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Evening capital. [volume] (Annapolis, Md.) 1922-1981, April 07, 1923, Image 1

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Associated press I
ft Dispatches of late
pf wi are published in
jj, e Evening Capital.
tv tut IV BN INO BXCKI'T BUN DATS.
yol. LXXVII No. 169.
0i LOSES
IST. JOIN'S IN
HCimiNTH
jj-ors "Blew” And Cadets,
playing Inside Baseball Nosed
ojtojt Victory Over New York
fs, 5 To 4, In Opening Con
rtt.
ANDII OKD twirled
IN SUPERB FORM
nctiing their season of base
ijanies yesterday afternoon,
St. John’s College Cadets
rid a splendid triumph over
riham in an exciting finish in
ninth inning. The local coi
gns had outplayed their op
mts all the way, and while
ir was loose fielding by both
*- the contest was interesting
jutfhout. 1 w ice the teams
t locked in a tie, but defeat
't. John's seemed imminent
tn the New ot hers got a run
"in the ninth. But the Ca
i went to the bat in the same
• . displayed inside tactics,
rkdl the S(jueeze play, took
advantage of their opponents’
cms and nosed out a victory.
Mmidh'ofd lliirlcil Superbly
lindifonl, of Baltimore Poly
tnn*. who entefcul St. John’s only
i months agd, twirled a highl>
tuible gam*. His steady work, In
as good enough to win with
prative case, but his teammates
Wed in ii couple of innings. The
i Engineer fanned 11 opposing
mtn slid otherwise had a perfect
fd on the slab, as well as In the
(Hdefs First To Score
I* Cadets went out in front In the
ad inning. With one out, Standl
irew a base, hut was thrown out
icond on Holmes’ fielder’s choice.
is stole second and got home on
irner's error. They added another
tbe third on Merrick's hit and
i and Bounds’ single. Fordham
•el the count in the fourth, get
i brace of tallies on three errors,
it and fast base running. Both
:*cot a tally in the seventh, Ford
by an error and one hit, and St.
•'* through a free pass, a steal,
in error. Fordham went one to
Md In the ninth. Landry landed
ICniillniif*<t on P*|* 4.1
sls REWARD!
N! IM'OHMATIOX LEADING TO
-T"T AM* CONVICTION OF
t HOW |> y WHO lIItOKK MY
M'OW ON n: \NCIS STKKKT.
KI'WAHP .IKWKI.T,,
170 Main Street.
- 4
Announcement
LOUS X. PHIPPS an
'Wkys that lie has severed
' connection with the
intcrs**n - Phipps Auto
‘tnpany and is now asso
with the MYERS’
Gar \t ,K. local BUICK
’ V 1 KS. where he will
P'cased to serve his old
fonds. Phone 103.
LOUIS X. PHIPPS.
a?
)o;/V Fail to Visit
Annapolis and East port Com-
Wroial Kxhibit at the Eastport
M E. Church
> APRIL 10. 11. 12.
'■ •' i'!.* description will l*e on
1 *islit luii* h and refresti
g, , meuta ou sate.
il ' l! n<ii.ia. to*.. Si'hsou tickets. 553*'.
'guiENOT’S I
Wauran! and Lunch R. oom i
NOW OPEN
“ LEge AVE. & BLADEN ST.
J
WANTEDI
; alesmen
AN '-\'APolis territory. *
|, Apply
‘ 1 11 ARLES STREET
tw , on 7 and 9 P. M.
(jfcotning iiylfcill.- Capital.
WASTE PAPER CO. MAY
BE FORCED TO OBIT;
CITIZENS CAN HELP
Unless more public interest can be
aroused in the local business offices
and householders in regard to one of
the small items of waste that occurs
in each of these places daily. Annapo
lis will soon stand in a fairway to
lose one of Its most useful small busi
nesses which has recently opened up
here and has. until within the past
few days, received excellent public
co-operation.
This business is the Chesapeake
Waste Paper Company branch in An
napolis. Several weeks ago the
Chesapeake Waste Paper Company, of
Baltimore, established an Annapolis
branch and undertook to give Anna
polis a service of which it felt itself
very much in need, the disposal of
the waste paper of the city.
Not only does the Chesapeake
Waste Paper Company purpose to col
lect the wf.Bte paper, bu‘. o*t'*"s a very
fair price for this- murh of the com
mon waste.
The saving of waste paper by
householders and business men not
only gives proper support to this
much needed business, but is in line
with the great nation-wide movement
towards conservation of waste paper
which promises within a few to
become acute to such a point that tnc
shortage will reflect materially in the
price.
The Annapolis branch operates as
a subsidiary of one of the largest
waste paper concerns in Baltimore
City, and the local manager is at gll
times ready to make arrangements
with any business for the collection
of waste paper. There is no* limi
tation placed on any grades of paper
The. usual office waste or the collec
tion of magazines, newspapers and
paper rubbish which commonly clut
ter up some corner, or attic, go to
this business stock in trade and the
economic advantages of turning this
waste over to some concern which
can make use of it are obvious.
The manager of the local branch
announces that a telephono call to his
office No. 233-W will bring about a
ready arrangement for paper dispo
sal.
N. A. Chapel Guild
To Meet On Monday
The April meeting of the Naval
Academy Chapel Guild will be held
oti Monday morning at 10 o’clock at
the residence of its president, Mrs
Henry B. Wilson.
All ladies in the families of officers,
professors, or instructors on duty at
the Naval Academy are invited to at
tend the meeting and have a part in
the work of the Guild.
NOTICE!
Ancient City Lodge No. 173 (Colored).
Improved Benevolent ami Protective
Order of F.lkn of the World, will liohL
its Aiitiunl Memorial slid Thanks
giving Service at Mt. Moriah A. M. K.
Church on Sunday, April S. at 8. I*. M.
Public Is cordially invited.
Notice to Patrons
Owing to tomorrow being
Easter Sunday in the Greek cal
endar. the ANNAPOLIS RES
TAURANT will he closed in ob
servance of the holiday, and we
ask the indulgence of patrons of
Annapolis Restaurant.
(Signed)
STEVE FOUNDAS,
a? Proprietor.
DANCE I
Saturday, April 7th
P. M.
ST. JOHN’S GYMNASIUM
BENEFIT OF LACROSSE TEAM
ST. JOHN’S COLLEGE
ORCHESTRA
—o— i
Admission. fl.dQ.
V- ■
Keep Your Eyes On i
Bay Ridge
Select your lot NOW.
We will build for you.
HARRY PRICE
PHONE 735.
Representing
BAY RIDGE REALTY COUP..
BALTIMORE. MO.
$* —— .......
ACTIVE CAMPAIGN
FOB CITIZENSHIP
Educators Will Discuss Charac
ter Building And Compel
Teaching In Schools
(By Tba Associated Press. 1
WASHINGTON. Apr. 6—The re
cent action of the American Bar As
sociation in promoting an active
campaign for a law to compel the
teaching of citizenship in the public
schools of the land has received wide
spread comment. There might even
seem to te an implication that edu
cators have not been looking after
this very important phase of school
work, but such is not the case, de
clares the Character Education Asso
ciation, of this city.
Much Research! Work
Research’ on the pro/lems of educa
ion for citizenship has been carried
m by educators for several years,
and at the forthcoming World Con
ference on Education, to te held in
3an Francisco next June, when dele
gates from all parts of the world will
Tieet, this subject will be discussed,
it was said.
“There is, however,” declares the
tssociation’s statement, “a larger
movement going forward than mere
ly the teaching of citizenship. This
is “character education," which has
as its fundamental purpose the culti
vation of the disposition and purpose
to act right as citizens, and not mere
ly or chiefly a knowledge of the con
stitution and the principles of gov
ernment. Statistics sluw that half
>f the notorious criminals and citi
zenship perverts of the nation , are
well informed regarding the United
States constitution the laws of
the states. These people take ad
vantage of their legal knowledge to
contrive ways and means of breaking
the laws of the land without subject
ing themselves to the danger of suf
fering the penalties of their crimes
Character Forming Paramount
“The educators of America realize
that character forming should be one
of the principal aims of our schools.
Inculcate in the child the will to do
right and act right, and he will grow
up to be a worthy citizen. Ignore
the inoral side and there is always
the possibility that the more knowl
edge a person receives, whether it
be in citizenship or anything else,
the greater criminal will he turn out
to he eventually. Many a defaulting
hank president would be only a “sec
ond-story worker” but for an educa
tion that has neglected the moral ele
ment.”
The Character Education Associa
tion was organized to give impetus
to the movement for charaoter train
ing. It is under the control of a
board of trustees, all federal educa
tors, and the state commissioners and
superintendents of education, is non
commercial, and works under endow
ment. It recently completed a com
petition for a code of morals for chil
dren, and awarded the prize to Wil-
Hutchins, president of Berea
College. This code is now used ex
tensively in various school systems
through the country.
Vestrymen Chosen
For Severn Parish
The election of a vestry for Severn
Parish was held in St. Stephen’s
Parish House on Easter Monday. The
following persons were elected ves
trymen: Messrs. William Coleman
Rogers. R. G. Henry, Milton Turner.
Brice Worthington. C. dePevster Valk,
Maynard Carr, Everett G. Wallis, Zack
Turner. Edward Hall, Jr., was elect*
ed registrar, and Robert G. Henry,
treasurer. Delegates to the conven
i tion are R?. G. "Henry and Everett G.
j Wallis. Delegates to the convocation
are Milton Turner and J. Revell Carr,
i Wardens: Irving Hardy, Horatio
i Proctor and Mr. Duvall.
Prof. Richardson To Speak
Prof. Charles Richardson, of the
|; University of Maryland. College Park,
I wiU deliver an address at the meet
j ing of the Farm Bureau local of Da
, j vidsonville which will be held in the
Davidsonville Hall next Thursday
night. The public is cordially in
vited to attend this meeting.
Davidsonville A. C.
Moves Club House
Quite a little excitement was caus
i ed in Davidsonville on Monday by a
; “moving house” which passed through
about noon. The Athletic Club moved
i the Club House from the farm of
| Mrs. St. George Barber to the- base
ball grounds on Mr. Mortimer Beard’s
i place. The house was put on wheels
j and drawn by Harry Duckett’s trac
> j tor-
ESTABLISHED IN 1884.
ANNAPOLIS, MD„ SATURDAY. APRIL 7. 1923.
H SERVICE IS
CONDUCHE TO
CHURCH GOING
Plan Has Been Worked Out In
Chicago Church By Which
Children And Parents Unite In
Morning Worship—Trial Has
Convinced.
TRADITIONAL FAMILY
PEW IS RESTORED
U
•By Th* Ankik'liU Prr.)
CHICAGO, Apr. 7.—How the family
automobile may l eeome to the city
church goer what the family farm
wagon has always been to the rural
worshipper, is being worked out at St
Mark’s Church, a down-town Episco
palian Parish in Minneapolis, the Rev
Phillips E. Osgood, * rector of tlfe
parish, told the church club of Chic
ago in an address here today.
The Sunday School as a separate in
stitution has been abolished in his
church. Dr. Osgood said, and the par
ents and children are brought to
gether for morning worship. Five
months’ trial has convinced him that
the plan is a success.
o-M inute NeriiKpf T Children
-When parents and children as
senihle at 11 o’clock In the church, the
regular service of morning prayer is
conducted with some slight modifica
tion to suit the changed program. A
five-minute sermon for the children is
then delivered, followed by the offer
tory, and then while a hymn is being
sung the children retire to the parish
house where they have 30 minutes of
class instruction. Meanwhile, the
regular sermon is preached for the
edification of their elders.
When the regular service is ended
the children are waiting for their par
ents, the family automobile is loaded
or the family group proceeds to street
cars, and all return home ready for
Sunday dinner.
Tradition Of Family Pew
‘‘The chief object of this plan is to
restore the family pew to its tradi
tional position,” continued Mr. Os
good. “We found that because of our
situation on the edge of the down
town district, many of our parish chil
dren were not attending our school
But the difficulty was not so much
that the children were going else
where for instruction, as that the
family unity in worship was sundered
or that ultimately we lost the entire
family because parents so naturally
follow their children.
“The great fault of the traditional
Sunday School was that It did not
train children in church going. It
could no more do this than a black
board diagram could teach a person
to swim. The only way to teach church
going is going to church. The only
way to learn how to swim is, to get
into the water and swim.”
Attendance Shows Increase
Mr. Osgood said the attendance of
the children had been increased 30
per cent, in the five months and that
the regular attendance of parents at
services had been well ahead of the
same period for preceding years.
“The presence of the children has
vitalized the service,” he added. “For
merly we were a rather staid down
town congregation, but that condition
has changed.”
The plan has been supplemented by
activities for the children starting at
10 a. nT„ so that parents who desire
may attend adult bible classes as
sembling at that hour.
* While the bible classes are in ses
sion, children who care to do so may
' occupy themselves in modeling, map
making. extemporaneous dramatiza
, tion of Biblical stories, and similar
activities under the supervision of an
, jnstructor.
Presbyterian Women
To Have Meeting
The Women’s Missionary Society of
Presbyterian Church will meet at the
church parlors Wednesday afternoon.
April 11. at 3 o’clock.
The program will be as follows:
(1) Report of Presbyterial meeting,
Mrs. N. H. Foster; (2) Place of the
Negro in American lif&; (3) The life
h and work of Rev. Jeremiah Swan.
Mrs. S. E. Persons. The hostesses
for the social honr will be: Mrs.
McCandless. Mrs. Heintz, Mrs. Brooks
a and Mrs. Persons.
I)
A
f St. Anne’s Vestry To Meet
* The Vestry of St. Anne's Church
s will meet on Monday night at §:3O for
s organization purposes. This wifi be a
'* half-hour later than the usual time
for Vestry meetings.
BOYS' WEEK GIVEN
9ENERALAPPROVAL
Institution And Citizens Also
Deeply Interested In Children’s
Playground Plan
“Boys’ Week” and the campaign
for children's playground sponsored
by the Rotary Club of Anapolis. are
meeting with general approval
throughout the city and receiving
fresh impetus every day. Officials of
the several hanks have added their
hearty endorsement to both projects.
togeUier with substantial checks to
ward helping defray the cost of con
structing the playgrounds.
The Rotary Club is emphasizing the
fget that the expenses of ‘“Boys'
Week” will be borne entirely by the
club, and also that there will be no
solicitation of funds from individuals
either for that or the playgrounds.
The Rotary Club has pledged itself to
accomplish loth of these commends
able projects, and their realization is,
theerfore, assured.
Many Volunteer Donations
However, as to the playgrounds, all
organizations and institutions, as
well as individual citizens who de
sire to have a part in providing this
boon for the children of Annapolis
and suburbs, are heartily welcomed
in giving their support. Already a
number of public-spirited citizens
have volunteered donations, so that
it will be fully in the nature of a
community welfare proposition, as It
ts aimed to be. The Rotary Club is
welcoming co-operation and is re
ceiving it generously from all sides;
it is working with the community as
well as for it.
Governor Tops List
With Governor Ritchie topping the
list of those who have expressed their
approval of the two propositions, W.
Gordon Parlett. chairman of the com
mittee of the Rotary Club, has receiv
ed a number of other letters of en
dorsement, with contributions to the
playground fund.
“Boys' Week” begins on Sunday,
April 29. the opening feature of which
wilf be “Boys’ Day in church.” The
ministers of the local churches and
the Sunday School superintendent?
will that day specialize on the boys'
connection with the church, and the
Rotary Club will lead off with this
part of the program as paramount
to all others.
MISS COMBS TO SING
BROADCAST PROM N. Y.
W-A-E-F MONDAY NIGHT
Those folks of Annapolis owning
radio sets will have opportunity Mon
day night of hearing a former Anna
polis singer sing broadcast from sta
tion W-A-E-F, New York. The singer
will be Miss Laura Combs, daughter
of K. L. Combs, of St. Petersburg.
Fla., formerly of Annapolis. Miss
Combs has a rich soprano voice, and
is well-known to music lovers of An
napolis. having sung at numerous en
tertainments during her residence
here.
Word that she would sing broadcast
from the above named New York sta
tion was received by Annapolis
friends of the Combs’ today. The
hours of Miss Combs’ concert will be
fiom 7 to 10 p. m.
Former Resident Hurt
In Motor Accident
The many friends of Mrs. George E.
. Mattingly, of Washington, formerly
, Miss Cora Medley, of this city, will be
glad to hear that she is improving
from the injuries she received on
Monday last when she was struck by
an automobile in front of her home.
Mrs. Mattingly’s left arm and three
, ribs were broken and she was severe
ly bruised about the body. She is a
f patient at the Emergency Hospital in
> Washington.
To Hold Oyster Supper
The members of McKendree Metho
dist Episcopal Church will give an
b oyster and meat supper on Wednes
b day. April 11, beginning at 6:30 p. m.
, This supper will be held at the resi
s dence of Mrs. John Sherbert, proceeds
, being for the benefit of the Sunday
School. The public is cordially in
vited.
Marriage Licenses
KUS-RAU Charles J. Kus, 22,
A Richmond, Va.; Dorothy R. Rau, 21,
r Baltimore city. •
a DILLS-STOXE— Emory N. Dills. 25.
e Duluth. Minn.; Jeannette Sands
Stone, 30. divorced, Annapolis.
COUNTY LAD, SIXTEEN.
10 DISAPPEARED. IS
FOUND WITH ROAD GANG
Missing from his home near West
Rivef since Tuesday morning of this
week. Stanton Grimes, 16-year-old
son of Oscar F. Grimes, a farmer,
was found this morning, working with
a gang of laborers on a State road
in the lower county.
The lad disappeared apparently
without cause. His father immedi
ately instituted an investigation, even
to advertising his disappearance
through the press of Baltimore, as
it was thought that he would make I
his way to that city, although so fai
as known, he was without funds. It J
was learned in the meantime, that I
the boy spent Tuesday night in a
shack not far from the home of his '
father and Wednesday he was seer i
on the South river road coming in t
the direction of Annapolis. He is said
to have told a friend that he Intend-1
ed going to Baltimore, hence the ap- |
rehension of his father and his turn j
to extraordinary measures-in an en- 1
deavor to catch up with him. Witi
the finding of the boy this morning
there followed a happy reunion o
father and son.
MOTORISTSFIir
' FOR VIOLATING LAW
Activities of State Motor Vehicle
patrolmen and other police official*
resulted in a numler of arrests foi
violations of the Motor Vehicle Law
recently. The following offenders art
listed in the report of Automobih
Commissioner Baughman for the
weekly period ended on Thursday:
F. W. Carlson, operating without li
conse in possession, $1; also no reg
istration certificate in possession. $1;
F. K. Crandell, speeding over 3f
miles, $25; James J. Dwyer; reckles*
driving, $5; Oscar Morgan, fletitiom
markers, $10; same, no registratloi
certificate in possession. $1; same m
license in possession, $1; John Nox
operating without license, $10; An
drew H. Wilson, speeding, $lO.
In addition to being fined for speed
ing, the license of F. K. Crandell
who is from Churchton this county.,
was revoked, and the licenses of John j
W. Haines, and Lena Miller were,
suspended for speeding. The license
of Henry Cromwell, of Glen Burnie.
was suspended for 30 days for oper
ating without license or registration
certificate.
Total fines assessed in the State
for the weekly period amounted to j
$3,459. of which $1,736 representea
fines imposed in the counties., and
$1,723 for Baltimore city.
Eggs At 25 Cents And Lower
A general decline in the price of
eggs was noted on the local market
today. The prevailing retail price
was 25 cents per dozen and in some*
instances they were to be had at a
couple of cents lower than that.
Meeting Of Legion
Auxiliary On Monday
A large attendance is urged at th.'
meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary of
the American Legion, which will be
held on Monday night at 7 o'clock at
the Bladen street armory. This will
te the first meeting held since the
return of the president, Mrs. C. R.
aPrlett, who has been' absent in
Washington.
:
Notice!
DANCE
AUSPICKK CHOWNSVILLE
i . SOCIAL CLl'B
Benefit Baseball Team.
, MURRAY HALL, CROWNSVILLE
| Saturday, April 7th
AT 8 P. M
MUSIC BY ANNAPOLIS JAZZ BAND
Ladies. 25c.; Gentlemen. 50c. a"
-| 4=- ---■■■ ~ . ■■■-=. ■
: Card To The Public
5 The undersigned desire herewith to inform the many
friends and patrons that the Strange and White firm will
continue to conduct the clothing, furnishing and shoe busi
ness at 133-155-157 Main street, as before, and we take
this means of soliciting a continuance of friendly relations
.and patronage.
* ! (Signed) CLARENCE A/. WHITE,
R. THORNTON STRANGE.
* l _ • .. ' _
THE WEATHER:
• Cloudy and warmer
tonight and Sunday. Oc
casional showers.
COMPKEHCNSIVI LOCAL AMD QMHMLAL MMWA.
PRICE TWO CENTS.
Surge changes
IN CONTROL OF
STiCOLLEGE
Alumni Association Recommends
Plan For Reorganization Of
Board Of Governors And Fac
ulty And Conference Will Be
Held Monday.
SUCCESSOR TO PRES.
FELL ALSO PROBABLE
Election of a president of St.
John’s College to succeed Hr.
j 1 hoinas Fell, who wishes to re-
I tire and tendered his resignation
j several months ago after over 37
years of service, and discussion of
j drastic changes in the organiza
i tion and administration of
at the institution, will be urged
upon the Board of Governors and
Visitors by the alumni associa
tion at a conference to be held
here on Monday. The situation
as regards the future of the col
lege has reached an acute stage.
Quest lon Of Control
A meeting of the Alumni Associa
tion was held yesterday at the South
ern Hotel.
Resolutions proposing a reorgani
zation of the college' along “more
porgressive lines'’ were adopted
unanimously at the annual ihceting
of the association recently. Under
'roposed reorganization. 1 control of
the college would practically pass
from the present board of visitors.and
governors to the Alumni Association.
For Smaller Governing Body
It is proposed by the association
that the membership of the board of
visitors and governors be reduevd
from 24 members to 13. Seven of th %
13 members, the plan propones, wotilu
be elected by the Alumni Associa
tion, three members would be elected
by the board and three others would
be appointed by the Governor. The
plan further provides that these IS
, members shall elect annually the
president of the college.
I The preamble to the resolutions
■ adopted by the association declared
that a modern form of government
aPI licable to the present needs of Bt.
John’s College is an imperative need.
'lt is desirable, it is declared, that
i this change be accompanied concur-
I rent with the installation of the new
, president.
For Faculty Reorganization
Reorganization of the faculty and
"evision of the curriculum with a
sharp definition of duty is suggested
so that "the president may have a
free hand in the disciplinary and ed
ucational administration of the col
\
(Cnntlnneri On Png* 4.)
BALL GAME
OPENING GAME OF THE SEASON!
ANNAPOLIS ATHLETIC
CLUB. INC.
' va.
TIGER A. C., OF BALTO.
Sunday, April 8, 1923
Game called at 2:30 P. M.
At Athletic Field, West Annapolis.
■ ' "" —-/J
*
If You Are Thinking
of Building a Home
You can buy the beat lot on
Thompson street, in the most
desirable section of Annapolis.
50x140 feet, on northwest side
of street. Reasonable terms.
PHONE 504-R.
all
, .4

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