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Evening capital. [volume] (Annapolis, Md.) 1922-1981, March 31, 1923, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83009667/1923-03-31/ed-1/seq-1/

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■ SSOCIATED PRESS
A Dispatches of late
are published in
Evening Capital.
IVIBT aVBNINO BXCBPT SUNDAYS.
tT7|! \\ \ll No. 103.
TO BE
- PROCLAIMED IN
jl'i CHURCHES
I Of Joy And Music Will
I p ca ! Out To Commemorate
I flat's Resurrection And Tri
■ Of Soul Over Death—
I Seautiful Floral Decorations.
I ;ABORATK PROGRAMS
have been arranged
I j';.rs n with lilies and banked
fS <) (lW ,r-< tomorrow will mark the
festival of the Christian year.
Mu of joy "HI peal out to com
ptratt* Christ's resurrection and
(triumph ef the soul over death,
ftr days the flower shops have been
(jiss of lovely blooms, which to
irrow will till churches and homes
a their I eauty and fragrance.
Et.rv church In tills locality lias
anted a special program of music
i devotions in honor of the day.
Music Af St. Mary’s
jt St. Mary's the following anusi
iprogram will be rendered at Sol
ti High Mass at 10:30 a. in.
I|i Vidi Aquiun, H. L. Stewart; (2)
(re. Mass in honor of St. Joseph,
fifgaiul; (Hi Gloria, Mass in hon
nfSt. Joseph. J. Wlegand; (4) Veni
etnr A. M Knabel; , (5) Credo,
p in honor of St. Joseph, J. Wie
ji <6 Offertory, “Regina Coeli,’’
M l,oesih; (7) Sunctus, Mass in
rof St Joseph. J. Wiegand; (8)
rHiitus, Mass in honor of St. Jos-
I.J Wiegand; til) Agnus Dei, Mass
honor of St. Joseph, J. Wiegand;
'I Recessional, “Haec Dies," by J.
Kind. Miss Lillie K. Henkel is
and choir director of the
Services At SI. Anne’s
1! St Anne's Church the music at
ly morning communion sendee
bp sung by St. Cecilia’s Guild,
the 11 o'clock service the anthem
*ake thou that Sleepest,” by Fred-
Itk Maker, will be sung. The an
i2 at Evensong will be “Break
r!i with Joy,” by Joseph Barnby.
lithe 10:45 a. in. service at the
fi Academy Chapel, the organist
' t’rosley will lie assisted in the
tsMil program by Bandmaster
Simian with an orchestra of forty
lff!i The preludo will begin at
55 o'clock.
Music At Calvary Church
u<vr music will characterize the
rt'is at Calvary Church tomorrow.
morning service will begin at
>' o'clock instead of 11 and the
*ing musical program will be
Mfrml:
'an prelude with ’cello obligato,
Trnf Charles H. Rawlins and Miss
kl " ! Anthem “Christ is Risen,” by
(Continue)! On 4.V
VASTER 1
EGG SALE!
ID in d\.> egirs nt home when you j
II ui buy them already dyed at I
. ,: i>' s.ite at st. Anue's Parish I
EGGS dyed for the
CHILDREN AT 40 CENTS
PER DOZEN.
held on Saturday. March
i jV Goisli House, from 10 A. M.
• . :l|r ' v he given over 'phones— j
'’ or or route to
• v ii .a., Saturday and make your
, *1 V„s tlol
lv , ' ,11; "le rakes and candy will
- ile at reaaouahle prices.
--.-rras-s-^
LOST !
GREEN GOLD
;n 'ET RING. REWARD IF
-ETl'Kxed TO EVENING
i Ari TAL OFFICE OR MARY
LAND HOTEL.
rcD'IENOPS
tolaurant and Lunch Room
NOW OPEN
L LL£ GE AVE. & BLADEN ST.
J
WANTED!
Salesmen
AN.Vapolis TERRITORY.
| • Apply
‘ ' HAR LE S STREET
Hot w een 7 and 0 P. M.
Glnpital.
DE MODE CAUGHT
INEWVORK APT.
I Former Marine Corps Officer,
| Disguised As Old Man, Was
With Young Woman
NEVA YORK, Mar. 31.—Disguised as
5 an old man, Louis F. de Roode. of Bal
- tiniore, formerly a midshipman and
- later a major in the Marine Corps,
was arrested yesterday afternoon as a
fugitive from justice in an apartment
on Riverside Drive, New York, which
he was alleged to have been occupy
> ing with a young woman. He was
taken into custody at the request of
the Baltimore authorities, who said
he was charged with absconding with
$52,000 worth of securities.
De Roode, who was said to- he 31,
and married, was reported by the Bal
timore police to have been an execu
tor of the estate of his uncle, Dr. L. C.
Carrico, a prominent physician, of
( buries county, Md. Detectives said
they found in the apartment $10,405 in
cash, $30,000 in negotiable securities,
and a bank book made out to “Morton
Fox,” showing deposits of $3,072.
Met At Door By Woman
The officers said they were met at
Ihe door of the apartment by the
young woman, whose name is being
withheld. Over her protests, they en
tered the suite to be confronted by an
old man, with white hair and mus
tache. bending over a cane.
“We know you; you’d better come
through," said one of the detectives,
who added that de Roode then had
drawn himself up dramatically to his
full six feet and whipped off a false
mustache.
According to-police, de Roode pur
chased the wig and mustache in Bal
timore and used the disguise to escape
from that city on March 20. The de
tectives said he donned the disguise
whenever he left the apartment. They
found he had been shaving when they
called and had to don his camouflage
rapidly.
De Roode is said by police to have
admitted the charges against him and
to be willing to waive extradition.
Mark M. Jouron Dies
At Emergency Hospital
Mark M. Jouron, of 226 West street,
died at 7 o'clock last uight at the
Emergency Hospital after an opera
tion for stomach trouble. He was
born In Kewanee, 111., August 28.
1890. a son of the late Paul and Julia
Jouron.
Mr. Juron has made Annapolis his
home for the past nine years and
married Mrs. Viola Leonard, daugh
ter of Richard G. Chaney.
Besides his widow, Mr. .Jouron is
survived by a step-son. Duane C.
Shaper, and his mother and several
brothers and sisters who are living
in Kewanee. 111.
Auxiliary Meeting
Postponed A Week
On account of the Easter holiday
the regular monthly meeting of the
Women’s Auxiliary to the American
| Legion which is due to be held on
Monday night will be postponed un
til a week from Monday, April 9.„
when it is hoped to have a larg gath
ering at the Bladen street armo^y^
#> • •
Keep Your Eyes On
Bay Ridge
Select your lot NOW.
We will build for you.
HARRY PRICE
PHONE 738
Representing
BAY RIDGE REALTY COUP.,
BALTIMORE. MD.

FOR SALE!
dwelling, good location.
2 complete, separate apart
ments. OR CONVENIENT FOR ONE
FAMILY. RENTS WELL. PART
CASH. INQUIRIES CONFIDENTIAL.
siXTY DAYS' OCCUPANCY. IU.IX 11.
CAPITAL OFFICE! WM
The Annapolis Garage
WILL OPEN APRIL Ist
TAXI SERVICE. STORAGE,
WASHING
W. I. OWENS F. L. FOSTER
. 103-106 WEST ST. TELEPHONE 960.
v a5 •
” FORRENT!
Furnished dwelling S 3 Market
street. For June Week or longer
p period. Immediate possession. Jl L
IAN BREWER & SON. •'-
BALTIMORE AMERICAN j
. AND NEWS BOUGHT BY
. HEARSE ORGANIZATION
William Randolph Hearst, editor
and owner of the New Y'ork American,
and also of a chain of newspapers
J in a number of the leading cities of
. the United States, has purchased the
I Baltimore American and the Balti
more News from Frank A." Munsey.
Although official announcement is
1 lacking, it is understood the deal was
1 consummated in New York several
i days ago. Mr. Hoarst will take pos
. session of the properties today. J. E
( CuLlen, A former newspaper man of
j Baltimore, now associated with the
1 Hearst organization, will l e in charge
, an d will establish the "News” and
“American” in conformity with the
type of all tho other Hearst news
! papers.
It is understood the sale of the
papers )vas the result of negotiations
- between Mr. Hearst and Mr. Munsey
covering a period of a year.
The setting op of the Hearst pa
pers will mark h radical change
in two of the oldest newspapers in
Baltimore. _ For a number of years
the “News” was conducted by Charles
H. Grasty and a group of Baltimore
interests as an aggressive newspaper
of independent leanings in politics
The “American" is the oldest news
paper in Baltimore, having leen es
tablished in 1773. Before passing into
tho hands of Mr. Munsey, in Decem
t er, 1921, for many years it was con
ducted by Gen. Felix Agnus and was
a strong supporter of the Republican
party.
NAVY LOSES OPENING
CONTEST ON COURTS
In the opening match of the tennis
season on the Naval Academy grounds
yesterday afternoon Columbia won
from the midshipmen by four strings
to three. The Navy players won three
of the five strings in singles, and were
hopeful of a victory, but were out
classed by the team play of the visi
tors in the two double matches.
The visiting team included Ander
son, former indoor champion; Lang.
Emerson and other high-grade col
lege players. Harshman. the Navy
captain, lost a love set to Anderson
but rallied and forced the second to
go to 10—8. Anderson, however, play
ed at a faster pace and drove the
ball accurately whenever closely
pressed. Lang also played a strong
game for the ‘visitors.
Lyman, who entered the academy
this year, gave a fine exhibition, tak
ing two sets from Emerson after los
ing the first. His work stamped him
as a young player of much promise.
The summary:
Singles—Anderson, Columbia, de
feated Harshman, Navy. 6-0. 10-8;
Lang, Columbia, defeated Shoup,
Navy, 6-1, 6-1; Lyman, Navy, defeated
Emerson, Columbia, 5-7, 6-4, 7-5;
Hartwig. Navy, defeated Marshall,
Columbia, 8-6. 6-2; Winslow, Navy,
defeated McLoughlin, Navy, 7-1,
1-6, 9-7.
Doubles—Long and Emerson. Co
lumbia. defeated Shoup and Harsh
man, Navy. 6-1. 6-2; Anderson and
> Marshall, Columbia, defeated Lyman
and Hartwig. Navy, 6-1, 6-2.
Easter Day Services
In St. Anne's Church
Easter Day Services in St. Anne’s
Church will be: Holy Communion.
7:30. at which St. Cecelia's will sing;
Morning Prayer, read, at 10; Holy
Communion and Sermon. 11; Bap
tisms. 1; Children's 3; 30;
Evening Prayer. 7:30.
On Monday and Tuesday, the Serv
ices will be at 7 and 10 a. m. N
Monday evening at 8 p. m. the qual
ified electors will elect four vestry
' men at a meeting to be held in the
Guild Room.
All Star Juniors Get Ready
The “All Star" Juniors have or-1
ganized their baseball team for the!
coming season, and would lige to ar
range games with teams in the city
and county. Challenges should be
5 sent to H. Kotzin. manager. S 9 Main
i street, or 'phone 435-W.
'College Baseball Scores
At Greensboro. N. C.—New York
>.| University. 0; Guilford College. 5.
At Lexington. Va.—Washington and
Lee, 10; Amherst. 5.
At Raleigh. N. C. —Carolina State,
! 13; Maryland. 0.
t At New Windsor, Md.—Syracuse, 9;
r j Blue Ridge. 5.
At Charlottesville. Va. —Princeton,
2 ; Virginia. 4.
I
ESTABLISHED IN 1884.
ANNAPOLIS. MD.. SATURDAY, MARCH 31. 11)83.
BELVIDERE HOTEL. I
CHESAPEAKE BEACH.
SWEPTBY FLAMES
Chesapeake Beach, a popular
summer and amusement resort in
Calvert county, just across the
border line of Anne Arundel, pa
tronized chiefly by Washington
ians, was visited by a disastrous
fire this morning.
The fire which is said to have
been of an undetermined origin,
started in the big Belvidere ho
tel, a frame structure, and larg
est building on the premises.
This building soon was reduced
to ashes. Fanned by the strong
northwest winds, the flames
spread to adjoining property, in
cluding a small frame dwelling
house, belonging to a Mr. Ben
nett. This too, was destroyed.
The fire was discovered short
ly before 9 o’clock and spread rap
idly. Residents began to form
bucket brigades, but it was early
realized that this means of com
bating the flames would be futile,
and a call for assistance was sent
to Annapolis, and also Wash
ington. The chemical . engine
truck of the Water Witch Hook
and Ladder Company was dis
pached to the scene, as were also
three pieces of fire fighting appar
atus from Washington. The An
napolis fire laddies did great
work in helping to extinguish the
blaze. The fact that other build
ings were somewhat widely sep
arated from the hotel, prevented
a more serious conflagration.
One man whose name could
not be learned here, who occu
pied the Bennett dwelling, is said
to be missing. Whether he lost
his life in the fire, or went to
Batlimore and remained over last
night, could not be ascertained.
The destroyed hotel was a
large structure, containing, it is
said, nearly 100 sleeping rooms.
miodieswihM
LOSE IN CAROIINA
Defeated In Morning Game By
State, They Nosed Out Uni
versity In Afternoon
FOUR RUNS In! THIRD
. The Midshipmen halved their dou
ble bill against Tarheel State toams
yesterday, losing to North Carolina
State, 8 to 2, in the morning game
fft Raleigh and trimming the North
Carolina University team, 5 to 4, in
the wind-up at Wilson. The good
ship Navy could not weather the
broadside by State in the eighth ses
sion and the second bunch of Tar
heels showed a world of power, but
did not begin to swing their bats
until after the infield had thrown the
game away.
Second Game Belayed
Fans who had braved wintry blasts
in order to reach Wilson Park at 3
o’clock did not see any action until
4:45 o’clock on account of a delayed
train. Once they had started Um
pire Brandon kept the collegians
hustling for eight innings until long
after the baseball had become a thin
white streak scarcely visible from the
stands.
Four Carolina runs in the sixth
J changed the complexion of the melee
from a runaway* to a horse race, but
valiant efforts by the Tarheels to even
up in the two tense innings that fol
lowed developed nothing further than
threats.
Eighth Was Disaster
Up until- the eighth session Navy
still had hope of winning the morn
ing game at Raleigh by a final rally,
but when'the State <*rew outsbot Navy
in the eighth frame with four hits,
a sacrifice hit and a sacrifice fly, the
Xgyy listed sharply to port, turned
’ over on its weatheC side and sank.
The battle was fought on rain-swept
seas, with a chilly nor-wester bring
ing distress to both crews.
(CentiiuH*! On Vmf <J \
i LOCAL ARRESTSfOR
VIOLATIONS OF THE
MOTOR VEHICLE LAW
The following local arrests for vio
lations of the State Motor Vehicle
Law are listed in the report of Auto
mobile Commissioner Baughman for
current week:
John Schnitzlein. lmvink markers of
another car, fined $10; same, having
no registration certificate, $10; Os
wald Stallings, operating without li
cense. $10; Henry A. Warfield, Jr.,
having no registration certificate.
$10; same, having markers of anoth
er car, $lO.
These arrests were made at Glen
Burnie and vicinity:
Michael Ciurca,/swinging markers.
$5; Henry Cromwell, operating with
out license, $10; also no registration
certificate in possession. $1; Lena
Miller, speed exceeding 35 miles an
hour, $25; Samuel Rosenthal, speed
exceeding 35 miles an hour, $25.
Fines imposed in the county dur
ing the week totaled $2,989; and in
Baltimore city, $1,047, making a
grand total of $4,036 for the weekly
period.
cmiFhwth
ll.' DECREASED III1S2!
(By TJm* AuMoriutnl Prewt.)
OTTAWA, ONT., Mar. 31—Canada’s
foreign trade for 1922 amounted to
$1,647,701,892, or an increase of more
than $45,000,000 over 1921, according
to the report of the federal depart
ment of trade and commerce.
Total imports for the year mount
ed to $762,339,309, the report shows
Total exports reached $884,362,583
The year closed with a favorable
trade balance of $3,221,337.
Great Britain was Canada’s best
customer during 1922 and the United
States was second, according to the
report. England purchased Canad
ian products to the extent of $374,-
751,894, an increase of more than
$65,000,000 over 1921, while the
United States purchased $340,156,247
worth of goods, an increase of about
$14,000,000 over 1921.
A surprising feature of the report
is the fact that Canada's purchases
from tho United States during 1922
showed a decline as compared with
1921, amounting to $506,823,760, as
against $555,091,000, a falling off of
$45,267,240.. Canada’s purchases from
Great Britain showed an increase in
value of more than $13,000,000, jump
ing from $123,149,776 in 1921, to $136,-
866,288, last year.
Lacrosse Game Today
With the team of Stevens Institute
as opponent, the midshipmen will
open their schedule of lacrosse games
this gfternoon. the game being booked
to start at 2:30. The Navy base
ball team is closing its Southern trip
this afternoon with a with the
University of Richmond, at Richmond.
Virginia.
TELEGRAPHERS BANK
WILLOPEN IN JUNE
(By Th Aunnitcd PrMM.I
~ST. LOUIS, MO., Mar. 31.—The
Telegraphers’ National Bank* which
probably will open here about June 1
will be conducted along the lines of
the Locomotive Engineers’ Co-opera
tive National Bank of Cleveland, ac
cording to E. J. Manion, president of
the Order of Railroad Telegraphers,
who will head the new institution.
Organization of the bank, wbicb
will have a capital stock of $500.00(
and a SIOO,OOO surplus, was authorized
at a session of the grand division oT
the railroad telegraphers’ union at
Savannah. Ga., in May, 1921. The
capital and surplus has been sub
scribed. Mr. Manion stated, and the
majority of it by members of the
union.
Although the bank will be control
led by the union, no distinction is to
be made in the list of depositors. The
accounts of all persons will be so
licited. L. J. Ross, grand secretary
and treasurer of the union, will be a
vice-president and cashier.
Under the by-laws as adopted by
the board of directors, a limit of 10
per cent, has been placed upon .the
dividends to be declared. Earnings
above this, Mr. Manion says, will go
either to the surplus or be divided
| among the depositors as a bonu^.
The bank will become a member of
’ the Federal Reserve System.
l To Elect Vestry Monday
The annual meeting for the election
of a vestry for Severn Parish will
be held on Easter Monday, in St. Ste
phen's Church, Crownsvile, at 12
noon.
\
i
EASTER IS OLDEST
CHRISTIAN FEIST
Celebrated Ever Since Resurrec
tion—Succeeded Spring Ob
servance Of Ancients
The custom of holding a great popu
lar festival in the spring to welcom
the return of lengthened days goe
back to the oldest recorded historj
and was well nigh universal. Th
Feast of the Passover, established ac
cording to Biblical tradition by Mose
in the wilderness, and celebrated an
nually by the Jewish people afte
their return from exile in Bahylonie
is am example of such a spring feat!
val spiritualized by giving it a dis
tinctly religious character.
The crucifixion took place on th
Friday before one of the celebration
of the Passover, and the resurrectio
on the morning of “the first day c
the week,” that is on Sunday. In
sense, then, it is correct to state th
Easter is the successor to the sprin
festival of ancient mythology. How
ever, because of the enormous import
ance of the historical fact of th
resurrection to the Christian faith, th
Easter feast contains elements whicl
raise it entirely above and beyond th<
spring time festival of pagan people
Oldest Of All Festivals
Historians state that the name Eas
ter is derived from Eastre, a Saxor
goddess in whose honor the grea'
spring festival was celebrated. Thi
celebration of Easter seems to liav<
been observed by Christians eve:
since the resurrection, and is there
fore the oldest of all the festivals ir,
the Christian calendar. The eelebra
tion of the nativity on Christmas da’
did not begin until the fourth century
During the days of the Apostles, Sun
day was observed as the Sabbath bj
Christians instead of the seventh day
Saturday, which was the Sabbath of
the Jews. Throughout .Christendom
in all ages. Friday has been a fast da>
and Sunday a feast day. as weekly
memorials of the crucifixion on Fri
day. and the resurrection on Sunday
The symbolism which connects the
sacrifice of the Paschal Lamb and the
eating of unleavened bread at the
Jewish Feast of the Passover, with
the sacrifice of the lamb of God and
the putting aside of the “leaven of
wickedness," has permeated Jewish
and Christian literature and liturgy
from the days of the prophets
Confusion Over Bute
In earlier days considerable con
fusion arose over the date of Easter,
but the Jewish Passover was fixed in
“the law” by a day of a month, the
months being regulated by the phase®
of the moon. Astronomical problems
entered into the question, and it was
not until A. D. 325 that a definite
method of determining the date of
Easter was authorized. Even today
in some of the eastern and oriental
churches, the western usage is not ac
cepted. In the West Easter is defined
as “the first Sunday after the first full
moon after the spring equinox.” that
is after March 21. This year the Pas
chal full moon occurs on Easter day
Today, in English-speaking lands
Easter holds a pre-eminent positior
as a religious festival. Christmas, al
though Christian in origin, has as
sumed largely a secular character, bu’.
Easter, with its promise of new life
new joy, new spiritual grace and
above all, renewed hope of life in the
.world to come, draws to the churches
of all types and fills the
houses of worship with their largest
congregations of the year,
Jews To Observe
Feast Of Passover
Commencing at sunset today all
Jews will celebrate the Feast of th(
Passover in commemoration of the
liberation of Israel from the rule of
the Egyptians. Services are held
daily for seven days to celebrate the
new era of happiness after the release
from Egyptian bondage.
Tonight and tomorrow night thf
Seders will be held in all Jewish
homes, when all the ancient Jewish
customs will be observed and where
all .will partake of the unleavened
bread in memory of the suffering anc'
hardships of Israel in the flight from
the persecutions of the Pharaohs.
The story of these hardships is told
and retold to the younger generation
at the Seder services.
Missionary Society To Meet
The regular monthly meeting of
the Women’s Foreign Missionary So
ciety of Calvary Church will be held
i on'Monday night at 7:45 o’clock in
I the Sunday School room of the
- church. Mrs. C. C. Bramble will have
! charge of the program. The subject
of the evening will be “Japan."
THE WEATHER:
• Fair tonight and Sun
day. Continued cold to
night.
COMP REHEN 81VI LOCAL AMD OKtMEAL MMWI
PRICE TWO CENTS.
. AMERICA CROWS
MORE RELIGIOUS,
FIGURES SHOW
Latest Tables Give Membership
In All Christian Bodies At
More Than Forty-Seven Mil
lions But Constituency Is Near
1,000,000 Mark.
METHODISTS LEAD ALL,
THROUGHOUT COUNTRY
(Bjr The Aanoelated Prena.)
WASHINGTON, Mar. 31.—America
pparently is growing more religions.
Figures made public today by Dr.
*• O. Watson, statistician of the Fed
rated Council of Churches, show that
he religious bodies in the United .
tates made their greatest growth
uring last year. The increase la
.220,428 members over the previous
ear.
The present membership of all re
:gious bodies according to the latest
vailable figures is 47.461.568. This
, increase is approximately 50 per cent,
greater than the average for the pre
ceding five years. There was a gain
of 9,591 congregations and 15,262 min
isters. The total number of congre
gations is now 243,590. They are led
t>y 214,583 ministers.
Average Of 3J145 A Day
According to these figures, church
representatives point out that each
day in 1922 art average of 3,345 per
sons joined the various religious bod
; ies; 42 ministers were ordained or
licensed; and 26 congregations were
organized.
The shortage in clergy is not as
* great as the fact that there are 29,-
i 007 more congregations than minis
ters would indicate. . Many pastors,
especially in rural districts, have
charge of two or more congregations.
Besides a number of mission and
, rural churches are served by laymen.
This activity on the part of laymeh
is one of the significant features of
the year.
Owing to different methods adopted
by the various bodies in computing
their membership it is hard to make
J comparisons. The Roman Catholic
Church shows a membership of 18,-
, 104,804 persons. Its figures represent
estimated church population and in
clude all baptized Evangel
ical Protestant churches show a
i membership of 27,454,080. They
count communicants only.
The thirty bodies related to the
Federal Council of Churches report
a total membership of 20,722,142 per
sons. They have 149,436 congrega
‘ions, served by 119,077 ministers.
Their gain in membership over last
year is 869.261. • Their total constit
uency is now 59,021,718 persons.
Total 4’onst It nency 9*4*878,867
The total religious constituency of
the country is placed at 98,878,367
rersons. Church officials define con
stituency .to mean all baptized per
sons, all adherents, and all those who,
In the supreme test of life or death,
turn to a particular communion.
When the figures of the various
churches are placed on a comparable
basis through methods agreed upon by
church and government officials, the
. constituency of the great bodies la re
, ported as follows:
• Protestants 78,113.481
Roman Catholic 18,104,804
Jews 1,600,000
Latter Day Saints (Mor
mons) 604,082
’ Eastern Orthodox
(Greek and Russians) 456,054
1 Jewish Figures game
j The Jewish figures are the same as
j used last year. They are computed
, on a different basis from the various
, Christian bodies because of their
? variation in methods of counting
membership. The Jewish authorities
estimate the Jewish population of the
j United States at more than 3,300,000.
Though some of the larger bodies
F have not reported on their expend!-
, tures, the figures already in hand
- show that the churches raised $16,-
1 628,894 more than last year. The to
, tal reported to date is $505,052,978.
j The greatest increase in meraber
„ *hip is due largely to the gains of the
Roman Catholic Church, which shows
I an increase of 219,158; the Methodist
Episcopal Church. 122,975; the South
ern Baptist Convention, 97.116; and
f the National Baptist Convention
- (negro), 74.570. The Roman Catholic
d figures indicate a decrease in the rate
n of gain as compared with the annual
e average for the preceding flve years,
e which was 432,766. The Methodist
t churches have the largest coastitu*
(CMtIMMI M PM* 4.1 —* _ ,

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