OCR Interpretation


The Portland daily press. [volume] (Portland, Me.) 1862-1921, July 11, 1862, Image 1

Image and text provided by Maine State Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016025/1862-07-11/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

—PORTLAND DAILY PRESS.
VOL- L PORTLAND, ME., FRIDAY MORNING, JULY 11, 1802. NO 10
PORTLAND DAILY PRESS,
JOHN T. OILMAN,,
JOSEPH B. HALL, (Editor»
J« published at Xo. «) EXCHANGE STREET,
In FOX BLOCK, by
FOSTER, OILMAN And HALL,
Fnder the firm name of
N. A. FOSTER & CO.
Terms:
The Portland Daily Press is published every
morning, (Sundays excepted), at *5,00 per year in ad
vance.
Rates oT Advertising:
Transient Advertisements, *1.00 per square,
for three insertions or less; exceeding three, and not
more than one week, *1.25 per square; 75 cents per
week after. One square every other day one week,
*1.00; 50 cents per week after.
Exhibitions, Ac., under head of Amusements,
*2.00 per square per week.
Special Notices, *1.50 per square for first week,
*1.00 per week after.
Business Notices, in reading columns, 12 cents
per line for one insertion. No charge less than fifty
cents.
Lkoai. Notices at usual rates.
Advertisements inserted in the Maine State j
Prkss (which has a large circulation in every part of :
the State) for 88 cents per square iu addition to the
above rates for each insertion.
Transient advertisements must be paid for in ad
vance.
By All communications intended for the paper
should be directed to the ”Editors qf the Press,” and
those of a business character to the Publifhm.
tyThe Portland Daily and Maine State
Press Office, in Fox Block, No. 82J Exchange
Btreet, is open at all hours during the day and eve
ning, from 7 o’clock in the morning to 9 in the
evening.
ty Job Printing of every description executed
with dispatch; and all business pertaining to the of
fice or paper promptly transacted on application as
above.
MISCELLANEOUS.
Gleatiings from the Field of Conflict*
The army correspondent of the New York
Time* says Gen. McClellan’s army, when lie
retreated from before Richmond, consisted of
sixty thousand men. At six o'clock, on Tues
day morning, they arrived at Haxall’s Land
ing, weary with the exhaustion of five battles
and continuous night marches, with little food
and scarcely any sleep, unable to understand,
and therefore bewildered and partially discour
aged by the constant falling back, but not pre
pared to be beaten, nor exhausted of courage.
At eight o’clock, Tuesday morning, our
forces having been concentrated at Malvern
Hills, the line of battle was formed. At nine
o’clock the reliels opened the battle with a
heavy lire of artillery, to which we responded
from numerous batteries which had been placed
along the hill-sides in commanding positions.
Tin- day was a Is-autiful one, clear and cloud
less. unless from the smoke of the incessant ar
tillery tire: the position a line one, an open
country, with rolling ground fringed by thick
woods: the James river in sight, and on its
waters, clean'd for action, two gunlMiats. the
Jacob Bell and Galena, whose llJO-pounders
jKiured awful missiles of death into the woods
above the river, by whose sides ndiel reinforce
ments were coming in heavy ntimhers. The
tire of the artillery on the hills was kept up
during the day, the rebels getting decidedly
the worst of it.
Facing this as long as they could, they would
at length wheel around and march hack again
in good order, leaving the ground coven'd w ith
their fallen. Again and again, w ith new regi
ments, this was repeated, and again and again
shot aud shell, grape and canister, gave them
awful punishment. It was too much to be
borne, and at last they no longer marched back
in columns, but ran hurrying for life from the
terrible ministers of death.
lip to six o’clock it w as an equal game—if
anything, we were getting the worst of it. At
six o'clock in the evening, Gen. I’orter sent
word by an aid, who drove hastily up, dust
covered aud well nigh exhausted, to Gen. Sum
ner. who, as senior general, was in command,
saying that he must have reinforcements or
lose the day. Gen. Sumner immediately di
rected that two of Richardson's brigades—
Gen. Caldwell'* aud Gen. Meagher's—lie sent
to his assistance. Gen. Heintzelman at the
same time sent two of Hooker's—Gen. Sickles’
Excelsior brigade aud Gen. Patterson's New
Jersey brigade.
These new men, lighting with a courage and
determination of which the annals of w ar can
not furnish a superior, drove the enemy until
(lark, and decided the fate of the battle of Mal
vern Hills aud the army of the Potomac.
The change of base was necessitated by the
impossibility of holding our extended lines
with the army which Mr. Stanton would grant
to Gen. McClellan. Our front extended from
Mechanicsville on the right to White Oak
Swamp on the left, a distance of fifteen miles.
Besides defending this against a greatly su
perior force of the reliels, to say nothing of
satisfying the ambition of the Secretary of
War and Congress for an immediate advance,
we were obliged to- guard some twenty miles
of railway, from White House to Fair Oaks.
Gen. ilrCteUan had not men enuut/h to hohl
this position after the reinforcement of the
rebels by Stonewall Jarksou and others, and
he Ix'came convinced of this after the dash of
Gen. Stuart's Cavalry. Our right was con
stantly subject to the danger of being turned,
and our army being surrounded. The rels-ls
knew that this was our weak position, and
when they could bring an overwhelming force
to bear against it and were sun- of success,
they made the attempt.
_:.. _ .... . • ..
defeat of the relx-ls, and the order with which
our soldiers have gone through it. proves them
to be of the very best kind, reliable and wor
thy of the world's applause. Gen. McClellan
owes everything to his soldiers and to some of
his leading Generals, for the success w hich
has attended a movement upon which he haz
arded the safety of Ids whole army.
The position which we now occupy is one
which our enemies say we can defend against
anything Jeff. Davis or any other monarch can
bring to bear upon as. Our line, instead of
being fifteen miles front with twenty miles of
railway to defend, is scarcely five miles long.
One of our flanks is the James ltiver, not a
railroad to lx- torn up, nor a high w ay t hat may
be olistructed, but a sure means of conveying
supplies, and easily defended by gunixiais.—
Our other line is readily held§ty the force we
can bring.
If we could only have occupied this same i
position six weeks ago, instead of the difficult
one we took, your correspondent would now
be dating his letters at Richmond, instead of
twenty odd miles below there, Though fur
ther from Richmond than we w en- last Thurs
day, in miles and furlongs, in effect we are
nearer that stubborn capital, ami surer of its !
capture.
I will not venture to name the exact date
when we shall exchange the hardships of the
camp for such luxuries as Richmond will afford,
but the day cannot he far distant, if other co
operative movements are properly conducted.
The army is in excellent spirits ‘to-day, and
disposed to let off a deal of Fourth (if J uly
patriotism and powder.
Tile 4th w as observed by the army of the Po
tomac, by order from the Commanding Gen
eral. The correspondent of the New York
Would says:
“Gen. McClellan reviewed tile troops in the
afternoon as announced, and was received with
the most enthusiastic cheering all along the
lines. The soldiers have the most unlimited
confidence in their general’s military capacity.
They express no apprehensions for the future
under his command. They do not consider
their retreat a defeat, but believe it a part of
Met lellan s plan. They do not believe their
leader lias made a movement that was not jus
tified by sound military policy. They think
that tile capture of Richmond will come in
good time, in accordance with Gon. McClci
Ian's plans, and are anxious to lie led whenever
he gives the word to do their part toward that
; result; so the troops, of course, cheered their
young commander as he rode along the lines.
As he passed along, he made a few remarks to
them, thanking them for their gallant conduct,
encouraging them for the future, and telling
them them that their labors were not yet
over.”
The New York Ilrralil correspondent, writ
ing duly 4th. says:
During the whole of the seven day's contest
our troops fought bravely, and drove back the
enemy at many points. Gen. Woodbury’s En
gineer Brigade remained behind till the last
moment, destroying and blowing up the bridg
es. But the rebels have Engineers as well as
we. They have besides, what we have not. an
intimate knowledge of the tophography of the
country, and they know of many fords and
passes across the stream which arc unknown
to us. The consequence has lieen that their
engineers very quickly rebuilt the bridges,and
while part of their army crossed on these, oth
er parts crossed by the fords. Thus they kept
close on our rear.
The Union Engineer Brigade obstructed all
the roads through the great White Oak Swamp,
and so effectual were their labors in doing so
tluit Gen. Hciutzehnan publicly declared that
they had saved the army. What he meant was
that the obstructions which our brave engi
neers placed in the roads through that swamp,
so delayed the pursuit of the enemy that our
army effected its movement In safety. But the
hordes of the rebels toiled day and night at the
removal of some of the obstructions, and
sought out new paths by which others might
la- avoided, so that by Tuesday night they were
ready to cross the swamp with whatever force
they pleased. Before that time, however, our
army had reached the James river, anil were
comparatively safe.
Our position lien- is strong, our artillery ad
mirably posted, our men somewhat recovered
from their fatigues, and there is not a man here
who is not willing to die for his country, soon
er than yield or fly. We may is1 overpowered
by the loree of numbers; but you may depend
iilHin it McClellan's army will never surrender.
In the meantime why are we not further rein
forced ?
The Washington correspondent of the Trar
W/rr writes July 7th. as follows:
The Western Generals are congregating
here in nutnliers. Pope, Mitchell. Sherman.
Wallace—four of the liest Generals in Hal
leck's army—an- here. What does it mean ?
Wallace, it is said, declares that the Govern
ment should instantly concentrate troops
around Kiehmond, bringing large numbers
from the West for that purpose. He says if
the rebels are permitted to beat us in rapid
concentration of troops, they will surely tri
umph.
' «»um nuium&i ip uui III IIM* rU'pilDIK'ail
supporting tin- same idea. I understand that
the President dislikes to try on the plan of
sudden concentration of troops, fearing that
the reta-ls will boat him at it. (Jen. McClellan
is in favor of the plan, and must have been
from the first, for he has been liegging for
more troops ever since lie got into the Penin
sula, and he. of course, knew the amount of
forces here, and the need of them.
The Washington Republican of July 7th
says:
The week’s lighting, ending with Tuesday
the first day of July, has been a great advan
tage to Ihe national cause. Anything was bet
ter than that nightmare of torpidity which
had brooded over the army of the Potomac
for months. We have lost more men, tw ice
over, by inglorious disease in the swamps of
the Chiekahominy, than in all this seven days’
lighting. Our losses in these battles have
been cruel. In the first moment of the na
tional anguish,1St may term unfeeling to sug
gest any considerations of compensating ad
vantage, lint the truth is. ware cannot lie pros
ecuted to a successful termination without
lighting, and least of all, such a war as this is.
The reliels an- not to lx* put down by block
ade, by starvation, or by any form of ihe “an
aconda" policy. It is to lie done bv fighting,
and by killing off their leading spirits in bat
tle. And while that is not to be accomplished
without deplorable losses on our side, the sac
rifices of life in idle ramps are really greater.
The New York Evening Post calls Ibr a gen
eral arming of the people of the five States. It
says:
Our wllole population must Ik- made ready
for w ar. We have the rebellion to put down
with the strong hand, and we have the pros
pect of fon-ign intervention, which will lead,
of course, to a war with one or two of the
most powerful and warlike nations of the
world.
We call, therefore, upon the national admin
istration and uikui all the State governments
to bring out every able-Uidied man. put him
into some military organization where he may
Ik- drilled, and to.provide arms, equipments
and stores sufficient for putting them ull in the
field.
lint we must not confine our arming to tin
land. Me must make ready to wage such a
naval war as has never been seen. Iron-clad
vessels can be built in three months. Let us,
then, have enough before this year is out to
match the navies of England and France, while
with our wooden navy and our privateers we
can swi-i-p the commerce of our enemies from
tin- ocean.
Let us, then, go to work. M'e have boon
playing at war, not waging it. M’e Imve been
sluggish in our preparations and timid in our
execution. Let us change all this. Let the
incompetent and the suspected step aside.
M'e want laild. energetic, patriotic men to step
forward and take the lead in bringing this na
tion to that condition of perfect armament
which will leave us not a moment of appre
hension.
i net uugresaionai correspondent oi tlie same
paper says:
There is serious talk of a conscription act.
Volunteering would do well enough if the de
mand for au increase of forces w as not imme
diate. It is suggested in some quarters that
Congress should pass a hill authorizing the
President to resort to a draft whenever, in the
absence of Congress, he shall think it expedi
ent. It is quite probable that within a month
after the adjournment the Executive will And
it necessary to resort to drafting, and if such
should Is* tlie ease, it would is- exceedingly
awkward to be obliged to call Congress to
gether for the. authority.
Major General Hai.lkck.—There is al
ways something in a man of character w hich
is specially worthy of remarking. All individ
uals—speaking oi' men in the highest terms
—are to he studied w ith the same closeness we
would study a picture, or a specimen. In
great men. tile one peculiar point to lie ob
served is their perfect simplicity—their lack of
pretension, or even of profession. What they
are, that they arc; and they never think of
such a tiling as talking almut it. It is not nec
essary. They would feel themselves cramped
and diminished by so doing, or sufficing oth
ers to do it for them. It is just its easy
and natural for a great man to do a good deed
as it is for a small man to perform a trilling
one; each is spontaneously done, even when ii
appears to be more or less mechanical.
A great many |>crsuus feel an active interest
in tlie personal apperanee and traits of a man
like General Halleck, now in successful com
mand of our Western department. A writer
in camp says Hint lie looks not tlie military
man at all: hut appears in lib rich uniform, as
it lie was getting around in borrowed cloatbs,
In fact, lie resembles some “round, fat, oily,”
Methodist parson,dressed in regimentals, with
a wide, stiff-rimmed, black felt hat,sticking on
the liack of his head.aud showing his forehead
so prominent that his troops have nicknamed
him “Old Brains." Ilis demeanor is very
simple and business-like; no |M>mp, no unusual
ceremony, and no laek of order. On horse
back lie neither looks like a soldier, nor rides
like one; but rattier carries the apjieurauce of
a man ol peace. His face is large; his eyes,
tlie eyes of genius—a kind of indistinct gray,
not without expression, but of the deep-welling
kind whielt only reveals the emotion without
indicating its character.
PLEASURE PARTIES.
I/XtiJtsloNlsTS visiting the Islands, supplied
j with stores al tin* shortest uotice.
Orders solicited.
ISO Kore Street tsenr fool of Rxrhnnge.
CALUKItWOOD k ISKChbiT
foil land, June 2d. dtf
MISCELLANEOUS.
STATE OF OTAIME.
Executive Department.
Augusta, July 4, 18C2.
7b the People of Maine :
An additional numlier of troops is required by the
exigency of the public service, and if raised immedi
ately it is believed bv those* who have the best means
of knowledge*, that the war will Ik* brought to a speedy
and glorious issue. Of this number the President of
the United .states desires and expects that Maine
should furnish her proportion or quota.
Our gallant and |»atriotic State has done her whole
duty in the past, and she will not falter nor fail in the
present nor in the future.
That her material interests may be protected and
advanced, that tranquility and peace mav be restored
throughout the land, that the Constitution and the
Union, which have U*cn to us all the source of un
measured blessings, may be preserved; that Liberty,
of which they were the inspiration and are the selected
guardians, may be sav «*d. and that the light of one
gn at example may shine brighter and brighter, to
guide, to cheer and to bless the nations. To aid in
all these. I invoke of the people of this State a prompt
and hearty response to this new demand upon their
patriotism; and may they all unite in the work that
is before them, each laboring in his own sphere, do
ing what he can by his example, influence and sympa
thy— proferring his treasure, his time, his strength,
his heart, and his highest hope to the cause or his
couutry!
General Orders will be issm-d immediately, giving
authority for raising new Regiments of Infantry, ami
for calling into actual service a portion of the linuni
formed Militia of the State.
ISRAEL WASHBURN, Jr.
By the Governor.
Joseph B. Hall, Sec’y of State.
STATE OF MAINE.
head quarters,*
Adjutant General's office,
August a, July 6, 1862.
GENERAL ORDERS. No. 16.
In pursuance of requisition and authority from the
President of the United States, the Governor and
Cntnmat.der-iii-Chief orders and directs.
1st—I hat two additional Volunteer Regiment* of
Inlautry, for the service of the Government, be raised
ai d orgs.iized forthwith The Seventeenth will ren
dezvous at Port la ud and the Eighteenth at Bangor —
The exigency of the occasion i* such that the utmost
expedition and vigilance is required.
2d—Whereas the ununiformed Militia of this State,
constituted a* provided l»y chapter ten of the Revised
Statutes, and subsequent acts, is subject to activ e duty
‘•in ease of insurrection, war. invasion, or to prevent
Invasion, or to be mustered into the Hervice of the
l nitod State*, Upon * requisition made upon the Gov
ernor and < ommandrr-iiM biefbv the President of
the Ulifted States by virtue of the Constitution and
Acts of Congress." and tin* exigency having arisen,
when the Governor and f onmiandcr-iu-rhicf is au
thorized and required to call the said ununiformed
Militia, or a portion thereof, into actual service; it is
ordered that the Major General of each Division in
this State take measures forthwith for the organi
zation of all the Companies of Infantry from the en
rol led, uii uni formed Militia of hi* command, bv the
issue of orders forthwith to the Orderly Sergeants of
such enmpanit** to call out their companies without
delay, for the elections of officers, returns whereof are
to be made to the Adjuf»nt General forthwith. After
the receipt of such return*, orders will Ik- promulga
t'd for the organization of two regiments of Militia
in each division, to In* formed and constituted from
said companies by detarimieut or detail. It is ex
pected that this dutv of calling out companies and
electing officers thereof, will Ik- perform<*d in
the shortest possible time after the receipt of this or
der.
3d—All the members of the ununiformed Militia
will Ik- relieved from service under this order. ui»on
enlisting in either of the regiments of Maine Volun
teers already in tin* Held or now being raised for the
service of the United States, in which case each will
receive h premium of two dollars, one month’s ad
vance pav, and a bounty of twenty-five dollars in ad
vance. To those who join a regiment aln-adv in the
field, the advance pay and bounty will Ik- made each
upon his muster individually into the service. If he
joins a new regiment, he win receive his advance pav
npon the muster of his company Into the service, and
his advance bounty upon the mastering of his regi
ment, making the total amount which he will have
received, upou the muster-iu of his regiment. Forty
Dollars.
In addition to the foregoing, at the expiration of
his term of enlistment, or u|h>ii his honorable dis
charge from service, he will receive a further cash
bounty of seventy-live dollars, which, iu the event of
his death, is pav able to his family.
Recruiting agents will receive authority in writing
from the Adjutant General, and such other persons
as may hereafter be designated.
By order of tl © Commander-In-Chief.
JOHN L. IIODSDON,
d&wtf Adjutant General.
HEAD QUARTERS,
Aiuutant Gkxkral’* Ornri,
Augusta, July 7th, 1862.
GENERAL ORDER. No. 17.
To the Major Generals <\f the Militia .
Accompanying this you will receive General Order
No. 16, with PriK-'amations of His Excellency the
Governor, and recruiting paper* and instructions to
be put into the hands of the Orderly Sergeant or some
other person of each of the companies organized un
der your direction, with a request that they will en
list all such persons therefrom, or others, as mav be
possible. For this service they will receive a suitable
compensation for each man * enlisted by them and
mustered into the service of the United States.
The necessities of the service admit of no delay, and
It is most earnestly hoped that tin- several Major Gen
eral* will see that the requirements of this order are
promptly executed, and the Orderly Sergeants or oth
er parties designated as recruiting’officers will omit
no effort on their part to secure as main recruits as
possible for the Volunteer Regiments.
As members of the Militia will be called into actual
service under the laws of the United State* and of
this State, as Militia, for a period which in all proba
bility will la* quite as long as that for which they
would be held as Volunteers, the ad\autages to be de
rived by the soldier in volunteering, iu the matter of
premium, advance pay, bounty, ami other benefits,
are so great and obvious that it’ is believed there will
be no hesitation in diluting as Volunteers, rather
than to serve a* Militia, in which capacity they will
receive uothing but monthly w ages, rations aud’cloth
iug.
Citizen soldiers! remember you have a country to
save, and you are the men who can render most effi
cient aid in this holy and patriotic work. To render
success speedy and certain, and to alleviate and
abridge the cat ami tit^s of war, the President of the
United Stall's has requested this call to be made.
The Comniander-iii-Cliief does not doubt that our
true-liearted soldiery will make such response as will
still further illustrate the patriotism and devotion of
our galiant and laitliful State.
lly Order of the Commander-In-Chief.
JOHN L. HODS DON, Adjutant General.
Jy» dSt
Crockery Ware, China,
GLASS WARE,
AT LOW PRICES.
PLATED AV^YTIE,
Castors, Spoons, Forks, Card
and Cake Itaskrls,
Tat>lo Cutlery,
IVOHY, HORN. EBONY AND COCOA
HANDLED KNIVES.
KEROSENE OIL AND FLUID.
51 UNION STREET,
i , S. B. WAITE.
1 Jc23—Owcod
BUSINESS CARDS.
TITKI'K A WEHSTEK,
109 Middle, corner of Temple Street,
Fashionable Clothiers,
AND DBALKUH IN
GENTS’ FURNISHING GOODS,
Of the Most Desirable Pattern.
Portland, June 23. 1802. tcislm
J» L. WINfSLOW, Agent,
MANl'FACTVKKR OF
Steam Engines, Steam Boilers,
AND EVERY DESCRIPTION OF MACHINERY,
Steam Cocks, Valve., Pipe.and Connections, Whole- I
sale or Bctail.
STEAM AND GAS FITTING, |
Done in the host manner.
Worka 6 Union St„ and 233 & 238 Pore St.,
Jnltdtf PORTLAND, ME.
EC KT 8 O^rT
SIOJI and ornamental
PAINTER,
No. 31 Exchange Street, Portland, Me.
nr- (irder* solicited. j«>3b—3m
L. J. C ROSS,
141 Middle Street, •' - Portland, Me.
Cva Watch-Maker,
X. B.—All work being prnmptlv and person
allv attended to, is warranted <° give thorough satia
fketiou. jc23tf
C. D. BROWN,
Successor to Manning A Brown,
Commission merchant,
AND WHOLKAAL* DEAI.fR IN
FLOUR, PRODUCE. PROVISIONS AND CRAIN,
UNION ST., For.land.
Portland, June 23. 15W2. dtf
DOLE A MOODY,
GENERAL
Commission merchants,
AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
FLOUR, CORN AID PRODUCE,
No. 5 (Fait Block Commercial Street,
PORTLAND. Me.
ANDREW T. DOLE. FRANKLIN C MOODT.
June 23. codtf
T. R. BURNHAM,
Photographic Artist,
90 MIDDLE IRRKET,
PORTLAND.
THIS is the onlr Itooin where either of the Rnrn
ham* are interested in thr City, J. U. 1*. Burn
ham having sold his Itooin and gone to New York.
8U5 Broadway.
HEM KNRRIt TUB NUMBER.
SIGN OF THE BIG FLAG.
60 MIDDLE STREET,
T. R. BIRNIIAX
.Tune 23. dim
JOHN LYNCH & CO„
"Wholesale Q-rocers,
-and
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
GRANITE STORES.COMMERCIAL STREET,
(Opposite head of Widgery'n Wharf.)
Partin ad, Mr.
joint LYNCH, PKLKO BARKER, THOfl. LYNCH.
j«*23dtf
WILLIAM CAPEN,
SIGN PAINTER,
Half YVay Dawn Willow Street,
PORTLAND, ME.
June 23. d3in
BREED A TI KEY,
— IMPORTER* OP —
Lastings, Serges, Elastic Gnssettings,
AND FINDINGS,
MANUFACTURERS of BOOTS & SHOES,
ALSO, Kill AND GOAT STOCK,
60 Union, four door, from Middle Street,
c.n. BREED. PORTLAND, ME. j.g.titkkt.
je30—3md& w
JOHN B. BROWN A SONS,
Sugar Refinery,
YORK STREET, PORTLAND, MK.
j<*28dtf
ALBERT AY EBB A CO.,
— DEALERS IN -
Corn, Flour and Grain,
HKAD OK MKRRIl.L'S WHARF,
Cominrrrial Strrrl, - - Fnllnnl. Mr.
je23tf
wn. H. H. HATCH,
141 MUallr Slrrrl. . - P.rtla.4, Mr.
Manufacturing Jeweler,
AND SILVERSMITH.
Also, Dealer in Watches. Jewelry and Silver Ware.
Portland. June 23. 18*3. tf
Marble Work.
J. R. THOMPSON,
Is prepared to receive order* for
Marble, Free Stone, Soap Stone,
Marble Chimney Pieces, Monumental Work and
(irindstoue*.
Ctrarr af Pearl and Federal Sts..
je23tf PORTLAND. ME.
TRY IT AND BE SATISFIED 1
IF yon suffer from the Toothache you will be re
lieved by using the
ODONTALGIOO.
It is sixteen years since this remedy was introduced,
and it has constantly gained in public estimation.
For .‘“ale by the Proprietor,
A. PARSONS, 51. D., Druggist,
Corner of Middle and Cross Street*.
W. F. Phillips, L. C. Gilson, and Apothecaries gene
rally. ju!2dtf
tViinlrd lo Purchase.
A MASTER'S Interest in a Veasel. Best of Ref
aY erences given.
Address PORTLAND POST OFFICE,
June 24. 1862. *d4w BoX 672.
To Lumber Dealers, Builders, and others.
rpilE undersigned hereby give notice that they have
A established a
LUMBER PLANING MILL,
Near the foot of l uion St retd, where they horn' to be
able to give all the accommodation and dispatch
which the nature of the business will admit.
Turning, Sweep and Circular Sawing, Ac., !
attended to as heretofore.
OFFICE « UNION STREET.
WIN BLOW A DOTEN.
Portland Julie 23,18G2. 3tw4wl
DRUGS & MEDICIN ES.
h h7hay7
JUNCTION OF FREE ft MIDDLE STS., |
- DEA LRU IN
Fine Chemicals, Pure Drugs, j
GENUINE MEDICINES. j
ENGLISH, FRENCH AND A1ERICAN PERFHERT, j
AND FANCY GOODS,
APOTHECARIES' GLASS WARE. FOREIGN
LEECHES, SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS,
TRUSSES, SCPPORTEK8, BRACES,
ELASTIC STOCKINGS. Ac.,
-ALSO
VARNISHES, PAINTS, OILS,
And Dye-Stuffs,
KEKOSEXE OIL, LAHD OIL,
And all other article* usually kept in a Drug and
Taint Establishment.
tr State Agent for DAVIS k KIDD’S MA(i
NETO ELECTRIC MACHINES. je23-lmdaw
1STew Drug Store!
cbosyiay & poor.
HAVE taken store. Bfa. 7 3 Middle Street,
(Fox Block.) and respectfully invite public at
tention to tlieir large and well selected stock of
Drags, Chemicals, Fancy Goods, Ac.,
And solicit a share of public patronage, trusting
that by furnishing the purest chemical*and best stock
of drug* the market affords, and a careful attention
in the dispensary department, to merit the confidence
of the public.
CHAB. r. < ROHM AN. je24tf THOR. H- POOR.
-PREPARED BY
I,. II. TITCOMB,
APOTHECARY,
373 Conprc** Street, - - Portland, Me.
cr RES.1 >y spepsia,
CORRECTS.lndig«*stion and Flatulency.
PREVENTS.Liver < ompiaiuts & Bilious Fevers,
RELIEVES.Constipation and Headache,
STRENGTHENS the Nervous System.
July 1, 1*22. * lin
FOR THE PREVENTION AND C URE OP
Consumption, Asthma, C hronic Bronchitis, Nervous
Pro-tration. General Debility, Dyspepsia, Scrofu
la, Marasmus, Loss of Appetite, Neuralgia,
Female Complaints, and all Disorders of
the Nervous and Blood Systems.
This remedy ha* obtained a great reputation for
most Extraordinary Cure* in all staged op
Consumption. It is recommended by many thous
and Physicians in the L'nited State* and Europe—
having Won used with results uuparalloiled iu the an
nals of medicine.
The /Ittpo/th'ttphitrs have a two-fold and specific
action; on the one hand increasing the principle
which Constitute* Nervous Energy, and on the
other, being the Most Powerful Blood Generat
ing Agents Knows. In cases of Nervous Debility
or Lustration of the Vital (lowers, from any cause,
the Remedy has no superior.
“WINCHESTERS GENUINE PREPARATION."
Is th.> only reliable form of IIypophohphitks, made
after the Original Formula of Dr. Churchill. g3P*“IN
QUIRE POK AND t'SK NO OTHER!
A FAIR TRIAL IS A CERTAIN CURE !
tlT'PRICES—In seven ounce bottle*. 91—Six
Bottles for 96. In sixteen ounce Bottles. 92—Thice :
for 96. Circular* gratis. Sold bv all resjiectablo ,
Druggists, and at the Sole General Depot in the Uni- ,
ted States, by
J. WINCHESTER. 3fi Jobs Stbiet. X. Y.
A SPECIFIC REMEDY FOR
Spermatorrhoea. or Seminal Weakness, and General :
Irritability in either Sex.
This malady, the terrible consequences of which are i
too well known to require more than a bare allusion
to them, is on© of the most insidious, and therefor© I
dangerous, of all the long catalogue of human ills. '
It saps the very springs or Life, rapidly undermines
the constitution, and sinks the unhappy victim into
iuiUn ility and a premature grav e ! From one to three
boxes of the Specific Jill are sufficient to efftet a per
manent cure iii the mum/ arttfmatted eases, whether
constitutional, or arising from Abuse or Excesses.
MEDICAL TESTIMONY.
'• We believe it to be. in the treatment of Sperma
torrhaa as near a Specific as anv medicine ran Ik*.”
—B. Keith, M. D.—Ameriatn Journal of Medical
Science.
“ 1 have found them alt that amid he desired. Their
effect has been truly wonderful. 1 used tln-m in a
case of S|»erinatorrh«ca of long standing w hich has
been under treatment for years. I think three boxes
will complete the cure.”—E. 1*. Dicker, M. I).
tyThi* is not a Homeopathic reinedv, nor is ther©
any mercury or other deleterious ingredient combiu- I
ed with it.
Price—31 per box. Six boxes for 96, by Mail pre
paid. For sale hv all respectable Druggists, and at
the b<»le General Depot in the United Matos, bv
J. WINCHESTER, m John bT., N. Y,
Sold at wholesale by W. F PHILLIPS.
junc23dfc w4w Portland. Me.
pensions, noi .vrv .HONEY,
Itstck Pay, Ac.,
IjlOR serviceiu the present w ar, obtained for Soldiers
and Sailors, their Widows and Heirs, from the Uni
ted States Government, on application in person or
by letter to
BRADFORD A HARMON,
No. 88 Exchange st.. Portland, Maine.
Having devoted our attention exclusively to the Pen
sion business for the last twenty years, and having a
reliable Agency in Washington, we are enabled to
prosecute all claims against the Government with
promptness and despatch, and on very reasonable ;
terms, making no charge until the claim is obtained.
FREEMAN BRADFORD,
Z. K HARMON.
Portlaud, June20th. d&wtf.
L)r. John C. Mott,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
Court St., Corner of Howard, Boston, is
consulted daily fr«mi 10 until 2. ami from 6 to 8 in the
evening, on aft diseases of the Urinary ami iieuital |
Organs, Scrofulous Affections, Humors of all kinds, 1
bores. Ulcers and Eruptions. Female Complaints,&c.
An experience of over twenty years’ extensive t»rac
tioe enables Dr. M to cure all of the most difficult
case*. Medicines entirely vegetable. Advice Free.
June 28, 18*52 9ii3aw8m
HOTELS.
Summer Retreat,
SOUTH SIDE OF PEAK S ISLAND,
HENRY M. BRACKETT, - - Proprietor.
OPEN for Genteel Boarder*—three mile*
from Portland—within thirty rod* of the
Ocean—with good opportunities for fishing,
U sea-bathing and water excursions. A Steam
_i er runs from Port laud dml\ Experienced
tmen in attendanc.
PREBLE HOUSE, - - PORTLANdTmT.
Sltaated aa f'aagrrss, eoraer af
Preble Streets.
THIS ta the largest Hotel in the State, pos
| settsing all the modern improvements, and
J_i Hr*t class in every appointment.
TERMS MODERATE, FOR BOARD BY WEEK
OR DAY.
CHAS* 11* ADAMS, Proprietor*
Je23- 3m
SAGADAHOCK HOUSE,
AlfVetl Carr, • • Proprietor,
BATH* MAINE.
THE City of Bath is one of the healthiest
localities on the coast of Maine—delight ful
t| lv situated on the Kennebec, twelve miles
. B from the sea, and affords one of the most
iting retreats from the dust and turmoil of our
large cities.
'Hie Saoadahock i* one of the finest, most spa
cious. and best appointed Hotels in the State, located
within three minutes walk of the Depot, Steamboat
Landing, Post Office, Custom House. Ac., being di
rectly iu the business centre of the City.
Term* Moderate by the Week or Day.
Bath, June 23. 18*52. dtf
CENTRAL HOUSE,
I£* G. Mayo, • • • • I'roprietor.
PASSADUMKEAO, MAUVE.
galbTHE subscriber would very respectfully an
J**wHrHnonnce ;to hi* numerous friend*, ami the
!>[S(i|l<llb!'c p‘n,'ra*l> * that during the temporary
IJ ffft Rcompafsory suspension of his business he
ha* furnished thi* well-known house anew, and is
now better than ever prepared to wait upon hi* cus
tomer*, and hope* by .strict attention to their wants
to merit a continuance of the patronage which he has
hitherto received. E. G. MAYO.
Passaduiukcag, June 23. 1862. d& wtf
BATH HOTEL,
By C. M. PLUMMER.
386, Washington St., Bath.
•**Terms 31 per day. Stable connected
with house.
Bath, Dune 23, 1862. dtf
DIRIGO EATING HOUSE, '
No. 7 MILK STREET. . . . PORTLAND, ME.
JOHN ROBINSON, Proprietor.
Every Delicacy of the Season
Served op at all liotira.
TURTLE SOtTT. TUESDAY AND FRIDAY.
BROUK TROl'T a ad all kiadaafGA.ME
Served to order.
TINE APPLE LEMONADE.
STRAWBERRY LEMONADE.
-F” Frog* Served to Order.
Meala to Reoclar Hoarder* at Rednced Ratra.
open every Sunday from 8 to 1, and from 2 to 5
o’clock. jc23e.lt f
A. W. BANFIELD,
(Sueccraor to P. J. Forriatall and MUIa A Forriatall,
IMPORTER AMD DEALER t!t
ENGLISH. FRENCH AND GERMAN.
FANCY GOODS,
Pocket and Table Cutlery.
YANKEE NOTIONS,
CLOCKS, WATCHES AND JEWELBY,
STATIONERY, TOYS, Ac..
28 and 30 Federal am! 106 Vangreaa Street a,
ADDiaoa w. barpield. Boaton.
P. J. Forriatall can be found at the above place.
Jane 23. vrly
-N
STATE OF MAINE.
EXKCCTIVl l>er*KT«EJIT.
AuoTOta, July 7, 1663.
ft iff known that large number* of soldiers are ab
sent from their regiments. some on furlough and some
on sick leave, who are now able to return to the regi
ments, where they are needed for the sen ice of their
country. There are other iuvalid or w ounded soldiers
w ho are able to travel, although their disability mav
not have been wholly removed, and who are required
under the General Orders of the War Department.
No. 61. to repair immediately to Anna|>olii«. Marv land.
All the former class not repairing forthwith to their
regiments, and those of tin* latter class who do not
immediately proceed to Annapolis.will be reported as
deserters, and liable to be treated as such, unless thev
immediately, upon the receipt of this Order, report
themselves at Augusta in person.
All officers of the Militia, all magistrates and all
good people of the State, are most respectfully and
earnestly requested to give notice to John L. llods
don. the Adjutant General of this State, of tin* pres
ence of such soldiers in their viciuity, giving their
uatnes, the compauy and regiment to which they be
long when know n, with the places where thev now
aie. Much soldier* will obtain pa**** for their'trans
portation to Augusta, from Major tieueral Wn. \V.
Virgin. Norway; Col. K. K Harding. Ass’t gr. M.
(•cueral, Cortland; Major General Win. II. Titconib.
Kocklaud; Major General James H. ltutler. Baugor;
IJeut. («. W. Sabine. Eastport; and Maj V. D. Sew
nll, Bath. All of which geutlemeu are authorized to
give passe* for the above purfMwes, which conductors
of railroads amt managers of other public convey
ances will regard as sufficient.
ISRAEL WASHBURN. Jn.,
jy9d3t Governor of Maine.
EXTRACT from an Act of Congress, ap
proved July 29, 1*61. entitled. "An act to provide lor
the suppression of reliellion against, and reahttouce to
the laws of the United States, and to amend the act
entitle*!, ‘an act to prov ide tor calling forth the mili
tia,’ Ac., passed Feb. 2*. 1798 ':
“Scmo* 3. And hr it further ennrt*d. That the
militia so called into the service of the Cuited Mates,
shall be subject to the same rules ami articles of war
as the troops of the United States, and be continued
in the service of the United States until discharged
by proclamation of the President: Provided, That
such continuance in service »hall not extend hevoud
sixty days after the commencement of the next ses
sion of Congress, unless Congress shall expresslv
provide by law therefor: Aud provided further, lhat
the militia so called into the service of the United
States shall, during their time of service, be entitled
to the same pay, rations, ami allowances for clothing,
as an* or may he established by law for the armv of
the Cuited States." ’ J)9ri3t
COM. HESS STREET SEUIVVRV,
FOR YOUNG LADIES AN LI MISSES.
nisi E. L. Whittier, - - Principal.
Prior to July 21*t, full information can ho obtained
of the Principal, 349 ( ongn*ss Street. Hours from
8 to 1 o’clock, except Saturdays. After that time ap
plication inav be made at 40 State Street.
Port laud. June 23. 1862. 2awl0w
At a Court or Trohat* held at Cortland, within
and for the County of < umberland. on the first
Tuesday of July, in tl»e year of our Lord eighteen
hundred and sixty-two,
CHI ARLES D AKEItS, Administrator of the ea
) late of Benjamin I nul Akers, late of Cortland,
in said Countv, deceased, having presented his ac
count of administration of said estate lor probate:
It teem Ordered, That the -aid Administrator give
notice to all persons interested, by causing notice to
be published three week* successively, ill tin* Maine
Mate Cress, printed at Cortland, that they inav ap
pear at a Probate Court to be held at said Cortland,
on the Hint Tueadav of September next, at ten of the
clock in the forenoon, ami shew cause if any they
have, why the saute should not be allowed
WILLIAM G BARROW’S, Judge.
A true eupv.
*3 Attest: EUGENE 111 MCUBEY, Register
_RAILROADS.
KENNEBEC AND PORTLAND R. R.
summit tSHASOMUT.
Ommm'rd April 140,1(«,
^ Pksacnger train. will Imre dally, (gun
SS3Bj,l»'» excepted) u follows:
Augu.cx iur Hath. Portland and Boston, at 11 15 A.
M connecting at llrunswick with the Androscoggin
ltsilroad for Lewiston, Ijvcrmore Falls, Wilton and
Farmington.
Leave Portland for Rath and Augusta at 1.00 P. M ,
connecting at llrunswick with the Androscoggin
trains for stations on that road; and at Augusta with
the Somerset & Kennebec Railroad for Watcrvill#,
Kendall's Mills and Mkowhrgan. and at Kendall's
Mills with the Penebscot k Kennebec Road for Pitta*
held, Newport and Baugor: arriving same night.
.Monday Morning and Saturday firming Trains.
On Monday trains leave Augusta at 5.30 A. M„ and
Rath at 0.80 A M . for Portland, connecting with the
8.4o A. M. train for IAtwell and Boeton.
Leave Portland on Saturdays, at 8.15 P M . on ar
rival of train from Boston, for Batb and Augustn.
staoc ronaacTion.
Stages leave Bath daily (Sundays excepted) at 3.00
P. M., on arrival of train from Portland and Boston,
foi Wise as set Llama riscotls, Waldoboro'. Rockland
and Thoinasfon.
Mages leave Augusta daily (Sunday* excepted), for
He!laM, on arrival of train from Portland and Boa
ton.
Ticket* *old In Bo*ton for all the station* on the
Kennebec k Portland, Androscoggin, and Somerset
k kcnnehec Koads.
Freight traius run dally between August* and Port
ia***!. b h. crsnxAK,
Manager and Superintendent.
Augusta, April, IMS. JntOdtf
ANDROSCOOOIN RAILROAD.
- Bl’MMXR AUKaNGKXKXT.
CS9HHED f>n and after Mokdat, Mar 5. IMS,
bIH leave Portland for lewiitoa
an«i taiunngton via Brunswick, at 1 P. M.
l^ave Farmington for (.ewistou, Bath and Port
land, via Brunswick, at 9 15 A M.
Leave I.ew iston for Bath aud Portland via Bruns
wick at 11 45 A. M.
Freight trains daily between Portland and Lawin
ton.
STAGS COJI!fSCTIOSS.
.^tago leave* .Strickland’s Ferry Tuesdays, Thors
dav* and .Saturdays, for Livermore, Canton, Peru
and Dixtield; returning opposite day*.
Stare Nave* North Jay for Fast Dixtield. Dixtield,
and W'eld, on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays!
returning opposite day*.
Stage leaves Farmington .or New Vineyard. New
l’ortiand and kingflela, on Wednesdays and Satur
day*, returning on Moudavs and Fridav*.
a 'dl^Sli'*** l‘arInin*ton dailT- for Strong. Avon
Passengers for this route will take the cart at tba
Portland, .Saco k Portsmouth, or Kenncb'-c k Port
land Depot*, in Portland. 8. W. EATON. Sup’t.
Farmington May 6. IMS. junettdtf
International Steam (hip Company.
EASTPORT, CALAIS AND ST. JOHN.
TWO TRIPS PF.R WEEK.
On and after April 23, the Steam*
em NEW BRUNSWICK and
"FOREST CITY*' will, until fhr
_sthrr notice, leave P. S. k P R. R.
wharf, loot of state Street, as followa:
Steamer "New Brunswick," ( apt. E. B Winches*
ter. will lemrc for Eaatport and 8t. Johr every
MONDAY, at 6 o'clock, P. X 7
Returning will leave St. Johr every THURSDAY
MoRNINo. at 8o'clock, for Eaatport, Portlard
and Boston.
Steamer "Forest City,” Capt. E. Field, will leave
for Eaatport and ST. Johr every THURSDAY at
5 o'clock P. M.
Through tickets are sold by this line connecting at
Eaatport with stage roaches for Xachiaa, and
with Steamer Oueen for Kobbinstnn, ('a LA is, St.
Stephens, and St. Ardrewa, and at the latter place
over Railway (hr Canterbury; from thence per
stage eoaehci for Woodstock and HorLTOB, which
is the cheapest and must expeditions way of reaching
the Aroostook County.
We also ticket through per Steamers and Railways
fbr Windsor. Halifax, Dioby, Fkxdkrictor,
Sussex, Xorctow, Shediac, Princ e Edward
Island, Pictou. North Shore or New Drubs*
wick, Mirihichi, and Bat de Chalevr.
C. C. EATON.
June 23. dawtf
aH»THROUGFTICKETS~
To Chicago. Cincinnati. Cleveland. Detroit,
Toledo, st. Paul, La ( romk, St. Lotus,
New Orleans, or any part of the
WEST, SOUTH OR NORTH WEST,
BT THE
ERIE RAILWAY.
Via Buffalo, Durkike, ard Niagara Falls.
This road is broad or age and is provided with
New and Splendid Sleeping Cars.
»7"Tickcta »o!d in Portland at lowest Boston rates
W. D. LITTLE, Agent.
OJIce 81 Exchange Street.
7Y You can save money by securing tickets at this
ofl;ce.
June 23. dswtf
_ STEAMBOATS.
Portland and Srw York Nlramm.
m The splendid and fast Steamship
f" "CHESAPEAKE,” Captain Sidxky
will until farther notice ran
tdSMSffl** follows:
Leave Browns Wharf, Portland, every WEDNES
DAY, at 4 P. M . and leave Pier 9 North River, New
Y -»rk. every SATA RDAY. at 3 o'clock. P M
This vessel is fitted up with fine accommodations for
passengers, making this the most speedy, safe aud
comfortable route for travellers between New Y'ork
and Maine. Passage #6.00, including Fare aud State
Rooms.
Goods forwarded by this line to and from Montreal.
Quebec, Bangor, Bsith, Augusta, East port aud St.
John.
Shippers are requested to send their freight to the
steamer before 3 P. M., on the day that she leave*
Portland.
For freight or passage apply to
EMEItY k FOX, Brown's Wharf, Portland.
II B < RoMWELL k CO., No. 86 West Street,
New York.
June 23. 1863. dtf
MONTREAL
OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO’S
Weekly Mail Line.
ON E of the following first-class, power
ful Steamers III BERN IA V. NORTH
AMERICAN, NORWEGIAN. JURA,
BOHEMIAN. ANGLO SAXON. NO
V— will sail from Quebec every Satar
dav morning, for Liverpool, via Londonderry.
Passengers leave Portland per Grand Tiuuk fraise
with I'nifed States mails, every Friday, at 1 15 IV M ,
connecting with Steamer at Quebec every Saturday
morning.
Passage to Liverpool, Londonderry or Glasgow:
Third CTa«s. 930. First i 'lass. 967 to #92 -according
to accommodation,—w hich includes tickets on Grand
Trunk Railway.
Prepaid ami n-tnrn tickets issued at reduced rate#.
Excursion tickets to the World's Fair, out and
hack. 9130.
Apply to Edmonstone, Allan k Co Montreal, or to
J. L. FARMER,
No. 10 EXCHANGE ST., PORTLAND.
June 23. 1862. dtf
Proprietor of the
LIVERPOOL PACKETS,
Sailing from Liverpool for Boston twice a month.
Steerage Passage. $30. Also. Agent for New York
and Liverpool Steamship*, sailiug from New Y’ork
every Saturdav. and from Liverpool every Wednes
day. aud calllug at Queenstown, Ireland. Cabin
Passage. 975. 3d Claw. 930.
Sight Bills of Exchange, for XI Sterling and up
wajd. pavable at any Bauk in Great Britain or Ire
land constantly for sale.
For Passage Certificate*. Steamer Tickets, Drafts,
or for farther information, Address.
GEO. WARREN. W State Street. Boston, Maas.
SPIRITS TURPENTINE.
TKJ’ATRONA SPIRITS TVKPKNTINE —\Y> Invite
lx a trial of the Natrona Turpcutiue from all paint
ers. for either House or Ship work, inside or out. It
is frtr from smttl, with flat coual to spirit*, evapo
rate* no faster, aud for Blind Work cannot be excell
ed. It works r.gi'AL to the comraou spirits on ALL
kinds of painting, or in Oil Cloth manufacturing.
As evidence of the excellence of the article, the un
dersigned can refer to numbers of the first painters
of Bostou and vicinity, if desired
CHARLES TOITAN,
Agent for New Euglaud, 40 Fultou St., Boston.
For sale by Hanker k Carpenter. Merrill A Brother,
S. J. Perkins k Co., Portland, and Cha*. F Poller
Augusta juin£3wlm

xml | txt