procedure by giving cir
r culation to a “false charge” had dona
*• an injustice to every American citi
| zen. _____ _ ___
PRICE TWO CENTS.

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