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The Portland daily press. [volume] (Portland, Me.) 1862-1921, November 06, 1862, Image 1

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Portland Daily press.
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\ OL. 1. PORTLAND, ME., THURSDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 0, 1802. jjq 117
r UKTiiAJNU iiAJLJLiI FKJSbb,
JOHN T. OILMAN, i _ _
JOSEPH B. HALT., ) Editor*‘
U published at No. 82$ EXCHANGE STREET,
In FOX BLOCK, by
FOSTER, GILMAN and HALL,
Under the firm name of
N. A. FOSTE R A CO.
r,. .
1 erras:
The Portland Daily Press is published every
morning, (Sundays excepted), at $6,00per year in ad
vauce.
Rates oF Advertising:
Transient Advertisements, $1.00 per square,
for three insertions or less; exceeding three, and not
more thau one week, $1.25 per square; 75 cents per
week after. One square every other day one week,
$1.00; 60 cents per week after.
Exhibitions, Ac., under head of Amusements,
?TLO0 per square per week.
Special Notices, $1.60 per square for first week,
$1.00 per week after.
Business Notices, in reading columns, 12 cents
per line for one insertion. No charge less than fifty
cents.
Legal Notices at usual rates.
Advertisements inserted in the Maine State
Press (which has a large circulation in every part of
the State) for 88 cents per square in addition to the
above rates fbr each insertion.
Transient advertisements must be paid fbr in ad
vance.
ty All communications intended for tbe paper
should be directed to tbe 14Editor* qf the Pre»s,” aud
those of a business character to the Publishert.
ty The Portland Daily and Maine State
Press Office, in Fox Block, No. 82$ Exchange
Street, is open at all hours during the day and eve
ning, from 7 o’clock in the morning to 9 in tbe
evening.
ty Job Printing of every description executed
with dispatch; aud all business pertaining to the of
fice or paper promptly transacted on application as
above
Thursday Morning, November 0.1862.
SPEECH
OF
GEN. RICHARD Bl’STEED,
Of New Turk, in Faneuil Hall, Hoston, Oc
tober 30,1802.
Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen :
I inert and greet you an liberty-loving, law
abiding, Government-sustaining and treason
hating men. (Applause.) 1 do not appear a
nioug you as a politician of the schools. I am
not either pervert or convert. The mere po
litical opinions of any man are not now of the
slightest consequence. (Applause.) The na
tiou is in the midst of a terrible struggle for its
life, and how best and quickest to save it, is
the all-absorbing question of the hour.
Everything must be subordinate to this, be
cause everything else is less than this. War,
uiij'1'jii/ni.u, 13 ui III”
made upor. a people who love peace, and de
sire to pursue it. Such war. having its origin in
peculation, treason, and fraud, must he allow
ed butoueend—absolute, unconditional subju
gation of the traitors who have made it and
who are continuing it against us. Twenty
millions of freemen are audaciously challenged
by the foe to yield up their liberty, their prop
erty and their government This is the sole
issue. To this I shall address myself. Its grav
ity demands that it be considered plainly, de
liberately truthfully.
The issue is one of individual as well as na
tional concern. It affects the well being of all
as much as tbe well beiug of each. Its con
sideration cannot be avoided or postponed.—
We are band to hand in a conflict with a haugh
ty, wicked and unscrupulous enemy; an ene
my that dislikes us and our principles, tastes
and habits; an enemy that tauntingly boasts
of hitnself, of his superiority in all that goes to
make up a wise, intellectual and honorable
manhood; that plumes himself on his chivalry,
aristocracy and cottou, ami consigns us to the
inferior condition of Yankee mudsills and
greasy mechanics.
It is well to understand what the conflict is,
which is now beiug waged by us upon these
self-adulatory neighbors—slandering and lib
erty-stealing warriors. It is a war between
darkness and light—between slave-pens and
school-houses (cheers)—!ietween labor and ca
pital—Itetween democracy and aristocracy—
(cheers)—between the rights of man and the
illegally gotten and fraudulently held privileg
es of the few—between violence and law—be
tween slavery and liberty—between falsebood
and truth. Now, God defend the right!
This war is not prosecuted to determine who
shall administer the government, but to decide
if there shall be any government left to ad
minister ; not shall tbe empire he divided in
twain, but shall the nation exist; uot to settle
the question of what laws shall prevail iu the
territories, but whether there shall be any do
main, State or territorial.
It is not a war to ascertain who shall exer
cise the elective franchise, hut whether there
shall be any elections held. Its objects are to
establish the individuality of a constitutional
selection ol the ruler of the American people
—to overthrow and prevent adherence to all
forms of governmental law, ami establish a
nation upon the bases of perjury, treason and
ltaud.
The people of the States are not called upon
to choose between the different modes of col
lecting revenue or laying imports, or to decide
whether a protective or prohibiting tariff will
best serve the national interests, or a national
bank be a benefit or a bane.
The question which confronts this people to
day is exist-nce or death. The Union, with
all its attendant blessings and powers, its his
tory from experience, its achievements and
hopes, or disunion with a long train of neces
sary calamities that attend upon such a meas
ure. The question, sir, is not so much wheth
er slavery shall continue to exist iu South Ca
rolina, but whether freedom shall be the rule
in Massachusetts, ami the navigation of the
Mississippi shall be unobstructed. (Cheers.)
The question is whether you will have a
. Governor, Senator and Kepresentative ol your
own selection. These are the general charac
teristics of the slaveholders’ war, The details
are to be found iu current history, and need
UVIC UC ClibCIVU I I I La I Ul UtU'll upuil.
If I am right in my diagnosis, if these at
tempts to destroy this government of the peo
ple be the result of unhallowed ambition,fren
zied hate, or a wicked and designed cause of
the love ol power and pride of lile, it cannot
and it will not succeed. It will not succeed
because it ought not. Its want of holy pur
pose, high thought, pure motives, is the leaven
ot its weakness. And neither of its own pow
er, nor of any aid derived from peaceful or
armed intervention, can it succeed. The logic
of truth
“Gives mvstical lore.
And coming events cut their shadows before.'’
Men change, but principles are eternal.
Truth and falsehood are so well defined, and
the characteristics of each so plainly traced
as to be beyond the power of casuistry to con
found or obliterate. What was false when the
Athenians gathered in the Acropolis, is false
in Faueuil Hall to-day. Time wears no chang
es on the azure front of truth. The weakness
of man may surround it with the dust of false
observances, may bury it from sight beneath a
heavy mould of desire, but like the undisclosed
fires, burning deep in the earth, ever and anon
it bursts forth to sight for the guidance of all
who honestly seek to worship by its light.
Magna est tertian. “The eternal years of God
are hers,” exclaims a poet of our native land.
The happiness and prosperity of the race de
pend upon the fulfilment of the demands ot
truth. Its requirements cannot be avoided,
w'ilhout incurring individual, social and nation
al ruin. No private enterprise and no system
ot government can be permanently secured
that rests upon unexact immoral foundations.
the distinction between justice and its con
trary must be observed in forming the social
condition and in enacting laws for it; the prob
lems of Euclid may be disregarded, but those
of humanity must la? solved by the principles
of actual justice, or woe to the State and the
political mathematicians. The history of our
I own country lumisues an exniDitton ot now
' much may be the protest for justice, and how
little may be done to secure its empire. The
Declaration of American Independence set
out with the affirmation that “all men are cre
ated equal and endowed by their Creator with
certain inalienable rights, among which art
life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.”
In Mr, Jefferson's dralt of the Declaration,
the w onis “inherent and” preceded the words
“inalienable rights,” hut the instrument as fl
j nally adopted lelt them out. It pronounced
: tbe^mdowed rights to be certainly of divine
; origin and incapable of alienation.' I am eon
; tent with this, because, if liberty be the gift of
| God, it is an Inherent right in man, and its in
alienability is a necessary corollary. (Cheers.)
In the short space of twelve years after this
grand charter had been given to the world,
and while yet ascriptions of praise and thanks
for it were rising from tlie hearts and lips of
universal manhood—while men were lolding
I the writing among the leaves of their Bibles—
the same people on whose behalf the Declara
tion was made, and live of the same persons
who to its support pledged their lives, their
fortunes and their sacred honor, adopted and
subscribed the Constitution ol 1787, the fourth
section of which doomed to helpless, hopeless
servitude, 700,000 human beings, and their
wretched Increase to all time. Front that hour
forward the dragon teeth of slavery multiplied
themselves, and spread into all the land; and
as its last and legitimate fruit, comes this war
and bloodshed which now desolate our once
peaceful and prosperous land.
It could not be otherwise. Effects follow
their causes as certainly as night the day, or
the seasons their course. The law of compen
sation adjusts itself to every condition of man,
and each violation of truth is followed by a
corresponding rctributiou.
I know, sir, tlie people are impatient of crit
icism when tlie acts of our revolutionary fath
ers arc under consideration. Veneration is a
national instinct, and the least return Ameri
cans can make to their ancestry actuated by
pure motives, is to accord to their conduct an
unqualified honesty of purpose. Veneration,
however, sometimes assumes the form of su
perstitions reverence, and blights progress by
foreclosing Inquiry. Respect for the past is
very well in its place and degree, and while I
yield to no man living in affection and respect
for the founders of this Government, I cannot
resign to this feeling the exercise of mv reason,
the convictions of my intelligence,or tite ‘cach
ings of my conscience. (Prolonged applause.)
Duty is bolder than theory, more confident
than the understanding, older and more im
perative than speculative science, existing
from eternity and recognized in its binding
force Irom the morning of creation.
1 am entirely persuaded that in forming the
Constitution, if the Irieuds and advocates of
free institutions had restlessly met and formal
ly denied the claims of tlie pro-slavery lelders
of that day. South Carolina would riot only
have joined tlie Union, but would not have
enacted the niillitlcation ordinance ol 1832, or
assailed Fort Sumter in 1861.
A recognition of man's right to hold his fel
low man in servile bondage.to make merehan-,
di<e of human blood and bone,to violate every
principle of justice, to make the Declaration
of Independence a "tinkling symbol," and the
nation a scorn—is tlie source of the attnede
ure tvin ii it null u^tl i»» Uir MitU- III
igarchiet* of our day, and their conduct illus
trate* I lie theory that the laws of compensa
tion and retribution an- unceasingly in opera
tion. I ill not attack the intentions of men
who compromise the wrong, but, sir, I do im
peach the act itself. (Loud cheers.)
A great master of the English language
says, "I care not with what principles the pat
riot is convicted if the measures lie supports
are beneficial to the community. The nation
is interested in his conduct. Ilis motives are
his own.”
The civil strife in which our country is in
volved, and whi ;h has culminated in horrid
and fratracidal war, establishes the lact that
neither iudiuidual nor national prosperity can
permanently exist, if principle l>e deposed by
selfishness and conscience be trampled on and
defied by injustice.
It is for these reasons, and reasons akin to
these, that I lately declared and now repeat, I
am in favor of a new Constitution as soon as
we can constitutionally procure it—(applause)
—not a moment sooner,— not a second later.
I want a Constitution which shall be a palla
dium of liberty, not a network with which to
entangle freedom; which shall maintain the
rights of every human being to life, liberty,
and the pursuit of happiness—(applause)—io
which an American the world over may refer
with pride; which will make tyranny tremble
in its sinew and marrow, and in which invol
untary servitude will not be recognized or
contemplated, except5 as a punishment for
crime. Any other Constitution is not worthy
the genius or sufficient to answer the In
stincts of a free, enlightened and Christian
people. (Applause.)
1 am sure that if the men who contrived the
fundamental law under w liich our Government
has exercised its attributes for seventy-five
years, could have anticipated what was to grow
out ol the concession they made to an unjust
and cruel system, the Constitution in its pres
ent shape would never have been ratified or
approved.
The fathers regarded the gradual abolition
of slavery a* a necessary element in the fu
ture cm the Republic; and in this faith, and in
} the belief that they thereby secured the bless
ings of liberty to themselves and posterity, or
dained an instrument which they otherwise
would have spurned and rejected.
I pnss from these views of a remote period
and transaction fn our history, to a considera
tion of the present circumstances of the na
tion. “The purple testament of bleeding war”
has been opened upon us. In the midst of an
unexampled career of prosperity all the in
dustrial and peaceful arts have been rudely
! checked by the red hand of blood. The busy
i click of machinery, the hum of the manufac
tory, the ruinbiingof the produce-laden wheel,
tlie figures of the counting-house, the business
of the merchant and professional man, have all
j vanished before the heavy tread of armed
| men. Civilians have la-come soldiers, farm
yards are converted into battle-field*, and
j churches turned into hospitals. Stalwart men
j are maimed and mangled; ghastly wounds
make of life one great suffering; and widow
hood and orphanage fill the land with a cease
less lamentation.
In such a condition ot the public affairs tnen
must attach themselves to one side or the oth
er. There is here no room for neutrality, and
only an idiot can be indifferent. The appeal
! is to each of us as individuals; to you and
me, and every man. How will you answer it?
en, and remains only unchanged as it is strong
er. I believe it to be my plain duty to support
the Government, and those who administer it,
by every means in my power, and at any cost
| of treasure or blood. What 1 do, 1 would in
Huenoe others to do; what I believe to be
truth I would have others accept fortruth. In
this crisis I would not embarrass the adminis
tration by drawing nice or labored distinc
tions between opposing theories, or by the
public or private discussion of questions
which relate to a time of tranquility and
peace. I would forget that I ever made a
partisan speech, or voted a party ticket. I
would know nothing among men but my coun
try, and her salvation. I would defer polities
to “a more convenient season,” and devote my
time, my means, and my life, if needs be. to
preserve for posterity the rich inheritance of a
free government, and its liberal institutions.
1 have satisfied myself as to what is my duty
in the premises. 1 believe slavery to lie the
cause of the war, and,therefore, 1 would abol
ish slavery forever. 1 believe slavery to have
I been the source of the heart-burnings and vio
lence which disgraced the national legislature,
while slavery was protected and existed at the
national capital, and therefore I hail the aboli
tion ol slavery in the District of Columbia as
ajus*. w ise, and patriotic act of legislation, de
manded as well by a proper respect for the
opinions of mankind, as by humanity, decency
and religion. I believe the President’s procla
mation of emancipation to be an effectual and
speedy method of conquering and defeating
the rebels in arms, and of destroying the main
spring of the war, and therefore I accept the
proclamation without an “if,” "and,” or “but,”
without dotting an “i,” or crossing a “t,” and
rejoice that Abraham Lincoln has had the
moral courage to look the ginntevil in the face,
and trusting in the right, deal the blow that
saves the nation. On the first day of January
next, the American republic will celebrate a
golden wedding with Liberty. Truth is on the
war-path to avenge herself, and her trusty
blade will not rest in sheath until every system
of falsehood and oppression bites the dust, and
every hostility is subjugated to her domina
tion.
Will any man of average intelligence and
sanity, deny that the existing state of things has
its origin in the institution of African slavery?
If there had been no slavery, there would have
been no agitation of the question, or discus
sion over its morality or lawfulness. If there
had been no heated discussion and reprobation
of it, the slaveholders in Congress would not,
they say, have abandoned their seats as repre
sentatives, or the slaveholders out of Congress
passed secession ordinances. In a word, if
there were no slavery, there would be no re
bellion. Abolfsh slavery, and you destroy re
bellion. Alexander H. Stephens of Georgia
himself asserts this:—“ Slavery,” says he, “lias
been the immediate cause of the late rupture,
and the present revolution. Jefferson saw that
the old Union would, some day, break u|>ou
this rock. He was right. The prevailing idea
admitted by him, and the majority of the
statesmen of his time, wa« that the -slavery of
the African race was a violation of the rights
of nature. But these ideas were fundamental
ly false. Our new government is based on
quite opposite ideas. The negro, in virtue of
his nature and by reason of the curse of Ca
naan, is made lor the position which he occu
pies in our system. The stone which the build
ers rejected is become the chief stone of the
corner of our new structure."
The utterance of these opinions, and my
course consequent upon entertaining them,
may or may not raise against me the cry of ab
olitionist, black Republican, negro-worshipper,
and the like. I am wholly indifferent to this.
The sentiments I now express may be aboli
tionism for all I know or care. They are
mine, at least, and the result of my earnest,
honest, intensest convictions. I hold them to
be democratic, too, in the best sense of that
word. I deny that democracy in America or
elsewhere, means slavery, in any former de
gree, or under any circumstances. He is not,
a genuine Democrat who prefers slavery be
fore liberty, or w ho, when the fair opportunity
presents itself, hesitates to strike for freedom.
Oppression is the same the world over; it diff
ers only in its victims. In England it fastens
upon an Irishman; in the United States upon
an African. The manwho to-day would rob
n negro of the result of his labor or skill would,
mutatls mutandis, cheat a Caucasian to-mor
row, and the exiled or self-expatriated Irish
man, who apologizes for. and deals tenderly
With, the enslavement of a race because it has
a black skin, is not far removed in sympathy,
spirit, or principle, from the aristocratic op
pressors of his own people. He lias no war
rant to speak for a land, every acre of which
is cursed with the imprint of tyranny's heel.
Daniel O'Connell nor taught nor believed in
such democracy. When he contended with
i lords and commoners for Catholic emnneiput
, ion, or any of the inalienable rights of man, if
hit opposers turned to written constitutions to
find authority for venerable Imposition, and
; proscriptive fraud, and hurled at him. “Thus
\ saith the Law,” this man of the ueonle. this
sturdy Democrat, this generous son of Erin,
i silenced their sophistry with, “I7m« taith the
Lord." To ail men born in Ireland, claiming
| to be Democrats, and striving in this crisis of
their adopted country’s fate to influence the
| conduct of their countrymen, I say, Go, no
| wise, thou, and do likewise.
PLEASURE PARTIES.
Excursionists visiting the islands, supplied
with stores at the shortest notice.
Orders solicited.
180 Fore Street nrar foot of Exchange.
CALDEKWOOD & BECKETT.
Portland. June 23. dtf
Freedom Notice.
THIS certifies that I have given Grenville H.
Deerinu his time during his minority, aud shall
c aim none of his earnings, nor pay auv bills of his
contracting after this date.
HIRAM W. PEERING.
Portland, Oct. 20th. 1862. oc21 dtf
j - . -
I. D. M Fit KILL A COM
jPLUMBERS,
No. 27 Union Street, Portland, Me.
Wafer Closets, Urinals, Force and Suction Pumps,
Hath Boilers/Wash Boirls, Silver Plated tf Brass
Cocks, of all kinds constantly on hand.
L-jr- All kinds of fixtures for hot and cold water
I set up in the best manner.
All aeder* in city or country personally attended to
I. D. MERRILL. JOHN BOND. t». D. MERRILL.
aug4dly
—" ■ .. -. .
THROUGH TICKETS
I T° NEW VORK. l'HILAOELTU'A. BAI.TI
i A MOKE and WASHINGTON, and to all parts of
! the WEST and SOUTH and NORTH WEST. via. all
the most popular routes and at the lowest Boston
rates, for sale by W. 1). LITTLE, Agent.
Oat.?.. dtf Office 31 Exchange St.
Co partnership Notice.
: rpnE undersigned have this day formed a Copart
! X nership under the firm name of
Ooold <fc "Waite.
! for the purpose of carrying on the
SAIL-MAKING BUSINESS,
! and have taken the loft formerly occupied by Wm.
Goold,
No. 117 Commercial Street,
Head of Long Wharf, where they are prepared to
execute all orders promptly and faithfully.
WILLIAM GOOLD,
A H. WAITE.
Portland, Oct. 10, 1802. % ocl8 d8w*
JAMES I*. SLEEPER,
FURNISHING UNDERTAKER,
No. Ill Exchange Street, Portland,
Residence rear of 411 Congress Street, keeps con
stantly on hand all the various kinds of
COFFINS and caskets,
Now in Use,
And will make to order anything of this kind that
may be ordered, at short notice, from the cheapest to
the very BERT. By giving my strict aud undivided
attention to the manufacturing, lining and trimming
oi i no a Dove, i can tarnish them cheaper than any
one else.
Aug. 6,1862. JAMES P. SLEEPER.
Pier and Mantle Mirrors.
WITH Oval, Square or Elliptical frames, with
Rosewood, Black Walnut or Gilt finish made
I to order, of any si/e, style or design, of new and
i elegant patterns'; also cheap Looking Glasses and
plates re-set in old frames, by
MORRISON & CO., 26, Market Square.
The Lady
WHO took the bundle containing a Tair of Pants
and Vest, Friday, the 24th Inst., from New
York Store, 126 Middle street, will please return it.
oc27 dlw n
TOWN AND
Corporation Bonds,
WITH COUPONS,
Town Votes and Orders,
AND ALL OTHER KINDS OF
FRINTIN&,
Neatly ami Promptly Executed
—AT THE—
Press Oflioo.
_
Book, Card & Fancy Printing,
NEATLY EXECUTED
AT THE OFFICE OF THE PRESS,
BUSINESS CARDS.
L. J. CROSS,
141 Middle Street, • - Portland. Me,
Watch-Maker,
N. B.—All work being promptly and person
ally attended to, is warranted to give thorough satis
faction. Je23tf
A.. D. R E EVES,
The Tailor,
— BAS JUST RETUBXED FROM —
NEW YORK AND BOSTON,
With a large and well selected Stock of
Cloths, Cassimeres and Vestings!
Also a Bill assortment of
Military Glottis,
And is prepared to make them np at short notioe.'
Call and See,
AT No. 08 EXCHANGE STREET.
Portland, Sept. 24, 1862. dtf
DOLE A MOODY,
GENERAL
Commission merchants,
AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
FLOUR, 00EN AND PRODUCE,
No. 5 Galt Block Commercial Street,
PORTLAND, Me.
ANDREW T. DOLE. FRANKLIN C MOODT.
June 23. eodtf
DR. C. II. OSGOOD,
C* mr*' SURGEON 4 MECHANICAL
I> E J>r TI *54 T,
X'o. 8 Clapp’s Block, fonirns Street,
OPP. OLD CITY HALL,-PORTLAND, ME.
Artificial Teeth inserted on Gold, Silver and Vul
cauite base.
3m d A woe
J. T. RICIIIRDSOI,
DESIGNER AND
ENGRAVER,
NO. 84| MIDDLE. 8TEEET,
One Door East of Canal Bank.
HT" Orders hr mail or express promptly executed.
augSeodSmlamw
WOOD.N.tXi, TRIE A C©„
Importers and Wholesale Dealers In
foreign ana Domestic Dry liooas,
1AMFACTCREBS AND JOBBERS OF CLOTHING,
Nos. 51 nnd 56 Middle Street, Portland.
Geo. W. Woodman, Alfred Woodman,
Seth II. Hersey, Charles Bailev.
ang2nd4wtf
JOHN It. BROWN Ac SONS,
Sugar Refinery,
YORK STREET, PORTLAND, ME.
• je23dtf
WILLIAM Fi PARKER,
UPHOLSTERER
-and
Manufacturer of
FURNITURE,
Loung(% Bedsteads,
SPRIXG-BEDS, MATTRESSES, PEW-CUSR
IOXS, tfc., $c.
148 Exchange Street, Portland.
fcJT~ Hair Mattresses renovated. Furniture re
paired and varnished. Chairs re-canrd in an im
proved manner. Second-hand Furniture bought,
sold or exchanged. ju!3nd6tn
Boys, Boys, Boys.
PARTICULAR attention riven to C UTTING and
MAKING BOYS’ GARMENTS, by
A. D. REEVES, - - Tailor,
98 EXCHANGE STREET.
Portland, Aug. 6.18d2. dly
TWITCH ELL Ac CHAMPLIN,
Commission Merchants,
- AMD DEALERS IN
FLOUR AND PROVISIONS,
85 Commercial St., opp. Thomas Block,
PORTLAND, ME.
John Q. Twitchell. ju!31d0m Ja’a P. Champlin.
3Mew Drug Store I
CROSMAN A POOR,
HAVE taken store, 15 >li«l«llp Street.
(Fox Block,) and respectfully invite public at
tention to their large and well selected stock of
Drugs, Chemicals, Fancy Goods, &c.,
And solicit a share of public patronage, tru.-ting
that by furnishing the {rarest chemicals aiid best stock
of drugs the market affords, and a carefti) attention
in the disisuisary department, to merit the confidence
of the public.
CHA8. F. CROSMAN. je24tf THOS. H. POOR.
Jf. L.. WINSLOW, Agent,
MANUFACTURER OP
Steam Engines, Steam Boilers,
AND EVERY DESCRIPTION OF MACHINERY,
Steam Cocks, Valves, Pipe* and Connections, Whole
sale or Retail.
STEAM AND GAS FITTING,
Done iu the beet manner.
Works 8 Union St., and 233 & 235 Fore St.,
ju!4dtf PORTLAND, ME.
ALBERT WEBB A CO
- DEALERS IN
Corn, Flour and Grain,
HEAD OF MERRILL S WHARF.
Commercial Street, - - Portland. Mr.
je23tf
ARM Y AND NAVY
TAILORING ESTABLISHMENT,
- BY -
A. D. REEVES, ... Tailor,
98 EXCHANGE STREET,
Portland, Au#. 6, 1862. dly
JOHN W. PERKINS A CO.,
WHOLESALE dealers in
Paints, Oils, Varnishes,
BRIGS, BYE STIFFS, GLASS WARE,
FLUID, KEROSENE OIL, &c.,
! SO Commercial Street, Thomas Block,
Jul29dkwly PORTLAND. ME.
' ' J. D. CHENEY,
| aMELODEON
Harmonium Maniifhcturer,
135} MIDDLE STREET.
"jVT B.—J. D. C. has received more first premiums
• tor best instruments than any other maker iu
the State.
tr Repairing and Tuning promptly and person
ally attended to. wlv7
BUSINESS CARDS.
VEATOIK & HALE.
Commission merchants,
SHIP BROKERS, CHANDLERS
— AND DEALERS IV —
Ship and Cabin Stores,
MOULTON'S BLOCK,
Corner Commercial Rt. and Long Wh’l,
Portland, Me.
JOHV YEATOV, JOSEPH HALS.
•.•Particular attention paid to procuring Freights,
and purchasing Cargoes and Charters for vessels.
August 2, 1W2. d&w6m7
GRANT’S
Coffee and Spice Mills,
13 A 15 UNION STREET,
PORTLAND, ME.
CONSTANTLY on hand, and for sale, at wholesale
market prices, in the crude state or manufactur
ed, every description of
COFFEE,
SPICES,
CREAM TARTAR,
SALE RAT US,
SWEET HERBS, *<?.. fc..
Packed in every variety of packages to suit dealers.
XST Coffee and Spices ground for the trade at
short notice.
All goods warranted as represented.
aug4—Smeodfcw J. GRANT.
Marble Work.
1. R. THOMPSON,
Is prepared to receive orders for
Marble, Free Stone, Soap Stone,
Marble Chimney Pieces, Monumental Work and
Grindstones.
Corner of Pearl and Federal Sis..
Je23tf PORTLAND, ME.
Shirts, Shirts.
GENTLEMEN,
IK you want a cheap and perfect fitting shirt, please
leave your measure for Mrs A. MOFFOTT’s cele- I
brated Oval Yoked Shirts, made from the best cloths,
and good custom work, at the very lowest prices.
Remember the place,
MRS. A. MOFFOTT’S,
No. 27 Market Square,
Orders respectfully solicited by Mrs. Moffott. who
will pay personal attention to the same. aul2dtf
JOHN LYNCH A €0„
"Wholesale C3-rocers„ i
- AVD- ’ !
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
GTfAVITI.' HTORFi POU UUPOr A T CTDTM’
(Opposite head of Widgery’s Wharf,)
Portland* Me.
joiin LYirrn. teleo barken, rnos. lynch.
jc28dtf
FAMILY GROCERY STORE.
JOHN PIJBINTON,
Vo. 183 Fore Street. Portland.
Keeps constantly on hand a general assortment oi
prime
FAMILY GROCERIES,
at Wholesale and Retail. His old friends and cus
tomers are invited to (five him a call. [aagflO 8m
J. M. BAKER,

COR.VER OF EXCHANGE t FEDERAL STS..
- DEALER IN
Choice Family Groceries,
PROVISION'S, FRUIT, VEGETABLES,
And Country Produce,
UT His Mends and the public are Invited to give
him a cal 1. sept lu—&n
WILLIAM A. PEARCE,
PLUMBER,
-MAKER OF
FORCE PUMPS AND WATER CLOSETS,
No. 121 Exchange Street, Portland, Me.
Warm, Cold and Shower Btifhs, H ash Bowls, Brass
and Silcer Plated Cocks.
INVERT Description of Water Fixture for Dwell
a ing Houses. Hotels, Public Buildings, Ships. Ac.,
arranged and set up in the be*t manner, and all or
ders in town or country faithfully executed. All
kinds of .Fobbing promptly attended to.
Constantly on hand. Lead Pipes and Sheet Lead,
and Beer Pumps of all kinds. july29dly
Trunks! Trunks!
VALISES, PORTMANTEAUS,
-AND -
Carpet-Bags,
-AT
DURA UPS MANUFACTORY,
No. 165 MIDDLE STREET.
\ LARGE and Fashionable Stock of the above ar
l\. tides mav be found at this establishment, com
prising everv description for a traveling outfit.
July 30, 1&2. dtim J. R. DURAN.
JOHNSON A C'HENEKY,
. - DEALERS IN
CHOICE FAMILY GROCERIES,
PROVISIOXS. FRUIT, VEGETABLES.
AND COUNTRY PRODUCE,
■JIM Congress Street, Portland, Me.
s«*pf»—3m
W . H. KENNEY A CO
-DEALERS IN
iUUillO l/X XXXjXj XEXIVjL/Oj
Poultry, Vegetables, Country Produce, Ac.,
Nos. 2, 4 A 6 Warren .Market, Portland.
W. H. KENNEY, A. W. PORTER.
53T Goods delivered in any part of the city, free
of charge. Bep£—3m
L. II. TITCOJIB,
Apothecary,
-AGENT FOR
< i PALMER’S
ARTIFICIAL LIMBS,
-ALSO,
Sheet Outta Percha for Splints,
AND CRUTCHES, SOR SALE.
SPECIMEN LIMBS MA Y BE SEEN A T
373 Congress Street, - - * Portland.
aug4dif
IF YOU
-WANT THE
Best Ambrotype or Photograph,
DO not fail to cal) at No. 27 Market Square, where
they take I’F.KEEtT LIKENESSES, and war
rant satisfaction, at pricer vhich defy competition.
N. B—Large Ainbrotypea only Fifteen Cents.
TRASK A LEWIS,
37 Market Square, h’d Preble St.
July 14th. 1902. dtf
CHASE BROTHERS A CO.,
Widgery'a Wharf, Portland, Me.,
IMPORTERS,
AND GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS
aep6—8m
BOOKS & STATIONERY.
fjg EXCHANGE ST.
BLANK BOOK AND STATIONERY,
—AND—
PAPERHANGING
WAREHOUSE !
R.tnblUhrd !■ 18*6.
Premium Blank Books on hand and made to order,
of every variety of style and finish. From our long
experience, we are enabled to offer to the trade and
our customers better bargains in quality and prices,
than can be found iu any other establishment in the
State. Our stock of
STATIONERY
Is selected with the greatest care from the best For
eign and American Houses, and embraces every arti
cle needed for public offices, Counting Houses and
private uses, and at lowest prices.
ROOKI PAPERS
Of every variety, quality and price, embracing all
the various styles of gold papers manufactured, to
gether with a full stock of Satins, mediums and com
mon papers—the largest stock to be found in this
market, at lowest market prices. School Books of
every kind in use at wholesale prices.
HALL L DAVIS,
63 Excbaxob Street.
PortUnd June 2*. 1882.
S. II. COLESWORTUY,
Hu removed his stock of
BOOKS, STATIONERY, PICTURES,
Pirtire Framn, Piper fliwiin Finry Goods, it., it,,
TO No 32 EXCHANGE STREET,
Next door above the British and American Express
Office, where be will accommodate all who may be in
want of goods in bis line, at very low prices.
Book’Binding and Picture • Framing,
Done neatly ns usual.
GENUINE HOMEOPATHIC MEDICINES,
For sale al the above store by
M. SEAVET.
Physicians and Families supplied with Medicines aad
books. Cases renewed ami vial* refilled.
June 24.18d2. eod6m
BLANK ACCOUNT BOOKS!
Manufactured and for Sale by
BAILEY & VOTES,
66 AND 68 EXCHANGE STREET, TOHTLAND.
Journals. Ledgers, Invoice, Sale*. Memorandum,
Cash, Record, Docket*. Letters. Masonic
and Church Collectors Book*.
We make to order every kind of B'ank Book used
by Banks. Insurance ana Railroad Companies, Ho
tels, Steamboats, Factories and Couu’iug Houses.
STATIONERY.
Letter, note, Cap and Record papers. Envelopes—
white and buff. Gold Fens, Steel Fens. Ac., Ac. Ev
ery article at lowest rates. Ws Bev for Cash and
Sell Cheap.
BAILEY A NOYES,
M and 59 Exchange Street.
Portland. June 23.1863. dtf
Eaton Boarding School.
WINTER SESSION.
THE Winter Session of the Eaton Boarding School
for Boy,, located at Kent’s Hill. Rcadtlold, Me.,
will commence Monday, Nor. 10th, 1862,aud continue
twenty week,.
The best of reference can be giren. rieaae send
for a Circular. U. M. EATON * SOX.
Kent’s Hill, Oct. 18.1882. oclT (I2w
BOOTS, SHOES^ & RUBBERS.
E. SHAW A CO,
No. 88 MIDDLE STREET,
As usual, keep constantly supplied with fresh
bHI »nd fashionable BOOTS and SHOES. in e\e
f BH rv variety and style for gentleman's and la
^^^dies wear, and invito all their old customers
and the public generally to give them a call whenev
er they desire to replenish their “understandings."
E. S. A Co. are agents for the Leavitt and Wilcox
A Gibbs SEWING-MACHINES. aug5-6md
Turner's American Express.
aTOP PARCELS. Packages, and all other
' articles usually sent by Express
will be forwarded between this city,
St. John, N. B., and all parts of the Provinces, with
despatch.
Tue subscriber solicits the patronage of th«pub)ic.
AN 8 EL LOTH HOP, Ageut.
Portland. Sept. 30,1862. d2m
COAL & WOOD,
CHEAP FOR CASH,
DELIVERED TO ANY I’ART OF TUECITT.
SPRING MOUNTAIN LEHIGH,
HA2ELTON LEHIGH,
COLERAINE LEHIGH,
LOCUST MOUNTAIN.
JOHN
THE GENUINE LOBBERY,
Pure nnd Free Burning.
CUMBERLAND COAL
FOR SMITHS’ VSE
11HESE Coals are strictly of the best quality, and
. warranted to give satisfaction.
Also, for sale, best quality of Nova Scotia and other
Hard and Kofi Wood.
The public are requested to call, as we are deter
mined to give good bargains to those who pay cash.
Office, Commercial St., head of Maine Wh’f.
SAWYER A WIIITAEY.
JuISltf
WASTED.
SMALL RENT, of five or six rooms, near
■ ■■fTTl inwiuvM !*•* * • r*AH|uirc *i
iUJUatlhi, office
Gilt Frames.
P>R PORTRAITS OR LANDSCAPES of inf
size or style desired—latest patterns and best
workmanship—made to order bv
MORRISON k CO . 26, Market Square
HOMESTEADS FOR $20.
THE MISSOURI LAND COMPANY have pur
chased from the llaunihal k St. Joseph Railroad
Company a large tract of laud in Northern Missouri,
adjoining the nourishing town of Hamilton, Caldw ell
County, for fanning aid manufacturing purposes,
and have divided their property into lots and nrmi.
They are offered to subscribers in shares of f20 each.
Maps, with ftill information, can be had by calling on
EDWARD SHAW, Agent,
102 Middle Street. Portland.
une dtf
A. W. BANFIELD,
(Successor to P. J. Forristall and Mills k Forristall,
IMPORTER AND DEALER IN
ENGLISH, FRENCH AND GERMAN,
FANCY GOODS,
Pocket and Table Cutlery.
YANKEE NOTIONS,
CLOCKS, WATCHES AND JEWELRY,
STATIONERY, TOYS, tc.,
28 and SO Federal and 106 Congreu Stmt!,
ADDISON W. BANFIELD- Iioeton.
P J. Forristall cin be found at the above plies.
June 38 wlf
HOTELS.
“ELM HOUSE.”
^THE undersigned respectfully Informs tbs
public that he has leased the abore House,
on Federal SI reet, Portland, and lnritss
the travelling community to call and sac it
he know.''how t, keep a hotel." Clean.
I airy room, good bed. a well-provided table, attan
tive servants and moderate charges ars the Indnca
"»>—
Portland. 1.,^ BU88’ 'V"'
AMERICAN HOUSE, ~
Boston, Mam..
IS the largest and best arranged Hotel in
the New T.ngiand States; is centrally loca*
[ted, and easy of access from all the routes of
[travel. It contains the modern improve
■Amenta, and every convenience for the com
loM ai.d accommodation of the travelling outlie
llie sleeping rooms aie large and well ventilated;
the suits of rooms are well arranged, and ompletely
furnished for families and large travelling parties,
and the house will continue to be kept as a first class
Hotel in every respect.
R v BICE, ProrHetor.
Boston, January, 1862. d/tos
BATII HOTEL,
By C. M. PLUMMER.
386, Washington St., Bath.
•- •••Terms #1 per day. Stable connsct-a
with house.
Bath. June 23,1862. 4tf
SAGADAIIOCK HOUSE,
Alft-ed Carr, - - Proprietor,
BATH. MAINE.
THE City of Bath is one of the healthiest
localities on the coast of Maine—delightful
ly situated on the Kennebec, twelve mi tee
_—- ft*™ tbe sea, and affords one of tbs most
itmg re-reats from tbe dust and turmoil of our
large cities.
The UaoADAHOCK Is one of tbe finest, most ina
elous, and best appointed Hotels in the State, located
within ibsee minutes walk of the Depot. Steamboat
Landing, Post Office, Custom iluiu.'. be., being di
rectly in the business centre of the City. *
Terns. Moderate by the Week or Day.
Bath, June 28,1862. dtf
CENTRAL HOUSU, ~
E. G. Mayo, .... Proprietor.
PASSADUMKEAQ, MAINE.
J“HE subscriber would very respeetfolly an.
loimce to bis numerous friends, sect tba
ubtic generally, that during the temporary
ompulsory suspension of bis business bo
hed this well-known house anew, and is
now oetter than ever prepared to wait upon his cus
tomers and hopes by strict attention to their wants
hitherto r«oivech*UCC °f,h' be ha.
Passadumkeag. June 28.188* dk wtf "
CITY HOTEL, - - PORTLAND.
AMASA T. C. DODGE,
HAVING assumed the proprietorship of
this house, promises to spare uo pains to
accummodaie its former patrons, as sail as
his old friends and the public generally
Having had an exrerienceof sixteen yearn,
n be tbinka he can now "keep a hotel."
I nit hotite it one of tli* In *La» ..a__
I 5tJ55t * on Codgrtm, corner of Grots
Portland. An*. 23.1962. dSwft w3m
! INSURANCE.
Mutual Life Insurance.
! _
Hew York Life Insurance Comp'y,
Establiahed Id 1S4&—Sat Capital orar
TWO MILLIONS AND A QUARTER.
THISCompany haa paid tinea Ita organization to
" mow.. Orphan, and Creditor, of the Aatured
upward, of
Twelve 11 ■ ad red Thousand Dollars.
It la one of the Oldest, Safest and most Successful
Lite Companiee in the United Stale., and aflbrd.to
persona wi.hln* to participate Iu the benefit, of Life
Ineurauce. advantage, nut excelled, and in tome ra
•pecta not equalled by any other in thla country.
Strict Economy—Care in its Risks, and Sa/e Invest
ments, characterize its management.
purely mutual company, aII it. profit, be! nr
divided among its members annually
In addition to all tbe various forms of Whops
Liva. short TSrw. Exdowmeht and Anwttrrr
policies which it issues, we Invite special attention to
; a nrrfeature in Life Insurance introduced hr thla
Company some two years aiuoc, riz: Use muing of
Life Polioiea not inbject to Forfeiture,
and upon which the premiums cease at the end often
: years, whereby under any and all circumstances the
money paid cannot be lost, but the original design of
the assured be attain*!, either iu whole or in part, hi
| e**ct proportion to the amount of premium mud.
No better evidence is needed of tne prosperity and
j success of this Company than tho fact shown by the
I recently published official reports, vis: that
IT ISSUED A LARGER XUMBER OE LIFE
POLICIES DURIXO THE TEAR WEI, TUAX
AXY OTHER COMP AX Y IX THE
EXITED STATES.
Further Information will bo cheerfully farUlOtd
on application by mail or otherwise to
WARREN SPARROW,
Gereral Aoeht tor the State of Him.
Office \o.71 Middle at..opposite Postoflue.
Portland, Oct. 17,1*62. ocl7 dfc w
FIRE INSURANCE.
W.4RREH SI* ARROW,
Oflice 74 .Middle, cor. of Exchaaft lt««
FOKTLAND. ME.,
Agent of the following First Class Insurance Co*f:
National Insurance Company,
Of Boston. • - Cosh Capital and Surplus, 9300,000.
Republic Fire Insurance Company.
Of New York. - - Cash Capital and Surplus. 9312,000.
Relief Fire Insurance Company#
I Of New York. - - Cash Capital aud Surplus, 9250 000.
Eqnituble Fire and Marine Ins* C»*,
Of Providence.
Perfect Sec rum . which ought always to os tbs
first consideration in effecting insurance, is here of*
i ft?red to the public, at the Unrest rates rf premium
adopted by sound and responsible companies.
Office in “Boyd’s Building,” opposite Pott Office.
! June 23. d&wtf
BATH MUTUAL
Marine Insurance Company.
OFFICE UXDER THF. SAGADAHOCK HOUSE,
FROST STREET
f|lHE President and Directors of the Bath Matsal
X Marine Insurance Company give notice that their
. Capital Stock amounts to
. _ _ _ _ _
And that they are prepared to make insurance on the
mutual principle, agaiust marine risks, not exceeding
$10,000 in any One Risk*
directors:
; John Tatten, Wm Drummond, G. E. R. Patton,
Oliver Mows, Sam'l I. Robinson. E. K. Harding,
M. F. Gannett, Arthur Sc wall, J. I’. Morse.
J. 11. 3IcLellan, Lewis Black mer, JH»id Patten,
Jas. F. Fatten, 8. A lloughtou. o. C. Jameson.
E. K. HARDING. President.
E. C. HYDE, Secretary.
Bath, July 8, 1962. d6m
j ———■■■■———————i
* PE\MO\S BOENTY MONEY,
Ita< k Pay, Ac.,
FOR service in the present war, obtained for Soldiers
and Sailor*, their VYidows aud Heirs, from the Uni
ted State* Government, on application in oersci* r
by letter to
BRADFORD & HARMON,
No. 83 Exchange Street, Portland, Mr.
Having devoted our attention exclusively to the Pen
sion business for the last twenty years, and having a
reliable Agenc> in Washington, we are enable<i to
prosecute all claims against the Government with
promptness and despatch, and on very reasonable
terms, making no charge until the claim is obtained.
FREEMAN BRADFORD,
Z. K. HARMON.
Portland, June 20th. d&wtf
On Hand.
A CONSTANT turplj of but Extra Doop Gold
Loaf, and at low rate* at
i 36 Uabbbt Squab*

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