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The Portland daily press. [volume] (Portland, Me.) 1862-1921, June 30, 1862, Image 1

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PORTLAND DAILY PRESS.
VOL. 1. PORTLAND, ME., MONDAY MORNING, JUNE 30, 1862. NO. 7.
PORTLAND DAILY PRESS,
JOHN T. OILMAN. |
JOSEPH B. HAT.t. |
I* published »t No. *2) EXCHANGE STKECT,
in FOX BLOCK, by
footer, gilman and hall,
Under the firm name of
N. A. FOSTER A CO.
Terms:
The Portland Daily Press is published every
morning, (.Sundays excepted), at $6,00 per year in ad
vance.
IUateR of Advertising:
Transient Advertisements, $1.00 per square,
for throe insertions or less; exceeding three, and not
more than one week, $1.26 per square; 76 cents per
week after. One square every other day one week,
$1.00; 60 cents per week after.
Exhibitions, Ac., under head of Amusements,
$2.00 per square per week.
Special Notices, $1.60 per square for first week,
$1.00 per week after.
Business Notices, In reading columns, 12 cents
per line for one insertion. No charge less than fifty
cents.
Legal Notices at usual rates.
Advertisements inserted in the Maine State
Press (which has a large circulation in every part of
the State) for 38 cents per square iu addition to the
above rates for each insertion.
Transient advertisements must be paid for in ad
vance.
HP* All communications intended for the paper
should be directed to the "Editors t\f the Press," and
those of a business character to the Publishers.
C3T“The Portland Daily and Maine State
Press Office, in Fox Block, No. 82} Exchange
Street, is open at all hours during the day and eve- '
ning, from 7 o'clock in the morning to 9 in the
evening.
Hr Job Printing of every description executed j
with dispatch; and all business pertaining to the of
fice or paper promptly transacted on application as
above.
COMMUNICATIONS.
Capture of the Rebel Steamer Gordon.
We have boen kindly furnished with a copy
of a private lettar from Capt. J. B. Warken,
Acting Muster Commanding of the U. S.
Steamer Victoria, address to a distinguished
gentleman of this city, given particulars of the
capture of the Confederate steamer Gordon, in
the perusal of which we dare say the readers
of the Press will find as much satisfaction as
we have. We publish below.
Off Wilmington Bar, X. C., I
U. S. S. “Victoria," May 28. ISO* f
Mt Dear Sib : At 8 A. M. weighed anchor,
to stand off to sea, and whilst in the act of do
ing so, the fog lifted, (for it was very foggy)
and we saw a steamer close in under the land,
steering directly for Port Caswell, under a full
full head of steam. I immediately started
ahead for the purpose of cutting her off, hold
ing her under my guns, for she was not more
than a mile off. when first discovered. The U.
S. Steamer “State of Georgia” saw her about
the same time, and immediately fired at her, of
which the chase took no notice. I then gave
orders to Are on her, with her with our 30
pounder rifled gun forward. The shell passed
over her amidships, but she still kept on her
course. We then fired again at her. The shell
this time, fell right under her bows. She still
kept on without regarding our firing. Our
next shot was a good line shot but passed over
her. The State of Georgia all this time was
sending shot and shell thick and fast around
her. Our fourth shot struck the water and ri
cocheted over her decks. She immediately
hauled down her flag and /tore to (or stopped
her engine.) At that moment I discovered a
boat filled with men pulling from the steamer
to the shore. I immediately gave orders to
Are upon the boat. Our first shell passed over
aud burst in the woods, but the fourth shot
struck the boat, falling directly in the midst of
the crew, who had just landed. The people
on board the steamer told us afterwards that
one man was killed and one wounded and that
the rest fled into the woods in every direction.
The boats were immediately sent and took
possession of the steamer, which proved to be
the confederate steamer “ Gordon,” which has
so often and so successfully run the blockade;
she has however recently changed her name
to “ Nassau of N. P.” She was loaded with
Enfield Itifles, ammunition, clothing, Ac., for
the Confederate army. She had on board a
large number of persons, although several had |
escaped by the boat*. There still remained on
board thirty, including two ladies. One of
them was a young woman, the daughter of 1
John M. Maflltt, formerly a Lieutenant in the 1
United States Navy, recently of the Confede- j
rate Mosquito fleet, and the other was a widow
Knox, probably in pursuit of a husband. Mr.
Law of Savannah, formerly of the firm of
Claphorn & Co. of S., was also a passenger, i
and claimed to be an Englishman. Also there !
was a Mr. Waters, a very important individual,
who appeared to have the control of the cargo
and the few remainiug paper* on board.
The steamer was taken off to a safe anchor
age and coaled from the “ State of Georga ”
sufficient to take her to New York. Lieuten
ant Ilaxton and an Assistant Engineer, with
ten men from the “ State of Georgia,-’ also two
Master Mates, an Assistant Engineer and nine
inen from U. S. steamer “ Victor” was sent on
board as a prize crew, and at 3 1-2 o'clock on
the morning of the 21H.li, they weighed anchor
and started for New York.
The “Nassau” was commanded by Capt,
Walker, the celebrated slaver, who has passed
under the names of “Capt. Williams,-’ “Capt.
Hope,” and several other aliases. No one was
hurt on board the steamer, and the loss of life
of those who attempted to escape in the boat,
though much to be deplored,w'as only occasion
ed by a conscientious discharge of what I felt
to be my duty. It was only owing to a fortu
nate raising of the fog just at the time it did,
that we succeeded in capturing the steamer.
Had the fog lasted twenty or thirty minutes
longer, she would have passed under the guns
of Port Caswell and have escaped us. As it
was 1 had chased her into about 19 or 20 feet
of water, and my l>oat drew 11 feet. This
Capt. Walker is one of their chief villians,and
recently arrived at Nassau Irom Liverpool,
with a large cargo for the rebels, of which this
is supposed to lie a part. He left his own
steamer (the Fanny Lewis) at Nassau to take
this one into Wilmington, and then return for
the balance. It was a lucky “grab" when we
took this Goliath of ltclicldom. If he docs
not succeed in retaking the steamer, which I j
have no doubt he will attempt to do, the reliels
have lost one of their chief Detils, i. e. one of
their chief Sea Detils. The former Captain
who took her out, J. M. Maflit, liad’nt the
pluck to take her hack, but sent his daughter
to claim the courtesy of the Navy, if taken,
and thereby save herself from Imprisonment,
%
and with her the widow Knox, who showed a
deal of the white horse style of language and
manners. She told us she was born a lady,
and we told her it was all right. We sent
them all North to spend the summer, that being
our style of showing Naval courtesy.
[From our Regular Correspondent.]
letter from Kkowhegan.
Daily Press—lion. Aimer Cohnrn—Sixteenth
Regiment — Col. Wildes — Farmer's pr as
pects—Carious Changes—Old residents, «fcc.
SkoWHJCOAN, June 26, 1862.
Messrs. EnrroRs:—The first number of the
Daily Press arrived duly, and presents an at
tractive appearance for the present, and a grat
ifying promise for the future. Its style, tone
and temper warrant the most flattering predic
tions for tlie career which is liefore it Long
may it wave 1
In an issue of yours the other day, I noticed
an article referring to the liepublican nominee
for Governor, Hon. Abner Cobum. What the
writer says of Mr. Coburn, of his high charac
ter and eminent fitness to discharge the duties
of the office in which his friends desire to place
him, is but the simple truth, and of this none
can testify more readily than his townsmen.—
If you want to know what a man is like, go
and inquire how he stamls among the neigh
bors with whom he lias passed his life. Tin
fact that among this class the nomination of
Mr. Coburn meets witli cordial approval,
speaks volumes in his favor. They have tried
him, for years, and they know that they can
rely upon him. From his birth he has been a
resident of this vicinity, and no public or pri
vate act of his has ever called forth a censure
from his townsmen. Few men can show, in
all the relations of life, a record so unspotted
and consistent. He is a high-minded, public
spirited, judicious, humane and liberal man,
and worthy the confidence and support of the
party which he represents iu his nomination.—
He is not a talking man, having always pre
ferred trork to teords, and he is without pre
tension or display; but sprung from the peo
ple, lie is emphatically the people’s choice.—
They have great confidence in his administra
tive and'financial ability; and they feel the
assurance that their interests, if intrusted to
him, will be confided to faithful and judicial
hands.
A company for the 16th regiment, Col. A.
W. Wildes, is in process of formation here. In
this busy season, when most of-the young men
are employed for the summer, recruiting is
ne^-ssarily a slow process; but the ranks are
filling w fiwt, perhaps, as could be expected.
Col. \\ ildes is a < sident of this town, and has
many friends among us. Skowhegan has con
tributed her fu.l share of brave Isiys to fight
the battles of the Union. With the gallant
7th and 3d 1 adore Richmond, with the ilth in
Florida, with the 15th on the steaming shores
of the Golf, and elsewhere, she is largely and
nobly represented. Some have fallen. From
time to time, grim war gives bark to some
hushed household the pale shrouded form that
went forth in the pride of manly strength. But
they died nobly, in a noble cause. Their
country will not “forget the faithful dead.”
It is raining hard_ here today, and the farm
ers “act as if they had received some very
good news.” In fact, matters had began to
look rather des|>erate w'ith them. So severe
and long-continued had lieen the drought that
serious fears were entertained for the result.
In many instances there were extensive fields
which seemed likely to prove a total loss. The
grateful moisture comes almost too late materi
ally to affect the hay-crop, which must be
light, but other things are looking finely.
A curious instance of the changes In names
and boundaries which may be witnessed in a
growing country like this, has just come to
notice here. The pretty cottage on Klin street,
long the residence of Samuel Philbrick, Esq.,
has been torn down recently to give place to
a more modern edifice. ‘ In connection with the
old house thus demolished. Mr. Philbrick states
the remarkable fact that be has lived in two
Slates, in two countiesrand in four towns, and
ail the time under this identical roof. Such
are the changes time brings. Mr. Philbrick is
one of our oldest and most honored citizeidf,
having been a resident here before the admis
sion of Maine into the Union, and lias seen the
progress of the place from its small and feeble
beginning to the present time. Some few oth
ers of the old and honored residents, the busi
ness fathers of the community, yet remain in
our midst. Conspicuous among these, I can
not refrain from mentioning Elion II. Neil,
Esq., who has been for many years an active i
and prominent man among ns, during which
time he has Justly acquired that reputation for !
thorough reliability, which is a business man’s !
best capital here, and the best legacy he can
I may possibly find from time to time, some
further items of interest. If so, 1 may jot
them down. Epsilon.
K. J. D. LARRABEE A ( «,
Manufacturer*, Importer*, and Wholesale and Re
tail Dealer* in
Picture Frames, Engravings,
ARTISTS’ MATERIALS, Ac.
Manufacturer* of
ORNAMENTAL GILT FRAMES.
For Oil Tainting* and Looking Glasses.
CONSTANTLY ON HAND,
Tier and Ovsl Frame*, with French Mirror*; Gilt, '
Ebony and Imitation Knee wood Frame*, both Oval 1
and Square, for Engraving* and Photograph*, at lowr
price* and warranted satisfactory.
JUST RECEIVED,
A very choice collection of Fine Engraving* and
Lithographs, w hich we shall be happy to show to any
who may call.
Our Assortment of Artists' Materials
I* very extensive, being of the br*t manufacture.
aiicIi a* Winsor It Newton'* Oil and Water Colors,
Brushes, Drawing Paper*, Pencils, Crayons, Oils aud
Varnishes, Mathematical Instruments, kc.
Our stock embraces all article* in this line, and is
the largest and best selected in the State, and we of
fer the i*e*t inducements to dealer* and pliotograpers,
both as to quality of good* aud as to prices.
PARTIES WISHING TO PURCHASE
Will be cheerfully furnished with our Catalogue,
which contaiu* a complete list.
A large assortment of Oval, Gilt, Walnut, Ebony and
ROSEWOOD MOULDINGS,
Constantly on hand.
E. J. D. LABRABEE & 00.,
No. 60 ICirhnnec Street.
J une 23,1*3. tf
FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION.
A Varied Assortment of Fire-Works for the
Fourth of July,
Just received from Hovey A •Sanderson’s “Etna Lab
oratories,” at
W. F. Bill’s
Jewelry, Toy and Fancy Good* Store,
« EXCHANGE STREET, PORTLAND
d&w3dnflt4dpjul4
BUSINESS CARDS.
TUCKER A WEBSTER,
Fashionable Clothiers,
iXP DKALKKf* IN
GENTS’ FURNISHING GOODS,
Of the Meet Deeirable Pattern.
Portland, June 23. 1862. tcblm
DAVID HALE,
Attorney and Counsellor at Law,
BRIDGTON, MAINE.
Prompt attention given to the collection of all de
mands.
REFERENCES:
lion. J. J. Perry, Oxford,
II. P. I>eatie, Esq., Portland,
D. W. Fessenden, Esq., Portland,
d&wlw Luther Billings, Esq., Bridgton.
OLIVER S. BEALE,
SIGN AND FANCY PAINTER,
No. 10 EXCHANGE STREET,
Portland, me.
Signs of every description executed to order.
June 23. daw2w
WILLIAM CAPEX,
SIGN PAINTER,
Half Wa, Down Willow Stmt,
PORTLAKD, UK.
June 23. _ d.3m
DOLE A MOODY,
GENERAL
Commission merchants,
AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IH
FLOUR, CORN AND PRODUCE,
No. 5 Galt Block Commercial Street,
PORTLAND, Me.
ANDREW T. DOLE. FRANKLIN C MOODY.
June 23. eodtf
Wall. II. II. HATCH,
141 Middle Street. - - Portland, Me.
jpk Manufacturing Jeweler,
AND SILVERSMITH.
Also. Dealer in Watches, Jewelry and Silver Ware.
Portland. June 23. 18G2. tf
L. J. CROSS,
141 Middle Street, - - Partlaad, Me.
ally attended to, ia warranted”to give tfioruugtf «a°ia
f»c,io11-__ _jt*£3tf
C. D. BROWN,
Successor to Manning & Brown,
Commission Merchant,
AXD WHO LEX A LX DEALER IX
FLOUR, PRODUCE, I'RO VIS IONS (AND GRAIN',
UNION ST., Partlaad.
Portland, June 23. 1862. dtf
JOHN LYNCH & (O,
"Wholesale Q-rocers,
-and
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
GRANITE STORES.COMMERCIAL STREET,
(Oppoaite head of Widgery a Wharf,)
Partlaad, Me.
JOBH LTXCB, rELKU BARKER, THOS LYXCB.
je23dtf
T. R. BURNHAM,
Photographic Artist,
90 MIDDLE 8RREET,
PORTLAND.
THIS i« the only Room whfr* either of the Bum
hams arc interested in the City, J. U. P. Burn
ham having sold his Room and gone to New York,
8U5 Broadway.
REMEMBER TI1K NUMBER.
SIGN OF THE BIG FLAG.
90 MIDDLE STREET,
T. Ra BURNHAM.
J""f 23.__ dim
Marble Work.
J. R. THOMPSON,
I* prepared to receive order* for
Marble, Free Stone, Soap Stone,
Marble Chimney Pieces, Monumental Work and
Grindstone*.
Corner of Pearl and Federal Sta*.
j«*23tf PORTLAND, ME.
Sugar Refinery,
YORK STREET, PORTLAND, ME.
jc23iitf
ALBERT WEBB Ac CO.,
- OKA LEUA IS
Corn, Flour and Grain,
HEAD OF MERRILL'S WHARF,
CaaBBtrrrlal S■ reel, - - I'onlnnH. Mr.
Ji-Zllf
A. CAll D .
The Crystal & Masonic Journal.
THE publication of this paper will lx* resumed in
July and lx? issued regularly on the 1st and 15th
of each month. .Subscriptions and communications
in the U. State** must lx* sent to
THE GRYSTAL. PORTLAND, ME.,
Those in Canada to WATERYILLE, l . E.
The first number will contain a full report of ‘Tub
Cbxtjckxial Celebration.” Those desiring extra
copies of that number please address as above.
CYRIL PEARL, Editor.
OFFICE PORTLAND ADVERTISER.
d& w2w
CHANGE OF SEASON !
VI. C. BECKETT,
jVIerchant Tailor,
13T, MIDDLE ST.,
Has prepared himself bv selections from the New
Styles of Goods recently imported in New York and
Boston, to inec* the requirement* of his customers
aud the public as to
FASHIONABLE CLOTHING FOR THE SPUING
AND SUMMER SEASONS !
In his new stock are comprised Fancy Cloths for
Spriug Overcoats and Business Suits, Rich Black and
FANCY B RO A DC IX >T 118
For Dress and Frock Coats, embracing the nicer
qualities of French and German, as well as the cheap
er sulistaiitia! fabrics. Elegant Black and Colored,
Plain and Fancy
DO KSKINS!
Of a great variety of patterns. VESTINGS of all
the varieties that the market affords—Silk, Satin. Lin
en, and Cotton—many rare and unique styles. Also
an assortment of the nicer qualities of
GENTLEMEN S FURNISHING GOODS,
To all of which attention is esiwcially invited.
##*C°ht and vest makers wanted.
Portland, June 23,14$2. dtf
PROSPECTUS
OF Til K
PORTLAND DAILY PRESS:
K D I K D BT
JOHN T. GILMAN, recently of the Bath Times,
AMD
JOSEPH B. HALL, of the Aroostook Herald.
The Portland 1 * ail V Press is intended to be
sn enterprising, vigor*** sod live Daily Morning
Paper, containing the UiXefit and fullest news by mail
and telegraph.
THE MAINS STATE PRESS
Is a large, wcll-flllct tally edited, and neatly
printed weekly paper led specially for jrnoral
circulation throughout4ite State.
Both of the above Mamed papers will labor to
inculcate, in no dictatorial spirit, sound political prin
ciples and to promote the material interests of the
State, and of the City of Portland as it$ interests
twine with, and are inseparable from, those of the
State.
Politically, the Press will give an earnest, cordial,
and generous support to the administration of Abra
ham Lixcols, who Jm^tle more than one year, has
indellibly impressed hMnamelf upon the nation's heart
as an incorruptible patriot, an inflexible Chief Mag
istrate, and an honest man; the ability of whose ad
ministration is most stjhmlly exhibited, not [ouly in
the matchless npcratioMMef our army and navy, but
in tbc unparalleled that, iu the midst of this
gigantic rebellion,’ on Government securities are
selling at a premium. It will zealously labor to ex
hibit and defend souwHfpnblican principle*, and,
inasmuch as political qganizatiou* have become a
necessity iu carrying yeffect great principles of
political economy, ami inasmuch as ,the Republican
party which, in the brigf chapter of it* history already
written, has successftilll refuted the allegation of its
enemies that Its desigm and tendencies were sec
tional, and triumphaq£jr .vindicated its claim to a
just and libera) XatinMllity, has remained steadfast
in its devotion to the C don while other organizations
have so generally bcojfne Infected with a dMoya!
spirit, and inasmuch 4l ii the only party which at
present seems competeffMo conserve the great prin
ciples underlying all llec Governments, the Press
will cordially sustain tMe organization of that party
not with a design to fetter a mere partizan spirit, but
in the full conicinu*4b that it embodies the true
principles upon wiiichipnr government rests, and af
fords the only available means of accomplishing such
results as a lofty patriotism imperatively demands.
It will neither seek met endorse any compromises
with men in rebellion kaiust the laws of the land,
but will inculcate loyaljf to the great central idea of
all true democracy—ttrit the majority must govern.
Upon the exciting qifMtiou of Domestic Hi# very, it
may be proper to say, fiat while the Pmxfcs dUBsanc
tion no interference wm the constttntional m legal
right, of loyal men. i*>'> ocHhar ^apologize tor an
evil which cou.titutc* the foulcM blot a poo our
national character. no| attempt to resist the tide of
events that seems d'-stjied to sweep from existence
an institution which ijffee greatest anomaly in a free
government. The esrfpfcicipation of slavery in the
federal Capital, the cooperation of the Federal with
the loyal State governments, to secure gradual eman
cipation, as proposed ly President Lincoln, and all
other constitutional mfiteures looking to a peaceful
removal of our greatest "moral, political and social
evil," will find in theffcEss a generous and hearty
support.
While thus distinctly announcing the general course
proposed for the Press, and intruding that, alike in
war and in peace— in oar country's peril and in **s
triumph, it shall speak with no uncertain voice,
do not lose sight of the* fact that true incn ha** hon
estly differed, and that, coming by different routes
they now find themselvefc travelling parallel roads;
and, instead of seeking Id widen the differences be
tween those who are required by a common patriot
ism to act in concert, the Press will labor hopefully
to eucourage unity of purpose and harmony of act
ion among all loyal men.
Aside from its political department, the Press will
be earnestly devoted to the advancement of the best
interests of the city and State. Its Local Depart
ment will in no case be neglected. Particular atten
tion will be given to the Commercial and Maritime
interests. It will be the aim of its conductors to make
it an indispensable institution of the State, and a ge
nial and welcome visitor in every work-shop, count
ing-house, and family circle. The Kditors. not un
known to the people of Maine, will give their undivi
ded energies t« the work before them, and labor to
make such a paper as the city of Portland, the State
of 3Iaine, and the exigencies of the times demand
one that shall be true to the popular instincts.
Thh Portland Daily Press is printed with en
tirely new type, on a sheet as large as that of any
daily in 3Iaino, and issued every morning, (Sun
days excepted,) at $5 per annum. Subscriptions for
less than stx months, 60 cents per month.
The 31aixe State Press, large, neatly printed,
and well filled with the news of the week, and orig
inal and selected Political. Agricultural. Literary and
Miscellaneous reading, making it specially adapted to
the Family Circle, will be issued weekly, at SI.50 per
year, idvariably in advance. To any person sending
the names of ne*c mb$rriber$, cash in advance,
an extra copy will be scut gratis.
N. A. Foster, \
J. T. t.iLMAir, J N. A. Foster k Co., Publishers.
J B. Hall. ) ,
Portland, May 10, 1862.
The undersigned cordially approve the enterprise
projected in the foregoirfg Prospectus, and earnestly
commend the new' paper to the hearty support of the
People of Maine.
Mav. 18H2
LEONARD ANDREWS,
SAMUEL E. H'HINfi,
N EIX)N DlSU LEY, Jr.,
R. S. STEVENS, 'Republican
N. A. FARWELL,
S. I*. STRICKLAND, State
EULENE HALE,
K. It. FULLER. Committee.
< . II. It WOODBURY,
T. HARMON.
E WOODBURY,
BEN.I KINOSBURY, Jr.,
CLEMENT I’ll INNEY, Cumberland Co.
DANIEL ELLIOT.
LUKE BROWN, Rep. Com.
O. Ci. COOK.
EDWARD L PICKARD,
JOHN T. HULL.
CHAR ELS II. OSOOOD,
HENRY L PAINE,
HENRY' P. LORD. Republican
JAMES DOUi.HTY,
OKEN KINO, City Committeof
WILLIAM OKAY',
JOHN M STEVENS, Portland.
AUli. F. 0EK1SH.
FRANCIS E. PRAY',
WM H. PLUMMER.
rtrn may not be improper to say by way of ex
planation, that the foregoing Prospectus was issued
originally uj>on short notice, aud without giving time
to hear from all the members of the State Committee
—a majoritg of whom have kindly commended the
new enterprise to the people of the State. This fact
sufficiently explains why other names—held in equal
esteem—are not appended to the foregoing commen
dation.
TENEMENTS WANTED.
MW ANTED—Convenient tenements for the
accommodation of two small families, in
respectable localities, and within ten min
utes’ walk of tin? Post Office. Kent not to
exceed from 9150 to 175 per annum.
Address Box 42, Post Office, or apply at the Count
lug Room of the Daily Press, Fox Block.
Portland, June 23. distf
We the l:ndmi|rnrd,
TMTOULD respectfully give notice that we have
v? bought out the Photograph rooms lately occu
Bled by J. U. P. Burnham, formerly the old stand of
urn ham Brothers,
No. Oft MIDDLE STREET,
Aud have newly titled up the rooms aud are prepar
ed to carry on the
Photograph Business,
In all its various branches, aud in the latest and best
style of the art.
we also say that we have at least a thousand splen
did negatives of the citizens of Portland, w hich can
be examined by persona wishipg pictures from any of
them, prints of which will he made at very short no
tice. •
Daguerreotypes and Ambrotypes Copied
To any si/e required, and finished in Oil and Water
Colors, India Ink and finest materials.
Pleas.- give us a call, as perfect satisfaction is guar
anteed ill every instance.
W. T. A If. II. WILDER.
June 2», 18tB. dlwoodlw
THE CHRISTIAN MIRROR.
VOLUME XLI.
THE FORTY-FIRST VOLUME OK THIS PAPER
Will Commence July 29.
All perrons who now subscribe to the Mirror by
P*.v*n* 92 shall hawe a receipt to the close of Volume
XLI—ending July 29,1863—being almost a year and
one quarter.
We are happy to announce Rev. Messrs. Rond,
Shepard, Harris and Smith, Professors in Bangor
Theological Seminary, as stated contributors to the
columns of this paper.
This paper is devoted to the diffusion of moral, re
ligious. educational, and such other intelligence as
pertains to the welfare of society.
Its foreign and domestic news is made up to the
hour (Monday noon) of going to press, and is suffi
ciently general to meet the wants of those who take
no other patter.
The fourth page is spprongated to the most inter
esting Literary. Scientific, ISd Commercial miscella
ny that can be gathered.
It has a department expressly for Children. It is
intended to tie a safe family newspaper; with nothing
to offend the most fastidious—neither cherishing a
morbid appetite, nor catering to a perverted taste.
We do not claim for it that it is the oldest, the lar
gest, the netrest, even the paper in the world: or
that the Church and State would fall without it.
V\ e claim for the Mirror that it is a ('hristian paper.
It aims to be a true reflector of Bible principle and
practicof and in the correction of moral evils and the
renovation of Society, to hold forth the true remedy.
It can be said of our paper that while its correspond
ence is not meagre, its epitome of news and compact
items of interest is inferior to that of no other paper,
and its abstract of valuable article# in American and
Foreign guartcrlies has supplied a place not filled by
auy other re ligious print.
If any want a pajn-r that can safely be a companion
on the .Sabbath, that gives an unprejudiced view of
public affairs, that aids to be a transcript of the age
without identifying itself with its error#, that ohroui
cles to ininuteuem religious and revival news, that
holds firmly the doctrine# and practice of a protea
taut Christianity and can In* safely put into the hand#
of the young, we ask them te take the Christian
Mirror.
This being pre-eminently a Family Journal is one of
the best chauncls for advertisements relating to Books,
Sale#, Legal Notices, and all article# of geueral con
sumption.
\\ eekly paper# generator, and especially religious
ones, are less likely to be destroyed than those more
secular—they are read tnortfln families than Dailies—
they are taken home and preserved, to be examined
at leisure—their contents an* more thoroughlv scan
ned—and they are often sent to absent friends to con
vey to those abroad, some idea of the state of affair#
at home.
I’ortlana, May, 1862.
TESTIMONIALS.
We subjoin some extracts from letter# recently pub
lished in our columns.
From Professor# in Bowdoin College.
Other papers, published out of the limit# of the
State, are useful; but they cannot be expcct«*d to take
the place and to fulfill all the object# ol a |taper pub
lished among ourselves. The Mirror is well known
to our religious people, and has been conducted by
! Mr. Lord, its present editor, with earnest i hristian
fidelity, with a high degree of ability, and at the same
, time in such a manner as to bring to'light and to chcr
1 ish those local religious sympathies amfinterest*, which
can be reached only by a paper published iu the State.
From Rev. Dr. Chickering.
All necessity for two papers having ceased, we
ought to have one taken iu all our churches, a# giKtd
as you and a hundn^i contributors.cau make it. The
most patriotic and liberty-loving among us cannot
complain of its tone in these stirring times; and 1
sometimes almost wish I were compelled to relv upon
your weekly Mimmary instead of reading so many ex
citing details in the daily papers. You tell us what we
| really mid to know; and a great many things that
\ we ought to do.
From Rev. Dr. Carruther*.
It contains a weekly summary of event* written in
a lively style—criticisms, literary and moral, of great
practical value—and such matter* of general and de
nominational interest as serve to keep it* readers well
‘posted up.' If ministers and others, at different
point* in our large State, would be a little more com
municative of local fact*, they would greatlv increase
its intrinsic worth, and proportionally eularge its cir
culation.
(From Rev. Dr. Tappan.]
In common w ith many others, I have earnestly de
sired that we might have in Maine, under the attspfeea
of our denomination, tut one religions newspaper,
and I canuot but hope, that the Mirror, which I have
taken from the beginning, and on many accounts
| have highly valued, may again secure general support,
; and prove In its future course to he a paper in which
i we can all unite. In most of the views expressed in
| relation to this subject, bv Professor Pond, in the
I Mirror of this week, I Billy concur. Your own of
fer “to send it without charge to any who inav be de
sirous of receiving it, till the meeting of the June
(State] Conference in Portland.” is fair and liberal.—
You will permit me however to inquire whether it
might not Im* well toseud one number at least to every
Congregational minister in the State, who is not now
u subscriber, w ithout w ailing for an application, dps*,
otherwise many may not know' that such a proposal
has beeu made.'
From Professors in Bangor Theological Seminary.
From Rav. Dr. Pond.
We obviously need one good religious paper in
> Maine; and one (if it cau be made satisfactory,) is
enough. We need it, not only as a vhehidc of Intel
ligence and thought, but lor the publication of no
tic**, and the accomplishment of various local objects
which can be reacln-d in ua other way.
• • • 1 have been v subscriber’for the Mirror
and a constant reader of it for almost thirty years;—
aud though 1 have seen things iu it occasionally
which 1 did not like, (as I do in most other paper*.)
still all candid readers must acknowledge that the
Mirror has lx*en, from the first, the steadfast advo
cate of tiospel order and truth, and *au important
auxiliary in the great work of eulightening aud evau
geli/mg Maine. I will also say that I think the 31 ir
| rou ha* never beeu more ably and faithfully conduct
| «*d than during the last few years. The present editor
devote* time, and thought, and labor to it. and suc
ceed* iu making it (what he has shown hiuiseif
abundantly able to do) au interesting weekly viaitaut
I to our families and homes. -
It should be further considered, that some of the
| exciting quc*tiou* which once threatened to divide
us, are changing their forms and losing their interest.
They may give place to others, for aught we know, or
may themselves come up again; but at present wo
see’m to have got be>oud them. The 3Iiukor is an
unflinching supporter of the government of the
l-mted Slate* in its contest w ith the slavery rebellion,
it hAka sincere friend to the colored race, amt is
read^B unite iu all well considered efforts for their
liberation and advancement—though 1 am far from
advising any one as to what, or how many religious
papers he shall take, yet 1 will venture to propose
that we make trial of the Mirror. As we ought to
have and must haw one religious paper in the State,
let us take hold of this together; subscribe for it,
write for it, and endeavor to make it such a* our
rhuiche* require.
From Professor I>. T. Smith.
It would be difficult for me to express too strongly
how desirable on every account, it s«*ein* to me to Ixj
that the MlRBQS ikoild be WuU l—tlhul Nowhere
is the influence of a p«MMt religious newspaper more
important than it is in Maiue. In no State is it more
important that the Congregational churches should
have an organ of their own. Nor do 1 see how any
reasonable man cau ask for a better orgau than tin*
MnutOl. Some other pajK-rs indt-ed an- enabled to
supply a greater quantity of readiug for the same
I'm' . wui I'uin i iniiutih* ■ iiiniiuiu ntini
paper like iPtnedium sized book, is better than a larger
one. aud 1 can say iu all sincerity, that 1 know of no
pa|ier, large or small, metropolitan or provincial,
which, with mi little intermingling of what is of a
different character contains a larger amount or a
greater variety of readable, reliable and every way
valuable matter, original and selected, than the Mir
non. Karely do 1 place a number upon tile without a
distinct feeling of regret in regard to more or less of
w hat it contains, that I cannot have it in a volume on
my shelves where it will be constantly at baud.
From Rev. Dr*. Shepard and Harris.
Mr. Lord. Dear Sir:—Permit us to express our de
sire that the Mirror may receive the confidence and
support of the member* of ourchurclies and Congre
gation* in Maim*. It is conducted with painstaking
and ability. It is a judicious and earnest supporter
of the doctrines and polity of our churches, of their
missionary enterprise* and their spiritual interests.—
Its religious articles for family reading are cltoice. Its
summary of news, though necessarily condensed, is
comprehensive and well-digested. The occasions for
difference respecting the application of Christian
truth to civil aud social affair* arc pacing a wav, aud
Christian people are rapidly approaching unanimity;
candor, forbearance and patience, with the grace and
providence of God, w ill enable them to obtain it.—
Under these circumstances we hope that those who
take a religious pajM-r will make a trial of the Mir
ror; and wo expect—we think with good reason—
that they will be satisfied with it. A Maine paper has
obvious advantage* to Maine people, above one pub
lished abroad, aud presents onvious claims to their
support. GEO. 8 HEP A RD,
Hangor, May 12. 1*52. SAMUEL HARRIS.
A. W. B A N FI ELD,
(Successor to P. J. Forristall and Milts k Forristall,
IMPORTER AND DEALER IN
ENGLISH, FRENCH AND GERMAN,
FANCY GOODS,
Pocket and Table Cutlery,
YANKEE NOTIONS.
CLOCKS, WATCHES AND JEWELBY,
STATIONERY, TOYS, fcc.,
28 and 30 Fedtrtd and 106 Congress Streets,
ADDISON W. UANKIELD. 13o»tOH.
P. J. Forristall can bo found at the above place.
June 23. wly
_H OT E L S._
Summer Retreat,
SOUTH SIDE OF PEAK'S fSLAND,
HENRY M. BRACKETT, - - Proprietor.
OPEN for Genteel Boarder*—three mile*
from Portland—within thirty rods of the
Ocean—with good opportunities for fishing,
sea-bathing and water excursion*. A Steam
I ter ran* from Portland doily. Experienced
boatmen in attendanc. je2,*8w
CENTRAL HOUSE,
E. O. Mayo, .... Proprietor.
PASSADUMKEAO,, MAINE.
THE subscriber would very respect hilly an
nounce to hi* numerous friend*, and the
U public generally, that during the temporary
__[compulsory suspension of Tils business he
furn shed this well-known house anew, and is
now better than ever prepared to wait upon his cus
tomers. and hope* by strict attention to their wants
to merit a continuance of the patronage which he has
hitherto received. E. G. MAYO.
Pasaadumkeag. Jane 23,1981. dfcwtf
PREBLE HOUSE, - - PORTLAND, ME.
Bilratc. €.'*■(r.M, earner af
Preble Street*.
THIS h the Urpnt Hotel In the State, poe
mint all the modern improvement,, and
drat clam in every appointment.
TERMS MODERATE, FOR BOARD BT WEEK
OR DAY.
CHAR. H. AD AMR, Proprietor.
jpffl—3m
SACUlitAHOCK HOUSE,
Alfred Carr, * * Proprietor,
BATH, MAINE.
; THE City of Bath is one of the healthiest
localities on the coast of Maine—delightfuI
1! lv situated on the Kennebec, twelve miles
i from the *ca, aud affords oue of the most
uviting retreats from the dust and turmoil of our
larye cities.
The Sagadahoc* is one of the finest, most spa
cious, and best appaftfMB Hotels in the State, located <
1 within time uunuteaiMlk of the Depot, Steamboat
Landing. Boat Often. Ofiftom llmmv Ac., being di
rectly in the bwhMiflftrp of the City.
Terns* M|dsiMy hy the Week tt Day.
AMERICAN HOUSE,
Bnsmi, Mass.,
A TS the largest and best arranged Hotel In
UflLik I 'he New England States; is centrally loca
JJJftLfR'cd- sud easy of access from all the route* of
yV'^ERtravel. It contains the modern improve
[Ml foment*- and every convenience for the com
tort and accommodation of the- travelling public.
The sleeping room* ore large and well ventilated;
the suits of rooms are well arranged, and completely
furnished for families and large travelling parties,
aud the house will continue to be kept as a first class
Hotel in every respect.
LEWIS RICE, Proprietor.
Boston, January, 1863. d7mi*
HATH HOT Kb,
ft By C. M. PLUMMER.
386, Washivutus 8t., Bath.
J_1 •••Term* fl per day. Stable connected
with house.
Bath, June 23, 1862. dtf
JUIRIGO EATING HOUSE,
No. 1 MILK STRUCT, - - - PORTLAND, ME.
JOHN ROBINSON, Proprietor.
Every Delicacy of the Season
Served op at all boars.
TURTLE SOUr, TUESDAY AND FRIDAY.
BROOK TROUT ood all klod# of GAME
Strved to onler.
PINE APPLE LEMONADE,
8TR AW BERRY LEMONADE.
£F" Frogi Served to Order.
•*• Meal* to Kkoular Boarder* at Reduced Rate*.
Open every Sunday from 8 to 1, and from 2 to &
o’clock. je23edtf
CLOTHING.
GARDINER * BROWN,
would say to their friend* and the public that they
have purchased of Messrs. CUADBOL RNE A KEN
DALL, their Stock of
Ready-Made Clothing,
Also, their entire interest in Manufhcturing and Cus
tom Department. Having awared the service* of
Mr. J. E. FOLEY, late Foreman and Cutter for
Messrs C. k K., they hope to merit a flur share of the
patronage bestowed upon their predecessor*.
02 Middle St*# •ppaalte Peat Oflrr.
June 23, 1862. 4wdaw
D. W. CLARK,
-DEALER IN
SILVER STREET - - - ICE HOUSE
-and
No. 32 EXCHANGE ST., PORTLAND, Me.
OT All order* promptly attended to, and the
BEST QUALITY OF ICE delivered in any part of
tin* city, at the market rate*. 2w
THE BEST. MOST EXTENSIVE
AND VARIED
Assortment of Dry Goods,
Ever brought into the city, can always be found at
N. I. MITCHELL'S, - - 127 MIDDLE ST.
» e nave in store the moat extensive stock of
Just purchased at the lowest cash price*, to be sold at
a trifling anvance.
We have also a large lot of
CLOTHS, CASSI MERES, DOESKINS,
MIXTURES, SATINETS, Ae., Ac,,
Either for Coat or Pants, and in this line we will sell
at prices that can’t be beat.
Ladies’ Sacks and Mantillas,
Constantly on hand, and made to order.
OUR STOCK OF PRINTSj
BLEACHED OK BROWN COTTONS,
QUILTS, LINENS.
DAMASKS, FLANNELS,
- AMD -
Every Variety of Houte-Keeping Goods,
Is unsurpassed, and one can always flud any article
in this line, at about wholesale price*.
We have a large assortment of
PARASOLS, SI'S - UMBRELLAS,
SKIRTS, HANDKERCHIEFS. BUTTONS,
EMBROIDERIES. LINEN BOSOMS,
t.loves, hosiery,
And >n cndlru rariotjr «f of Small Article pertain
ing to our bMtneM, all of which will be Mild cheap
for ca#h, at
]M. I. IvlitohelTs,
197 MIDDLE STREET,- - MUZZEY ROW.
jdSeoddk wtf
HOMESTEADS FOR $20.
THE MISSOURI LAND COMPANY have par
chased from the llauuibal St St. Joseph Railroad
Compauv a large tract of land in Northern Missouri,
adjoining the flourishing town of Hamilton, raid well
County, tor tanning and manufacturing porpoee*,
and have divided their pro)H‘rty into lots and farms.
They are offered lo sub-crib* rs in share* of B20 each.
Maps, with Bill information, can be had by calling ou
EDWARD Nil AW, Afral,
lu2 Middle Strxbt, Pobtlaxd.
June 23. dtf
_RAILROADS.
KENNEBEC AND PORTLAND R. R.
SUMMER ARRAXUXHXHT.
Commenced April 14f*. 1882.
ana P»«*enger trains will leave dally, (Sun
W^^Wd«tt excepted) ns follows:
Augusta tor Bath, I'ortland and Boston, at 11 U A.
M., connecting at Brunswick with the Androscoggin
Railroad (or Lewiston, Livermore Falls, Wilton aad
Farmington.
leave I’ortland for Bath and Aagnsta at 1.00 F. M,
eoiiuectiug at Brunswick with the Andrceeoggta
train, for stations on that road; and at Aagnsta with
the Somerset k Kennebec Railroad for Water, II Ic,
Kendail's Milts and Skowhegan. and at Kendall's
Mills with the Penobscot k Kennebec Rend for Pitta
Held, Newport aad Bangor: arriving same night.
Mototog Morning and Unturdag Evening Trains.
On Monday trains leave Angnsta at 8 JO A. M„ aad
Bath at 8J» A . M . for Portland, connecting with tha
8.48 A. M. train for Lowell and Boston.
Leave Portland on Saturdays, at 8.18 P. on ar
rival of train from Boston, for Bath and Aagnsta.
STAOB < "XXECTIOXS.
Stages leave Bath daily I Sundays excepted) at 8.(0
• M . on arrival of train from Portland and Boston,
for W iscnsset. Dmmariscotta, WsWoboro', Rockland
and Thonimnton.
Stages leave Angnsta daily (Sandays excepted), for
lie!tut, on arrival of train from I'ortland and Ben
ton.
Ticket* sold in Bonton for all the stations or the
Kennebec ft Portland, Androscoggin, and 8onerwt
ft Kennebec Roads.
Freight trains run daily between Augusta and Port*
)»ud. B H. CUSHMAN.
Manager and Superintendent.
Angnsta. April, 18*2.junc23dtf
Internstlonsl Btesauhip Company.
EASTPORT, CALAIS AND ST. JOHN.
TWO TRIPS PER WEEK.
On and after April 28, the Steam
er. "NK.W BRUNSWICK" and
FOREST CITY " will, aalfl for
: (her notice, leave P. 8. k P. K. R.
wliait, tmrt ot state Street, as follows:
Steamer "New Branswick,” Cnpt. E. B. Wixcaxa
T»a, will leave for Eastpobt and St. Joh.u every
MtiNllAY. at 8 o'clock. P. M.
Returning will leave St. Johx every THURSDAY
MoRMNti, at 8 o’clock, for Ex ST roar, Postlard
and Boerox.
Steamer "Forest City." Cap*. E. Finn, win leave
for EARTroaT and St. Juux every THURSDAY at
8o'clock P M.
Through tickets are sold by this line counseling at
F.AerrouT with stage coaches for MAcaiAa. aad
with Steamer Oneen for Rohbinston, Calais, St.
Stkfiixx*. sad St. Axdhxwr. and at the latter plaee
over Railway for Caxtububt: from thenee per
stage coaches for WoottsTOcx and Hocltov, which
is the cheapest aad most expeditions way of reaching
the Aroostook County.
We also ticket through per Steamers and Railways
for Wixtmon. Halifax, Dtuxr. FuDmicmr,
St'SSXX. Moxrrox, SHXDIAC. Pxtxex Edward
Islaxp. Pit-ror. North shore or Nhw Buu.vs
wick, Mikimioh. and Bay db Chalxl'b.
C. C. EATON.
_Jnne23.__ dswtf
ANDROSCOGGIN RAILROAD.
■UMXIU ARMA90KMSST.
:SBSBB3 On and after Moxpat, Mar 6, UR,
will leave Portland for Lewietaa
Him FI nm.gton via Brunswick. at I P. M.
Leaks Farmington for Idcwistou, Bath and Port
land. via Brunswick, at 9.16 A. M.
I>*wfcton for Bath and Portland rla Bruns
«tt at 11.45 A. M
Freight train* daily between Portland and Lewis
ton.
itaoi covnacnova.
Stage leaves Strickland’s Ferry Tuesdays. Thurs
days and Saturdays, for Urermorr. Canton. Pent
and Dixfield; returning opposite davs.
Stare loaves North Jay for East Dixfield. Dixfield,
and Weld, on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays;
returning opposite days.
Stage leaves Farmington -or New Vineyard, New
Portland mod Kingfield. oa Wednesdays and Satur
day*. returning on Mondays and Fridays.
Stare* leave Farmington daily, for Strong, Aroa
and Phillips.
Passenger* for this mate will take the cars at the
Portland. Saco A Portsmouth, or Kennebee A Port
land Depots, in Portland. 8. W. EATON. Sapt.
Farmington May june&rftf
an THROUGH TICKETS
To Thk aso, rmniATi. (LimAro. DuTuotT,
Toledo. 8y. I'acl. La (’eouue, 8t. Lortu,
New Oeleaee, or Bay part of the
WEST, SOCTH OR NORTH WEST,
BY THE
ERIE RAILWAY.
Via Bcyealo, Dcekiee, asd Niagara Fall*.
Thi, rood i> broad anoi And i, provided with
New end Splendid Sleeping ('in.
ITTWdi told in Portland at loweat Boeton rate*
Vj
W D. LITTLE. Asset,
Ofirt 31 Exrhamgt Strtrt.
ET" Yon can are money by teearing ticket, at thli
office.
June 23. dawtf
STEAMBOATS.
Portland and Xew York Steamers.
m .a, The splendid and ffiat Stranuhtp
iffitg r---ruplaiu SlDRBY
will until farther notice run
SRSEaBbaa follows:
1-eave Brown* Wharf, Portland, everr WEDNES
DAY, at 4 P. M-, and leave l*ier 9 North River, New
Yori, every SATURDAY, at 3 o’clock. P M.
This vessel is fitted np with fine accommodations for
pawiigen*, making this the most speedy, safe and •
comfortable mute for travellers between New York
and Maine. Passage #6,00, including Faro and State
Rooms.
iioods forwarded by this line to and from Montreal.
Quebec, Bangor, Bath. Augusta. Eastport and St.
John.
Shippers are requested to send their freight fa tbo
steamer before 3 P. M , on (lie day that the leaves
Portland.
For freight or passage applv to
EMERY A FOX. Browurs'Wharf, Portland.
H. B CROMWELL A CO., No. 96 Weal Street.
New York.
June 23. 1962. dtf
MONTREAL
OiEAI STEAMSHIP CO’S
Weekly Mail Line.
197i r.or tne min*wing nnr-mw, power
ful Steamer* III HERMAN. NORTH
AMERICAN. NORWEGIAN. JURA.
BOHEMIAN. ANGLO SAXON. NO
VA MOllAN—will nail from Quebec every Satur
dav morning, for Liverpool, via iAiudonderrv.
IWhk«h leave Torvill per Grand Truuk Train*
with I'uited Stale* mail*, every Friday, at 1 IS 1* M .
connecting with Steamer at Quebec every Saturday
moraiag.
P».-«age to Liverpool. Londonderry or Glasgow
Third Clase. WV First Class. *H7 to «*2—according
to accommodation,—which includes ticket* ou Grand
Trunk Railway.
Prepaid and retnrn tickets issued at reduced rates
Excursiou tickets to the World’s Fair, out and
back. flfiO.
Apply to Edmonstone, Allan k Co., Montreal, or to
J. L. FARMER.
No 10 EXCHANGE ST., PORTLAND.
Jnne 20. 1863. dtf
Warren,
Irn-KMOK TO
THAYER A WARREN,
Proprietor of the
LIVERPOOL PACKETS,
Sailing from Liverpool tor Boston twice a month.
Steerage Passage. *2l). Also, Agent for New York
and Liverpool Steamships, mailing from New York
every Saturday, and from Liverpool every Wednes
day, and calilng at t^ueeustowu, Ireland. Cabin
Passage, *75. 3d Claaa, *30.
Sight Bills of Exchange, for XI Sterling and np
wmjd, payable at any Hank in Great Britain or Ire
land constantly for sale.
For Passage Certificate*, Steamer Tickets, Drafts,
or for further information. Address,
GEO. WARREN. 9b State Street. Poston. Maas.
EATO!\ BO \HIMX* SCHOOL,
„ FOR BOYS.
KENT’S HILL, - - READFIiLD, MX.
milE SECOND OCARTER of the Summer Session
X of this Institution will commence
MONDAY, JUDY RUt.
This Is a Family School, and the best of reference
emu be given. Please seut for a Circular.
II M. EATON A SON. Proprietor*.
AMOS II. EATON, Principal.
LLEWELLYN A. LUCE. Assistant.
June 2Wth, 1*8_ d2w
Notice.
FROM and after the first of July, Postage Stamps
and Stamped Envelope* will not be charged at
the Duet Oboe JeRtf

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