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Evening capital. [volume] (Annapolis, Md.) 1922-1981, March 24, 1923, Image 1

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ASSOCIATED press
A Dispatches of late
are published in
Thf Evening Capital.
\ml. LX.W II —No. 157
Ilf CAPTURES
IIIU HONOR
IN “Glflir MEET
ig Pearson, Captain Of Team,
Wins All Around Cham
pionship —Yale, Pennsylvania,
Harvard, Completely Outclass
d Failed To Score.
PGHT institutions
entered competitions
f. r th<* fourth consecutive season
l Annapolis niiilshlpmen captured
(, :nU‘rri)l)'Klate gymnastic honors
IHir annual tournament held at the
Acadnny last night, and John
Iptaritoii. captain of the Navy team
k th** individual championship for
l third successive season.
Vivy registered a total of ft 1 points,
jarctiin, their nearest competitors
prel 15; New York University got a
p? of 4. Massachusetts Tech, 3, and
(rtmwith. 1. Yale, Harvard and
Btmvlvanifl representatives were
ipeiess 1 y outclassed and failed to
loiter a point. Flight teams were
prtd in the competitions, itutgers
B llaverford, previously on the
gj, withdrew. Navy’s victory was
iwirr by two points than that of lagt
non
PenrMin, Stellar Performer
Pearson look the all-arottml chant*
Hihip with comparative ease, pll-
I up the big score of 229, against
H by i'arker. of Princeton, who
u second, and Whuelock, Navy.
Mt Into third place with 146.8.
ttrm took first on the parallel bars
g also the horizontal bar event, but
p beaten out on the side horse by
brldon. of Princeton, by three-tenths
I I point. The Tigers’ other first
bee win* in tlie tumbling, which
won by ('roust*.
Wood Paring On Itings
food. Navy, on the flying rings,
rformed in fine style, his toe drop
iw especially clever, and practical
i clinching that event. The con
ex rs on the bars and side horse
to executed difficult stunts.
During the afternoon the annual
toting of the competing teams was
M ami it was decided to hold next
r's tourney on the last Friday or
Kurday in March By regulations
It captain of New York University’s
•®. yet to be chosen, was chosen
Wident of the association, and the
liei of Massachusetts Tech will be
to-president. FL E. Krause, Univer
h of Pennsylvania, was re-elected
toretarv and treasurer. Next year’s
tCnnOntiKa on I’ma t >
■ t
Keep Your Eyes On
Bay Ridge
‘Select your lot NOW.
W* will build for you.
HARRY PRICE
I’HONE 758
ttptvsruting
> ; A\ It I DUE REALTY OORP.,
BALTIMORE. MO.
AUCTION SALE
—OF—
Household Goods
' *niting i>f Furniture. I.ltien and
Kit,hen Utensils.
Monday, March 26th
AT 10 A. M.
10 s 'VEST STREET
* rner Madison Street.
."'ale: — Cash on day of sale.
k G. SCIIERGER.
* SH'KIKI.n,
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' ‘trybody /.oves It!
WHAT? .|
HH) S
The Milk Bread!
AT THE o
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KI:K1 ’ KM FREE FROM BUGS!
BUGGO
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bh fj" , °f hugs, ants, roaches, bed
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PRICE. 25c
west f:nd pharmacy
Distributors
AXXAPOLB, MD.
(Opening <£nmtnl.
TO CELEBRATE PALM
■ SUNDAY TOMORROW
Commemoration In Churches Of
Christ’s Triumphant Entry
Into Jerusalem
HOLY WEEK SERVICES
Palm Sunday, the beginning of the
most solemn week of the Christian
year, will Le celebrated tomorrow in
all the churches. Christ’s entry Into
Jerusalem will fe recalled by all
( hristians and the story of the Naz
arene riding in triumph through the
gates of the Holy City will be retold
from the pulpits.
Palms will le blessed before sol
emn mass at St. Mary’s Church and
distributed. The Gospel of the Pas
sion, the longest gospel of the year,
will be read.
The distribution of the palms com
memorates Christ’s triumphant entry
into Jerusalem when palms and the
branches of trees were cut down and
strewn before the King while cries
of “Hosanna, Hosanna, Blessed Is He
that cometh in the name of the Lord”
filled the air.
Services Holy Week
Special scervices will be held dur
ing Holy Week at the local churches.
At St. Mary’s the Tenebrae will le
chanted on Wednesday, Thursday and 1
Friday nights. On Holy Thursday the
Blessed Sacrament will be placed in
•he Repository . On Good Friday the
•Hiss of the pro-sanctified will be
said and the Stations of the Cross.
The observance of the Three Hour j
Agony will he made In St. Mary’s
and St. Anne's Churches.
Spodal music will he sung both to
morrow and Fluster Sunday in many
of the churches. At St. Anne’s to
tomorrow portions of the Cantata
‘‘Olivet to Calvary” will be given.
The choir of Calvary Church which
has been reeharsing Spohr's Oratorio
“The Last Judgment”” during the
greater part of Lent will give it on
Easter Sunday night. An augmented
choir and orchestra will give the Eas
ter Sunday music at the Naval Acad
emy Chapel and there will be elab
orate musical programs in all the
churches.
Navy Fish Compelled
To Withdraw Entry
Their team disorganized by the
resignation of Guy Winkjer. of Wash
ington, captain, and sickness of Angus
Sinclair and Rule, crack distance and
dash swimmers, the Annapolis mid
shipmen withdrew their entry* in the
intercollegiate swimming meet at
Princeton today.
Winkjer has swam generally in the
100-yard breast stroke, and relay. A
member of the First Class, he would
have graduated in June, but desiring
to leave the service, he resigned at
this time. Under a new departmental
ruling, seniors cannot resign after re
ceiving their diplomas, but must give
at least three years to the service.
NOTICE
[ELKS!
Special train
leaves Short
Line Station
MONDAY,
6.50 P. M.
J I
WANTED 1
SALESMEN
ANNAPOLIS TERRITORY.
Apply
102 CHARLES STREET
Between 7 and 9 P. M.
GUIENOT’S
Restaurant and Lunch Room
NOW OPEN
COLLEGE AVE. & BLADEN ST.
’k - '
CURLING AND WATER WAVING
Ella Small Colbert
(Formerly with Miss L P. Winslow.)
SHAMPOOING - MANICURING
Facial Massage - Scalp Treatment
Rooms 14 sn,l 16 liars Boil,ling
(Third Floor)
< Pboue 961-W. Annapolis, Md.
GRAHAM RITES TO
1 BE HELD MONDAY
t Retired Naval Officer Who Died
Yesterday Had Varied And'
Interesting Career
j The body of the late Lieutenant-
I Commander Samuel Lindsey Graham,
j 74. United States Navy (retired), will
be buried in the Naval Cemetery here
Monday morning. He died early yes
terday morning In the Naval Hospi
tal here after a three days’ illness
of pneumonia, having suffered a re
lapse after it had i een thought kis
I condition was improving. His death
cast a gloom over the naval contin
gent, and many other friends in the
city.
Arrangements have been made for
funeral services to be held in the Na
val Academy Chapel at 10:30 o’clock
Monday morning, and burial will be
with miiltary honors.
Had Interesting Career
Lieutenant - Commander Graham
had an interesting career. in
Carlisle, Pa., September 10, 1848, he
was appointed to the Naval Acad
emy from that* state in July, 1866,
and graduated in the class of 1870.
He was promoted to Fhisign, July,
1871; Master, 1874; Lieutenant, 1880.
He served aboard the Guerriere on
the European station, 1870-1872 and
the next two years he was assigned
to the Pacific station. He landed
forces at Honolulu during tho riots
attending the election of King Kala
; kaua. Sulsequent Iy he served aloard
1 the Saranac and Tuscarora, loth of
... i twm | i
NORTHWEST SQOAIL
FORCES NAVY CREWS
TO RACE FOR SNORE
Caught in a strong northwest blow
that came up suddenly after a balmy,
summer-like day, the varsity second,
third and plebe eight-oared shell
crews of Annapolis midshipmen were
compelled to race for the shore late
yesterday afternoon to prevent being
swamped in the heavy rolling seas.
Taking advantage of the otherwise
splendid conditions of the earlier aft
ernoon, Head Coach Glendon and his
assistants allowed the oarsmen a
longer paddle up stream above the
bridge. Tho gust came up si quick
ly that it was out of the question
for the four crews to get hack to
the boathouse, so a run into shore
was decided as the best course to
pursue. This, ♦as accomplished with
out mishap to the frail cedar craft
which were safely moored for the
night and the oarsmen took a cross
country run for home. The crews
were a mile and a half above the
railroad bridge when the elements
broke.
LAST ORGAN RECITAL
AT NAVAL ACADEMY
i
J. W. Crosley. choirmaster of the
Naval Academy Chapel, will give the
last of the Lenten organ recitals in
the Chapel tomorrow afternoon at 4
o’clock. These recitals have been
steadily growing in popularity since
they were started. Following is the
program to be given tomorrow after
noon :
1. Overture to “Pique Dame”
(Suppe).
2. Largo from “Xerxe9” (Han
del).
3. Fancies (Sellars).
4. Rhapsody (Silver).
5. Vocal —“Les Rameaux” (Faure).
6. Reverie (Silver).
7. Festival Prelude (Reiff).
IF J. W. ALTON
| .. E/cctrical Contractor..
BURNSIDE ST.. EASTPORT
PHONE 343. ni3o
- . V
|£oooooooooooooo6ooooooooo*
o
| EaSter Eggs! |
o 1 - O
’ O o
j O ALLEGRETTI £
Ho VIRGINIA DARE
NOVI A O
O A
o ALPINE o
1 - A T- 1
| Wiegard’s!
. 00009000000000000000000004
ESTABLISHED IN 1884.
ANNAPOLIS, MD., SATURDAY, M.\RCH 24, 1923
HOSPITAL RECEIVES j
1 DONATIONS OF LINEN
. AT ANNUAL SHOWER
A feature of the annual linerv-show
er and visiting day held Thursday
at the Fhnergeney Hospital was the
- opening of the reception room on
. the left of the entrance which has
1 teen furnished by A. H. Hill in mem
• ory of his wife. The handsome fuw
• ed oak in which it is done fits in
- admirably with the tan walls of the
i room.
Tea was served in this room Thurs
day. a profusion of spring flowers
i brightening the table at which the
• president of the board, Miss Kate An
• drews presided. Visitors came and
went throughout the afternoon and
the hospital was generously remem
bered, receiving a number of checks
■ in addition to presents of linen. ’
Mrs. Hill, in whose memory a
bronze plaque will be placed in the
reception room, was closely identified
with a number of public movements
during her residence here. Of a quiet
and unobtrusive nature she carried
‘ on her philanthropies unostentatious
• ly. Ardently devoted to the cause of
“Votes for Women” she did not live
to see the victory pf female suffrage,
• but died a martyr to the cause, hav
ing contracted a fatal illness of pneu
monia on a trip in connection with
1 work for the suffrage.
Eastport Membership
Supper Successful
The Annual Church Membership
Supper of the Eastport Methodist
Episcopal Church which was held on
Thursday night was far more success
ful than that of last year. The at
tendance was so much larger that it
was impossible to seat all at one
time. Reports were read from all or
ganizations showing them to be in
fine condition.
Services have been planned for
1 every night next week closing with
the Communion .service on Friday
, night. At this service there will be
a lighted cross on the altar.
The subject of the sermon Sunday
I morning will be “Jesus Welcomed as
, King.” Tho subject at night will be
, “Drifting.”
FRANKhIrNALL, 74,
DIES IN BALTIMORE
News has been received here of the
1 death of F’rank Hall Darnall, 74 years
old. which occurred yesterday at his
1 residence, 2420 North Charles street,
Baltimore. He is survived by a
widow, formerly Miss Eleanor Car
roll; one son, R. Bennett Darnall,
lawyer, of Baltimore, well known
> here; and one daughter, Elizabeth
‘ Darnall.
i Mr. Darnall for many years had as
his summer residence Portland
Manor. Anne Arundel county, which
is on the estate his ancestors received
under a grant by Lord Baltimore.
Funeral services will be held at 9:30
T o’clock Monday morning from Sts.
Philip and James’ Catholic Church.
North Charles and Twenty-seventh
streets. Burial will be in Cathedral
, Cemetery.
i Colored Minister Visits Brother
Rev. W. W. Colbert. B. D., traveling
1 evangelist, of Baltimore, spent the
? week with his brother, R. A. Colbert.
28 Fleet street, and visiting friends.
• Annapolis A. C. Nine
Priming For Season
The Annapolis Athletic Club. Inc.,
will open its baseball season Sunday.
. April 8. at their athletic field at West
Annapolis. The Tiger A. C.. of Bal
timore, will be the team played.
The schedule for the season is be
) ing rapidly filled. As soon as the
Navy schedule is over thq best teams
in the county and out of town will be
! brought here for both Saturday and
Sunday games.
Quite a number of the best baseball
players of the city and vicinity have
joined the club and are practicing
daily. The playing field is being put
j. in first-class shape, and if the public
> gives its patronage this year the club
J I will build a clubhouse next year.
l\ m u ~
l Missionary Meeting
Postponed For Week
}
j The meeting of the Women’s For-
eign Missionary Society of "“Calvary
j Church, which was to have been held
y on Monday next, March 26, has been
\ postponed for a week and will instead
y be held in the church parjors on the
$ evening of Easter Monday, April 2.
DEMENTED NEGRESS !
TO CROWISVILLE
Shady Side Woman Who Attack
ed Mother And Burned Home,
Pronounced Insane
lonia Gross, also know as lonia
Prann, 28 years old, the demented
negress who yesterday ran amuck,
threatened to kill her mother, and
then set fire to the family home at
Shady Side, West River, has been
committed to the State Hospital for
Colored Insane at Crownsville, this
county. _
Details of the woman's ravings were
not received here until late yesterday
afternoon when Sheriff H. T. Levely
arrested and brought her to Annapo
lis. It appears that lonia's mind has
been unbalanced for several months
and residents of the neighborhood
feared her. For some unexplained
reason, she turned upon her mother
first threatened to shoot her and then
attempted to attack her with an axe
Set Fire To Ho me
The older woman fled. Then lonia
piled brush about the small two-story
frame dwelling and set fire to it, defy
ing anyone to come near. The build
ing was reduced to ashes in short
order. Residents notified Sherifl
Levely, who immediately went down
county by automobile. Without dif
Acuity the sheriff took the raving wo
man into custody and brought her to
the city. Dr. William S. Welch and
Dr. J. J. Murphy pronounced the
negress insane, and necessary ar
rangements were at once made for the
trip to Crownsville.
EDWARD HALL. FDRVER
COUNT!, INJURED
JN AUTO ACCENT
Edward Hall, 58 years old, of Joppa,
Harford county, is a patient at the
Emergency Hospital here, suffering
from injuries which he sustained
when he was knocked down by an
automobile on Church Circle, near the
intersection of Main and Gloucestex
streets, alout 9 o'clock last night. He
suffered flight concussion of the brail
antY a scalp wound that required sev
eral stitches to close, but his condi
tion is not regarded as serious by at
tending physicians.
The car which struck Mr. Hall was
driven by Philip Miller, proprietor o'
the Republic Theatre. Mr. Miller was*
operating slowly at the time, accord
ing to his own statement, and that of
witnesses to the accident. The stree*
bed was wet and slippery following
the rain storm of the early part ol
the evening, which necessitated the
exercise of great caution. Mr. Hall
who had just stored his car in a local
garage after a trip to West River,
where he owns a farm, was on
his way to the Maryland Hotel to join
Mrs. Hall, when the accident hap
pened. Mr. Miller lent every assis
tance to the injured man and con
veyed him to the hospital.
Mr. Hall is a former resident of this
county, and though now living in Har
ford county, practices law in Balti
more city. He is a brother of Miss
Annie Hall and J. Cheston Hall, of
wear Lothian, in the Eighth district of
Anne Arundel.
MUSICAIIiW 110
BE PRODUCED HERE
The Knights of Columbus are get
ting ready for another musical com
edy. To those who were so fortu
nate as to see "Daddy Long Legs”
and “Little Johnny Jones" this in
formation is more than welcome for
both of the above jnentioned shows
were among the best produced here
this winter.
The new production, which is en
titled "The Man Who Owns Broad
way,” will be given late in April. J.
L. Convery. who directed and par
ticipated in “Little Johnny Jones”
and "Daddy Long Legs,” is also
coaching this comedy. Inasmuch as
Mr. Convery scored such marked suc
cess in the two aforementioned plays,
there is at solute safety in the proph
ecy that “The Man Who Owns Broad
way” will not only be an artistic and
dramatic success, but that it will at
tract large audiences at every per
formance.
Baptism Services Tomorrow
Baptismal services will be held to
morrow in the Baptist churches of
Annapolis and Eastport. At the Col
i lege Avenue Church baptism will be
administered at the 11 o’clock service,
and at Eastport at the 8 o'clock serv
ice.
I FINE COLONIAL HOMES
DEPICTED IN LECTURE
Swcpson Earle. Incapacitated By
Illness, But Capable “Under
study” Filled Bill
1
FINE ESTATES ON ‘SLIDES'
Owing to illness which developed j
suddenly yesterday and confined him
to bed, Swepson Earle. Chief Engi
neer of the Conservation Commission
of Maryland, was prevented from at
tending the meeting of the Men's
Guild of St. Anne’s Parish last night
and delivering the lecture on Colonial
Homes Along the Chesapeake Bay
However, a very able substitute wa>
provided in Percy Skirven, one of tin
noted present day historians of Mary
land, the author of several historical
works and a member of the Recon
Committee for the Diocese of Mary
land. succeeding the late John Wirt
Randall of Annapolis.
’8 Slides Displayed
Mr. Skirven has made a life study
of colonial Maryland, and had ac
companied Mr. Earle on many of his
trips up and down the Chesapeak*
and along the tributaries of the bay
He was. therefore, thoroughly comer
sant with the subject and delivere
a delightful illustrated lecture. Ther
were in all 78 slides showing color,
ial homes all along the Eastern Shor
of Maryland, beginning with Poet:
moke Sound, and going to the hea<
of the bay and then covering the tide
water counties of the entire Wester.
Shore. Of particular interest wort
the colonial homes in Anne Arundel
and in Calvert and St. Mary's.
The lecture and the pictures em
phasized the fact that Maryland has
a rare abundance of beautiful colon
ial architecture and picturesque
homes. It also brought out the great
wealth of water front advantages
along the fifteen hundred miles of the
Chesapeake Bay and Its tributaries.
MOVEMENT FOR LIONS
CLUB WINS FAVOR
Plans N for the organization cf a
Lions Club in Annapolis are progress
ing favorably, according to Albert L
Mundorff, field director of Lions In
ternational who has been in the city
this week making a canvass among
business and professional men. The
movement has received much approv
al, the feeling being there is room in
the city for a civic club of this type.
The Lions Club meets weekly, pre
ferably at noon-day luncheon.
It is a non-sectarian, non-political
organization designed to enlarge civic
and social opportunities. Lionism
promotes the principles of good gov
ernment and good citizenship, and
takes an active interest in tho civic
commercial, social and moral welfare
of the community. Only <W active
member will be assigned to each 1 usi
ness and recognized profession. The
meetings provide a forum for the full
and free discussion of matters of pub
lic interest, partisan politics and sec
tarian religion alone excepted.
A preliminary meeting will be held
early next week, at which time the
organization committee will plan to
invite a group of our citizens to join
with them in the undertaking.
There are successful and enthusias
tic Lions Clubs at Baltiftiore, Wash
ington, Frederick, Hagerstown, Cum
berland and nearly 700 other cities in j
the United States and Canada.
State Gets $3,382 In
Fines From Motorists
Automobilists paid the State $2,382
byway of fines for violating the Mo*
tor Vehicle Law. according to the re
port of Automobile Commissioner E.
Austin Baughman for the period end
ed on Thursday.
Five offenders were arrested In or
about Annapolis, as follows:
Harry Armiger, reckless driving,
$5; Robert Clark, having no registra
tion certificate, $1; Edgar Popham.
reckless driving, $5; L. Roth, no reg
istration certificate, $10; John War
pen, operating without a license. $lO.
Of the total fines imposed, $1,396
were collected for offfenses commit
ted in Baltimore city, and $1,986 in
the counties.
Broadcast Tonight On
Esperanto For Radio
Allan Davis, principal of the Com
mercial High School, Washington,
will broadcast a talk on "Esperanto
for Radio” from the station W I A Y
Woodward and Lathrop, 360 meters,
this evening at 8 o’clock.
THE WEATHER:
m Fair tonight and Sun
day* Colder tonight.
i !
COMPRKHKNBIVB LOCAL AND QINBHAL KIWI.
PRICE TWO CENTS.
WIESE
TO MAKE DEBUT
ON WEDNESDAY
i
Though Hampered By Bad Wea
ther, Ensign Blakeslee’s
Charges Will Be In Fair Shape
To Pry Off Lid With Syra
cuse.
“CHIEF” BENDER IS
tutoring twirlers
Though hampered Jo a marked ex
tent by the fluctuations of weather
Ensign “Vic" Blakeslee. head eoacli
of the midshipmen s baseliall team,
expects to have his charges in pretty
good shape to pry off the Hd for the
season. The opening game i H booked
with Syracuse for next Wednesday.
The schedule calls for a total of 21
.ames including the season's supreme
est with the Army Cadets which will
be staged at West Point. June 2.
last year's game having been played
it Annapolis.
Several Features In Hehedule
The schedule is not (inly a strong
one, but is marked by several spe
•ia! features that will make the sea
son the most interesting in the life
>f the diamond sport at the naval
school. While the Army contest is.
>f course, viewed as the outstanding
.eatlire, the team will he permitted
:o play four games away from home,
a privilege not hitherto extended.
Eight at the outset of the campaign,
he team will be taken south for a
run of three games. On March 30,
the middies will play a double header,
meeting North Carolina State at Ra
leigh. in the morning; and North Car
olina University at Wilson, in the aft
ernoon. The following day the Uni
versity of Richmond will be played
at Richmond, Va. The other away
from home game will be with the
University of Pennsylvania, at Phil
adelphia, May 19. Carolina State will
play a return game at Annapolis,
April 28. Another feature of the
schedule will be a contest with tho
Washington American Leaguers at
Annapolis. Maryland teams listed in
clude St. John's of Annapolis; Johns
Hopkins, University of Maryland and
Washington College. The date of the
Army game will be a big "service
day" in athletics at West Point, as
the Middies will also clash with the
soldiers in a dual field and track
meet and on the tennis courts.
‘‘t’hlep’ Bender Handling Pitchers
Head Coach Blakeslee has a big
squad of candidates at work, there
being two or more men in the field
for each position. He is being übly
assisted in handling the pupils by
Ensign "Eddie” Milner. Both Blakes
lee and Milner starred on Navy teams
in recent years. The squad has put
in several days at work out of doors,
but the frequent rains and the recent
-•old spell proved a big drawback.
However, big "Ike” Niemeier, "Slim”
(CfintlniiMl On Put#
MAIN IS BEING
RUNG DOWN ON NAVY
WINTER SPORTS TODAY
The final event of the winter indoor
program of athletics at the Naval
Academy is being staged this after
noon. The wrestlers and boxers hav
ing finished their schedules a week or
two ago, the gymnasium team said its
swan song last night by scoring a
brilliant triumph in the intercollegi
ate finals, bo It remained for the fenc
ing team to ring down the curtain on
a most interesting and varied season.
The middy swordsmen are enter
taining the representatives of the
University of Virginia. The contest
was scheduled to get under way at
2:30.
Though closing the local season, it
will not be the final appearance of the
middies, as they are entered In the In
tercollegiate tournament to be held In
New York early next month, and they
stand a good chance of taking the
laurels in that big event, having dis
posed of a majority of the teams be
longing to the association in pre
liminary contests held at. the Acad
emy during the last several weeks.
Glen Burnie Organizes Nine
The Glen Burnie Baseball Club has
reorganized for the coming season
and would like to book games for the
Glen Burnie field. Address George E.
Taylor, Glen Burnie, Md., or phono
Elkridge 197-J.

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