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Evening capital. [volume] (Annapolis, Md.) 1922-1981, April 02, 1923, Image 1

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IJciated press
CatchM of late
1 ar e published in
Evening Capital.
' i gHlu IVIKI IVHNINO EXCEPT SUNDAYS. ;
— No. 164.
If ION 10
(3 HON
ITHERIiI TRIP
jHomc A;;ain And Coacher
f Satisficrl Over Succesr
garbed First Extensive
pry Away From Base
g Undertaken.
o
It RICHMOND U.
SATURDAY, 6 TO 2
, tw> victories stored
. .against one marker on the
j.klc of the ledger, the mid*
Ern 's s<|ttad rcturn
ithe \a\ ai \cademy yester
jftrrnoon from their tliree
na.'ioit <f North Carolina
Virginia, the most extensive
t ever taken by a Navy
Members of the coaching
sitt gratified over the sue
jttaincd while on the trip.
I cloning frame of the southern
hi played against the llniver
i Richmond, at Richmond, Va.
Uy and the middies earn*
p on tin* li nn end of a 6 to 5
Tin middies began their tri]
y playing North Carolina Stat*
l morning, and went down t(
I s to 2. In the afternoon
r they staged a “come back'
Iwncd University of North Car
I tc 4
riiij In frigid Weather
ime at Richmond Saturday
jiayed in frigid weather. Th
with a more experienced
•ere at the mercy of Snead in
Kip; four innings, when errors
IMion and commission permit
km to score. Only two runt
pmd.
k tanned 10 of the visitors, bu
touched for tO hits, three of
itcre the result of slow fielding
*r pitched a pretty game for th<
ind was well supported except
third and fifth, when errors en
tl Spiders to register,
weather conditions were bad
t cold, sti IT breeze sweeptn,*
l the field.
riiet s work at third was par
f y Rood, his one-handed stab o
1 inter featuring the game. His
kse hit was the hardest blow
i(tame. Mills at second put uj
'tame, int Hedenuan, at short
dm fielding, with two errors li
knees. *
(f nnMni|p,F It,) P,| C o A.)
FOR SALE!
So <>()()!) LOCATION.
<iM.i:rr sim'ahatk apaht
' Oi; • IIWHMKNT I'Olt ONE
o I; l VI'S WELL. PART
1 INt.M mills CONI'IIiRXTIAL.
' I’Ats imvVpaXCY. ItOX 11.
" T t‘ ornci:. a2
w7 Fail to Visit
' napolis and Eastport Com
' ai Exhibit at the East port
M E. Church
APRIL 10. 11, 12.
(lesiTlptlon will be on
t-'-iii luiiiU ami n-freitti
m-uth mi sale.
to. Seawall tickets, C3o.
Elks! Installation
Ot Officers
-e meeting of the laulge on
\ 4 at 8 P. M.. the offi
r the ensuing year will be
After the business
," r, K ;l * vul session will be
A Elks are requested to
•Signed)—
W V. McCREADY.
Exalted Ruler.
.
LOST!
REMAN S GREEN GOLD
4 NEt HINT.. REWARD IF
kNEI) TO EVENING
; ‘Ai (VFICE OR MARY
*-x° hotel,
GUIENOT’S 1
u *an/ and Lunch Room
NOW OPEN
AYE, & BLADEN ST.
WANTED!
ALES MEN
Napolis territory.
: r Apply
H arles street
® e tween 7 and 9 P. M.
Opening ll!3£ii Capitol.
NAVY LACROSSE TEAM
TAKES OPENING GAME
... _
Stevens Institute Outclassed By
George Findlayson’s Mid
shipmen Pupils
TEAM WORK SUPERIOF
Playing a much superior game In
every respect, the midshipmen's la
crosse team launched upon the sea
son's campaign Saturday afternoon
by administering a decisive defeat to
the twelve of Stevens Institute of
Hob< ken. N. J., 12 to 1. Displaying
better team work, the naval lads
forced the fighting and kept their op
ponents on the defensive the major
portion of time.
The game was played in frigid con
ditions of weather, similar in every
respect to the Navy-Syracuse base
ball setto on Wednesday. A biting
cold northwest wind prevailed
throughout, and the players forced tc
don heavier than the customary togs.
And the gallery of spectators like
wise was small.
Wilson Places “Buck”
Rear-Admiral Henry B. Wilson, su
perintendent of the academy, started
the teams into hostilities, by placing
ths little ball let ween the sticks of
the opposing centre men, and he
quickly cantered to the sideline
bleachers, fearing that, he might get
i rap of some sort, as the players
began to mix thlugs up. The Mid
dles assumed the offensive |at the
outset and within two minutes of the
start, Billings, who played a brilliant
game all the way, netted the ball for
the first score. The sailor lads, ai
though playing against the stiff wind
amassed 7 points before the visitors
were able to count us a result of s
clover shot by Sperr. This occurred
within four minutes of the close of
the first half which ended with the
figures reading. Navy, 8; Stevens, 1.
Middles Resume Alertness
The second half found the middies
again forcing the issue, and play war
confined almost entirely In the zone
ICuntlnn.il On I'nif. 4.*
GOVERNOR NAMES W. K.
CONWAY AS SECRETARY
As had been forecast. Governor
Ritchie has appointed William K
Conway, of Baltimore, a former news
paper man. as his executive secretary
to succeed W. Oscar Anderson, Jr.
who was also formerly engaged in the
newspaper business in Baltimore. Mr
Conway lives at 4030 Kate avenue
Forest Park, Baltimore. His prede
cessor resigned to become manager of
the Baltimore l ranch of a well-known
brokerage firm.
Mr. Conway was engaged in repor
torial work on Baltimore newspapers
for 11 years, and last summer was ap
pointed secretary of the Maryland
Fuel Distribution Committee, serving
that position until the dissolution o
that committee two weeks ago. Dur
ing the war Mr. Conway served with
the Three Hundred and Thirteenth In
fantry in France and was wounded at
Montfaucon. He is the son of Mrs.
Ella Keating Conway, and resides
with her.
BANDITS IN ST. LOUIS
STAGE HOLDUP IN
BROKERAGE DISTRICT
(By Th. PrM.t
ST. LOUIS, MO..'Apr. 2—Five or
six men armed with sawed off shot
guns held vn a mail truck in the busi
ness section of the city, took a quan
tity of mail including nine packages
of registered mail, locked the driver
and the messenger in the cage of the
truck and escaped.
The truck was on its way from the
main postoffice to a sub-station. The
holdup occurred in the middle of the
stock brokerage districts. Postoffice
inspectors said they could not deter
mine stolen until a check
had been made. It was said that
there was no big bank mail in the
loot.
The Annapolis Garage
WILL OPEN APRIL Ist
TAXI SERVICE. STORAGE.
WASHING
W. I. OWENS F. L FOSTER
IOC.-105 WEST ST. TELEPHONE 900.
■3
TORRENT!
Furnished dwelling 83 Market
street. For Juno We*k or longer
period. Immediate possession. JUL
IAN BREWER & SON. a2
HARRY POKE NAMED
TO POST IN Off ICE
OF STATE AUDITOR
!<
Announcement has been made by
State Auditor Lewis M. Melbourne of
the appointment of Harry Price, of
Annapolis, as a dejfuty in the State
auditing department.
Mr. Price is a retired lieutenant of
the Supply, or Pay Corps of the Navy,
having been commissioned during the
war when he was serving as a pay
clerk. He is a native of Harford
county, but has been a resident of An
napolis for more than 20 years. H'.s
home is in Southgate avenue. Murray
Hill. For eighteen years he served in
the pay office of the midshipmen’s
store at the Naval Academy, and also
"performed a short tour of duty at sea.
He became physically incapacitated
and was subject to a delicate opera
tion on the head, from which he made
a fine recovery. However, he was fin
ally transferred to the retired list of
the navy about a year ago.
For the past year Mr. Price has
been associated with the interests de
veloping Bay Ridge property on
Chesapeake Bay. Mr. Price will as
sume his new duties immediately,
which, it is understood, will enable
him to still maintain his residence in
Annapolis.
EHIIIS¥ IQ IOST
“TRAGIC FIGURE” IN
EUROPEJEPORT SAYS
Tha P %
YORK, ENGLAND, Apr. 2 - Reports
of a serious disagreement letween
former Emperor William and Prin
cess Hermoine, his bride of a few
months, which have cropped out fre
quently since the first of the year,
were revived today by the Doom cor
respondent of the Yorkshire Evening
News. The correspondent states that
he has learned from a “singularly
well informed source” that the e#
Kaiser and his wife do not live to
gether.
The ex-Emneror's life is reporte
to bo “very solitary” and his estab
lishment “very simple” for “althougb
his private means are still ample
they are not under his control.” The
correspondent describes the Emperoi
William as “one of the most tragic
figures in Europe.”
Supt. Fox To Address
Davidsonville Club
George Fox, County Superintendent
of Education, will address the Wo
men’s Club of Davidsonville and its
guests on Wednesday, April 4. on the
ways of “Helping Our Public School.’ ‘
The club cordially invites all the wo
men of the neighborhood to attend thr
meeting, which will be held at 2:30
p. m.
WEATHER NOT DAMPER
TO CHILDREN BENT
ON ROLLING EGGS
Blustery winds and low tempera
tures proved not the s’ightest hind
rance to the uproarious enthusiasm
of the hundreds of children who gath
ered in Cedar Park to roll their Eas
ter eggs today. From all sections of
the city they gathered in groups,
many accompanied by mothers or
chaperones, and malSe the trip to Ce
dar Park afoot or in motor convey
ances.
Throughout the day their joyous
shrieks rose above the whistling of
the wind ami the gay colored prod
ucts of their Easter baskets dotted
the green slopes of the suburb like
premature flowers of extraordinary
brightness. Games and picnic lunches
also featured the celebration, the
young folks enjoyed their holiday re
spite from school with all the care
free gaiety such holidays are wont
to arouse
AMERICAN WOMAN.
YET UNIDENTIFIED,
DIES IN LONDON
(By Thr Aniwlntfrf PwO
LONDON. Apr. 2—An American
woman, believed to be Mrs. Jessie Mae
Hellon Bowie. 48, and possibly a resi
! dent of San Francisco, died suddenly
; Saturday night at a hotel in the West
End. The authorities have been un
able to identify her further, but she
was apparently well to do and is re
j puted to have Teen the wife of an
American millionaire.
ESTABLISHED IN 1884,
i_
ANNAPOLIS, MI).. MONDAY, APRIL 2. 11)23.
FINE MUSICAL
J SERVICES MARK
JOKOUSEASTER
Churchgoers Turned Out In
Large Numbers Despite Rec
ord Cold Weather That
Brought Forth Fur Coats Atop
Of Spring Finery. .
.. 7^
ORATORIO RENDERED
AT CALVARY CHURCI
The coldest Easter on record in no
wise dampened the ardor of the
crowds of churchgoers that filled all
the city's places of worship at the
various services held yesterday, but
the feminine part of the throng sal
lied forth in fur coats Instead of the
spring finery that should have been
worn.
Easter hymns and anthems were
sung in all churches, and many of
them had elaborate musical pro
grams. *
Oratorio At Calvary
The eighteen members of the choir
of Calvary Methodist Church gave
Spohr’s oratorio. “The Last Judg
ment.” to a packed congregation at
last night's service at the church
Rarely has the auditorium been filled
to capacity for a similar occasion, bui
the difficult music of the oratorio and
its inspiring message was worthy the '
tribute. All the solos were well given
and sonic with unusual beauty and
understanding, the powerful bass solo
“Thus Said the Lord.” being particu
larly noticeable. The soloists were:
Sopranos. Miss Rullman. Miss Wilson
Mrs. William King and Mrs. W. M
Feldmeyer; alto, Mrs. W. Shenton;
tenors. Prof. W. Olivet, J. Wilson, Dr
J. C. Joyce; bass. Prof. W. F. Shenton
H. Snyder, H. Sadler and W. M. Feld
meyer.
The organist. Prof. CTH. Rawlins
played the scofe of the oratorio with
masterly style and artist-v vat de
serves the highest praise. His inter
pretation of the many dramatic pas
sages was excellent, and h : s support
of the choruses and solo parts at all
times sympathetic and adequate.
Great credit for the success of the
evening’s program is due to W. Mor
(ftißtlmifil On
‘SOLDIER’FLEi FOR
DE RHODE DENIED; HELD
FENDING EXTRADITION
(Bjr The Associated Press.)
NEW YORK. Apr. 2—His word “ar
a gentleman and a soldier” that he
would not attempt to ecaape failed to
guin freedom today for Louis Rem sen
De Roode, of Baltimore. He was cap
tured Saturday in a Riverside Drive
apartment, disguised as an old man.
and held for extradition to Baltimore.
His counsel, informing the court
that De Roode had been a major in
the Marine Corps during the war,
asked for his release until the extra
dition papers arrive from Baltimore.
“As a gentleman and a soldier, rav
client gives his word he will go back
to Baltimore and face his accusers.”
the lawyer said. “He has already re
turned 125,000 in cash and SIO,OOO in
bonds of the amount that he is alleged
to have stolen, and the indictment
only charges theft of the sum of
$6,300.”
Magistrate Corrigan willed that he
had no power to release a man held as
a fugitive from justice.
Raise For More Wool Workers
(By The .Associated Press.)
MARTINSBURG. W. VA.. Apr. 2.
A wage increase of approximately 10
per cent, effective at once, was an
nounced here today by two woolen
companies. Four hundred employees
arc affected.
nERUIu'
GUILTY OFGONSPIRRGY
hT The 4*sAClat*4 P*
BALTIMORE. Apr. 2.— <5. Graham
Archer, member of the 1 ankrupt
stock Irokerage firm of Archer, Har
vey and Company, and F. Berne Wil
son, a customer of the concern, to
day were declared guilty of conspi
racy to defraud customers prior to
the failure. They were tried before
Judge Epstein in criminal court with
out a jury. Date for the trial of
Arthur Gordon, office manager of the
concern, on similar charges has hot
■ b een announced.
The firm fdiled in December. 1921,
l with liabilities of approximately
$360,000, assets about $70,000.
\
HEART STROKE FATAL
TO WIFE OF SENATOR
A. THEODORE BRADY
Mrs. Florida Malone Brady,
wife of State Senator A. Theodore
Brady, died suddenly shortly after
noon today at her residence, 211 Han
over street. Heart failure was the"
direct cause of death, although Mrs
Brady had Leeu indisposed for sev
eral weeks, suffering from bronchial
trouble.
Mrs. Brady was a daughter of
Judge Malone, of Quincy, Fla. There
are no surviving children. Arrange
ments for the funeral have not been
completed.
To Elect Vestrymen
At St. Anne's Church
There will be a meeting of the
qualified voters of St. Anne’s Church
this evening at 8 o’clock in the Guild
Room of the church to elect four ves
trymen.
Jouron Rites Deferred
Because of delay occasioned by his
mother in reaching Annapolis from
her home in Kewanee, 111., funeral
services for the late Mark M. Jouron
which were to have 1 een held from
St. Mary’s Catholic Chtirch this morn
ing at 9 o’clock, have been deferred
until tomorrow morning at 9.
GOLDEH WEATHER AGAIN
OYERSFREINE WEST
111 IE EAST
fTtv
WASHINGTON. D. C.. Apr. 2
Cold weather again is overspreading
the northwest and the Ohio valley and
lower Lake regions will experience a
return to low temperatures.
After an Easter, which in many
sections was the coldest ever record
ed, generally milder weather prevail
ed in the Eastern states today and
indications are that still warmer tem
perature will come tonight in the
territory bordering the Atlantic. P
wide disturbance however, is center
ed over Colorado and pressure ir
high over the eastern and southeast
ern states, the Mississippi Valley and
the Rocky Mountain' region.
Thirty-five stations reporting to the
Weather Bureau yesterday and this
morning, registered the lowest tem
peratures ever recorded in April.
A reading 14.9 degrees here, was
with two exceptions, lower than any
temperature recorded during the
winter.
ADOPT RESOLUTIONS
UPON DEATH OF T. E.
STRANGE. MERCHANT
Annapolis Chamber of Commerce,
at a recent meeting, adopted the fol
lowing resolutions upon the death a
few wrecks ago of the late Thomas E
Strange, prominent merchant and
member of the Chamler:
“Whereas, Death having come
among us and taken from earthly toil
our friend and member, Thomas E
Strange, who while with us was ever
ready to serve, and was truly loved
admired, and held in the highest es
teem for the many splendid traits of
his character, his loving and unself
ish disposition and his willingness
at all times to aid his fellow-man
or make someone else happy, there
fore be it
“Resolved; By the Chamber of
Commerce of Annapolis. Md.. that bV
the death of Thomas E. Strange th’.s
Chamter has sustained the loss of
one of its most esteemed members;
the community one of its most use
ful and energetic citizens; and his
family a loving husband and father.
“Resolved; That the sympathy of
. this Chamt er be, and the same is
hereby extended to the family of our
departed member in their lereave
ment, knowing that our Heavenly
Father, who shaoes the destinies of
our lives will take them under the
wings of his great love and give them
that peace which passeth human un
derstanding.
> “Resolved, That these resolutions
si be spread upon the minutes of this
-j Chamter and a copy be transmitted
E to the family of our deceased mem
i ter, and also published in the local
t press.
“LEON STRAUSS.
“DENNIS THOMPSON.
“THOMAS G. BASIL,
“Committee on Resolutions.”
GIRL PUZZLES POLICE
BY STORY Of POM
Mexican Miss Says She Swallow
ed Dose After Ejection From
Chapim Apartment
INFATUATED, SHE SAYS
(Hy Thy AMorlutnl Pram.)
HOLLYWOOD. CALIF., Apr. 2.—P
young woman, saying she is 15 year:
of age and claiming acquahitanc'
with Francisco Seranno, Mexicat
minister of war, and Pedro J. Alniada
Inspector-General of Police in Mex
ico City, interested police, surgeon:
and newspaper men today with dec
larattons of having swallowed poisoi
after having been ejected from th<
bedroofn of Charles Chaplin, motioi
picture actor.
Tells Story Of Infatuation
She gave the name of Mrs. vMarin
Vega, of Mexico City. While n<
traces of poison were found, th
movie comedian, in whose car sh
was brought to the hospital, told o
several entrances effected to hi
house through ruses. Her story wa
of infatuation with the comediai
whom she had seen in moving pic
tures in Mexico City, and unsuccess
ful attempts to see him at the studir
followed by gaining entrance to hi
residence while he was out and rc
maining in his bedroom until discov
ered there by a Japanese servant
who held her until the arrival of Mr
Chaplin, accompanied by Pola Negri
his fiancee.
Entered House Second Time
The girl was induced to leave afte
a brief talk with Chaplin, but return
ed a second time and after bein;
put out said she purchased poison a
■> nearby drug store and once mor
entered the Chaplin residence.
Induced to enter an autcmotile, sh<
collapsed, saying she had swalowe'
poison. She was rushed to the re
ceiving hospital, but surgeons ther<
after an examination shook thei;
heads and placed a question mark o*
the story she told.
PLANS’UNDER WAY FOR
COMMERCIAL EXHIBP
Arrangements are well in hand fo
♦he Annapolis Eastport Commercia
Exhibit which is to be held at th
Eastport Methodist Episcopal Chure'
under the auspices of the Men’s Bibl
CNass April 10-11-12.
Nearly every merchant in Anna
rolls .and Eastport has entered th
exhibit. Articles of every descrip
t on will be displayed with the nanu
of tho merchant or business firr/
contributing the same. . These will be
on exhitit for three nights and will
1 e sold to the highest bidder the las j
night. This will be a most splendb j
means of advertisement for the mer
chants and business men of the com
munity lecause the exhibit will b
visited ly a large number of th;
people of the county.
A large number of churches an
fraternal organizations of the counts
that have received invitations have
notified the chairman of the exhibii
that they would be present. A grea
many tickets have also been sold it:
the community. The price of admis
slon to the exhibit appears on the
front page of 'the Evening Capital.
In addition to the exhitit a lunch
room is being fitted out where ligh'
lunch and refreshment will be ot
sale.
Any merchant, business or
professional man who has not entere
the exhibit and desires to do so
should call Annapolis 744 W for par
ticulars.
AUTO TRUCK OVERTURNS
WHEN WHEEL GOLUtPSED
1 Collapsing of a front wheel on a
! i Ford delivery truck of the Mayer
- hofer Bakery, caused -a smashup on
West street at 2:30 o’clock this aft
• ernoon. The truck, driven by Clar-'"
‘ ence Sutton, was proceeding east on
1 West street, at a moderate rate of
■ speed, according to the driver, when,
suddenly the wheel gave way, caus
i ing the dray to collide with a Nash
; j touring car belonging to C. Ritchie
1 i Winterson and which was parked near
■ j Winterson s garage.
1 The truck overturned. Sutton was
thrown to the street but escaped with
only a slight bruise on the knee. Dam
ages to the touring car consisted of a
broken front wheel and one fender
badly bent.
THE WEATHER:
* Fair and much warm
er tonight. Tuesday in
creasing cloudiness.
COUPBEHKNBIYB LOCAL AND QINIftAL NNWt.
PRICE TWO CENTS.
WHITE Nil IS
SHOT TO DEATH
AT MEADE JCT.
Walter Smith And Edward
Brooks, Quarrelled Over Hog,
It Is Said. And Latter Fired
Revolver, Killing Him In
stantly.
WERE WALKING ALONG
ROADWAY TOGETHER
Walter Smith. 27 years old, a boiler,
maker by occupation, but who lived on
i farm place in the Fourth district In
he county, was shot and instantly
’tilled by Edward Brooks, colored,
xime age, ns the result of an alterca*
ion on a county road near Cump
Vleade, at 12:16 o’clock today. Sheriff
larry T. Levely was notified of the
raged.v and left the city immediately
).v automobile for the scene.
Quarreled Over Hog, Report
Details of the murder have not been
earned here, but it is understood to
lave resulted from a quarrel be
wcen the two men. according to the
widow of Mr. Smith, who is prostrated
by grief. It is said there had been ill
feeling between the men for several
months. Today, it is said, they quar
reled over possession of a hog, and as
a result the negro whipped out a re
volver and shot Smith in cold blood.
Tho white man died instantly.
The tragedy occurred on a road
near Camp Meade Junction on tho
Washington, Baltimore and Annapolis
Electric Line. State police otfleers,
who were in the vicinity at the time,
captured the negro, it is understood,
and he is being held pending the ar
rival of Sheriff Levely.
PITTSBURGH RAISES
PAY SCALE OF LABOR
ALL DOWN THE LINE
*** T1 >* Pm<.|
PITTSBURGH, PA.. Apr. 2—A
vare increase for building trade
voikers in Pittsburgh ranging from
0 to 25 cents an hour was announe-
J today by employers’ associations.
The pew scale reads:
Painters, $1.25; bricklayers, $1.40;
•.tone cutters and stone masons,
-1.25; structural iron workers, $1.25;
lod carriers, $100; common labor
ers. 60 cents, (after July 1) 70 cents.
:T0 DISCUSS FRENCH
POLICY IN THE RUHR
“The French Policy in the Ruhr”
will to discussed in connection with
the program of the University Club
at the regular meeting of the or
ganization to be held in McDowell
•Hall, St. John’s College, Thursday
evening. The speaker will be Daniel
Jor Tan, assistant professor in the de
partment of modern languages at the
Naval Academy.
Another interesting topic to be
treated is “Petroleum,” by Captain
John Halligan, Jr., of the Navy, in
charge of the Engineering Experi
ment Station at the Naval Academy.
BUSINESSCENTERM
GHESTERTOWN, MD.,
DJP BY FIRE
(By Th* Associated Press.)
CHESTERTOW’N, MD., Apr. .2.
Destruction threatened the business
center of this city today when sparks
blown by a high wind from four burn
ing buildings near the Pennsylvania
railroad tracks caused half a dozen
minor fires to start in various sec
tions of the town.
Large oil tanks located near the
’ first fire were saved from ignition
, only by the strenuous efforts of the
■ local fire companies assisted by two
i companies of firemen from Centre
: ville.
Spicher’a Garage and the ware
house of Massey and Kilbourne were
i destroyed.
t After a t wo-hour fight with the
- flames, the fire chief announced that
i the blaze was under control. Total
: | damage will range between $26,000
and $50,000, It ia thought.

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