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Evening capital. (Annapolis, Md.) 1922-1981, March 30, 1923, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Maryland, College Park, MD

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83009667/1923-03-30/ed-1/seq-2/

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firttrtttnrj Capita)
1884 * 1923
ANNAP OLI 8, M I).
Published Dally Kv.-ept Hundsy by
THE CAPITAL J'I'BI.ISIHNi} COMPANY
THE EVENING CAPITAL
la on sale Ht the following places:
(leerfe W. Jon?* '"i West
William Schults* *4 Will Ktr.v:
George J. Ivl# .-..14 Mary land Ave
Chaa. •i. KfldUCKr S 4 Maryland A?'-.
"Hluei rd Confectionery" Kmi tb-orgc Ht
William Pak< r West A Cathedral Sta
W. H. A A. Newstsad, Short Line Terminal
M. Miller J3I West Street
N. Mamlria. Thlr.l A- Severn Art., Kaatgort
|r. Churlca It, llenkel.. .'-“J Maryland Are.
Martina Mualcul Si..r<‘. -5V* tv eat Street
Aarnaraa.. Main A Conduit Sir
Delivered In Annapolis, Butpurt, tier
loantnwu and Wart Aunapoiia tty carrier
for 45 cent* |*r
Tou rail lie\e tin i VKNINtI CAPITAL
mailed tt> you when away from the elty
by leaving vur name and addrraa at the
otfl'-e. fur 4*v u'iiiii ier luotitb; 15.00 ner
year, payable lu advance. to any postoillce
In the I’nlted Slates or Canada.
Entered at Annapolis. Poatofflce at
Rccond-Class Matter.
Member of Tlie oeluted I'reea
The Aaaoelated Press !a exclu
alTely entitled to tlie uae for re
nublleutlon of all tietra credited to
it or liat otherwise credited In
thla paper mid itlao the local news
publlahed herein. All rights of
re • publication of apeelal dia
patrbea herein are alao rearred.
FRIDAY. MARCH 30. 1923.
HIGH PRICE OK SILAH
There are many things far
from sweet in the sugar situation,
but the most striking one is the
readiness by which the law of
supply and demand may be re
pealed.
Karl 1). Babst, president of the
American Sugar Refining t 0., re
cently returned from Cuba with
the announcement that the sugar
supply in the United States i:
ample. Only the normal growth
of consumption has been noted.
But the wholesale price has more
than doubled in a year.
Approximately two cents of
the present 10-cent price is due
to the Fordnoy-Mct'umber tariff
•—the highest since President
Grant’s administration which
the absence of a consumer’s rep
resentative* in Congress permit
ted to he levied. But the rest
of the rise in price came without
the direct interposition of govern
mental machinery, although tin
suggestion has been advanced
that advice of high government
officials was instrumental in
causing the economic price-rais
ing machinery to he put into ef
fect.
Speculators are said to he seek
ing to catapault sugar to 20 cents.
There will he controversy whe
ther the refiners arc trying to in
crease their profits, producers art
trying to pay their mortgages
or speculators have obtained con
trol of the market. But among
the persons responsible for still
further alteration of the law of
supply and demand, the ultimate
consumer will remain as guiltless
as he was in the imposition of
the Fordney-Mct umber tariff.
WHY NOT FOR PEACE I
It is announced from Wash
ington that President Harding
will soon call upon Great Brit
ain. France, Italy. Japan and the
Netherlands to sign an agree
ment to put into effect new rules
to govern the use of radio and
aircraft in war.
Ihe question is inevitable:
Why not in peace?
I*or some decades there have
been some ponderous and some
minute efforts toward the hu
manizing of war. whatever that
may be. I here can be no crit
icism of such efforts. Anv
agreements between individual
nations, or between all nations
tending to minimize the evils of
war. are worthy.
But peace is the thing. Why
siumd not peace-time be devoted
to sharpening the implements of
peace, and oiling the machinery
of commerce, as well as to con
sideration of ways to use wea
pons in war?
Radio and airplanes are dis
tinctly peace-time assets. They
are fundamentally international
in their use, and sound waves do
not stop at the national boun
dary lines. I here is no reason
why a beginning should not he
made at once in creating the un
derstandings in international
problems which arc bound to de
velop as air development grows.
'The making of rules for use of
the air in war will not be en
tirely a harmonious proceeding,
hut peace-time air can he charted
amicably.
Why Wood Fail* to Float.
Wood is heavier than water. It is
the air trapped in the many cells that
makes It appear lighter. When wood
has been in water for some time this
air escapes, the wood is waterlogged
mid will not float.
i
F==== —tl
j < LETTER TO EDITOR j i
j Kriiiii Ear Off Shawnee. Oklahoma.
The Kapilal Reeeites Words Oil
I’r i*-e Emm Chamber Of Com- j
merer.
■ to thr E'l it or of thr Evening Capital:
Dear Sir: We had the pleasure of
r Hving a copy of your paper to
* day. May wc congratulate you on
iis make-up and general merit?
ft !.s a credit to your organization
and to the city you represent.
Yeura very truly,
K. R. WAITE,
Secretary, Shawnee, Okla . Hoard of
Commerce.
CITY BOWS HEAD
ON GOOD FRIDAY
(Continued From Page 1.)
dren, to whom Easter is synonymous
with an unlimited number of candy
rabbits, chickens and eggs. This year
the local stores are displaying a line
of Easter novelties even more effec
tive than usual. Marvelous creations
In chocolate eggs and rabbits, downy
white and yellow chicks, and beautiful
baskets containing every conceivable
size amt color (if Easter eggs already
have occasioned shocking reductions
in youthful savings.
Many of the grown-ups also have
fallen victims to this phase of the
: holiday ntid spent materia! sums with
the various confectionery and novelty
, dealers of tht* city.
Honreous Display Oi Flowers
The flower shops, with their exqui
site products displayed in artistically
decorated windows, are also thronged
! by the usual rush of patrons deSlr
-1 ing to remember friends and relative?
with these appropriate tokens of the
arrival of spring—the season chosen
* to commemorate the resurrection' o.‘
Christ. With the pxoeption of Eas
, ter iillies. none of which are obtain
. able because of the cold, which har
greatly retarded their growth, thr
flowers are little affected by the fact
that the holiday comes so' early in thr
* year. A beautiful range, of potted
“ hyacinths, pansies, calla lißies, tulips
hydrangeas, begonias and geraniums
I as welt as roses, sweet peas and other
. cut flowers, arc to be had at normal
Easter prices.
U. S. To Spend *2.IMMMMMI
i The popularity of flowers at thif
season is not a local matter, however
it being estimated that the United
Slates will spend about $2,000,000 on
Easter flowers this year. In Wash
ington, it is said that several ship
loads of Easter have been* im
ported from Bermuda, which country
I also supplies most of the bulbs foi
t lily plants in this country. Most ol
I the lillies cultivated in tlie United
States are grown under glass. De
partment of Commerce experts de
clared the lily growing industry
could he developed as a big business
In the South.
SIX KILLED; oiies
HURT IS AUTO UNO BIG
j! FOUR PULLMAN CRASH
(By Tlu* Associated
* j COLUMBUS. O . Mar. 30.- Six per
f sons are known to have been killed
and some seriously injured when a
j fast “Dig 4” Pullman train on route
1 from Boston to Cincinnati struck an
automobile at a grade crossing at the
North City limits today. The engine
[ left the track and turned over in the
- ditch, four Pullmans piling up on top
* of i(. All of the cars with the ex
ception of a diner Jeft the track.
;! The known dead are:
| , Horace Holbrook, Warren. Ohio:
Earl \V. Wilson, lireman. of Colunt
. bus; J. W. Klee, fireman, of Cleve
land: Mrs. Frank F. Hemminger, of
Columbus, wife of an attorney, who
was driving the automobile that war
struck; Robert Hemminger. 5 years
her son. infant Hemminger.
Some of the injured are:
F. H. CincinffStf; rapt. J. E
Covington. 28tli Infantry. Brownsville.
| Texas: V. I). Lewis. Boston.
The train, which was more than
an hour late, was running at an es
timated speed of 65 or 70 miles an
hour when it struck the motor car.
11 Killed, ( inciiiiuiti Reports
CINCINNATI. 0.. Mar. 30 —A report
received at Big Four railroad head
quarters here said that 11 persons
were killed in the wreck of passenger
train No. 11 on the outskirts of Co
lumbus today. Six unidentified bodies
have been recovered, it was said.
JAPAN APPROPRIATES
FOR ROAD BUILDING
(By The Associated Press.)
TOKIO, Mar. 30.—The Japanese
government contemplates spending
300.000.000 yen. or approximately
*150,000,000. during the next 30 years
to improve the roads of the empire.
This includes ‘the new Yokohoma-
Tokio and Osaka - Kobe automobile
roads now under construction, which
will eventually form part of a main
road connecting Tokio. Yokohama.
Nagoya. Kyoto. Osaka and Kobe, the
width of which will be 36 feet near
the cities and 30 feet in the coun
try.
At present motoring is made diffi
cult in Japan owing to the narrow
ness of the roads and the fact that
they pass through thickly populated
villages.
1
THU £\TLNTCNf CA.Fi f AL, ANTtfAPOHS. MARYLAND. FRIDAY, .MARCH no. 1923.
BIGGEB STRAWBERRY
AREA THIS SEASON
i Preliminary Survey Indicates 7 j
Per Cent. Increase In Acre
age Planted To Berries
If favorable conditions prevail dur
ing the growing season there ought to
be a bountiful production of straw-1
berries this season, according to
John S. Dennee, crop statistician at
Baltimore for the United States De
partment of Agriculture, division of
crop estimates.
Acreage in 16 States, classed as
early and Intermediate, is estimated at
103.400 acres this season compared
with 96.890 last season, says the
Statist, an increase of 7 per cent.
These figures are based on a pre
liminary survey by the division of
crop estimates of the Department of
Agriculture, Washington. The total
area of t he so-called “intermediate"
States, in which class fall Delaware.
Maryland and ‘Virginia, is 81.130
acres, against 79.340 last season—an
increase of slightly less than 2,000
acres.
Maryland Hus iI.HKI Acres
Delaware is estimated to Have 5,000
acres against 5,040 last season. Mary
land 9,940 acres against 9,320, and
Virginia 5.500 acres against 5.08 b last
season.
Tennessee leads in strawberry acre
age this season with 20.060 acres; Ar
kansas is next with 16.430; LottHano
third with 14,500; Missouri fourth
with 10,560, and Maryland ranks fifth
with 9.940 acres.
Florida and Louisiana are the only
important States shipping at the pres
ent time. Theso Stales down to
March 24 had moved a total of 889
carloads, according to reports ren
dered.
During the season of 1922 Delaware
shipped 928 carloads, Maryland 1.634
and Virginia 1,621. The season’s
ihipments approximated 18,500 car
loads. The yearly average for the
seven years, 1916-1922, is about 12,150
cars.
When ihe war was on attention was
drawn away from strawberry culture
to the production of more essential
crops. But since 1290 the industry
has been developing, and last season’s
total movement exceeded the seven
year average by about 6,000 cars.
GENARO LOOKS TO
OUirm H RING
(Hr Tlie Amw ltcl Press.)
NEW YORK. Mar. 30. Fate al
most miscast Fratikic Genaro, the 21-
vcar-old New Yorker who recently
toppled Rancho Villa, the Filipino, off
’i;s American flyweight throne.
It would be difficult for many peo
ple to look at the bundle of energy
'hat is Genaro. with his boyish, smil
ing face, showing two front teeth
broken off. and not wonder if lie
weren't In bis first long trousers.
Frankie, however, a veteran of 3c
professional ring battles, is the fath
er of two children. Marie, 3, and
Anthony, 1. He was married when
he was seventeen.
His father died when ho was young
iml Genaro went to work driving a
mtcher’s delivery wagon. His slight
mild and knowledge of the nag he
Irove prompted a friend 4o suggest
hat Frankie try jockeying for a liv
ng.
But after two days at the track ai
1 rave send Bay he was thrown off the
o! for beating several other jockeys
nto submission. As the Paulist Fath
>rs look after an athletic club named
in their honor, Father Morris sug
gested that Genaro try boxing.
He was a success from the start.
Nick Floria, a club trainer, took
pains with Genaro and within a year
and a half had his protege in shape
to represent the United States on its
boxing team at the Olympic Games.
He won the world’s amateur title for
his country, defeating J. Diveto, of
Denmark, in the final brut.
Upon his return to the United
States Genaro became a professional,
and after three years has reached all
but the top rung of his class; the
world's title is held by Jimmy Wilde,
of England.
Still one of his mother's financial
supporters. the new ohsilipion fs anx
ious. he says, to hurry through his
boxing career, win the world's title
and take the lucre that goes with
it. and then sit down and think up
something for a tusim-sg man to do.
U. S. PATHOLOGIST
TO ADDRESS PACIFIC
SCIENTIFIC CONGRESS
(By The Associated Crews.)
ST. PAUL. Mar. 30.—As a result
of his work in the realm of plant dis
eases. Dr. E. C. Stakman. plant path
ologist at the University of Minne
sota. department of agriculture, has
been invited to address the Pan-Pa
cific Scientific Congress in Sydney
and Melbourne, Australia, in August
and September. Dr. Stakman hopes
to be in a position to accept, he de
clared.
A leader in the fight on the com
mon barberry bush and the black
stem rust of wheat for the United
States Department of Agriculture, as
well as the university. Dr. Stakman
toured all the countries of western
Europe last year jf* investigations
to determine Jie eon ne< j t * on of the
bnsh and the destructive. rust.
IMP'- *
! ——
American History
DAY BY DAY
By T. P. Green
.MARCH 30
Black Monday massacre in
Dublin, Ireland, on March 30r i
1209.
First meeting of Congress
under the United States Con
stitution on March 30, 1789.
Ant Napoleonic allies de
feated the French before
Paris on March 30. 1814.
Privateering abolished in
Europe on March 30. 1856.
Impeachment trial of Presi
dent Andrew Jobnsoti began
on March 30, 1868.
George I proclaimed King of
Greece on March 30. 1863.
UNSrai PICT |
CANCELLED 91R. S.
INO JAP GOVERNMENTS
I ■ mr ' KBy The Associated Press.)
t). C., Mar. 30.
The celebrated Lansing-Ishii agree
ment, by which the United States in
1917 recognized Japan's "special in
terest” in China, has been cancelled
by mutual agreement of the Wash
ington and Tokio governments.
Diplomatic negotiations between
the two governments have been based
primarily on the provisions of the
"'tie nrTvr r act, written and regarded
ns applying more effectually the
“principles of the open door or the
quality of opportunity in China.”
In disposing of the Lansing-Ishii
agreement and substituting for it the
principles of the document subscribed
to by the nine powers.—the United
Stateß, Japan, China, Great Britain,
France, Italy, Portugal,the Nether
lands and Belgium.—the American
and Japanese governments accept a
document that is regarded as covering
more fully the situation and at the
same time do away with an agreement
that was a source of controversy from
the moment that it became effective.
The agreement was signed by
Secretary Lansing and Ambassador
Ishii on November 2, 1917, in the form
o£ an executive understanding and as
such it became immediately’effective,
, Financial Statement and Growth
Annapolis and Eastport Building Association
ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL STOCK $500,000.00.
INCORPORATED 1903
I FINANCIAL STATEMENT AS OF JANUARY 31, !923
* i
ASSETS LIABILITIES
Cash on Hand and in Banks $ 8,482.26 Deposits. Shareholders $285,945.18
Mortgage Loans 347,443.31 Bills Payable 61,700.00
l urniture and Fixtures 194.75 Surplus and Undivided Profits... 8,475.14
1 i
$356,120.32 $356,120.32
* : - ■ ■■■ ■■■
Growth of the Association Since 1914
RESOURCES:
• 1914 $78,292.03
1915 $90,586.05
1916 $97,107.57
1917 $110,030.74
1918 $121,919.67
1919 $147,239.56
1920 $210,654.09
1921 $221,753.44
1922 $266,924.79 !
1923 $356,120.32
■'■■■ - ■ ■ -■ - - -
WE HAVE PAID SIX PER CENT. TO J YOU ARE INVITED TO BECOME A
MEMBERS ON DEPOSIT ACCOUNTS MEMBER AND WE WILL HELP YOU
SINCE 1903 J TO BUY OR BUILD A HOME
When You*Buy or Build Your Own Home—You Save the Rent—You do Not Have to Move
—You Take Pride in Improving Your Home and Life is Worth Living—YOU BECOMF a
REAL CITIZEN
OFFICERS:
GEORGE C. BARTON, President. T. ROLAND BROWN, Vice-President
WINSON G. GOTT, Attorney. FRANK B. FRANTZ, Secretary-Treasurer
DIRECTORS:
GEORGE Ci .BARTON CHARLES F. LEE WTVQov r rn-r.
T. ROLAND &ROWN j. De P . bOUW vn ?.° TT
JAMES F. STRANGE WILLIAM H. THOMAS b FRANTZ
“OLD AND TRIED, FEW AS GOOD NONE BETTER.”
Office: LEE BUILDING, Annapolis, Md.
vv ° PEN F ° R BUS *NESS EACH SATURDAY EVENING FROM 7to 9 o’clock i
Associated with the utmost secrecy
on the part of both governments, it
created one of the outstanding dip
lomatic sensations of the war days
when news of it first reached the out
side world in press reports published
on November 5.
SHOOTS LOVER THEN
COMMITS SUICIDE
(Continued Krtim rase 1.)
j clubs for several days at a time and
I they accepted his statement that he
' was a bachelor. Mrs. Ziegler said
! she had advised Helene not to marry
Burnham, as she asserted be had ask
ed her. because he drank.
Recently Burnham attempted to dm
continue his affair with Miss Ziegler.
He told men friends that his wife had
learned of his relationship and had
told him that he must give up either
his family or his friendship with the
girl. He was said to have made yes
terday’s appointment for the purpose
: of talking over the matter with Miss
1 Ziegler.
Germnu* Save Postage Stumps
(Bv The AuMcUtnl Prm.)
BERLIN. Mar. 30.—One of the most
popular forms of investment for Ger
; mans anxious to guard against de
i predations of the mark has been the
collection of postage stamps.
sums have already been spent in this
way by the well-to-do. and the stamp
business In Germany has made new
i records.
1 PROPOSAL
Bills will be received by tlie City Clerk
until VJ o'4X‘k noon. Saturday, April Ttli
! for the removing of garbage and street
; sweepings from all nf the streets, lane?
I i and alleys in the City of Annapolis. Md.
for the ensuing year from June Ist
ItKEt. The right ts reserved to reject ati>
i J and all bids. For further information am
speelthatious, apply to
W. 11. V ANSA XT.
i aC City Commissioner
PROPOSALS
I I
Bids will be received by the City Clerl
until o'clock, noon. Saturday. March :!1
' | for laying Srtnch terracotta sewer on Cla>
i ' street. >Tai linear feet, more or less.
The right Is reserved to reject any am
j all bids. For further Information, plain
; - and specifications, apply
, | W. 11, VAN'S A XT.
m3O. City Commissioner.
i E. O. LEAGUE
: j ROOFING
■ j Spouting. Sheet Metal and Slate Work
I | STOVES AM) FURNACES INSTALLS!
ANII REPAIRED
WIONK 131-W.
! The German government has estab
lished an official department known
as the dispatching department for
stamp collectors, which supplies
stamps to subsctpbers as soon as
they arc issued and attempts to re
! vive as many of the old issues as
| possible for sale purposes.
i
Ed—nearest, my love for you is like
a babbling brook!
Co-ed —Oh, dam it! I
W. B. & A. ELECTRIC | ;
RAILROAD
JlMin - TMISWB >
'1 H.iif Hourly Service Morning and Evening
Between ' Annafndis. Hsltlmore an d
| Washington and ftmp Mode,
(Washington and Camp Meade
I passengers chauge at Naval
Academy Jaactlon.) 1
LEAVE ANNAPOLIS
Wmt Street Station
r. 10, \5.50, fi.JO, xG.SO. *7.50. 8.20. 9.20.
! 10.20, 11.20, A. M.. 12.2a 1.20. 2.20, 3..
4 20. x i r*o, 5.20. 0.20, 7.00. 8.20. 10.20.
11.211. I*. M. „ '
Leave Naval Academy Gate 10 minute*
earlier; State House Station, ltladen
Street and College Avenue, aeven (7>
i minutes earlier , , „ „ „
Connecting at Odenton with P. R. It.
ANNAPOLIS SHORT LINK HIV.
Hidden Street Station
320 K M. and half-hourly thereafter at 20
P and 50 minutes after eneh liour until
, 0.30 p. M.. then at 7.50, 8.50, 0.50, 10 50
and 11.50 P. M.
[> 3.20 and 5.50 A. M. trains daily except
f j Sunday.
LEAVE Baltimore—W.. B. ft A.
■ <135 7.55. 8.35, 9.35. 10.35. 11.35. A. M.
12.15, 1.35, 2.55. 3.35. x 4.05. 4.35. *5.05.
5 358.35.7.35. 9.35, 11.35. P. M.. 12,35
A. M.
All trains receive or discharge passengers
k at loeal points between Aipiapolis and
t. Naval Academy Junetlon and at Ship
>t ley and Linthletnn on signal.
ANNAPOLIS SHORT LINK HIV.
t. Howard and Lombard Sts.
>’ 3.15 A. M. and half-hourly thereafter at 15
d and 45 minutes after each hour uutll
(5.15 P. M.. then at 7.15. 8.15. 9.15, 10.15.
11.15, P. M.. and 12.15, A M.
r. 5.15 and 5.45 A. M. trains dally except
Sunday.
LEAVE WASHINGTON
5.00, C. 45, 8 00, 0.00. 10.00. 1100. A. M.. 12 00.
k 1.00, 2.00, 3.00, *8.30. 4.00, X4.JO, 5.<H),
1, c.oo. 7,00, 9.00, 11.00, P. M., 12.10 A. M..
y x—Dally except Sunday.
d For tickets and information apply at our
is city ticket offices: West Street S'atiou.
Carvel Hall. Short Line Station, Bladen
Street.
' Suits Madfe To Order!
NAVAL TAILORS
CLEANING AND PRESSING
k - Ladies’ Work a Specially.
i .
II
Hotel Maryland Tailors
ANNAPOLIS, MIL— ” fi
CLASSIFIED;
Ads

. I.os r
LOST - t;.'11!,, ; M t - V
ring. Reward ,•
Capital cih,,,
LOST Betw c. >i \i , ~~
Fish Market. t„, ' ; '
$5 reward It
Holland si tv, i.
LOST -Last ~ 7
slve pendant
atones. Find, i
LOST- Black i.-’U
iltg two $] hills ,
turn to Capital , :>
, Wan up
WANTED (*v t,,t- i
allty, inltinth.
ten .veins' i,t ... ,
ttewsjmiter i* \jt, ■
lion with amldii
will Vnt ~n, t
otilco.
WANTEH T.. ~~~ -—,
small hiingalou ' '
napolls. Kent huim i,
price and location v ' I
tal office.
FOR HIM
FOR RENT Tw,. 7i...!, —.
rooms and hath. \ , ! ' l| ",
Store. 201 Main
FOR RENT l ive •,,
West street; $27
Julian Brewer and s
FOR HEN I \
fnrniabeti. 257 h
over street.
FOIt HEN r Ft
Charles street.
FR RENT —Three
llieilt. Apply 127 I'n *
FOR KENT six ~
ply B. Friedman. . > w,
FOR RENT Font
boon a cow pasture 1 '
t'■ rev ovonue. West v
W. E. Pleasant, Seventh m :,,
I*B. West Annapolis pi,,,,,,. w j '
rOK RENT Deslrahle ftmiUhTTT!
74 Conduit street.
r<>R RENT—Three or f-.urc™D~
llished apartment. Apply .if-t s .
5 Murray avenue.
FOR RENT--Six-room hnusc. w
(nod location ; all t \
50 West street.
FOR SAI F,
FOR SALK One Dodge Dr,.!h.-rs
cial car (1920): one p
State Garage, in* East sttv.t
FOR SALK—Baby earring,- | ,77
ecru linlsh; line < oiidition; n-ie-
Apply 15 Dealt Street.
r>K SALE Small *K ,-ylinder ■
car. Just compldelv metUmtits
'quire Mr. Main, Chihli
Garage.
FOR SALK OK RFM
FOB SALE <*H KL.NI
Charles street. For parthttlsrn *>
F. Childs.
FARM W WITH
W ANTED—SmaII, cheap farm. r
eight-room house; near slati-m . •
- line. Want to deal direct with (
28U5 E. l’restou street, Ihiltiunmr II
CARD OF THANKS
Wr desire to acknowledge will
predation the kind sympathy ,-sprr-*
our innity trleuds during lire I i*
death of our dear mother, 11 i,t 11<- Hi !
S. W. HARDESTY Wl* I'AMU
IN MEMOHIAM
PARKER lit loving I’tiumbru
denr mother. ISABELLA I'AKKCI
departed Into spirit IIP- thro ”
March 29. P.*2t. Gone hut not D't
Today recalls sad rheitmries
Of a loved one gone t” rest
And the ones who think <-r 10-r ’■
An* the ones who loved In-r In-**
Nome may think that we l-rce '
Though on earth you ere i,- -'
Bat In memory you are with
As ytni always were before.
FRANK PARKER AND
/
' SALESMAN
WANTED
for popular priced hottwh o ''!
articles; houre-to house lil ‘
vassing. Good profit. Sw
, SI.OO for sample Guaranty
$25.00 weekly salary on
tract. Address
G. R. WANNEN
241.1 WOOUBRIMIK %VF.
BALTIMORE. Md.
m?>o
- —-
Carlson & Carlson
160 CLOITWTKR ' T
CONTRACTORS
and BflLI’ER*
Agents for Jbhii‘>*MaiiviH , ‘
Estimates Cheerfully
PHONE 37
ORDER MSI
In the Matter of the > "f ‘
Ileal Estate of Mary "• * ■
No. 1742 V E’i'ii'.v
In the Clr.-uit Court for Anne ■'
Ordered, this 22ud day
that the sale of the property. ‘. t - a f
ported by John S. Straii-n*. •
ratitierl and eonflrmed. un
contrary thereof he shown "U
tb* % ,\T:
24th DAY OF APRIL.
Provided a copy of this order J jg
In some newspaper pub*
Arundel cohnty. on<-e in M l-11 , .. uf
eessive weeks before the -
April, next. , nnt of •*
The report states the anmnut
to be 513.f525.00. r , n r .ff*
WM. X. woomvAßP-
True Copy, Test;
. WM. X. WOODWARD, clfrt '

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