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The Portland daily press. [volume] (Portland, Me.) 1862-1921, June 27, 1862, Image 3

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MATTERS ABOUT TOWN.
The Christian Warrior.—The meeting
of the Maine State Conference, held yesterday
morning, at High Street Church, was of a most
interesting and absorbing character: the church
was densely filled with eager listeners, and,
perhaps, at no time in the history of Portland,
were the love of God and love of country so
happily blended, as was shown by the audience
there assembled. General Howard, of Maine,
the patriot, the Christian, and the soldier, be
ing present, was called upon to address the as
semblage, which he did, and in his own pe
culiarly enthusiastic and warm-hearted man
ner. The effect of his oratory upon the multi
tude was most thrilling. And, as the heroic
sentiments of patriotism, love of God aud
country fell from his lips, and found instant ac
cess to the hearts of his hearers, feelings of a
noble and God-like character tilled their souls.
Tears poured from eyes unused to weeping,
and a holier and stronger feeling of man’s duty
to God aud country animated the enraptured
listeners. Now, the audience was with him
upon the battle fields of our beloved country,
now, at the bedside of the dying soldier, and
now, at the earnest, heartfelt prayer meeting of
the camp, where the soldier, anticipating, j>cr
haps, a violent death on the morrow, could
consign his soul into the keeping of the great
God of battles.
Gen. Howard, in the course of his remarks,
alluded to the untiring energy of Chaplain J.
B. Adams, of Gorham; who, unmindful of his
own life, followed the soldier into the carnage
of deadly strife, and who, while the swift shot
and bursting shell were carrying death to many
a heart, and sorrow to many a home, chose by
his Christian impulses to prove to the people
of Maine his readiness to do his duty under all
and any circumstances. Chaplain Adams, of
Gorham, was the only one out of four of his
profession who followed the Brigade of Gen.
Howard into every battle, and through every
deprivation, so attendant upon the life of a sol
dier. Gen. Howard spoke of a prayer meet
ing held by Mr. Adams, with the Brigade, just
before entering the battle of Bull Run. The
troops were drawn up in a little valley, and as
the devout chaplain stood among them and
Implored the blessing of God to rest upon our
arms, as he also committed each and every
soldier to His holy keeping, the noly Spirit
found an abiding place that day in the hearts
of many in the ranks; and who, with the dead
ly tube in readiness, felt themselves filled from
that moment with a calm resolve to do their
duty, let what might be the hazard. This chap
lain would ofler prayer when an opportuni
ty would present itself, and unintimidated by
the roaring of cannon, the bursting of shell,
the ringing of musketry, would solicit fovor of
the Divine, in behalf of the maimed and dying
hero, whose last thoughts of home and the dear
friends liehind him, would become sweetened
by the consciousness of the presence of that
prayer utteriug chaplain, whose voice ascended
to the ear of God through the din and turmoil
of battle.
Truly, Maine has just cause to be proud of
such sons. With such men a' these, breathing
a Washington spirit into the hearts of those
atound them, the forces of the old Pine Tree
State will win for themselves a proud distinc
tion among the brave defenders of our coun
try
The audience was also addressed by an In
dian preacher, of the St. Francis tribe, of Can
ada JSast, and who, with the love of ills people
ever before him, labored for them, as did his
Master among the Jews, without stipend or
compensation.
This gentleman received instruction from
certain of the Professors and Students of Dart
mouth College, many years ago. His remarks
were deeply interesting, and listened to with
much delight. As he closed, unsolicited aid
began to flow in towards the pulpit, and, the
sympathy becoming general, the plate was
Called for, into which was placed most gener
ous tokens of Christian largess.
tar- Onr friends of the Advertiser have
laid us under renewed obligations by kindly
copying items relating to the business matters
of our office.
A Change.—The trees have been weeping
tears for the past day or two, at the non-ap
pearance of the great fructifler. But it gives
us pleasure to note, that with the foggy,murky
atmosphere, and the penetrating “Scotch mist,”
have also vanished the gloomy look of the pub
lic—that dear public, to whom we always look
. for lavors, and upon the face of which we are
l ever able to discern the “signs of the times.”
Now, nothing but joy—ever radiant joy—is
depicted upon the features of every soul, which
seems to have won its kindly expression from
the generous sunshine, which floods spire and
dome with its glorious rays.
A General “Smash Ur.”—On Wednes
day last, as the team of P. W. Gcrrish, of Cor
nish, consisting of six horses, was passing over
Ilamlen’s Brook, in Limington, the bridge
broke down, and the driver, wagon, load and
two horses were precipitated into the brook.
By good fortune, the driver escaped without
serious injury, although severely bruised.—
rr»i_i_ i__ e. a >•
* “S, MM VIOO.', UVKVTVI, IMt/U Cft'IIJ, a
good rubbing up. There were three tons of
merchandise upon the cart, comprising a part
of which, was a beautiful melodeon. This of
course from sharp action became flattened;
thus demonstrating to the musical mind, that
high notes may be pitched upon a low quay—
(***•)
Flobal Exhibition—The attention of
gardeners and all interested, is called to the
advertisement in another column of the Horti
cultural Exhibition, to take place at Mechan
ic’s Hall, next Tuesday. A liberal list of pre
miums is offered.
&y Portland will present unusual attrac
tions on the approaching Fourth of July. The
regatta Is to be a marked feature of the day.
“All the world and the rest of mankind’’ are
expected to be here, and our city and her citi
aens will spare no pains to make the occasion
worthy of the day.
By We are indebted to Mr. M. N. Rich, of
the Portland Shipping Dist, for very late Lon
don and Liverpool papers, receive via. Quebec.
Funeral Notice.—The funeral of the late
Joaeph Knight, of Westbrook, will take place
this (Friday) afternoon at 3 o’clock.
Fashionable and Autistic Concekt.—
This evening, at New City Hall, that emi
nent composer, L. M. GottsciiAJ.K, assisted
by a talented corps of vocalists, will give one
of bfs grand concerts, in which will be per
formed some of the richest compositions
known to musical language. Mr. E. Hoffman
will preside at the piano. Doubtless a large
audience will be in attendance. Doors open at
7 1-2—coueert commence at 8 o’clock.
Municipal Court.
John Riley wailed before his Honor yester
day morning, charged with the heinous offence
of drunkenness and disturbance. Had John
have been less riley, lie would not have had to
Mettle the little amount of two dollars and
costs, which the Judge felt bound to impose
upon him.
Another case of an unpleasant nature came
before his Honor, but we forbear to publish it,
and also withhold tile name of the part y im
mediately concerned, hoping that as it was
his first oflcnce, so may it also prove to
be Ids last.
Interesting to Traders with the
Southern States.—The Cincinnati Gazette
of Saturday says:
“We had a conversation with Mr. Thomas
Ong, who has resided in Memphis for some
months past, from whom we obtained informa
tion of a commercial character, of value to bus
iness men. With reference to the probable
demand for produce at the South, Mr. Ong
says the consumption will open very slowly,
and progress gradually, until consumers are
able to buy on credit. Money is scarce, ami
cotton, which planters had to rely on for
means, having been to a large extent destroyed,
the people are generally in a crippled esndi
tion. It is estimated that one million 1 talcs of
cotton have lsien burned up to the present
time, nearly all of which was destroyed by the
military; owners having applied tlie torch, or
consented to the destruction, in few cases only.
As to the growing crops lie says, Arkansas
planters are raising, on the average, two acres
to the ten formerly cultivated. As this ground,
from the increased attention given to it, will
produce more per acre than in ordinary years,
the State may have one-third of au average
crop. •
“ In other sections the average crop will not
lie so large. Of sugar alsiut 15,000 hhds. re
mained in the bauds of Memphis merchants.
Each merchant was allowed to retain only fif
teen hhds. The surplus was sent into Missis
sippi by tlie military. Some little sugar was
wasted by careless handling, but otherwise
none was destroyed. The stock ol sugar at
Louisiana is estimated at 300,000 lihds. It
will lie sold pretty lively as soon as tlie river
is opened. The principal paper currency in
Memphis, since confederate scrip lias been sup
pressed, is Hank of Tennesee issues. This,
though now irredeemable, it is believed will
ultimately lie good, the charter of tlie Bank
being so valuable that capitalists will not suf
fer it to lie forfeited.
“ Advices from New Orleans show that con
siderable business is being transacted there in
sugar and molasses. The range of tlie former
was 2 1-4 and 4 1-4. fair selling at 4c. Treas
ury notes were taken reluctantly at New Or
leans, and drafts on tlie North were negotiated
with ditHculty. Parties going there to trade
should be supplied with either gold or sterling.”
By" The Lewiston Journal pays a very
high compliment to lion. James G. Blaine,
who, it is said, will have undisputed possession
of tlie Congressional race-course in the 3d Dis
trict, now that Mr. Morrill has declined a re
nomination.
Accident in Liminoton.—Peleg W. Ger
rish of Coruish, who drives a team of six
horses between Cornish and Portland, broke
through tlie bridge across Hamlin’s Brook, in
uu n , uie »>in met
precipitating his entire load down some ten
feet, into the water. The load, consisting of
flour, cases of clothing, and a valuable melode
on, was very badly damaged. Mr. Gcrrish had
two ribs broken, and was otherwise seriously
Injured. The team of Mr. Gcrrish escaped
without great damage. A defective bridge
was the occasion of the accident
Revolutionists Shot.—We have a letter
from Aux Cayes dated June 10, which states
that fifteen of the men who were engaged in
endeavoring to foment a revolution against
President Gcffrard had been shot on that day,
and that more were reserved for the same fate.
—[Boston Journal.
Internal Tax Bill.—The final passage of
the interna! tax bill by Congress, is tile subject
of mucli congratulation. It has tieen (lending
nearly three months, and the action of isitli
Houses was finally harmonized by the Com
mittee of Conference, whose labors have been
very great. The bill is very acceptable to the
western memls-rs. because of the suspension of
the land tax authorized at the last session,
while the tax on tabaeco and liquors meets
with much favor. In other respects the
bill is familiar to all, and with tile Senate's
modifications, which were almost wholly agreed
to, it is probably as nearly perfect as can he.—
Its defects can be easily remedied at the next
session. The hill will sen is1 published as it
passed.— Waehinyton Letter.
LATEST BY EVENING PAPERS.
BATTLE BEFORE RICHMOND 1
The Union Troops Invincible 1
JEFF. DAVIS RETORTED SICK AT RALEIGH.
Prom Don. McClellan’s Division.
McClellan's Headquarters, I
June 25, Evening. )
Gen. nooker at 0 o'clock this morning, ad
vanced his division with a view to occupying
a new position. The result was tliat the troops
met with a most determined resistance from
Ilie enemy, which lasted until 4 o’clock in the
afternoon, during which the rebels were forc
ed to give way tieforc the Invincible courage
of our men. During the day everything indi
cated a general engagement, hut the enemy
showed no disposition to accept. Our troops
all fought gallantly as ever. The loss on our
side was about 200 in killed and wounded.
The following are among the wounded:—
Col. Morrison, aid to Gen. Palmer, wounded
in the hand; Capt Rafferty, 2d Excelsior, in
the leg.
The loss among the officers of the 1st Mass,
regiment, which suffered most severely, is as
follows:—Capt Wild, wounded in the head;
Capt Corruth, wounded in the breast; CapL
Chamberlain, wounded in the face; Lieutenant
Thomas, arm amputated; Lieutenant Dalton,
wounded in the breast; Lieutenant Parkerson,
wounded in the leg.
Our killed is small in number, most of the
casualties being wounds. The loss of the ene
my is unknown, but is believed to be equal to
ours.
The rebel camp in front of Gen. Hooker’s
division was captured, and is now held by our
troops. The ground fought for was a swamp,
with thick underbrush beyond which is an op
en country. The woods intervening between
our troops and the enemy prevented the result
of our artillery Are being known.
The result of U>-day is highly important to
the health of the army, as but little more
ground is to be gained to place our troops be
yond the sw amps. Gen. McClellan was present
during the whole day, superintending ail the
movement*.
Jeff. Davis Sick at Raleigh.
New York, June 2fi.
In an obscure eomer of the Kiclunond Dis
patch of June 18, we And the announcement
that Jeff. I)a\1s was taken ill at lialcigh, N.
€., whither he had gone to visit his sick child.
A letter from Kiclunond to the Times says
Gen. Meridian is bringing up from Yorktown
sundry siege guns, some of which have already
arrived.
It was agreed between Col. Keyes and Gen.
Howell Cobb, in a recent conference, that the
surgeons taken on the Add of battle should
not la* regarded as prisoners of war, but non
combatant*. This arrangement has been sent
to Washington for approval, and there is but
little doubt it will receive it. Temporary hos
pitals will Is- put up at Fair Oaks station, at
Savages and elsewhere near the front.
Accommodation* for tents have already Ix-on
prepared for 2500 or 3000 at White House; this
will if possible be still further enlarged.
Deserters who came in to-day conftrm the
rejiort tliat Gen. Johnston’s wound is very se
vere, two of Ids ribs being broken, and that
Gen. Lee is in command.
Wise is in disgrace and has retired to a coun
try residence.
The Kiclunond Dispatch of the 23d says
that 23 deserters from our army were brought
into town yesterday. Some, of the men will
probably Is- shot as a warning to others.
Tin- Tribune Inis a letter from before Rich
mond, dated 23d, which says Gen. Peek was
this afternoon ordered to relieve Gen. Casey
in command of 111* division near Bottom Bridge.
Gen. A. P. Ilowe will take command of
Peck's brigade. To Gen. Casey will I* assign
ed tile exceedingly importeut and responsible
command oi protecting the base of our o|H*ra
tious at White House.
The Tribune's Washington dispatch says
Gen. Pope laughs at the idea of Beauregard
having reinforced the relel army at Richmond
! by a single soldier. He considers the war at
the West virtually at an end.
St. Joints, N. F., June 25.—The steamer
St. Andrew, from Glasgow lltli inst., for Que
bec, was boarded oft' l'a|ie Race at 1 o'clock
this afternoon.
TELEGRAPHIC
TO THE
PORTLAND DAILY PRESS.
[BY SPECIAL DISPATCH TO T1IE PORTLAND
DAILY PRESS.]
THE PEOPLE'S CONVENTION.
ORGANIZATION, RESOLUTIONS, NOM
INATION, &c.
Bangor, June 20.
The Convention assembled in Norombega
Hall, and Allen Haines, Esq., of Portland was
appointed temporary Chairman, and Messrs.
Simpson of Belfast and Emery of Gorham,
Secretaries.
The State Committee was appointed Com
mittee on Credentials.
Committee on Resolutions—A. G. Jewett Of
Belfast, J. A. Peters of Bangor, H. A. Wyman
of Skowhegan, C. P. Kimball of Portland,
and A. Libliey of Augusta.
Committee on Permanent Organization—C.
B. Merrill of Portland, Nathaniel Wilson of
Orono, and D. T. Pike of Augusta.
Speeches were made by Messrs. Blake of
Bangor nnd Sweat of Portland. Adjourned
till afternoon.
On assembling In the afternoon, the Com
mittee on Resolutions reported the following:
Revolted, That it is the first duty of the cit
izen, in tliis perilous national crisis to yield a
ready and unwavering supjiort to the govern
ment in all necessary and proper efforts to sub
due the existing rebellion, and vindicate the
authority of the Constitution and Union over
every inch of territory within the limits of the
United Stab's.
Reaolved, That our army and navy arc enti
tled bi the warmest gratitude and supjiort of ev
ery citizen for their self-sacrificing efforts in be
half of the common country, and that we will re
sist ait measures and efforts bi convert this war
for the Union into a crusade for negro emanci
pation.
Resolrrd, That we cordially invite all citi
zens of this State who concur with us in the
foregoing declaration of sentiments, to unite
with us in the elevation of men bi official place
who will act iu accordance with these senti
ments.
The following was offered from the floor by
C. P. Kimball of Portland:
Rmulced, That we cordially approve of the
rwitriotic course of the brave Gen. McClellau;
that we admire his genius and skill as com
mander of our army, and that our whole hearts
are enlisted in his success before Richmond;
that we view with detestation and scorn the
wicked attempts of scheming jmliticians to un
flprmiiiH <inH wn<iL-on liim umt Kin oMn» In
heroic efforts for the vindication of the Union.
The Committee on Permanent Organization
reported Francis G. Butler of Farmington,
President; Robert S. Soule of Freeport, Moses
Riggs of Georgtown, E. M. Clark of Win
throp, Vice-Presidents; and William II. Simp
son of Belfast and-Emery of Gorham,
Secretaries. •
The Convention Toted for a candidate for
Governor, with the following result:
Whole number of votes, 282
Charles D. Jameson, 170
Bion Bradbury, 100
On motion of C, I*. Kimball of Portland, the
nomination of General Jameson was made
unanimous.
The result was received with nine cheers for
Jameson, for McClellan, and for the army and
navy.
On motion of E. W. Flagg of Bangor, a com
mittee, consisting of A. G. Jewett of Belfast
and C. P. Merrill of Portland, was appointed
to inform Gen, Jameson of his nomination.
A State Committee was choseu consisting of
the following gentlemen:
Kennebec—Joseph V Meserve.
Sagadahoc—S. II. Hager.
Waldo—William II. Simpson.
Washington—F. L. Talbot.
Penobscot—N. Wilson.
Somerset—S. W. Turner.
York—William P. llaincs.
Piscataquis—W. P. Oakes.
Aroostook—Shepard Cary.
Oxford—Alvali Blake.
Kuox—A. P. Gould.
Hancock—Monroe Young.
Cumlierlond—Charles B. Merrill.
Franklin—E. F. Pillsbury.
Androscoggin—Calvin ltecord.
Lincoln—R. n. Tucker, Jr.
Eloquent and patriotic speeches were made
by Hou. John A. Peters and others.
Tlie Convention was very enthusiastic for
tile Union and the Constitution.
A vote of thanks to the officers was passed,
and the Convention adjourned.
XXXVII CONGRESS—First Session.
Washington, June 26.
SENATE.
Mr. Foster, from the Committee on Pensions,
reported a bill for the relief of General C. I,
Smith.
The bill to grant the proceeds of certain pub
lic lauds in aid of the Pacific railruds was pass
ed.
The bill to carry jnto effect the treaty with
Great Uritian for the supprssion of the Blave
trade was passed, yeas 54, nays, Carlisle, Ken
nedy, Powell and Saulsbury—4.
The bill for the admission of the 8tate of West
ern Virginia into the Union, was taken up:
Mr. Sumner said there was a condition in the
bill which recognized slavery until the end of
1865, so that the bill would admit another slave
State to which he was opposed.
He offered an amendment, that within the lim
its of said State there shall be neither slavery
nor involuntary servitude, otherwise than as
TlliniKHlllf>nt fur ertinw aKnriwif ilia I.urtif
convicted.
Pending the question, the Senate resolved it
self into a oourt of impeachment, for the trial of
Judge Humphries.
The Sergeant-at-aems reported the Judge not
to lie found.
The proclamation, calling on him to appear,
vrss made without an answer.
The President pro tern stated that the mana
gers, on the part of the House, were at liberty
to proceed in support of the impeachment.
1 he names of the witnesses subpeoned were
read.
Mr. Johnson was excused from obeying the
summons on the ground of public duties.
Mr. Traiu, on the part of ehe House, opened
the case, analysing the articles of impeachment,
and brifly stating what was intended to prove
against the defendant. The evidence then pro
ceeded.
The galleries were densely crowded. The
members of the House filled the seats of the
Senators, who were arranged upon a platform
expressly constructed for the purpose. The wit
nesses, including Col. Polk, Brownlow and Bai
ley Peyton, occupied the settee* on the other
circle.
The proceeding was conducted with all the
dignity becoming a high court of impeachment.
Jacob MeGaritt, John Hugh Smith, H. B.
Bcovill, Isaac Sutton and Win. G. Brownlow gave
evidence in proof that Humphries, while holding
office from the government of the United States,
was a rank secessionist, and had held a court of
the stymlled Confederate States, at which were
tried Union men, charged with sedition and re
bellion against the Confederate States, in giving
aid and comfort to the United States. Mr.
Brownlow heard him make a vindictive stump
speech from the bench.
Mr. Bingham, on the part of the managers,
said he would offer no more evidence, thinking
that the facts charged abundantly proved, he
should therefore, in the name of tbe House, and
people of the United States, demand that con
viction be had of the impeachment with which
charged.
The President pro tein then put the question,
whether the accused was guily of the high
crimes and misdemeanors chanced tiy the arti
cles of the iui]>cachiucut of the House of Repre
sentatives.
The accused was declared guilty on the first
article by an unanimous vote.
Thirty-eight Senators were present. Messrs.
Bayard, Carlisle, Johnson, Pearce, Simmons,
Stark and Wilson of Mass., were absent.
tin the second article, charging him with sup
porting secession, 35 voted him guilty. Brown
ing voted not guilty.
On the third article, charging him with or
ganising an armed rebellion, the vote was,guilty
32, not guilty, Anthony, Fessenden, Foster,
Harlan.
On the fourth article, charging him with
conspiracy to oppose the government, guilt v 27,
not guilty 10.
^■
On the fifth article the vote for guilty was
unanimous.
On the 6th article, charging him with the
confiscating of property of citizens, guilty 11,
not guilty 24.
Mr. Foster offered the follwing question:
Is the court of the opinion that West II.
Humphries lie removed from the office of Dis
trict Judge for the District Court of the United
States for the District of Tennessee.
Mr. Trumbull moved to mid,and be disqualifi
ed from holding any office under the United
States.
Both Mr. Trumbull’s amendment add Mr.
Foster’s question were adopted.
The President pro tem then pronounced judg
ment: It is hereby ordered and decreed that
West H. Humphries, Judge of the District
Court of the United States, for the Western,
Middle and Esstcrn Districts of Tennessee, be
and is removed from said office, and that he lie
and is disqualified from holding or enjoying any
office of honor, trust or profit under the United
States.
The court then adjourned sine die. A flea
which the Senate adjourned.
HOUSE.
The members shortly after assembling, pro
ceeded to the Senate Chamber to attend the
Court oi Impeachment in the case of Judge
Humphries.
W hen the members returned from the proceed
ings, and the result of the Court of Impeach
ment reported, Mr Walton oi Vt, as a question
of privilege, caused to be read a communication
in the New York Tribune, entitled “Intelligencer
Book Job,” sent thither by one of its Washing
ton reporters. It was due to himself as mover
of a resolution to whica reference was made by
one who by courtesy occupies a seat in the re
porter’s gallery, that the charge made in that
article be investigated. He therefore offered the
following resolution:
Whereas, The publisher of the New Y'ork Tri
bune, on the authority of one of its correspond
ents, have declared that offers of a pecuniary
nature have been made apparently for the pur
pose of obtaining the action of the House im
properly, corruptly and criminally, which
charge if true involves a breach of the privileg
es the House, and if false in respect to any mem
bers of the House, or others who are implicated,
is a breach of the privilege accorded to reporters
by the courtesy of the House; therefore
Resolved, That the Committee on the Judi
ciary be instructed forthwith to inquire by whom
and on what authority such change, and any
other contained in the article referred to, has
been made; and to make thorough investigation
as to their truth or falsity, and report all the
evidence to the House with their opinion there
for, and such resolutions as to them shall seem
meet, and that said committee have power to
send for persons and papers, and report at any
time.
The resolution was adopted—102 against 18.
The House passed the Senate bill to provide
additional medical officers in the volunteer ser
vice.
The members again proceeded to the Senate by
invitation of that body, to hear judgment pro
nounced in the impeachment case.
. After the members returned, the House ad
journed.
New Ship Canal.
ATROCITIES OF THE REBELS !
Northern Humanity.
REBEL BATTERY SHELLED !

gen. McClellan still iiolds the
NEW PICKET LINE !
FEOM WASHINGTON.
Wasaixotoic, June 36.
The rumors from New York of Cabinet chang
es are not believed here in any quarter, and are
generally regarded as mere simulations, arising
from the feet of the President's visit to Lieut.
Gen. Scott on business, the military bearing of
which is only conjectured.
The new gunboat Paul Jones, Capt Stead
man, having taken on board her armament and
complement of seamen, left the Navy Y'ard yes
terday afternoon.
The Select Committee appointed by the Speak
er, to whom all the papers on file in relation to
the construction of a ship canal around the falls
of Niagara are referred, consists of Messrs.
Van Horn of New York, Blake of Ohio.Nevrics
of Kentucky, Trowbridge of Michigan, Kice of
111., Davis of Pennsylvania and Cravens of Indi
ana.
Hon. Emerson Etheridge will deliver an ora
tion from the steps of the Washington Monu
ment in Baltimore on the 4th of July. Exten
sive preparations for celebrating this national
holiday have been made by the union men of
that city.
Flag Officer Davis in his official report con
cerning the expedition up White river, mentions
that after the accident to the Mound City, the
wounded men were shot by the enemy while in
the water, and adds that the Navy Department
and Country will contrast the barbarities of a
savage with the humane efforts made by our
people to rescue the wounded and disabled un
der similar circumstances in the engagement of
the 6th insL Several of the poor fellows who
expired shortly after she engagement expressed
their willingness to die when they were told the !
victory was ours.
Flag Officer Farragut communicates to the j
Navy Department that an encouhter between !
our gun boats up the Mississippi and rebel bat
tery in the vicinity of Gran Gulf between Natch
es and Vicksburg, a boat sent down to bring up
coal vessels from near that point, discovered
earth-works in the process of erection. The
Wissabuckon and Itasco were sent down to attack
them ; the found a battery of rifled guns loca
ted there and a force of some five hundred ar
tillerists ready to receive them. A vigorous
fight ensued. The Itasco was struck twenty-five
times, and the Wissabuckon seventeen ; they
however lost but one man killed and six wound
ed. The fort being too serious an obstacle to
have in the rear ot the boats. Commander Palm
er serving at that point, determined to bring
down the remainder of the squadron and break
up the business before it became too formidable.
On the afternoon of the 16th we dropped down
with the squadron and shelled the town for
an hour, but they deserted their batteries, and
with the exception of a few rifle shots, manifest
Art Yin rMIltfflWV f\imman<li.r Palmnw aova tksa
bights are filled with riflemen and if they give
him any more annoyance he shall burn the
town.
A dispatch received at the War Department
this afternoon from Uen. McClellan, states that
the affair yesterday was perfectly successful,
that we had the new picket line undisturbed and
that all is very quiet on the banks of the Chicka
hominy.
The British Post Office has withdrawn its orig
inal proposition of 1857, and which was formal
ly accepted last November by Post Master Blair
for a reduced rate of internal letter postage,
from 24 to 12 cents. The United States Post
Office did not anticipate this withdrawal after
the subject was favorably reported by the Post
Msstcr and uiion British basis. This will be
much regretted by commercial and social corres
pondents of both countries.
E. W. Turner and Frank Rauha have been
promoted to Acting Masters at Boston on the
ship Iona.
The consolidation of the forces uner Major
Gcnetals Fremont, Banks and McDowell, to be
called the Army of Virginia with Miyor General
Pope as the Chief Commander, is hailod with
delight as an earnest of the determination of the
President to act with reference only to the pub
lic welfare, while it is not doubted that all these
officers will cheerfully co-operate in the perform
ance of this patriotic duty.
The Army of Virginia.
Washinuton, June 26.
The forces under MtQor Generals Fremont,
Banks and McDowell have lieeu consolidated into
one army called the Army of Virginia, and Maj.
Oen. l‘o|>c was especially assigned by the Presi
dent to the chief command. The forces under
Uen. Banks constitute the 1st corps to be com
manded by him. The forces under Gen. Banks
constitute the 2d corps and are to be command
ed by him. The forces under Gen. McDowell
constitute the 3d corps and to be commanded by
him. General McCall's division ten thousand
Btrong which formed a part of McDowell's corps
lias reached McClellan by water and another di
vision is to follow immediately in the same way,
while Gen. Pope will also operate against tiic
enemy at Richmond. Besides Gen. McCall's
Division, Gen McClellan has received other rein
forcements to the amount of several thousands
since the battle of Fair Uoks.
Confiscation of Kebel Property.
Washinuton, June 86.
George A. Coffee, Esq., U. S. Attorney for
Eastern Pennsylvania, reports that nineteen
twentieths of the prisoners brought into Phila
delphia have been or will undoubtedly be con
demned, and their proceeds distributed as prise
money. The costs in most cases arc light.—
Quite a number of the prises are already con
demned and sold nml the meuey is about being
paid over to the Navy Department.
Railroad Accident.
New York, June 24.
An accident occurred on the Canada & Amboy
Railroad yesterday, in which one car was demol
ished and four others precipitated into the canal
near Trenton. One man connected with Capt.
Uook’s Massachusetts battery was drowned and
twenty horses killed. The accident was caused
by a detached rail.
Various Matters.
New York, June 26.
The Mayor has vetoed the appropriation of
880.000 for St. Joseph’s Hospital for sick and
wounded soldiers, as not within the province of
the municipal government.
A special Washington despatch to the Post
says it is rumored that Earl Russell has sent a
communication to Secretary Seward protesting
against Cen. Butler's conduct to the women of
New Orleans. It is probably unfounded, but if
true, the Earl Russell will get a tart reply.
A Maryland slave-hclder has appealed to the
War Department, the military authorities of
Alexander refusing to obey the process for the
delivery of a fugitive slave.
Southern Item!.
Crrr Poiirr, June 26.
Last evening one of our gunboats moved up
and shelled the rebels on the Petersburg road,
but without any casualities on the side of the
rebels, according to their own account of the
affair.
The Southern newspapers contain no impor
tant news.
There is nothing further from Charleston.
Gen Lougstreet issued a flaming address to his
troops on Monday, in view of the great conflict
imminent, inciting them to new deeds of hero
ism, and advising them to aim low and make
sure of the mark.
The official lists of the rebel losses at the bat
tle of Fair Oaks have been published. Eighty
five regiments and battalions in all were engaged,
sustaining a lues of killed, wounded and missing
of 5897.
The rate of postage in the Southern Confed
eracy has been raised from 5 to 10 cents.
About 10 o’clock" this evening a conveyance
arrived at City Point, with Capt. Robertson and
Lieut. Sykes of the rebel army, who returned
under their parole of honor to Fort Warren, the
rebel government having decided not to make
any individual exchanges until the government
shall agree upod terms for a general exchange of
prisoners.
Gen. Prentiss ami 90 other federal officers,tak
en at Shiloh, have been removed to Atlanta, Oa.
A dispatch from Chattanooga says the federate
have stampeded from that place, leaving their
camps and everything behind.
The Charleston Mercury says all was quiet at
James Island on Sunday, but the enemy was
busily engaged in throwing up earthworks.
From Charleston.
Charlestok, June 24.
Steamer Memphis, from Liverpool to Charles
ton via. Nassau, N. P , run the blockade yester
day successfully. 8he has aboard Mr. Wanl.late
minister to China, and a valuable cargo of Brit
ish goods. The Memphis is a new iron steamer.
From the Weet.
Memphis, Jane 23.
Gen. Grant has assumed command of the dis
drict of Western Tennessee, and has appointed
Col. Webster commander of the post, and Col.
Hilger the Provoat Marshal of the district, and
Lieut. Col. Armstrong Provost Marshal of Mem
phis.
The Union meeting was attended yesterday by
about 200 citixens. A full ticket of Union men
was nominated for city officers.
Five hundred t>ales of cotton were shipped for
the North yesterday.
Special dispatches in the Grenada Appeal of
the 16th, say that ten mortar boats have passad
Rodney, coming up.
Beauregard publishes a letter in the Mobile
News of the 10th, denying emphatically the cap
ture by Gen. Pope of 10,000 prisoners, as tele
graphed by Gen. Hal leek. He says that 100 or
200 stragglers would cover all the prisoners he
took, and about 500 damaged muskets. He also
says that all we lost at Corinth and during the
retreat, will not amount to one day's expense to
the enemy’s army.
The Grenada Apneal of the 20th, says that the
rebel army of the Mississippi is being greatly
reinforced in health.
The Jackson Mississippian says we have relia
ble information that the enemy have fallen back
from Holly Springs.
Stock Market.
American GolS. 1091; Treasury 7 3-10,1061; United
Stale* Sixes 1867, 1,00|: do. 1881. 1,06; do. fives, 1875
coupons, 96$; do. sixes 1881, coupon*, 1,06$.
New York Market.
Cotton excited and firmer, sales 28^0 bales at 36;
Flour 5.£10 higher, sales 33.000 bbls. Super Mate
4,31**4,45; Extra do. 4,65^4.75; Canada more active
and 10 c higher; sales2200 bbls. Extra 4.65*6,25.
Wheal 2 c higher, sales 249.700 bushels Chicago
Spring 1,[email protected]; Red Winter Western 1,16}*1,20.
Corn 1 c higher, sales 131,000 b usee Is new "mixed
Western 47 a 52; old do. 63*64.
Oats unchanged.
Pork firmer, 880 bbls. mess U,[email protected],12; Prime 8,62$
@6.75. 1
Rice, more active, sales 300 bags Rangoon at 4b«£;
25 casks Corolina at 6]^7j and 25,000 bags East In
diana on privato terms.
Sugars, more active and firmer, sales 2,000 hhds.
New Orleans 8$; Muscavada 6^7]; Porto Rico 73iJ
Coffee firm, sales 1000 bags Maracavbv at 21$; 300
ban Java 26; 100 bags St. Pomingo at 19.
Molasses steadv, sales 100 hhds. English Island at
22*26; 19 hhds. Porto Rico at 34 bv auction; 50 hhds
at 52*36; 100 hhds. Muscavado 25 *28.
Freights to Liverpool more active and firmer.
Cotton nominal; Flour 3s; Grain 9$*10 iu bulk
and ship bags.
Wool quiet.
THE 'PORTLAND DAILY PRESS
STEAM POWER
Book and Job Printing Office,
>'•. 82] EXCHANGE STREET,
FapBlock, • Second Floor, j
PORTLAND, MAINE.
The Proprietor* of the Port L. A an Daily Pros
rcspectftilly inrite attention to their facilities for exe
cuting, in bcantiful style, every description of
BOOK AND JOB PRINTING!
Their Establishment is tarnished with all the ap
proved modern machinery, aud their assortment of
Book and Fancy Types,
Is adequate to do any work demanded in this State.
Business Cards of Every Variety,
Style and Cost.
PRINTED AT SHORTEST NOTICE.
BILU-I1EADS RI'I.ED AND CUT IN
TIIK NEATEST MANNER.
Billets A Circulars iu Every Variety of Typo.
BAMCRECkS, NOTES, AN! BILLS OF LAWNS.
TAGS riEKCED WITH HOLES A GLUTEN ED
WHEN DESIRED.
Dolicioa Printed and Hound lor
Inutiranee Companies.
Deeds, Law Briefs, Equity Cases,
BUSINESS CARDS. .
TECKEK A WCBSTEH,
Fashionable Clothiers,
AND DKALKUA IN
GENTS’ FURNISHING GOODS,
Of the Moat Denirabla Pattern.
Portland. June 23, 18(3. tci.lm
ALBERT WEBB * CO,
- DKALURA IN
Com, Flour and Grain,
HEAD OF MERRILL’S WHARF,
C»a»aM>rclaI Street, - - Pertlaad. Me.
je23tf
JOHN B. BROWN * SONS,
Sugar Refinery,
YORK STREET, PORTLAND, ME.
_jc23dtf__
Ivlar ble Work.
J. R. THOMPSON,
Ii prepared to receive orders for
Marble, Free Stone, Soap Stone,
Marble Chimney Piece*, Monumental Work and
Grindstone*.
Caraer af Pearl mad Federal T,te.,
Je23tf PORTLAND, ME.
JOHN LYNCH * CO,
”Wh.olesal© Grocers,
-AMD
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
GRANITE STORES.COMMERCIAL STREET,
(Opposite head of Widgery’i Wharf,)
Pertlaad, Me.
JOH> LTNCjn^^ rELno babknr, thoa, lynch.
T. R. BURNHAM, 1
Photographic Artist,
OO MIDDLE SR MEET,
rOHTLAND.
THIS I* the only Room where either of the Bum
ham* are intereeted in the City, J. V. P. Brnn
HAa having .old bit Room and gone to New York.
8B6 Broadway.
BlimtS THI NCMBKR.
SIGN OF THE BIG FLAG.
20 MIDDLE STREET.
T. R. BURNHAM.
June 23. dim
WM. II. H. JIATt'II,
|14I Middle Street. - • Portland, Me.
Alto, Dealer in Watches. Jewelry and Silver Ware.
Portland. June 23, 1«62. If
l. j. CROSS,
141 Middle Street, . - Perllaad, Me.
C. D. BROWN,
Snccewor to Manning A Brown,
Commission Merchant,
A»D WnoLKBALl DEALER IX
FLOUR, PRODUC'K, PROVISIONS|AND GRAIN,
UNION ST., Pertlaad.
Portland, Jane 23, lSfiJ. dtf
DOLE & MOODY,
GENERAL
Commission Merchants,
AHD WHOLESALE DtALKRfl I»
FLOUR, CORK AHD PRODUCE,
No. 6 Galt Block Commercial Street,
PORTLAND, Ha.
AHDRKW T. tOIJL FBABKLIV C XOODT.
Jane 23. eodtf
WILLIAM CAPES,
SIGN PAINTER,
Half Way Dewa Willew Street,
rOBTLABD, MB.
Jane 23. d3m
OLIVER 8. BEALE,
SIGN AND FANCY PAINTER,
Ne. lO EXCHANGE STREET.
POBTLABD, MB.
SIpM of every description executed to order.
Jane 23. daw2w
DAVID HALE,
Attorney and Counsellor at Law,
BRIDGTON, MAINE.
Prompt attention given to the collection of all do*
sands.
REFERENCES :
Hon. J. J. Terry. Oxford,
H. P. Deane, Km|., Portland,
D. W. Fessenden, Kaq.. Portland,
d& wlw Luther Ui'lings, Esq., Bridgton.
JUNCTION OF FREE & MIDDLE 8T8.,
- DEALER IX
Fine Chemicals, Pure Drugs,
GENUINE MEDICINES.
IMUSH, FRENCH AM AHR1CAS PKRFIIERY,
AND FANCY GOODS.
AFOTH EC AMIES' GLASS WARE. FOREIGN
LEECHES. SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS,
TRUSSES. 8UPFORTEKS. BRACES,
ELASTIC STOCKINGS, kt.,
-ALHO
VARNISHES, PAINTS, OILS,
.A_n<l Dye-Stuffs,
KEKOSKNE OIL, LAKD OIL,
And all other articles usually kept in a Drug and
Faint Katabliehmont.
State Agent for DAVIS k KIDD S MAG
NKTO-ELECTUIC MACHINES. Jett-lmdaw
New Drug Store!
CKOSMAsT* POOR,
HAVE taken More. li Middle Street,
(Fox Block,) and Mpctfully imit«* public at
tentiou to their largo aud well selected Mock of
Drags, Chemicals, Fancy Goods, Ac.,
And solicit a share of public patronage, trusting
that by furnishiur the purest chemical* aud be*t stock
of drugs the market affords, ami a careful attuntioa
In tbs* dispensary department. to merit ttie confidence
of the public.
(HAH. F. CKOS MAX. je24tf THOH. H. POOR.
_MERCHANDISE._
HUTS I HUTS!
200 'xlh111*' ®VWF variety tad of the
For sale by WM. ALLEN, Jr.,
___ No*. 13 ft 16 Exchange Street.
ORANGES AND LEMONS.
OAA Me—tnu OnuifN,
w' fU 1W do. " lemons.
The B**t Lot of Fruit in the market, fbr sale bf
WM. ALLKN, Jr.,
Nos. la k 18 Kxchange Street.
FIRE CRACKER*
or.n BOXES No. 1 Gold Chop Fire Creckon,
£t)\J 160,000 Torpedoes, No. 1.
For sale by WM. ALLEN, Jr.,
Noe. 13 ft 16 Exchange Street,
FIRE-WORKS.
A LARGE assortment of Fire-Work*, Chinos*
Lanterns, American Flags, Me.
For sale by WM. ALLEN, Jr .
Noa. 18 k 18 Exchange Street;
TOBACCO.
OAAA POUNDS Nsvt Tobacco—1 lb. lamps,
3000 do. Nectar Lass Cavendish.
1000 do. Manaoc'a ilaosoii Natural Leap,
1600 do. Pbiob or Flittaeia “ “
600 do. Pet Lamb—Air article,
Selling cheap, by WM. ALLKN, Jr.,
Noe. 11 ft 16 Exchange Street.
8ARDINES. ’
1 AAA HALF Boxes 1‘HiLLirra ft Cauavm
1UU" ‘ Sardiaea. For sale very low.
By WM. ALLEN. Jr.,
Noe. 13 ft 16 Exchange Street.
LEMON SYR OF. "
l OO V'm tl
For Sale by WM. ALLEN. Jr.,
Noe. 13 ft 16 Exchange Street.
DRIED FRUIT, **
RAISINS, Currants, Citron. Prunes, Fig#, Dates,
Preserved Ginger and Chow Chow, Guava
Jelly, fte. Also as line and well selected an Basort'
ment of goods as can be found in any Frail Store
in the city.
BOLD CHEAP MOB CASH,
By WM. ALLEN. Jr.,
dtf Noe. 13 ft 16 Exchange Street.
Molasses and Ssgar.
t>rt/k Hll D8. Cardenas Molasses.
At)U 100 do. Muscavado do.
100 boxes H. B. Sugar,
Ja0-3m For sale by JOHN LTNCH ft CO.
Teas.
I) 'A HALF CHESTS Fine Ooloag Teaa,
Aiill" GO do. do. Souchong do.
je23—3m For aula by JOHN LYNCH k CO.
Batter, Cheese, Flow.
-i KA BOXES Vermont Checuo beat dairiea.
ItiU 2f> Tub* Choice Vermont Butter.
580 Bbls. Family Flour.
Iu store and to trrlrt.
For sale low by F. A. SMITH,
19 k 21 SILVER STREET.
Portland, June 28,1862. d4w
Beef Tongue*.
OA BBLS. Cragla k Co’*, for nle by
AW THOMAS SHAW.
June 23, 1862. dlOd 186 t ommrcW Street.
R. M. D. LARRABEE * CO,
Manufacturer*, Importer*, uud Wholmal* aad Re
tail Dealer* in
Picture Frames, Engravings,
ARTISTS' MATERIALS. Ao.
Manufacturer* of
ORNAMENTAL GILT FRAMES.
Fur Oil Fainting* and Looking Glaam*.
CONSTANTLY ON HAND,
Pier and Oral Frame*, with French Mirror*: Gilt,
Ebony and Imitation Rowwood Frame*, both Oral
aud Square, for Fingraviug* aad Photograph*. at low
price* and warranted rati*factory.
JUST RECEIVED,
A rery choice colleetion of Fine Kngiarlng* and
Lithograph*, which nr* tball be bappy to atww to any
who may call.
Our Ataortment of Artitta’ Matariala
Is very extensive, being of the best maailkctira,
•tach mm Winsor k Newton’s Oil and Water Colon,
Brashes, Drawing Paper*, Pencils, ('rayons. Oils and
Varnishes. Mathematical Instruments. Ac
Our stock embraces all articles in this line, aad Is
the larrest and best selected in the State, and we of
fer the Dost Inducements to dealers and photograpera,
both as to quality of goods and as to prices.
PARTIES WISHING TO PURCHASE
Will be cheerfully furnished with oar Catalogue,
which contains a complete list.
A large assortment of Oval, Gilt, Walnut, Ebony and
ROSEWOOD MOULDINGS,
Constantly on band.
B. J. D. LARBABEE * 00*
No. (9 E ichange Street.
Jane 23. 1862. tf
BLANK ACCOUNT BOOKS I
Munnfhcturcd and for Sale by
BAILEY A NOYES,
66 AND 58 EXCHANGE STREET, PORTLAND.
Journals, Ledgers, Invoice, Sales, Memorandum,
Cash, Record. Dockets, Letters, Masonic
and Church Collectors Books.
We make to order every kind of Blank Book used
by Banks. Insnranoo and Railroad Companies, Ho
tels, Steamboats, Factories and Counting Houses.
STATIONERY.
Letter, note. Cap and Record papers. Envelopes—
white and buff. Gold Pens, 8tcel Pens, he-, he. Ev
ery article at lowest rates. Wi Buy roa Cash amd
8all C'BKAr.
%
BAILET A NOTES,
66 and 68 Exehang* Street.
Portland, June 23.1863. dtf
FOURTH OF JULY, ISh!
FIREWORKS,
lUckrU,
Roman ChmUcs,
Beagotaa,
Flu-Wheels,
Serpents, Sc, Sc.
- A LW) —
FIRE-CRACKERS, TORPEDOES,
And everything else in this line.
JVt the Lowest Prices,
-AID
AT WHOLESALE AND RETAIL,
MECHANICS’ HALL, - - CONGRESS ST.,
Corner of Casco Street,
SMITH * BOYD.
dSw
PENSIONS, BOUNTY MONEY,
Back Pay, Ac.,
FOR service in the present war. obtained for Soldier*
and Sailors, their Widowsaud Heir*, from the Uni
ted States Government, on application in person or
by letter to
BRADFORD A HARMON,
No. 88 El r ha bob St., Poktlabd, Maixb.
Having devoted our attention exclusively to the Pen
sion hinduc** for the last twenty years, and having a
reliable Agency in Washington, we are enabled to
prosecute all claims against the Government with
promptness and despatch, and uu eery reasonable
terms, making no charge until the claim is obtained
FREEMAN BRADFORD.
Z. h 11A KMnK.
Portland. June 30th. dAwtf.
For knlr.
TIIK Three Story Brick DWELLING
HOUSE. No. 8 (ir*v Street. It in in
good repair, and contain* ten finished
rooms. If not M>ld Is fore the ll»th of
August next, it mil Is- -old on that day,
1 at 11 o'clock, A. M at Auction, without
reserve. Terms very ea*y. For information apply
to JOHN RANDALL, on the i> natives. or at the
store of RANDALL A WOODBURY, on Commer
cial Street. head Central W hart.
June 2). 1*3 dtf
CONOKE9S STREET SEMINARY,
FOR YOUNG LADIES AND MISSES.
Misa E. L. Whittier, • - Principal.
THE Al'TI MN SESSION will commence Sept.
8th, aud Continue 15 weeks
Prior to July 21st, full information can be obtained
of the Principal, SB* t otigress Street. Hours from
8 to 1 o’clock, except Saturday*. After that time ap»
plication niav be made at to State Street.
Portlai.il, JuneM, 1868. 2awl0w

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