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Evening capital. [volume] (Annapolis, Md.) 1922-1981, April 26, 1923, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83009667/1923-04-26/ed-1/seq-4/

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PATRIOTISM SERVED I
El NATIONAL SIDES
WASHINGTON’, Apr. 26.—‘The pro-1
pcsal of Hoary Ford to buy the Old- j
royd Lincoln Mentorful Collection and
remove It from the ho ise where Lin
coln died, on Tenth street between
E and F street, Washington, D C.,'
directly opposite the old Ford T'.ie-j-j
tre has aroused a storm of opposi- j
tion among those who telieve that!
the greatest collection of mmneijtoes I
of the martyred president In ex’*tenco I
should remain In the Capital City a? i
a permanent shrir.e.
One organisation has taken the
matter up actively, and with the suc
cess of the Ladies' Mount Vernon As
sociation in preserving the birth *
place of the Father of His Country
cs a national shrine in view, the
Games of the Loyal Legion have an
nounce! their Intention of working
actively to persuade Congress to pur
chase this Lincoln collection and keep
it In Washington.
The movement to buy Mont ice 110
and keep forever inviolate as a na
tional shrine the beautiful home of
Jefferson, is well under way. The
Thomas Jefferson Memorial Associa
tion has been Incorporated in New
York to purchase and maintain Mor.-
ticello as a national monument to
“The immortal principles inscribed
in the Declaration of Independence.’
so that Monticello may rank among
the country's sacred altars with the
birthplace of Washington and the
tomb of Lincoln.
For many yeurs there have been
movements to acquire the property
ns a national memorial to the nu
Cior of the Declaration of Indepen
dence, and its present owner has sig
nified his willingness to turn it ovei
to tiie Jefferson Memorial Foundation
Doth the Thomas Jefferson National
Memorial Association, a Virginia or
ganisation, and the National Monti
celio Association, with headquarter*
in Washington, have pledged their co
operation.
COSPEL MISSIONARIES
TO MEET NEXT MONTH
(By Tlit AttNOflutml Prww.l
MINNEAPOLIS, Apr. 26. Mission
folk from the east, west, north and
south will assemble here May 20-24
for the tenth annual convention of
the International Union of Gospel
Mission*. Missions In .ISO American
eft leu of all sizes have been invited
to send n director, superintendent
add a successful convert to tho imut
lug, according to KeV. W. A. Paul,
of, this <Mty. chairman of the commit
tee on arrangements.
A new feature entitled “A Clinic
lit. Regeneration” will be staged dur
ing the meeting, and a largo nunil er
of outstanding converts, mon vdio
luive made good in business and in
the professional world, will give short
testimonials on each of the live nights
of the convention.
Mission problems listed for discus
sion include: “The Panhandler.
V The Handicapped Man," “Tho Fan
uticnl Mission,” “The Church Sup
port.” “The Wandering Convert,”
“The Work Test,” "The Transforming
of Reformed Men,” and the “Future
of Rescue Work.”
On College Diamonds
At Syracuse -Cornell, 3; S: ru
ense, 2.
At New Haven-—Yale, 4; Wes
leyan, 3.
At Cambridge, Mass.—Harvard, 3 ;
Dates, 0. (Culled in eighth, dark
ness)
At Lexington—North Carolina
Ftnte. 3; Virginia Military Insti
tute, 0.
At West Point Lafayette, 12;
Army, 7,
At Morgantown, W. Vd. Wayne
s-1 urg College, 8; West Virginia Uni
versity, 3.
At Champaign, II!.—Illinois, 4;
Purdue, 1.
At Princeton-Princeton, 1; Holy
Cross, 0.
At Quantico, Va.—Marines, 15;
Ua Hamlet. 14.
At College Park Maryland, C.
Catholic University, 4.
Works Roth Ways
“And what about your references?”
asked the employer of the applicant |
“Yes; my advertisement stated!
“References?”
‘Best references.' ”
“But I thought that applied to you!”j
A CLEAR COMPLEXION
Ruddy Cheeks—SparklincfEyes
—Most Women Can Have
Says Dr. Edwards, a Well-Known
Ohio Physician
Dr. F. M. Edwards for 17 vears treated
scores of women for liver and bowel ail
ments. During these years he gave to 1
his patients a prescription made of a '
few well-known vegetable ingredients
mixed with olive oil, naming them
Dr. Edwards’ Olive Tablets. You will
know them by their olive color.
These tablets are wonder-workers on
the liver and bowels, which cause at
mal action, carrying oil the w.js*c ar-* I
poisonous matter in one’s svsfer
If you have a pale face, sallow look,
dull eyes, pimples, coated tongue, head
aches. a listless, no-good filing, allr ut
of sorts, inactive bowels, \?w take or:
of Dr. Edwards’ Olive Tablets nightly
time and note the pleasing results.
Thousands of women and men taka
Dr. Edwards’ Olive Tablets—the suc
cessful substitute for calomel —n >w and
then just to keep them lit. Ibc aud 3Ue.
l
1 " * '
THE EVENING CAPITAL. AKHAPC/LrS, MARYLAND, THURSDAY, APRIL 2L 1023.
EDUCATION IN
U. S. PRESENTS
GREAT PROBLEM
(Cannoned From rose 1.)
! national problem; how shall we fin
'■ ance our institutions; how shall we
, pay for a reasonable education?
“The second phase of this problem
j *B. what kind of an educational system
shall we foster. There has alwayv
' been a debate between the proponents
sf the so-called system of liberal edu
i nation and those in favor of a voca
tional system. It is absolutely essen
| t'al to have a sound foundation of
jthe liberal type of education lefore
the vocational type starts. We must
teach men how to live before we teach
them how to make a liFing. How
shall we split up our system, when
shall we start specialized education
with special teachers in department
alized schools? Should it be at the
end of the sixth grade with the en
trance Into Junior High School, at
tiie end of the eighth grade with the
entrance into a Senior High School,
or should it be at the entrance iuto
college?
Colleges Divide Issue
“In. the colleges there has been a
division in the problem. One school
calls for a stimulation of the funda
mental independence of thinking, an
us ential spontaneity,* an intellectual
virility; the other school still holds
to the memory type of education
which rots the individual of much
of his initiative. Our colleges are
introducing many devices for inde
pendent thinking of their students, the
university system, the honor system
the tutorial system, and the system of
examinations In a field of inde
pendent thought before graduation
All of these attempt to stimulate
thought. These are all efforts to get
away from the mechanical, artificial
ly stimulated, stereotyped spoon-fed
system of education and an attempt
to make education a living mastery
which becomes part of a man’s mind
clue to the intellectual power gained
Physical And Mental Development
“One other trend of education is
the linking of physical with mental
development. There have been many
blotches on the escutcheon of athletics
and physical development in our
schools, but it I 3 a tremendous step
when we no longer think of the edu
cated personage as the aesthetic, the
skinny individual with the absent
mind. We are developing human bod
ies into l etter working machines.”
Before tho talk. President Angrll
was the guest of the Yale Alumni
Club of Annapolis at Carvel Hall for
dinr.er. Professors Robert, Fenton,
Stevens. Alden, Fowler, Colton and
Ray wore ulso present.
President Angells talk was heard
by i 11 audience of the University men
and women of Annapolis which taxed
the capacity of the hall.
Retribution Was Snh’t
A negro minister discovered two
men playing cards on a Sunday—and
for money.
“Rastus,” said the minister, “don’
you know* it’s wrong to play cards on
do Sabbath?”
“Yoh, passon,” answered Rastus
ruefully. “But. believe me, ah’s pay
in’ for mah sins.”
Square Deal Garage
AM. WORK C.t\R\NTKKt
G. •*. (Irilt! Moltlfn, Prop.
GENERAL REPAIRS, STORAGE
AND WELDING
Curnhlll mid Fleet si*.. AnnarolU, Md.
Telephone 7:i. lilt.)
iIHHEL W. BSOOKSSCO.iI
111 AM. N El. HON BROOKS
PAINTING - D KUO RATING
PAPER HANGING
SMidiitM Cheerfully Furnlal.Ml. J
1 Color 4oh,ir.M for furniture pointing*. I
FpHolnterlnif nod Gold Lint Work. j
!11 % tPEAS sr. ft*IIONB $44-vr. j
—HIT I ~ * r f I
|C. W. Tucker & Son
ROOFERS
Np'vtrvltiic, Sheet Metal and HI ate Work.
Mo\e and Furmaro !Up*i'ri h*.
PHONE 52-. L
!
Star : Theatre
CHANGE OK PICTURES! OAII.Y
TODAY
WARNER BROTHERS PRESENT
“Beautiful and
Damned”
In Seven Big Reds!
Episode No. 6. Serial:
“GO GET HIM, HUTCH.*’
... iw|* FaMts. j
FRILAI . SATUi^GU
Voddvil—Vodavil
GIBSON TRIO AND COMPANY
Featuring
Little Baby Corrine
Build A Playground Where We Can Play
*;t out. ’ yell the Cop. •“ ’r I’ll soon put stop
'1 u y’ur nerve rackin’ din by 'runnin’ you in
You won’t play on the street, when I’m on this beat.
So C base y’urself hense. Git away from that fence.”
An’ the Cop he’s the law and we’ve got to obey,
Put he don t tell us vvhht r where we can play.
‘‘Git out” yells the man when we kick his ash-can,
J hen he calls us vile toughs, an villians an roughs,
An names if I said would knock mother down dead.
W e run all our might, to get out of his sight,
An’ bump into people who kick us away,
An’ growl, but don’t menticn a place we can play.
”(iit out of the way.” yells a man with a dray,
As he nearly runs down niv chum, Billy Brown;
He raises his whip, then all of us skip,
But we only change streets, for where else can we go
To escape Cops and drivers, does any one know ?
If you were a lad, didn’t mean to be bad,
Had no place to meet except in the street,
Xo place to play ball, ’r “tagger” at all,
X’o place just to—\ ELL, when y’ur feelin* real well,
Now, honest and true what on earth would you do?
Why, you’d swear and make bets, an’ smoke cigarettes;
You’d gamble and fight, an’ throw stones just for spite.
You’d try to live to the names you were named!
An, you’d lie, with the gang; without feelin’ ashamed.
Big Brothers of ours, we want to do right.
But try as we will, it’s a hard uphill fight.
We’d rather play ball in a place where we dare,
Than skulk near a corner an’ gamble an’ swear.
We’d rather dim’ ladders an’ act on a bar,
Than dodge a policeman *r hang on a car,
It’s up to you, Brothers, come, please don’t delay,
But build a playground where us kiddies can play.
(SPIKE) WEBB.
String-Beans Au Frontage
Wax string-beans, red peppers, 2 ,
tablespoons flour, 1 cup thin cream
or rich milk, parsley, salt and pep- i
per, 2 tablespoons margariu, M cup ■
grated cheese. (
Wash the string-beans well, remov- i
ing ends, and boil in slightly salted
water until tender; then remove and
drain. Divide into bunches of about
six and pass through rings of pepper
and lemon peel or onion. Arrange
these uround edge of a deep plate, al
ternating each bunch with a spray of 1
parsley. Make a sauce with the niar
gcrin, flour, cheese and milk, season
well, adding a little minced parsley,
and pour in center of plate.—From
“The Designer” Magazine for April.
Perhaps many of those drunkards
fou hear al out are merely prohibit
tlonists drunk with success.
I REPUBLIC THEATRE I
Tomorrow Double Bill! £5
The Beloved American Actress:
LAURETTE TAYLOR
“Peg O’My Heart”
In a photoplay version of her greatest stage
success. The play, by J. Hartley Manners,
has been performed more than I 5,000 times.
BUSTER KEATON
“My Wife’s Relations”
A Very Amusing Comedy.
TODAY
Katherine Mac Donald
Supported by Bryant Washburn and
Mitchell Lewis in
“The Woman Conquers” v
I
I ~ J —— —=
quan.il ———— I—li —1 — w~r-qri i i ■mmrm imnill I ’ "Jll,lt—
"ifou sMpielMHnU
s-ll
4ist; •*< Jki, SioeWUi i
Kory jo Yozir
Shoes A ‘eat ‘
F. F. DiEry Cooi r *n; be. N. Y.
—■- ■ ~
A •woman who drives her own ma
chine was almost electrocuted last
week while examining the motor. One
of her cut-steel earrings made contact
with a spark plug. The shock was sc
great that she couldn’t hear any gos
sip for two days.
STOPS COUGH AND WHEEZY
.BREATHING
“Had a cough and wheezing in my
throat,” writes Caroline Dillard, Pe
tersburg, Va. “Foley's Honey and
Tar gave mo quick relief and stopped
my cough.” Coughs resulting from
Flu, Grippe, Whoiipisg Gvuglv, Asth
ma and Bronchitis, quickly relieved
with Foley's Honey and Tar. Three
generations of satisfied users have
made Foley’s Honey and Tar the larg-;
est soiling cough medicine in the
World. Refuse substitutes. Insist
upon Foley’s.—(Adv.)
HOPKINS TCSSERS
DEFEATED BY NAVY!
l< nnl!nufi) i roin Pagf I.)
ninth, when Newton, a second string
pitcher, got wild, passed th"ee tats
men. and hits ly Thomas, Holland
and Dannetiel, and fast base running,
enal led the Baltimoreans to cross the
rul ter six timoa. Captain iiederman.
! N'av' s shortstop, had a good time of
i it with the stick, rapping out 5 sin
; gles. out of six trips lo the plate.
\ bteve Barchet got a triple and two
singles out of live tuanccs.
Score:
NAVY Ab. R. H. O. A. E.
Harris, If 5 3 2 1 0 1
Ward, If ... 5 2 1 2 0 0
Hederman, ss. . 6 3 5 3 3 1
Carney, lb 5 1 2 11 0 0
McKee, 2b 5 11 3 4 1
Leslie, rf 4 11 1 0 0
Barchet. 3b 5 2 3 0 4 0
Zimmerman, c. . 5 2 2 6 1 0
Newton, c 0 0 0 0 1 0
Peterson, p 2 0 0 0 1 0
Haynes, p 1 0 0 0 1 0
xxßiggs 11 1 0 0 0
Totals 44 1C IS 27 15 3
HOPKINS Ab. R. H. O. A. E.
Grace, ss 5 11 3 2 1
Dannetiel, cf. . . 4 0 1 2 0 0
Rich, rf 4 2 11 0 1
p.. 1f.... 2 110 0 0
CIRCf F Attractions This V/1
Shows at 7-9. Matinees Wetkesday-Sa'urday Frm
IIP TONIGHT (THtItMMV)
II *A Triangular story
lIJ cf the Tricolor*
S Gc<Jfc
T* Directed, by
£ Jerome
———-——
Bn
,!e ' |
•h 1
• -iiß
ot
t>e a
n. Wm
n
:r - i
C* 1
te m 1
1
■J fll '
in nil I
Iff f Tgj
L
jf' rviy Sedan .‘“o Coupe (5-Pa„.) _ 2550
Jg-.-gyp |_. 1500 Sedan 2QSQ
Terms to meet Your Convenience
flij CHARLES WEISS
i: u I’iion i 2i. i. \ , j |
THIS IS A.STUDEBAKER YEAR
Merrick, lb 3 1 2 10 0 1
j Marrion, 3b 4 0 0 1 3 1
Thomas, 2b 4 11 1 5 2
Holland, c 4 11 4 2 0
Smith. If 1 0 0 1 0 0
McCubbin. p. ... 3 0 0 0 1 0
Totals 34 7 8x23 13 G
x—Leslie forced out between bases
xx—Ratted for Peterson in fifth.
Navy 6 4 1 0 2 3 0 0 x - 16
Hopkins. ..0 0010000 6 6
Two-base hit—Carney. Three-base
hit—Barchet. Home run -Zimmer
man. Stolen bases- Leslie. Grace (2>.
Rich (21, Schact, Merrick. Thomas
Holland. Rases on balls -Off Schact.
1; off Haynes, 3; off McCubbin, 3
Struck out —By Peterson. 4; by
Haynes. 1; by Schact. 2; by McCub
bin, 1. Double plays—Hederman to
McKee to Carney; Thomas to Grace
to Merrick. Ralk -Schact, Haynes.
Left on bases -Navy, 8: Hopkins. f.
Umpires—Aubrey and Hughes. Time
—1.55.
—lt is little in the way of surpris
ing coin men t to read that ‘'the Ger
mans cannot be trusted to keep their
word."
They demonstrated that way lack
in 1914 when they chose to regard
a sacred treaty as a "scrap of paper."
And the German national conscience
has not improved since that time. 1
OTHER
ATTRACTIONS
“POP TUTTLE”
COMEDY
MOVIE CHATS
Harold Lloyd
AESOP’S FABLES
—AND—
F. G. WTTWFR’S
FAROES"
“FIGHTING
BLOOD* ; *
KOEEItERECh’S
FAROES SYNCOPATED
ORCHESTRA
Extde I
BATTERIES j, I
I ■ I
MAKK up your mi]
that when >,v j ,1
another batten % I
going to have r.i I
the best will pay Xoi
every sense of the \ I
We try to make our J
pair work on all v. * KOs I
batteries live un T J
Exidc name.
W. IT • I
151 WES I v;
Atmapul •
ff'e handle only genuir „ '
_ aamraßijM - ..
IK 11 > \ \
I
MWSs-: I
I
if ■ 1
/i4v ‘Q I
1 IX \\ <3. 1
Vjp^i
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fa" r -j
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