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Evening capital. [volume] (Annapolis, Md.) 1922-1981, February 03, 1923, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83009667/1923-02-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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j( S OCIATED press
&h f !•
j arc published in
s? Evening Capital.
fHIO rviHY tVENING EXCEPT SUNDAYS.
—No. 115.
[NISON ID
HOLE ALL IS
I'EEZEY’S PLAN
; , n of Penitentiary To B<
Qf House Of Correction
t And Believes Jessups
i Place For Combined In
jution.
IKFORD OUSTED;
reforms OUTLINED
pttvliiuily Indicated, the State
i„( Welfare has decided to piac?
unaftement <if the Maryland
,if Cm ret tion. at Jcsnups, this
t aiii ihc Maryland Penl
_ in Baltimore, under one
ami yesterdav tile hoard up
('„! Claude It. Sweczey, war
i! the "IVn," to take charge or
isstiuitiotis. He will succeed
William K Lankford, who haa
.jj, poult lon continuously since
f r IMO, and for a period prior
i, making ids total service about
in.
Would Heige Two Prisons
jo not believe that the prison
non of Maryland is large
k to warrant the upkeep of two
piani," Colonel Sweezey said
•fore. I advocate a single insti
. preferably located on the site
f present house of ('orrectlon.
i there is space for development
growth. If the Peiiitentlury
ni poHstbly could he utilized for
ether purpose ly the State, 1 be
i m*le penal institution would
icthal and highly desirable.”
Reforms Outlined
el Sweczey said he wus in
thy with the reforms outlined it:
titement issued by lOmory L.
itz. Mrector of Welfare,
tw include the more effective
(ration of prisoners, the cen
ition of the shop industries, tile
it ton of agricultural products
the House of Correction for food
t Penitentiary and the central!
of the bookkeeping for both
hnef paragraph in the Coblent t
wnt makes mention of the pro
consolidation, saying that h
till be made of the project
t board, through Chairman
j 1. Cohlentz. announced that
i Sweezey is to serve as war
! the House of Correction “wlth
•l but. at the same time, it was
that his salary as warden
k Penitentiary had been in-
Mfrom $6,200 a year, as fixed in
hie budget, to $7,200 a year. In
(fiiiitlntttfl On Png*
LA
NEAPOLITAN
HAVANA
l()c
CIGARS
Try Them
°tice of Meeting
of .Annapolis
anj Eastport Building
Association:
' ere by given that the reg
meeting of the share
“ °f Annapolis and Eastport
■" iation will be held at
Co Association, Lee
1 Circle and South
' Maryland, on the 12th
• uary. 1923, at 7:30 p. m..
; Ci meeting the regular
of directors will oc
" C: >ach other business
'•efore the meeting.
H > F. U FRANTZ,
NSKET - BALL l|
Street Armory
February 3
1 !i s SKNIOIt GIULS
VS
s J! Mon GIKL9*
A 11. s. BOYS
Vs
' ALVEItT HALL
First game TSWJJ
<££otntng lUsHii (Unpitnl
TALK OP BUSINESS
COURSE AT ST. IN'S
“Collegian” Student Publication
Suggests Its Addition To Cur
riculum Of Institution
WOULD INCREASE ROLL
According to an article which ap
peared in the current issue of the St.
John's Collegian under the caption
’ A Needed Course.” the students at
the local institution are anxious to
have a course in Business Administra
tion, and alliod subjects, added to the
college curriculum. The article, In
pnrt, follows:
“We have here at St. John’s first
class B. A. and It. S. courses, ones
which we are proud to compare with
any in the State or elsewhere, but we
still seem to lack the very thing
which is attracting the majority of
students today, and that Is a course
in Business Administration, and al
lied subjects.
Talked About Campus
“Rumors have been heard around
the campus that such a course will le
incorporated Into the curriculum. If
this rumor is true, there is cause for
much rejoicing, but If It is not, wo,
as students, want to know why. We
could quote instances by the dozen to
show the need of this course from its
results in other colleges, but one ex
ample should suffice. Gettysburg
College inaugurated a similar course
a few years ago, and since that time
tlie student body has almost doubled \
In number, and this increase is ac- J
counted for wholly by the course In
Commerce and Finance, as it is called
there.
"Practically all of the men who at
tend St. John's are men who expect
to earn their own living after leav
ing college, and they naturally desire
an education that will more directly
fit them for their life's work. A lib
eral education is a great asset to any
man. especially to a lawyer or a
doctor, but when a man goes to work
s socn as lie leaves St. John’s, as
many of us will, he naturally feels
the lack of a training enabling him
to at once earn his living. Of course,
he may secure a position as a teacher,
but all poople are not endowed with
the proper temperament for instruc
tors, even should they have the in
clination."
LOCAL PREACHERS IN
PULPITS TOMORROW
With the exception of Calvary M. E
Church the local pulpits will le oc
cupied tomorrow' by their pastors,
many of whom were absent last Sun
day on account of illness or other
reasons. The Rev. Dr. H. W. Burgan,
who has been suffering from a severe
attack of grip, has not yet recovered
sufficiently to return to his clerical
duties at Calvary Church.
POLITICAL SCHOOL FOR
WOMEN IN BALTIMORE
Miss Mary Adele Joyce, of Millers
ville, will go to Baltimore next week
to attend the National School of
Democracy, which will be an inten
sive three-days’ training course given
at the St. George Hotel under the
auspices of the Democratic Women’s
Club of Baltimore. The registration
blanks may be had at the office of th s
paper and the fee of $1 50 may be paid
at. the opening of the session, or sent
to Mrs. William Johns Brown, Wal
brook postoffice, Baltimore.
Oooooooosoooooosocoooooo
SPECIAL
Z For Friday and Saturday Z
While They Last
O - o
o o
o EXTRA FINE CAPONS,
Z 50c PER LB.
Z LARGE ARTICHOKES, %
20c EACH.
SCALA & CO. I
O PROMPT DELIVERY. PHONE S 5. c
O o
FURNITURE
Upholstered, Repaired and Refinished.
Picture Frame* Made to Order.
J. B. BETHEL
117 Market St. Phone S3S-J
r
Business Established Over Sixty Years:
W. F. CHILDS & SON
Groceries, Fruits, Vegetables.
Canned and Bottled Goods.
Fresh a n<l Suiokwl Meats.
Prompt deliveries. Polite service. Order*
solicited. Phone 92.
STORES; 100 AND 171 CONDUIT ST.
no
ANNAPOLIS, MD„ SATURDAY, FEBRUARY :l. 1023,
I AMERICAN DOLLARS I
\ BOON TO BUSINESS
U. S. Money Supplants Portu
guese Currency Which Is
Legal Coin
I
Tlie A •**‘lnfe<l |*re*o
FUNCHAL. MADEIRA, Feb. 3
The American dollar, although Portu
guese currency in the legal coin of the
Island, has become the favorite
medium of exchange for local mer
chants and hotelkeepers. Every in
flux of American tourists, brought
1 here on the cruises to the Mediter
ranean and Egypt, is watched with
the keenest interest, and prices are
; marked and quoted in coin of the
i United States. Even in a standard
! commodity like Madeira wine, the
' price quoted to Americans is in dol
! lars.
While being more or less a conveni
ence to the tourists, the dollar stand
j ard of value brings considerable
money into the pockets of the dealers.
The depreciated value of Portuguese
currency would render their returns
very meager if they adhered to their
own escudos. As it Is. they buy their
merchandise in escudos and sell them
In dollars. At the stores where sou
venirs are sold, the sales boy snap
out their prices in dollars and cent*
with the alarcrity of street vendors.
Wooden Sleds, Rut No Snow
Wooden sleds drawn by oxen over
cobblestone streets, on which not one
flake of snow ever falls, again provide
the principal form of amusement this
j season for the American invasion
j The quaint wooden sled is an elabor
| ate construction as sleds go. It par
| takes of the nature of a slel and. at
: the same time, a victoria. It is gaily
i painted, and is capped by a fringed
canopy to* shade the passenger from
the sun.
The oxen .are hurried on by their
driver with a whip which he slashes
as he runs alongside the vehicle. A<
intervals he throws a heavy piece or
canvas, doubled several times and
saturated with oil. under the runner
jso that they may he 1 lbrlcated. The
' process is more habitual than effica
cious.
Sharing with the oxen-drawn sled,
as an amusement feature, is the
! wooden toboggan. This is run down
a fairly steep cobblestone road from
the hill overlooking Funchal’s pic
turesque harbor. A cog railway
facilitates th e ascent.
ANNUAL MEETING OF
S. P. C. A. ON TUESDAY
TO ELECT OFFICERS
The annual meeting of the Society
of Prevention to Cruelty to Animals
I of Anne Arundel County (the local
I S. P. C. A.) will be held on Tuesday
afternoon next. February 6. in the sun
parlor of Carvel Hall at 4 o’clock. All
members are urged to be present.
Unlike many other societies, the
; S. P. C. A. only holds one general
meeting a year. It is therefore im
portant that all members who are in
terested in the workings of the or
ganization make an effort to be
present, not only to vote in the elec
tion of officers for the coming year
but also to make suggestions and hear
reports of the officers. Thanks to two
generous bequests and a donation to
♦he society, it hopes shortly to be able
to extend the scope of its work.
Four o’clock on Tuesday is the hour
set for the meeting. The bills for the
coming year will he out by that time
and if members will bring their dues
to the meeting it will save them time
' j and trouble.
MERMAN'S
GROUND HOG DISAGREE

-
The Weather Bureau and the
‘ ground hog are at odds. One says we
i are in for the worst weather of the
J season and according to the other the
► next six weeks are to be warm, sunny,
and springlike.
No one in this neighborhood has
ever seen a ground hog, not even the
erandfather of the oldest living man.
but. none the less, the animal has a
great reputation for sagacity where
weather matters are concerned, so lo
cal residents hesitate to ignore his
forecast, particularly as it is in a line
j with their most ardent wishes. With
: I the shortage of fuel and the preval
. ence of grip and pneumonia, the j
' thought of extreme cold and bad
\ weather is an appalling one. Every
one is backing the ground hog and
* hoping he has the right line on ven
, ther conditions, instead of Mr. Wea
ther Man.
ESTABLISHED IN 1884.
Athletic Events On i
Card For Today
Following is schedule of ath- j
leiic events for thi3 afternoon and
tonight:
Basketball—Navy vs. Buckncll,
Dahlgren Hall. 2:30.
Swimming—Navy vs. Univer
sity or Pittsburgh. Gymnasium.
2:30. •
Gymnastics—Navy vs. Phila
delphia Turnverein, Gymnasium.
2:30.
Basketball—Navy “P!el es" vs.
Western High School, of Wash
ington, Dahlgren Hall, 4:00.
Basketball Annapolis High
School, State armory Senior
girls vs. Junior girls; boys vs.
Calvert Hall School. Girls’ game
starts 7:30.
STATE EDITORS TO
BE IDE GUESTS OF
GOVERNOR RITCHIE
Governor Ritchie will le host to
editors of the ♦ re-s of Maryland at
a luncheon to le given at the Exe-j
cutive Mansion February 10, to be !
preceded by a discussion of Statei
problems. Invitations havo been sent
to editors of papers In all counties of
the State, and a full attendance is
expected.
The Chief Executive, at the l e?,in
ning of his administration, inaugur- j
ated a policy of open and frequent j
communication with the Press of the j
State, giving them full information as j
to his program of State business and I
dolivering addresses at each of the
meetings of the Press Association.;
Previous to the last session of the
Legislature, the Governor discussed at
length with the newspaper men the
then proposed re-organization plan,
and acquainted them With the pur
pose and details of it. Following the
adoption of this ::lan by the Leg's!#- !
ture. he reviewed at last Summer’s i
meeting of the Press the work that!
had l een accomplished to that date, |
and gave special consideration to the ;
school and agricultural features at |
the joint meeting held at Wilmington j
last Saturday.
The Governor is understood to'
have in mind still further reforms in
State government, besides the carry
ing out of the program already start
ed, and it is for the purpose of dis
cussing these matters with the edi
tors of the State that he has called j
them together for the meeting next |
week.
“VETS” URGE McHENRY
AS NATIONAL SHRINE
_*
Congressional action making Fart
McHenry a national shrine, with pro
visions for its proper upkeep and ,
care, is asked in a resolution adopted
here last Thursday night by Equality-
Waiter Reed Post, No. 284, Veterans
of Foreign Wars.
Erection of a flag or. the Francis
Scott Key biidge at Georgetown, re
cently opened to traffic, with the rais
ing and lowering of a flag there each
day, in accordance with military cus
tom, was asked in another resolution,
in which it was urged the bridge be
called by its full name.
IS. si. NEWNAM
OILS AT 87; NAM
OF CENTIME, MD.
Mrs. S. E. Newnam. 87 years old,'
widow of Rev. E. D. Newnam, died !
yesterday at the residence of her j
niece. Miss Flora M. Woolley. 14S j
Prince George street. Death was due j
to complications resulting from the;
infirmities of age. The body has been i
prepared for burial by Undertaker ;
William H. Feldmeyer, and will bej
cent this afternoon to her former
home at Centreville. Md., where the!
funeral will be held tomorrow after- j
noon and interment will be in the j
family lot there.
Mrs. Newnam was the widow of the
late Rev. E. D. Newnam. of the Y.'il
mington Conference. Methodist Epis
copal Church. Surviving her is one
daughter. Mrs. C. H. Whaley, of Xor- j
wieh. Conn. She was also an aunt!
of Mrs. Feldmeyer. wife of William I
H. Feldmeyer, 137 Charles street,this,
city. For the past three years she
had made her home in Annapolis with
her nieces.
St. Anne’s Vestry To Meet
There will lea meeting of the Ves
try of St. Anne’s Church tomorrow
morning after the 11 o'clock service.
COIL MINE TIRES j
BURN FOR YEARS;
Starting In Refuse After Digging
And Process Is Like Spon
taneous Combustion
my Tl Askoylatril l*r**i.)
SPRINGFIELD. ILL.. Feb. 3 —Fires
burning for years in coal mines, deep
beneath the ground, are one of the j
unsolved problems of coal mining In i
Illinois.
Many of these fires, walled up years j
ago. recently have caused trouble in
southern Illirfois mines, according to'
Robert M. Medill, director of the state
department of Mines and Minerals.
The Donk 1 rothers mine at Col
linsville. the North Mine of the Illi
nois and Indiana Coal Corporation at
Wilt, and several mines near Spring
field have been compelled recently to
steal up portions of their workings
to prevent the spread of these
smouldering furnaces, which burn
without stopping in the hidden j
chatnl ers underground. One nine
was ordered closed entirely.
The fires start in the refuse which |
is left after the coal is dug and are
caused by a process similar to spon
taneous combustion, according to Mr.
Medill. The miners call them “gob I
fires," from the word applied by coal j
diggers to the debris in the mine. ,
No Flaring But Burn Slowly
They do not flare up in flame, but!
burn slowly, smouldering away for
years until thav eat themselves out of
fuel. Chambers where these fires :
start become a mass of live red coals
and must le sealed up to keep the j
air from them.
The trouble is caused when a lire
eats its way through a wall and
threatens to break through into the
mine workings. Some time the
smouldering coals eat up the sup-!
porting coal pillars resulting In
weakening the support for the ground
al ove. ,
Theso fires cannot be extinguished
by water. Mr Medill stated. Water
only makes them worse. It Is the
chemicalization resulting from the
mixing of water and the refuse that
causes the original combustion. The!
only way to stop the fires is to re-1
move the burning coals from the
mine Many such fires may le seen
on slack piles on the surface in this |
section of the stato. These can be'
flooded with water and extinguished,
Mr. Medill stated.
postalsawngsln
ANNAPOLIS FOR 1922
AMOUNTED TO 515,125
More than ten million dollars worth
of Treasury Savings Certificates were
purchased in the Fifth Federal Re
serve District in 1922. the exact fig
ures being $10,512,893, according to a
statement just received by Acting
Postmaster James W. Robinson from
Treasury Department officials. In
Maryland the sales, through post
offices, amounted to $607,533 with a
per capita of $.45 for the State, while
the Annapolis ’postofllee is credited
with $15,125, or a per capita of 85
cents.
Postoffice sales throughout the dis
trict were distributed as follows:
• 'West Virginia. $3,061,968, per capita
$2.47; District of Columbia, $1,014,-
350. per capita $2.31: Virginia, sl.-
744.4G0, per capita $.82; North Caro
lina. $1,515,143, per capita $.63; Mary
land, $607,533, per capita $.45; South '
Carolina, $569,277. per capita $.36. In
addition there was sold through the
Treasury at Washington $057,255 and’
through the Federal Reserve Bank at
! Richmond $1,342,907, to purchasers
scattered over e the entire district,
making a grand total of $10,512,893, or
a per capita $1.15.
j The postmaster urges all holders of
1918 war stamps, who have not done
; so. to present their stamps for re
' demption or exchange immediately as
each day of delay means a loss of in
terest on their investment. Ex
: changed for the new certificates,
which have five years to run but may
be cashed at owner’s option at values
increasing every month, the invest
ment again possesses earning power,
as the savings certificates begin to
bear interest the day they are issued.
MONTHLY MEETING OF
N. A. CHAPEL GUILD
! The Fe! ruary meeting of the Naval
j Academy Chanel Guild will be held on
Monday morning next at 10 o’clock at
the residence of its vice-president.
Mrs. Thomas R. Kurtz, 14 Porter Row.
\il ladies in the families of officers,
professors and instructors on duty at
the Naval Academy are cordially in
vited to attend the meeting.
“BILL" INGRAM TO
COACH INDIANA TEAM
Former Navy Football Sta:
Signs Contract As Head Men
tor Of Varsity Eleven
WAS CRACK OARSMAN
Nows comes from Bloomington
lad., that William A. (Bill) Ingram
star football player and slroke of tin
Navy Varsity eight-oar crew a few i
years back, has signed a contract ti
coach the football team of University
of Indiana next season.
Ingram resigned the service soot
after graduation and last year he he
1 came head coach of football at Wil
liam and Mary College. Williamsburg.
Va.. where he developed a strong
team. Indiana is Ingram's native
State. His home is at Jeffersonville,
and is one of three brothers who
I showed prowess as athletes at th<
Naval Academy. Commander Jonas
I H. Ingram, an older brother now ir
the service, was a star football an<
baseball player, and like “Bill" hi
stroked the Varsity crew. A yottnier
brother, Homer Ingram, now de
| ceased, was a crack gridiron man
oarsman and member of the lacrosse
i team.
Coached Fleet Team. Too
Ingram will take charge of football
training at Indiana and will return
next September for the 1923 season.
The new mentor played quarterback j
I on the Naval Academy teams of 1916.
’l7 and *lB. and was appointed first
1 assistant football coach at the Acad
emy the fall after his graduation. He
was head coach of the Pacific Coast
: fleet team for two years and then ac
cepted the offer as head coach of Wll-
I liam and Mary College.
Ingram is 26 years old. weighs
pounds, and is G feet 2 Inches in
height. He was selected from a List
l of twenty candidates, the university
athletic board of Indiana announce I.
SURVEY TO DETERMINE
INCOME FROM FARMS
1 A nation-wide survey to discovei
the dollars and cents result of farm
1 operations for the country as a wfcah
j in 1922 is now’ Icing made by the
\ United States Department of Agrirul
: ture.
The survey, giving the facts cf re
ceipts and expenses, is the first of
J its kind ever attempted, and is pari
| of a permanent project to determine
the trend of incomes, from farming
currently from 1922 forward, nnc
! backward, 60 far as available data
j will permit. The survey will show
acroage, farm value, method of op
eration, production, receipts and ex
penses on individual farms. Compila
tions will le made by sections of the
country and also by commodities.
In addition to a general question
naire distributed among 60.000 of the
department’s crop reporters, a detail
od Iroadcast questionnaire will be
sent to all farmers in counties where
the department has already m ide
farm business analysis studies. This
year the special county work will in
clude 16 areas. 10 ty mail and 6 cov
ered personally by department re. rc
sentatives.
SIX LOCAL ARRESTS
: FOB VIOLATIONS OF
MOTOR VEHICLE LAW:
The weekly report of State Auto
mobile Commissioner E. Austin
Baughman, shows several motorists
were arrested in Annapolis or vicin-l
ity for violations of the State Mrtor
Vehicle law. The report, aa usual, is
for the period ended on Thursday of
this week. Speeding and other of
fenses were charged against the of
fenders arrested in this section, the
list and fines in each instance being
as follows:
Nicholas A. Cbomen, failure to stop
when signaled, $10; Thomas Dorsey,]
operating after license had expired.
S 10; Norman E. Popham. exceeding
( 20 miles. $5; same, reckless driving.
$5; Louis Phipps, no registration
card in possession, $1; E. H. Picker
ing, exceeding 15 miles, $10; James
i A. Stevens, exceeding 25 mfle3, $5.
: Daniel Ellison, arrested at Glen Bur
. nie for exceeding 35 mile speed limit,
was fined $25.
The report shows total amount of
t fines as $2,973, of which $1,776 rep
- resents offenses committed In the
counties, and $1,197, Baltimore city.
THE WEATHER:
* Partly cloudy with a
cold wave tonight. Sun
day fair and colder.
COMPREHBN iIVB LOCAL AND OKNIRAL NIWL
PRICE TWO CENTS.
GOVERNOR WILL'
OPEN AUTO SHOW
HERE ON FEB. 24
• _ . _
Ritchie To Deliver Address At
Event To Be Staged In St.
John’s Gymnasium Mackall,
Head Of Roads Commission,
Also Booked For Speech.
OBJECTION TO USE
OF “GYM” REMOVED
Governor Albert C. Ritchie will de
liver the opening address at the An
napolis Automobile Show, to be put
on in the gymnasium at St. John’s
College, beginning on the afternoon
of February 24, and continuing Febru
ary 26 and 27. The fact that tho
Army-Navy basketball game is tn bo
played the same date as the opening
of the show, at first loomed up as an
obstacle, hut as the time of this sport
ing event is fixed for 2:30 o’clock, it
' will b P over in about an hour, so that
the ceremonies of opening the auto
show will be held along about 4
o’clock.
Rond Mini nan n To Speak
Announcement, also is made that
John N. Mackall, chairman and chief
engineer of the State Road Commis
sion, now known as the “Director of
Public Works," will attend the show
on February 27 and deliver a brief
address on “What the Automobile Has
Done For the Roads of Mrayland."
That Mr. Mackall has planned to at
tend is received with much favor, and
•he coun\/ folks will 'bus be afforded
opportunity to get acquainted with
the man at the helm of the State
roads system.
For a time there was some objec
tion to the use of the college gym
nasium for the show, but this has
since been satisfactorily adjusted by
the Annapolis Automobile Dealers’
Association, promoters of the show.
It developed that the student bodv of
the college at first made protest
against using their “gym.” for fear
that same taint of commercialism
might be given the college.
Students' Spirit‘’Commended
Since it has been explained that 75
per cent, of the gross receipts are to
be distributed between the Red Cross,
Annapolis Emergency Hospital, and
the fire companies of the city, how
ever, and also that members of the
Dealers’ Association are to contributo
the main expenses for the function,
the objection was withdrawn. And in
this connection the students of tho
college desire the public at large t >
know that they always stand ready to
co-operate in any movement for the
benefit of Annapolis, feeliNg that the
people of the city have the welfare of
the college at heart. For the manifes
tation of spirit in trying to protect the
college against commercialism, the
student body has been highly com
mended by the promoters of the auto
show and others.
VAGABONDS DEFEAT
STRONG WYMAN FIVE
The Vagabonds basketball team de
feated the strong Wyman’s Athletic
! Club, of Baltimore, in St. John's Col
lege gymnasium last night by 44 to 24.
Aftlt, last year’s Naval Academy cen
ter. and Wilson, formerly of St.
John's, played fast and clever basket-
J ball. Wilson did all of his scoring in
{ the second half. Travers and Kelly
| played well for Wyman’s. The
j line-up:
Vagabond A. C. Wyman’s A. C.
Moran F Kress
Musterman. , F Travers
Ault C Kelly
Craig G Byrne
Bishoff G Barneit
Field goals—Vagabonds: Ault (8),
Wilson (7), Moran (2), Mustermari
(2) Wyman’s: Travers (4), Kell/
(3) Barnett. Foul goals—Vagabonds:
Ault (6 in 8). Wyman’s: Byrne (8 in
10). Substitutions—Vagabonds: Wil
son for Bishoff, Bishoff for Craig,
j Wilson for Moran. Moran for Wilson.
| Referee, “Billy” Lush. Annapolis; un -
I pire, Arthur Wheatley, Annapolia.
Time of halves—2o minutes.
AN “AUTO” SUGGESTION;
NOT BY COUE, THOUGH
When riding on a gravel road anil
you hear an unusual noise bt-bind you.
stop and investigate. A gravel may
be jammed between the brake band
and drum. If not removed, you*!
brake lining may catch fire. Any wag
It doesn’t do tbe brakes any gsed,

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