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Evening capital. [volume] (Annapolis, Md.) 1922-1981, May 05, 1923, Image 4

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CIO MUSEUM WILL . |
KEEP ALL TREASURE
FROM PHARAOH TOMB
- illv T.m AiwctaM Preaa.)
VALLEY OF THE KINGS. Luxor,
Egypt, May 5.--Member* of the
American Archaeological Mission who
are assisting the discovers of King
Tutankharoun’s tomb in identifying,
preserving and packing the amazingly
rich collection of antiquities removed
from the burial chamber of the Phar
aoh, are making rapid progress in
their work and hope soon to leave on
their annual visit* to the United
States. They will return to Luxor in
the autumn when the tomb is re
opened
Most of the article* taken from the
royal mortuary chamber are now
ready for shipment to the Cairo
Museum, There Is little chance that
any of these mementoes will find
their way to American, or indeed
British museum*. For the Egyptian
law prescribes that all objects found
in royal tombs shall remain in the
country as the property of the Egyp
tian government. The Britons who
discovered the tomb must find their
reward in the personal satisfaction of
having added so signally to the
world’s knowledge of life on the Nile
8,360 years ago. They have taken no
article from the tomb as their per
sonal property. And they have an
nounced they do not intend to do bo.
The American expert’s compensa
tion will he even less. They are aid
ing their British colleagues without a
penny of remuneration. And they
have done by Tar the greater part of
the Important work of conserving the
hundreds of fragile objects found In
The tomb. It may be Hald that with
out their help these articles would
have perished.
While Lord Carnarvon lay seriously
ill in Cairo. Carter was working night
and day to complete the cataloging
and packing of the articles before the
torrid heat of the Egyptian summer
ensues. As a reward for their sea
son’s work, he lias given his Egyptian
laborers and diggers, who number
nearly a hundred, small honorariums
of money and food. Four of the labor
ers promptly UHcd the money to pur
chase additional wives, although they
are already married. The slave sys
tem still prevails in the interior of
Egypt, and the women go to the high
est bidders.
GOVERNOR OF KANSAS
ISSUES PROCLAMATION
BOYCOTTING SUGAR
•My Thy TaHoi'litlrd I’rraa.i
TOPEKA. KANSAS. May 6.—A
public proclamation urging a ‘‘sugar
boycott" because of the unprecedent
edly high prices, was issued yester
day by Gov. J. M. Davis. He advo
cated that It he carried out "In the
spirit of our forefathers of Boston
tea party days" and extended his re
quest not alone to the residents of
Kansas, but to those of the nation as
well.
“GIRLS’ WEEK" AT REPUB
LIC THEATRE
MAY 7-MAY 12
Valuable assortment of Gifts to the
Ladles—FßEE
The Republic Theatre, starting
Monday, May 7. will give away to the
Ladies, for a drawing to be held Mon
day. May 14. at the Republic Theatre,
at the starting of the second per
formance:
86 Original I’ucknges
Each containing one of the following
celebrated articles namely: Violet
Simplicity, Garden of Allah Perfumes,
Toilet Water, Pace Powder. Cold
Creams, Sachet Body Talcum; also
the latest creation in Oriental Per
fumes—“Dreamerie.”
This liberal offering was made pos
sible through the courtesy of Dr. T.
Kent Green's Pharmacy, which is the
distributor of these High Grade
Articles.—(Adv.)
NEWSBOYS HAVE BIG
TIME AT THE CIRCUS
• Continued Prim* rare 1.)
the same time, it was indeed hard to
(lx attention, on apy one thing. In
consequence, those “roly-holy" eyes
which the vaudeville artists used to
sing about, were very much in evi
dence. But at that, the "newsies"
saw enough to make them feel that
they really had not missed a single
trick. And when they were piled in
to the autos and started homeward,
even the lateness of the hour didn’t
keep them from staying wide awake
and chatting almost ceaselessly about
the big doin’s of the evening.
The circus treat to the newsboys '
was given jointly bv The Evening '
Capital management and J. B. Moore. .
of The Annapolis News Agency.
Those the sights were:
Harold Rawlings, Thomas Basil.
Henry Westphal, Benjamin Katcef,
Carol Koch. Frank Freeman. Albeano
Dimaggio. Marbury White. Thomas ]
Campbell. John Homberg. Fred Bush. ]
Richard Rush. Samuel Snyder. John I
Hughes and Marion Restanio. <
Said the judge: “I sentence you to \
be taken from this court to the prison, 1
where you will be hanged by the neck
until you are dead, on Thursday. 1
April 17.” Said the darky prisoner: 1
"You all doesn’t mean die cornin’ 1
April, does you. Judge?”—Wichita
Eagle. 1 1
#
PUPILS ON HONOR ROLL
AT SI. MARY'S SCHOOL
Eighth Grade—Myrtle Bassford.
Seventh Grade— Imeld Smith.
Sixth Grade Samuel Macaluso.
Louise Morgcnegg, Gertrude Krafft.
Mary Krafft. Charles Hoban, Eliza
-1 eth Stehle, Jeanette Stehle. Albert
Coronna, Cordelia Bassford, James
Dunleavy. Howard Welsh. Charles
Wiegand, Catherine O’Neill. Elvina
Tomainia. Pearl Bassford.
Fifth Grade —Loraine Gregory. Wil
bur Jones. Dorothy Meade, Louis
Jones, Eleanor Naughton.
Fourth Grade —Bertha Welsh.
Third Grade Lawrence O’Connor,
Josephine Viktor. Clara Cole, Dor
othea O’Neill, Edward Vodak, James
Suit.
Second*. Grade Mary Wlegard,
Ralph Jones. George Colburn. Char
lotte Taylor. Bernard MacWUllams,
James Patterson, Margaret Bassford,
Edward Collins, Jewell Wood, James
Goddard. Irene Velenovsky, Benjamin
Wood, Paul Gidius, James Small,
W’arren Lowman.
Honorable Mention Edith Collins,
Bertha Welsh, Marie Naughton, Viola
liaHsford, Isabel Suit.
Honor Roll—Colored School:
Eighth Grade - Agnes Baden, Julia
Spriggs, Doris Chase, Margaret
Fields.
Seventh Grade Joseph Duvall,
Thomas Colbert, Bernice Johnson.
Fifth Grade —Evelyn l.ueen, Claudia
Smith. John Chambers. Mary Harris,
Joseph Jacobs.
Fourth Grade Mary McGowan.
Cordelia Hobbit, Goldie Cook, Louise
Baden, James Hicks.
Honorable Mention Theodore
Steward, George Johnson.
NOW HONORARY MEMBER
OF FOREIGN WAR “VETS"
(Continued From r*i* l.
the V. F. W. are building a perma
nent memorial to our country.
Post In Community Factor
Annapolis Post Is now a factor in
this community and is making every
effort to live up to the high objects of
the Order which are fraternal, patri
otic, historical and educational; to
preserve and strengthen comradeship
among its members; to assist worthy
comrades; to perpetuate the memory
and history of our dead and to as
sist their widows and orphans to
maintain true allegiance to the Gov
ernment of the United States of Am
erica. and fidelity to its constitution
and laws; to foster true patriotism;
to maintain and extend the institu
tions of American freedom; and to
preserve and defeud the United States
from all her enemies, whomsoever.
CONGRESS WILL
HAVE TO ACT AS
TO NAVAL SCHOOL
(Continued From Pace 1.)
the attitude of Mr. Denby and the
Administration, characterized the agi
tation concerning the matter as a
"tempest in a teapot."
Requires Sanction Of Congress
Any move to transfer or abolish
the school would have to receive the
sanction of Congress, it is declared.
That body is not expected to meet
before next December, when it con
venes in regular session.
The prediction made yesterday at
the Navy Department is that there
will be no definite action looking to
ward transfer or discontinuance of
the school before then.
Meanwhile, it is pointed out, there
will be plenty of time for the Mary
land delegation In Congress to organ
ize an effective opposition to the pro
posal.
“MOVIES” MARK
CLOSE OF BOYS’,
WEEK IN TOWN
(Continued From Pace 1.)
Thanking the Rotary Club for the
prize award, John Sullivan presented
the club insignia, which was one of
the embellishments of the "float” in
the parade; Thomas Mortimer praised
the Rotary Club for prompting Boys’
Week, and then Tom Stone, the presi
dent of the class, proposed three
cheers for the Rotary Club, and the
lads responded with a vim, ending the
cheer with three “Rotiry Club.”
Tile boys all voiced their opinion
that they had had a good time
throughout the week. That alone was
sufficient reward for the committee of
Rotarians, who had worked so hard in
arranging the week’s program, but
praise is heard on all sides for the
noble service rendered by the Rotary
Club, in recognition of the boys, and
catering to their future welfare.
FARRRAR-TELLEGEN SUIT
MUST BE TRIED AGAIN
(By The Associated Frees.)
NEW YORK, May s.—Geraldine
Farrar's divorce suit against Lou Tel
legan, her actor husband, which had
teen nearly completed before a ref- ,
eree. must be retried before a jury, (
the Appellate Division of the Su- (
preme Court ruled yesterday in order
that Miss Stella Larrimore, one of
the co-respondents, named by the
diva, may have an opportunity to
clear her name in public.
ADYERTIgE IK TUB EVENING
CAPITAL. W PATS! > J
-XHEJiVENING CAPITAL, ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND, SATURDAY, MAY 5, 1923.
PROURTY TRANSFERS
U CITY AND COUNTY
RECORDED IN COURT
From Isiah N. Humphrey and wife
to Alice May Thomas and husband.
2 lots of ground at Brooklyn Park,
Fifth district. /
From Grover C. Shipley to Ferdi
nand H. Jacober and wife, tract of
land on Hammonds Ferry Road, Fifth
district.
From United Realty and Home
Builders' Corporation to Max C. Lou
denslager and wife, lot of ground at
Arundel Manor, Third district.
From G. Glenn Prout and wife to
John H. Owens and others, tract of
land at McKendree, Eighth district,
containing 1 42-100 acres.
From Henry M. Fitzhue, Trustee, to
George E. Egan, 4 lots of ground at
West Annapolis, Second district.
From Edward Hall, Jr., and wife to
William G. Williams and others, tract
of land in Second district, containing
156 43-100 acres.
From Robert M. Pindell, Jr., and
others to Minnie Catterton, tract of
land at Pindell, Eighth district, con
taining 4 acres.
From Sarah Morris to Irving H.
Brown and wife, property at West
Annapolis. - Second district.
From The Workingman’s Co-Opera
tive Realty Company, Inc., to Ezra H.
Lookingbill, 2 lots of ground in Third
district. •
From The Workingman’s Co-Opera
tive Realty Company, Inc., to Ezra H.
Lookingbill, 2 lots of ground at Glen
Burnie Heights. Fifth district.
From John and wife
to Arthur H. Miller, 4 lots of ground
at Marley Park Beach, this county.
From Lucy Brown and others to G.
Rfdgely Sapplngton and wife, prop
erty in this county.
From Aladdin Realty and Home
Builders, Inc., to Charlotte Hawkins,
lot of ground at Colonial Park, this
county.
From Sarah Elizabeth Crisp and
husband to Charles R. Hopkins, tract
of land in this county, containing 137
acres.
From Mary Hopkins Benson and
husband to Cordelia Anthony, tract of
land in this county, containing 130
acres.
From Nicholas H. Green, Attorney
to Lee Albert McNew and wife, lot of
ground at Eastport, Second district.
From Lewis Rose, Junior, and wife
to Nicholas Weiner and wife, 2 lots of
ground at Brooklyn Heights, this
county.
From Charles W. Mulligan and wife
to John M. Appleton and wife, 9 lots
o t ground at Pasadena, Third district.
From Margaret A. Boland to John
H. Boland, Jr., property situate in this
county.
Frotn Howard M. Pumphrey to Ed
ward J. McNally, 2 lots of ground at
Riveria Beach, this county.
From Howard M. Pumphrey to
Ethel M. Murphy and husband and
others, 2 lots of ground at Riveria
Beach, this county.
From John K. Culver and wife
William N. Crisp, 2 lots of ground a:
Brooklyn Park, Fifth district.
From William N. Crisp and wife *
William E. Cloman and wife, lot of
ground at Brooklyn Park, Fifth dis
trict.
From Benjamin Freidman and wife
to Guy B. Phipps, 3 tracts of land ir
Eighth district, containing in the ag
gregate 19 3-4 acres.
From Alexander Dennis and wife to
Charles A. Cooper and others, tract of
land at Shady Side, Seventh district,
containing 4 acres.
From Joseph B. Parodi and others
to Mary Josephine Bland, property
known as No. 218 King George street.
From Preston D. Leitch and wife to
Meyer S. Hess, lot of ground on Pud
dington Creek, First district.
From James M. Munroe, Attorney,
to The Eagles Club, lots on West
street, this city.
From Frank B. Kowalski and wife
to Jakob Taranowski and wife, lot of
ground at Outing Park, Fifth district
From Charles D. Reigle and wife to
W. Louis Clark and wife, lot of
ground at Odenton, Fourth district.
From John Stackerman and wife to
Edward E. Ward and’ wife, two tracts
of land In Second district, the second
tract containing 33 1-100 acres.
From Roland Terrace Corporation
to Michael Marx and wife. 2 lots of
ground at Roland Terrace, this
county.
On College Diamonds
At Chestertown, Md—Washington,
2; West Virginia. 1.
At Westminster, Md.—Ursinus, 10;
Western Maryland, 4.
At College Park, Md.—Maryland, 4;
Dickinson. 1.
At Lynchburg, Va.—Lychburg, 5;
Randolph-Macon. 3.
HOW’S THIS?
HALL’S CATARRH MEDICINE will
do what we claim for it—rid your sys
tem of Catarrh or Deafness caused by
Catarrh.
HALL’S CATARRH MEDICINE
consists of an Ointment which Quick
ly Relieves the catarrhal inflamma
tion. and the Internal Medicine, a
Tonic, which acts through the Blood
on the Mucous Surfaces, thus assist
ing to restore normal conditions.
Sold by druggists for over 40 years.
F. J. Cheney ft Co., Toledo, O. —
(Adv.)
One thing that still contributes to
the housing shortage is starting fires
with kerosene.
HUM FLEET iUIH BUCK !
su com or jeosey
'By The A—ortalfj Pr—■>
NEW YORK, May s.—The rum
fleet, which apparently had run away
in the face of a three-sided attack
by government forces, has circled
tuck* and is lying in extended forma
tion off the coast. Hampton Berry, c
of the Coast Guard service, has an- a
nounced. t
The yacht Ista and the British 1
tanker Aristawa are off Jones' Inlet, i
Long Island, while some schooners t
are Mattered along In open forma- i
tion about 12 miles apart i
The rum fleet which bobbed up off i
Jones’ Inlet, L. 1., after being driven
by a land and water cordon from its
old mooring place off Sandy Hook,
has adopted seaplane transportation
to defeat the -efforts of the Govern
ment to block landing of liquor car
goes, it was announced at Customs
Headquarters here.
A report of Lieut.-Comdr. Camden,
of the Coast Guard Cutter Seneca,
said the Seneca had surprised a large
gray plane without identifying its
number or Inhignia at the side of
t&e yacht Ista yesterday. The Ista’s
skipper signalled the aviators that
the Seneca was a government craft
and the plane quickly sped away.
PADDOCKSETS
WORK FOR 75 METERS
(By The Aaaoelated Press.)
PARIS, May s—Ch&rles Paddock,
running star of the University of
Southern California, who is compet
ing in the International Students'
Athletic Meet here, yesterday set a
new world's record for the 75 meter
dash. Running in an official trial
he made the distance in 8 and 2-5
> seconds or 4-5 of a second under the
, record previously established by Eng
i dhal, of Sweden.
Social and Personal
(Continued From Pace 8.)
| Back From Yisit
To North Carolina
i
Mrs. Louis B. Henkel, of Murray
avenue, who has been visiting friends
. and relatives in Winston-Salem, N. C.,
since Easter, returned home yester
j day.
, Gilbert Lucas
To Marry
The engagement of Gilbert Lout
j relle Lucas to Miss Eleanor Garner is
reported in this morning’s issue of
, the Baltimore Sun. Mr. Lucas was
, divorced last December by his wife,
Mrs. Sarah Belle Williams, who is a
. member of the summer colony on the
Severn. Miss Garner is well known
In the art colony of Baltimore. She
, has posed for young artists there, and
I on. several occasions has worn orig-
L inal creations of these artists at
masque balls.
Afternoon
Tea Today
Miss Elizabeth Persons is giving an
r afternoon tea today at the Presby
terian Manse in Duke of Gloucester
street in compliment to the party she
: will take to Europe this summer.
Among her guests, who include mem
bers of some of Miss Persons’ other
parties, will he Mrs. and Miss Meares
> Mrs. and Miss Croker, Mrs. Kennedy,
f and Mrs. Samuel Kirk, who will motor
. from Baltimore; the Misses Elizabeth
Fleming, Sarah Crane, Virginia Poor
> and May Perkins; Mrs. C. Alphonso
Smith and the Misses Smith, Mrs.
Ralph B. Foster, Miss Anna Ridout,
• Miss Louise Magruder, and others.
IGNORANCE OF LAW,
SAYS MISS LANGHORNE
(By The AmcrlaUd Prm >
- LYNCHBURG. VA„ May s—lgnor
ance of the law was declared by Miss
i May A. L*hghorne, at her home here,
1 to have been the cause of her being
penalized at New York for attempted
evaskyi of the customs laws. She
said that upon her arrival in this
country she wore apparel purchased
abroad last June and dill not know
that she was supposed to list it.
She said she had listed everything
she thought of any value and had
overlooked the clothing that ahe
wore.
PIANOS FOR SALE!
K. Roger ft Sons 9 60.00
Whitman. . 160.00
Mueller 200.00
York Player 475.00
.TERMS .
Free Tuning for One Year.
Royal Wigley
284 H MAIN ST.
m7
Square Deal Garage
AIL WOM GCAKAMTEEPI
. P. (Irish) Malden, Prop.
GENERAL REPAIRS, STORAGE
AND WELDING
CnrnhlU and Fleet SU.. Annapolis, Md.
Telephone 788. ml 9
C. W. Tucker & Son
ROOFERS %
Sponttny, Sheet Metal and State Work
Stare and Fnrnnee Repairing
PHONE fifr* |
ST. JOHN’S CADETS GO
DOWN D) DEFEAT AT
HANDS WGETTYSBURG
Gettysburg College had little diffi
culty In defeating St. John’s Cadets
at Gettysburg yesterday 8 to 3. Prom
the time “Snaps” Emanuel hit the
fence in deep left center for a home
run, scoring Bream ahead of him in
the first inning. Gettysburg scored al
most at will off Bock, but the ad
vent of Gray in the box in the fifth
inning put a atop to the run getting.
The score:
GETTYSBURG. R. H. O. A. B.
Myers, rf 0 0 1 0 •
Stevens, rf 0 0 0 0 0
Mens'll, cf 11 2 0 0
Bream, ss 2 2 1 2 0
Emanuel, 2b 11 3 2 0
Mordan, 3b 2 1 0 1 0
Plowan, If 0 11 0 0
Holl'er, lb 0 1 5 0 0
Faber, lb 1 0 5 0 0
Fisher, c 0 1 8 1 0
Coming, p 11 1 2 0
Totals..- 8 9 27 8 0
ST. JOHN’S. R. H. O. A. E.
Ho’hes, 2b 11 4 3 1
• H. Wenger, lb 0 1 9 0 0
Merriken. If 0 0 0 0 0
Engelke, ss 11 11 1
Holmes, cf 0 1 2 0 0
Dugan, 3b 11 0 3 2
Longer, rf 0 0 2 0 0
Jarvis, rf 0 0 3 0 0
Perry, cf .. 0 10 0 0
R. Wenger, c 0 0 3 1 0
Standiford, c 0 0 0 0 0
Bock, p 0 0 0 0 0
Gray, p 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 3 6 24 8 4
Score by innings:
Gettysburg 304 100 OOx —8
St. John’s 010 000 011—3
Three base hits —Bream, Mordan.
Home runs Emanuel, Engelke.
Struck out—By Collins, 8; by Bock,
1; by Gray, 2. Umpire—Mitinger.
WILL OFFER BILL TO
HOLDJUGfIR MARKET
(By The AHMoelatCu Preen.)
NEW ORLEANS, LA., May s.—Rep.
James B. Ashwell, Democrat, of Lou
isiana, has announced that upon the
convening of Congress in its next ses
sion he will introduce a measure
“that will forever prevent a recur
rence of the present scandalous con
ditions in the sugar market,” if it
is passed.
His bill, the representative said,
would solve the problem in much the
same way that the government has
handled the cotton and wheat prob
lems.
OUIMET DOWNS WILLING
FOR ST. GEORGE’S TROPHY
(By The Amorlated Preen.)
SANDWICH, ENGLAND, May 5
Francis Ouimet, of Boston, won the
royal Saint George's champion grand
challenge golf trophy, defeating by
one stroke Dr. O. P. Willing, of Port
land, Ore., in the play-off of the con
test here.
Ouimet took 77 strokes for the 18
holes, while Dr, Willing required 78
| SAMUEL W. BROOKS l CO. I
CHAS. NILBOR SHOOK*
PAINTING - DECORATING
PAPER HANGING
-*-
j, UlibiOm rwaiiLM
n- S l-r
--• alor trhnnf> (or furniture palatiuti
Upholstering onri Hold Line Work
11% PKAM *T. PHONE 544-VI
SPECIAL 1
MEN'S NAINSOOK UNION SUITS
50 Cents
10 DAYS ONLY!
A. GREENGOLD
-70rb-
Star: Theatre
CHANGE OP PICTURES DAILY
TODAY
Big Time
Vodavil!
" FEATURING
JOS. M. MEANS
That Mysterious Magician.
•LEATHER PUSHERS"
Century Comedy.
4—Other Acts—4
__ b>— *
WEDNESDAY, HAT t
POLA NEGRI
—IN—
“MAD LOVE”
NOISELESS TROLEY CARS \-
PLANNED FOR TWIN C/7/J ,' A
I arc
(By The Aeaorlated Pm. ) ■ -
MINNEAPOLIS. May s.—Minne
apolis and St. Paul and suburban ter
ritories are to have virtually noiseless
street cart in the not distant future
After years of experiment, the Twin
City Rapid Transit Company, which
operates street can in both cities
and suburbs, has had its engineers
build a trolley car that ia free from
most of the noxious noise attendant
upon present day traction operation.
Work on the construction of the
new car began when the motor,
weighing, about 900 pounds, was put
on the market by large electrical
•qntpment concerns to replace the old
motor weighing 2,400 pounds.
The journal box, which on the old
cars protrudes out from the wheel,
will be replaced by a new spiral roller
bearing placed inside and adjoining
the whesL
The new cars also have a rubber
cushion over tha spiral roller which
supports the weight of the truck, the
car and the passenger load, and they
are a great factor as a noise elimin-
STATE TO SUE~COUNTY
. TOREGOVERFEES
(By The Associated Press.)
BALTIMORE. MD„ May 5. The
State legal department, through as
sistant Attorney-General Allan H.
Fisher, will bring at least 1,500]
claims against the county commis
sioners of Montgomery county, the
clerks of the police court in that
county and the various magistrates
who have levelled auto fines In Mont
gomery county, which have been paid
to the county authorities and have
not been remitted to the state treas
ury.
l. The last session of the legislature
. passed a bill providing that automo
:, bile fines collected in Montgomery
county should be used by that coun
ty for the maintenance of police force
and should not be turned over to the
commissioner of motor vehicles.
rToo Previous
Boss—Sir, what does this mean?
Someone just called up and said that
you were sick aod could not come to
work today.
'• Clerk—-Ha! ha! The Joke’s on him.
He wasn’t supposed to call up until
e tomorrow.—Showme.
\ CIRCLE PLAYHOUSE
!i I A STEP LIVELY SHOW!
s
P Action and Laughter From Start to Finish
Cr “Crashing Thru,” with Harry Carey.
“Easy Street,” with Charlie Chaplin.
I “Fighting Blood,” with H. G. Witwar.
e L
d AESOP'S FABLES AND NEWS,
y 1
17
[. Coming Mon day - Tuesday
CONSTANCE BINNEY IN "A BILL OK DIVORCEMENT."
J
J.
I REPUBLIC THEATRE
TODAY
ADOLPH ZUKOR ‘Presents a
George Fitzmaurice Production
‘To Have And To Hold”
WITH
BETTY COMPSON & BERT LYTELL
The greatest story of romantic love ever written. A picture that
0 races thru a hundred breathless thrills, thru a hundred sceneg of
' dazzling beauty. With Betty Compson the sweetest heroine ever seen
and Bert Lytell her daring lover.
Supported by Theodore Kosloff, W. J. Ferguson, Raymond Hatton and
Walter Long
Story by Mary Johnston —Adapted by Ouida Bergere
ADDED ATTRACTION - - GOOD COMEDY
MONDAY AND TUESDAY
“Quincy Adams
Sawyer”
The greatest home-folks’ story ever written
A stupendous screening of a story which millions have loved
• • •
A photoplay version of a rural American classic.
• • •
Quaint humor, amusing situations and thrilling episodes in a rustic
setting.
• • *
In which love and courage thread through the mazes of conspiracy.
• • •
In which drama plays its striking part, with an assemblage of the
oddest characters imaginable.
From Charles Felton Pidgin’s Novel
ator. These cushions
load of 48,000 pounds
The trucks are also • I
what is known as a swing;-,*
plank which enables th* us. ; .■Pj'
bination of springs that : kt
overload ami are easily
all times.
Compared to the w
pounds for the old , iir . th,.
leys weigh 25.000 pen;:,;. My I
same carrying . a pa. . '"I
stand the wear and -, ~r Bj| T
the old cars, according i >
flclals . m \
One of the important i ■
noise in the new car is th, .
similar to the automoh.
which works on the
rather than the old shoe hr.ik
wheel itself.
Another improvement ■
ward elimination of nois, H*.
casement of windows it. !
preventing the rattle S (
■ c
I
ML s>■ yy ■
\ CHIROPRACTIC ad
justment is a scienti- H
lie Life Saver that puts m H
! place the vertebrae of the 8
I spine that may be press
I ing upon the nerves
Chiropractic is First As- H
| sistant to Nature who is V
I (the Peerless Physician

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