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The Portland daily press. [volume] (Portland, Me.) 1862-1921, November 12, 1862, Image 1

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PORTLAND DAILY PRESS.
V0L- L PORTLAND, ME., WEDNESDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 12, 1862. N0. 122.
.. . ' ----.. " —______
PORTLAND DAILY PRESS,
JOHN T. OILMAN,»
JOSEPH B. HALL, \ Edlt<>r8'
la published at No. 82$ EXCHANGE STREET,
in FOX BLOCK, by
FOSTER, GILMAN and HALL,
Undyr the firm name of
N. A. FOSTER & CO.
Terms:
The Portland Daily Press is published every
morning, (Sundays excepted), at 96,00 per year ih ad
vance.
Rates of Advertising:
Transient Advertisements, 91.00 per square,
for three insertions or less; exceeding throe, and not
more than one week, 91.25 per square; 76 cents per
week after. One square every other day one week,
•1.00; 60 cents per week after.
Exhibitions, Ac., under head of Amusements,
CVL00 per square jx*r week.
Special Notices, 91.60 per square for first week,
91.00 per week after.
Business Notices, in reading columns, 12 cents
per line for sue insertion. No charge less than fifty
cents.
Legal Notices at usual rates.
Advertisements inserted in the Maine State
Press (which has a large circulation in every part of
the State) for 88 cents per square in addition to the
above rates fbr each insertion.
Transient advertisements must be paid for in ad
vance.
rr All communications intended for the paper
should be directed to the “ Editors qf the Press,” and
those of a business character to the Publishers.
tyThe Portland Daily and Maine State
Press Office, in Fox Block, No. 82$ Exchange
Street, is open at all hours during the day and eve
ning, from 7 o'clock in the morning to 9 in the
evening.
ty Job Printing of every description executed
with dispatch; and all business pertaining to the of
or pruuipuy irauBucicu oh application at*
above
COMMUNICATIONS.
—■ ...- ■ ■ .1 —
Letter From the 25th Maine Regiment.
camp “TomCasey.” Arlington Heights, I*
Thursday, Nov. 7th, 1862. J
A KNOW 8 TO It M.
Dear Press.—Here we are in Virginia on
the 7th day of November in the midst of a
driving snout storm. Your correspondent,
with dozens of others in the regiment, was in
the habit of flattering himself while in Maine
thnt he was going to avoid the “cold weather”
of the coming winter. The individuals who
laid “that flattering unction to their soul’s” are
to-day wading ubout in four inches of snow.
WE OO A-LOOGING.
We are perfecting arrangements for making
this our domicile for the winter, although the
matter has not yet liecome a lixed fact yet.
A large crew is each day detailed to cut logs
in the woods near by for the purpose of build
ing cabins, and quite a formidable pile of tim
ber has already been gathered.
WrE take charge of long bridge.
The care of that famous Long Bridge has
been entrusted to the 25th and the boys
commence duty to-day, relieving the N. Y.
146th. This certainly looks like a permanent
stay in this God-forsaken regiAn. Well, the
old soldiers congratulate us and say “lucky
devils,” but we can't see it. I suppose it is be
cause we are green.
THE REST OF THE BRIGADE.
The 20th is still encamped close by, but will
probably be detached and ordered away short
ly, as has been the 22nd. The 27th,struck tents
and moved tills morning. They are all splend
ed regiments and we part from them with
much regret
“sick and wounded.”
The sanitary condition of our regiment is
very good, there being only about thirty-six
men in hospital. A member of Co. G. was
severely injured the other day while working
on the eiitreuchmeuts by being struck iu the
back with a pick, the point of which penetrat
ed two inches. The man is quite comfortable
considering the nature of the wound. The
boys are gradually getting acclimated; in a
few days we shall probably exhibit even a bet
ter “list of sick” unless ordered into active
service.
now WE FARE.
Thanks to the untiring efforts of Quartermas
ter Pennel, and his efficient and accommodat
ing assistants,—Serg’ts Clark and Graham and
their clerks,Coffin and Jordon—we fare much
better than the most sanguine anticipated. It
is much better than we received in camp
“Abraham Lincoln”—more variety, and of bet
ter quality.
“MUSIC HATH CHARMS.”
Our Band Is progressing splendidly in the
art of music, and they already execute several
pieces in excellent style—none of your played
out old marches, but real genuine modern
1UU-MV, IUU UI ass* i IH J salt; umiri
the direction of sn accomplished instructor
from Washington. The music puts new life
into the boys. There is nothing like it.
“AXI. SHOWED UP.”
A* I write the storm increases in violence
and the snow fails thicker aud faster every
moment. It has already reached a depth of
four inches with no present prospect of an
abatement. Our camp has more the appear
ance of one of Kane's in the artlc regions than
tint of a regiment that tupjxHied itself in the
“Sunny South." If you don't bear from me
again you can conclude that I am “all snowed
up.” MaiiEAHT. Major.
Or avgas.—t hie of the incidental curse* in
flicted upon the north by secession—and no
Uifllng loss, in the (minion of epicure*—was
the cutting off of the Chesapeake oyster trade.
The smrn, though southern by birth, true
Virginia natives, did nut seeede. so tar as
known. It is the happy privilege of the oys
ter to lie far t»!ow the troubled waters of our
time, at the bottom of the ocean, in the only
place where there is absolute quiet and undi—
tort set comfort, Natal eugagvutrnu overhead
and three cannonading along the shore* did
not disturb the oyster. He could listen to
them with that phiiueophie.il composure pecu
liar to bivalves, hiking that he was luckily
out of danger, sad tlien turn user on his Imd
aud go to-leep again < it all things. f.iur-leg
god. twieb-gged. auimatr and inanimate. in the
trark of the two contending armies, the oys
ters was the only thing that was spared—not
because either the federal* nr confederate,
would have rsemted the oyster from the cai
amllk-s of war, hut la-cause lie destructive pas
sion* of tile combatants could be better expen
ded ou objects nearer at hand. Tims situated
and thus privileged, it is not strange that the
oyster has improved the occasion to become
exceedingly fat and luscious. Tim fishermen
who have dragged in the mud of the Chesa
peake from time to time by special permission
of the government have found him so.
The present being the peculiar season for
oysters, a great many applications have been
made for the priviledge of fishing constantly
for the season in tlie Chesajieake Bay and its
affluents. Secretary Chase, appreciating the
commercial mid dietetic value of oyaters, and
willing to mitigate the horrors of the war so
far as lie can, has kindly authorized the grant
ing of clearances for oyster schooners from
this jiort, on the following terms: The oyster
mau must give l Kinds of a sufficient amount that
no greater number of jiersons shall lie convey
ed on the vessel than are required for the le
gitimate purpose# of the business; that no
more supplies shall be taken than are necessary
for the compliment of men; that all operation's
shall be subject to the orders of Gen. Dix;
that no landing shall la? made or communica
tion had with the shores of Maryland or Vir
; ginia, except at points actually occupied by
the Torres of the United States, or oy military
j permission, and that in no way shall aid, or
I comfort, or encouragement, la; offered to poi
sons .11 arms against the government of the
: United States; also, that all conditions im
j posed by law. and all departmental regulations
shall be strictly and faithfully fulfilled.
A large number of enterprising skippers
have accepted these terms, and are now, or
; soon will be, on their way to the rich oyster
! beds of the Chesapeake and its affluents.—
] [Journal of Commerce.
Southern Unionists.
The reported cruelties of the chivalry to
ward their own people who dissent from rebel
doctrines have been of a character so extreme
that in communities where the laws of hu
manity are held sacred, the statements, tho’
from authentic sources, seemed at first to be
incredible.
On this subject we have Some shocking de
velopments in the speeches of Southern slave
holders—Union men—who have barely escaped
with their lives, and who have recently ad
dressed public meetings in New York.
The following speech of the Rev. Mr. Frye,
of Mississippi, we commend to to the consid
eration of those tender-hearted sympathizers
with the South, who want to restore such men
as these to place aud power again, under tile
specious cry of thy “Constitution as it wTas
Ladies and Gentlemen:—I appear be
fore you, as your President lias said, from the
repudiating State of Mississippi. 1 will tell
you how 1 got here; 1 came on the under
ground railroad. [Cheers] I wits seized by
the rebels, heavily ironed, and placed with
eighty others, in a Southern dungeon. My
crime was that i had used .seditious language,
or as they term it there, I had talked union
talk. While 1 was in that prison numbers of
plied collins for those who were shot, but the
great number of executions prevented the
supply of coffins, so they dug a hole in the
ground, and made them sit down on the brink
of the hole, and there was a certain manlier of
soldiers who advanced and tired three halls in
to the brain, and three into the heart, and this
was the mode of execution. I was convers
ant witli a number of rebel soldiers who were
deserters; they were in the prison, and I
learned these particulars from them. I had
scarcely crossed the room from talking with
them w hen 1 saw the officers enter. They un
chained them, and ordered them to follow.—
Said one, “Shall X bring my blanket?” “No,”
says the officer, in a laughing mood,“you'll
never need a blanket again.” They were
marched out and shot, but my doom was to
lie hung. X was to lie. suspended between
heaven and earth as an arch traitor, because
on various occasions I bad expressed my sen
timents fully. I had charge of churches when
the reliellion broke out, ami 1 had preached a
sermon iu which I had told my people to op
pose the rebellion by talking against it, by
writing against it. and, if necessary, by light
ing against it. [Cheers] I was incarcerated;
in company with a friend 1 made an attempt
to escape; my friend got away, hut I was re
arrested. They sent after me with blood
hounds— yes, blood-hounds; they hunt the
Union troops now with those animals.
The second time I was more successful; I
went oil' iu a southwest direction, opposite
from my homo, in order to escape the blood
hounds; and X did not leave a single article of
clothing through fear that they would get my
scent. I knew that if 1 got away out of the
town of Tupelo, which was surrounded by reb
el camps, I could get aid from Union men.—
My fellow-prisoners labored all day to get my
drains in such a condition that they could be
slipped otf. I had to carry the iron bands
witli me till I could get among friends. Three
of the prisoners stood up between the guards
and myself, while I escaped by getting under
tlie floor. I had been elected chaplain of my
fellow-prisoners, and 1 never had a more
attentive congregation. 1 never preached to
them but some had been taken away and exe
cuted of them to whom I had preached before.
After I escaped I was compelled to live mostly
upon green corn and bad water, and when I
reached the Union lines 1 was in the condition
of a skeleton, and 1 have not got ovei it; my
constitution was shattered, and all this for be
ing a Union man. Some days after my es
cape I was compelled to go to a bouse; I was
becoming very faint, and it required perhaps
an hour to go a quarter of a mile; 1 went to
one house, and 1 noticed that there were some
slaves about it- X went away, knowing that
where there were slaves masters are secession
ists. I might a- soon have walked inco Tupelo.
If I could have seen the slaves alone, I would
have trusted myself with them. I found
another house where there were no slaves.—
The man was a man of herculean frame, and
I said, in the course of conversation, that the
Yankees were overrunning all the country,
and every man that was able to fight was
needpd in the army, and asked why lie wasn't
there. His wile gave her mind very freely.—
She said he was not there, and be wasn't go
ing there. And she gave her opinion of the
conscription law. Then I toid them my eon
union, mum hi\zy pair uie iiniu. i never iikuu
corn-bread very much, hut the corii-brcal that
they set bclore tne was the sweetest morsel
that I ever tasted. A chicken was killed, and
I devoured nearly the whole.
I must not name this man; it would draw
upon him tin* persecutions of the traitors, lie
said that he did not know the route to Rienzi,
hurts knew a man who did, and who would
show me. He concealed me in a thicket, and
brought this man to me. The man said—"I'll
do all 1 ran to get you to the Union lines;
you must go to that house In the distance, and
stay all day.**
1 went there, and at night he came with two
horses, and conducted me to a point eight
mile* distant, to his brother-in-law's, and be
asked him to conduct me to the Union lines.
His brother-in-law was a Uniou man; he bit
terly denounced Secessionists. He told me,
while there, that there was a gentleman by
tin* name of Newmuu, who "talked Union
talk,” as they called it—told of his love ami
devotion for the Union. The cavalry went
and arrested him, and there was a difference
of opinion among them; some were in favor
of snooting him, and some were in favor of
hanging him; but they Anally got hot water
and scalded him to death. |.Sensation. | Then
they huug up the body and put a laliel on it,
saying that any man who t<a«k down the
corpse should Is- served in tin* same way. My
fie nd and his triemls took him down and bur
ied bint, and in after time there will be a mon
ument raised to his virtues. My friend con
ducted me to the Uniou lines. 1 had traveled
before only during the night, but we had to
travel doling the day, because there was a
great storm, aud it was dangerous to cross the
Tallahatchie during the night.
When I got in sight of the Star-Spangled
ltauner. my 6s lings may la- more readily im
agined than desirilsd. At Rienzi, I found
Io*n. Aslaitli; 1 believe be is of this State;
and near by 1 fouml Gen. Jefferson C. liavis.
lie offered me all of Ids cavalry to get my fam
ily in. In one case it bad required two can
non and a large force of infantry to bring in
some families into the Union lines. 1 found
mv friend, who had escaped when I was re
1 arrested, there. Now, I will say a few words
in answer to questions that have been asked
me since I came North. 1 intend publishing
a work soon that will contain all the miuutiie.
With regard to this proclamation, about
which we have heard so much, I believe it is
right, and for these reasons: When 1 was a
mong tlie soldiers of the Rebel army. I found
that they employed slaves. They had slat es
as sappers and miners, as cooks, as teamsters,
as artisans, in the blacksmiths’ shop making
swords and knives to cut the throats of the
Union troops, and all this by compulsion; and
1 think it strange indeed, if w-e should not di
vert this labor from that channel. |Great ap
plause.]
They do not object to it. and why should
we ? Another reason why I think tiiis slave
labor should be diverted is this: Tallahatchie
: County, Miss., has but 550 voters, and that
| sends (KK) soldiers to the Hebei army. They
have 15,000 or'20,000 slaves, and these slaves
I are at work in the fields, producing the hog
j and the hominy of which you have heard so
much. If these slaves were liberated, these
600 men would be compelled, almost to a man,
to go home to produce that hog aud hominy
which is necessary to the support of them
selves and their families.
I am asked if I believe that this proclama
tion can be carried out. Yes, I believe it can
lie carried out. just so sure and just so long as
negroes have legs. [Laughter and applause.]
For they will escape to the Union lines at ev
ery opportunity. They came into the Union
lines long ago, but they learned it was the poli
cy of the Government not to receive them.
It was opposed to the views of the Generals,
and Gen. Nelson, and Gen. Wood, and Gen.
Ammon, have tied up negroes and whipped
them, and have sent them back. This I have
known to be the case, and have seen to be the
case. One of them has gone to his reward.
[ ‘More of ’em will go.”]
I am stating things now that I know to be
true; that I have seen with my eyes. We are
otteu asked this question: “Will the slaves
make good soldiers? Are they sufficiently
intelligent?” Let me tell you that the slaves
are more intelligent than the poor whites in
the South. Wily, I went i»t<vt house not three
months ago, and there was a lady belonging to
this class of saud-hillers, and I remarked, by
way of passing the time, as I was waiting for
her husband, that there was a picture of the
Presidents. “Yes,” said she; “Them’s the pie
ters of the Presidents, and some of ’em must
tie mighty old by this time, if they ain’t dead.”
[Prolonged laughter.] 1 remarked, in addi
tion, that the one at the head was Gen. Wash
ington. “Yes,” said she, “I’ve heeru of him
ever since I was a gal; I wonder if he’s dead
yet.” I told her that I had seen au account
of his death in the papers. [Continued laugh*
ter [
a uric were iwu Jimmies in 1 isuaniingo
County who were going to move, one to Tex
as and the other to Arkansas; but the wife of
the Texas man wanted to go to Arkansas and
the wife of the Arkansas mail wanted to go to
Texas. The men were out hunting one day,
and were thinking about it, and at last they
agreed that to trade would be a good plan.
[Laughter and applause.] As I am reiating
the matter just as it occurred. I shall have to
relate the express words. One of the women
was old, and the other was young. “Neow,”
said one, “if you had an old mar' and I had a
young filly, you wouldn't want to trade even,
would ye ? ’’[Great laughter.) The other agreed
with him, and so they compromised the matter
by tiie one who possessed the old wife giving
a double barrelled shot-gun and eighteen dol
lars, to boot. He paid the eighteen dollars,
however, in coonskins. and things of that sort.
Now, this is the condition of the poor whites
in that vicinity. The slave-holders rule them.
There is one thing that they complain bitterly
against, and that is this; they are compelled
to patrol the country to keep down insurrec
tion among the negroes. Though they never
could get them, or many of them to aid in re
covering their fugitive slaves—they arc too
proud to do that, that is left for the blood
hounds to do, and to the Northern people who
wish to carry out the Fugitive Slave Law.
[Loud and long-continued applause.] Al
though they cannot compel them to do this,
they can compel them to patrol the country.
They must go out at night, or at whatever
time they may be called upon by their lordly
masters.
Then there is the question about whether
the negroes will tight against their masters.
The negroes are a very kind people, and
they an- possessed of a very great, deal of pie
ty—indeed, I believe that the real piety of the
South is ensconced in the bosom of the slave
population of that country—and they would
not wisli to destroy their masters, however
they might abuse them or whip them. But
every man in the South is not the master of
every specific negro in the South; that negro
would not fight against his master, but he
woupl fight against every other master in the
South. 1 have relatives in the South; I un
fortunately have three brothers in the rebel
army.
If I knew I was aiming at one of them, I
would not shoot; but I would fight willingly,
audit in fighting I should kill one of them I
should do it with a good conscience. 1 have
been asked: Will there be insurrections? I
say not, as long as the negroes can run away;
so long as they can run and find protection,
there will be no insurrections. But there is
great alarm in theSouth through fear that there
will tie insurrections. I attended the Synod of
Mississippi in October last at Natehes, and I
was told that fifteen negroes had been hanged
there for fear of insurrection. Others said it
was not true, and that they were hanged upon
irresponsible statements of irresponsible per
sons. While I was in Macon last Summer six
negroes were executed, and one was burned
in the streets. When I wasat that Presbyterian
Synod, I preached to a large congregation of
slaves; it was the largest congregation I ever
spoke to in my life with this exception. With
one exception, that of the minister who sat be
side me, they ware all slaves, yet one-third of
them were whiter than 1 am; so that Slavery
is not confined to color, because you often see
red-haired and blue-eyed slaves. Another ques
tion is, will they come North? 1 would reply
to this, that if Freedom is proclaimed South,
they will not come North, because they love
freedom, but they hate labor. They would
prefer to go South. I saw a certain suggestion
in the papers to give them the State of Florida.
I was glad to see it; let them have that beau
nun territory or ronce tie Jbeon, so graphically
alluded to. If, however, they come North, I
have no objection; 1 have lived among negroes
and can again, but let that matter he decided
hereafter. (Applause.)
You are aware of the fact, that in all the
Soutlien part of the country, people born
nprth of the negro line are called Yankees. 1
am a Yankee too; by birth I am a native of
tins glorious State of New York, and I am
proud of it, (applause) and let me read you a
few lines of what they say about the influence
of the Yankees. This paper is printed in New
Orleans. (“Name of the paper.**) The True
H'i/ntju, but it U a false witness. (Mr. Iloye
read an extract copied from he /tow's Utrietr,
w arning the South against the leveling and
disastrous consequences which would flow
from allowing Yankee emigration.) They
seem to think that the war Is waged in behalf
of the institution ot Slavery, and that If that
is Injured in any way the whole has been profit
less ; for be believe* that the w ar was under
taken for the purpose of carrying Slavery
through tike free domain of the glorious West.
The causes of the Rebellion have been set forth:
I need not say anything in regard to that.
The only other questiou I have beeu asked is
this: Will there Is* harmony of feeling between
the Southern and Northern States hereafter?
I say then* will not *o long as this institution
of Slavery exists, (loud applause.) Hut let that !
institution he eradicated, and there is no ob
stacle to harmony. There is no feeling of re
sentment between the Maineites and tile Miss
lssippians w hicb may not pass away, and as
for the loyal Mississippi*!!*, they demand the
protection of the Star-Spangled Hantier, and
have reason to detest the protection of the
Star* and Rar*. a* my poor discolored ankles
now testify. (Applause.)
Rich Hkooah-Tiiikk.—A thief was
discovered at Northampton, on Monday, in a
a rather remarkable way. A Mr*. Argeudolf,
a German woman, was legging from door to
door, alleging that her family was starving, and
shortly after the spoons belonging to the wife
of a Northampton merchant being missed from
the house, it was supposed that she had stolen
them. Mrs. Argeudolf was fellowed to her
house by Sheriff Wright, and an investigation
made which resulted in finding a large quantity
of stolen property, includihg $420 in gold and
$190 in bank bills. The joke of the matter is
that the lost silver was not lost, it being found
a short time after the party started on their
searching tour, in the closet where it was usu
ally kept.
The nearest approach to a “parallel case” to
the above within our knowledge, is that of
an instance (reported to us by a young lady
who was present) in which tlie bridesmaid at
a wedding not a score of miles from here cons
picuously indulged in this species of “refresh
ment” during tlie progress of the ceremony.
—[Rockland Gazette.
BUSINESS CARDS.
JOHN B. BROWN A SONS,
Sugar Refinery,
YORK STREET, PORTLAND, ME.
Jc23dtf
WILLIAM F. PARKER,
-ANI» -
Manufacturer of
FURNITURE,
Lounges, Bedsteads,
SPRING-BEDS, MATTRESSES, PEW-CUS 11
ION S, tfc., tfc.
148 Exchange Street, Portland.
SPF“ Hair Mattresses renovated. Furniture re
paired and varnished, ('hairs re-caned iu an im
proved manner. Second-hand Furniture bought,
sold or ''xchangr'd. juliFMBm
Boys, Boys, Boys.
PARTICULAR attention given to CUTTING and
MAKING BUYS’ GARMENTS, by
A. D. REEVES. - - Tailor,
93 EXCHANGE STREET.
Portland, Aug. 6. 1862. dly
TWITCH ELL A CHAMPLIN,
Commission merchants,
-AND DEALERS IN
FLOUB AND PROVISIONS,
85 Commercial St*, opp. Thomas Hlock9
PORTLAND, ME.
John Q. Twitched. jul31d6in .la’s P. Cbamplin.
INIew Drug Store !
CROSHAN A POOR.
HAVE taken store, No. T5 Middle Street,
(l*ox Block,) and respectfully invite public at
tention to their large and well selected stock of
Drugs, Chemicals, Fancy Goods, &c.,
And solicit a share of public patronage, trusting
that by furnishing the purest chemicals and best stock
of drugs the market affords, and a careful attention
in the dispensary department, to merit thecoutideuce
CHA8. K. CBORHAK. jl-24tf THOS. H. POOR.
J> L. WINSLOW, Agent,
MANUFACTURER OP
Steam Engines, Steam Boilers,
AND EVERY DESCRIPTION OF MACHINERY,
Steam Cocks, Valves, Pipes and Connections, Whole
sale or Retail.
STEAM AND GAS FITTING,
Done in the best manner.
Works 0 Union St., and 233 & 235 Pore St.,
jnl4(itf PORTLAND, ME.
~ ALBERT WEBB A CO.,
- DEALERS IN -
Corn, Flour and Grain,
HEAD OF MERRILL S WHARF,
Commercial Street,— - Portland. Mr.
J.-23tf
ARMY AN D NAVY
TAILORING ESTABLISHMENT,
- BY
A. D. REEVES, ... Tailor,
98 EXCHANGE STREET,
Portland, An*. 6,1862. dly
J. D. CHENEY,
gp^ MELODEON
Harmonium Tlanufhrturer,
la^J MIDDLE STREET.
NB.—J.D. C. has received more first premiums
• for best instruments than any other maker in
the .State.
ZZT" Repairing and Tuning promptly and person
ally attended to. wlv7
WOO DJI AN, TREE At CO.,
Importers and Wholesale Dealers in
Foreign and Domestic Dry Goods,
IA.NtF.ACIlSIRS AND JOBBERS OF CLOTHING.
Nob# 54 and 56 Jliddle Street, Portland.
Geo. W. Woodman, Alfred Woodman,
Seth B. Ilersey, Charles Bailev.
aug20d& wtf
JOHN W. PERKINS A CO.,
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Paints, Oils, Varnishes,
DRIGS, DYE STIFFS, GLISS WARE,
FLUID, KEROSENE OIL, &c„
SO Commercial Street, Thomas Block,
ju!2iW&»ly PORTLAND. ME.
DOLE A MOODY,
GENERAL
CommiHMion Nrrrhanli,
AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
FLOUR, CORN AND PRODUCE,
No. 5 Galt Block Commercial Street,
PORTLAND. Me.
ANDREW T. DOLE. FRANKLIN C MOODY.
June 23 eodtf
DK. C. II. os<;ooi>,
SC IMF OS 4 MECHASICAL
1 > E TINT,
\t. t flippy Kkk. (tarni Sited,
OfP. OLD CITY HALL.-PORTLAND. ME.
Artificial Teeth inserted on Gold. Silver and Vul
canite ban*
3mdA woe
J. F. KIS H VKDMOV
DESIGNER AND
ENGRAVER,
NO. 841 MIDDLE STREET,
One Door Last of Canal Dank.
XJT' Order* by mail or express promptly executed.
aug$eod3inlamw
L. J. CROSS,
141 Middle Street, - - Portland. Me,
Watch-Maker,
x. p.—All work being promptly and person
ally attended to, i* warranted to give thorough satis
fketion. Je23tf
X. 13. REEVES,
The Tailor,
— 1IAS JUST RETURNED FROM —
NEW YORK AND BOSTON,
With a large and well selected Stock of
Cloths, Cassimeres and Vestings!
Also a full assortment of
Military Olotlis,
And is prepared to make them up at short notice.’
Call and See,
AT No. 06 EXCHANGE STREET.
I*ortl»nd, Sept. 24,1962. dtf
BUSINESS CARDS.
Ei. II. TITCO.TIB, '
Apothecary,
-AORST FOR
PALMER’S
ARTIFICIAL LIMBS,
-ALSO,
Sheet Gutta Percha for Splints,
AND CRUTCHES, FOR SALE.
SPECIMEN LIMBS MA T BE SEEN A T
373 Congress Street, - . . Portland.
aug4<lif
IF YOU
-WAKT THE
Best Ambrotype or Photograph,
DO not fail to call at No. 27 Market Square, where
they take PERFECT LIKENESSES, and war
rant aatiafaction, at price* rhich defy competition.
N. B.—Loree Ambrntypes on/y Fifteen Cents.
TRASK 6c LEWIS,
27 Market Square, h’<l Preble St.
July 14th, 18S2. dtf
CHASE BROTHERS A CO.,
Widgery’e Wharf, Portland, Me.,
IMPORTERS,
AND GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS
»ep6—3 m
JOHNSON A CHENERY,
- DEALERS IN
CHOICE FAMILY GROCERIES,
PROVISIONS, FRUIT, VEGETABLES,
i > uuuiMri I rKUDUUE,
291 Congres* Street, Portland, 3le.
sep6—8m
W. H. KENNEY & COn
- DEALERS IH
MEATS OF ALL KINDSj
Poultry, Vegetables, Country Produce, Ac.,
Nos. 2,1 4 0 Warren Market, Portland.
W. H. KKXXKY, A. W. PORTER.
t V* Goods delivered iu any p»rt of the city, free
of charge. septt—3m
WILLIAM A. PEARCE,
P LUMB E Ft,
-MAKKR OF
FORCE PUMPS AND WATER CLOSETS,
No. 124 Excbaxgr Strekt, I’ortlasd, Mr.
Warm, Cold and Shower Baths, Wash Bowls, Brats
and Silver Plated Corks.
I^VEHY Description of Water Kixtnre for Dwell
J ing House*. Hotel*. Public Buildings. Ships. Ike.,
arranged and set up iu the best manner, and all or
ders iu town or country faithfully executed. All
kinds of .lobbing promptly attended to.
Constantly on hand. Lead Pipes and Sheet Lead,
and Beer Pumps of all kinds. jul>29Uly
Trunks! Trunks!
i VALISES, PORTMANTEAUS,
-AM) -
Carpet-Bags,
-AT
DURAN'S MANUFACTORY,
No. 105 MIDDLE STREET.
ALARHE and Fashionable Stock of the above ar
ticles mav be found at this establishment, com
prising everv description for a traveling outfit.
July 30.18*52. d6m J. R DURAN.
FAMILY GROCERY STORE.
JOHN PI’HINTON,
N». 183 Farr Street. Portland.
Keeps coustautly on lmud a general assortment ol
prime
FAMILY GROCERIES j
at Wholesale and Retail. His old friends and cus
tomers are invited to give him a call. [aug30 3in
J. N. BAKU R,
CORNER OF EXCHANGE $ FEDERAL STS.,
- DEALER IX -
Choice Family Groceries,
PROVISIONS, FRUIT, VEGETABLES,
And Country Produce,
tr His friends and the public are invited to give
him a call. aeptlO—3m
Ivl arble 'W'orlc.
«I• H. T II O n P S O N,
Is prepared to receive order* for
Marble, Free Stone, Soap Stone,
Marble Chimney Piece*. Monumental Work and
Griudstouo*.
Cararr of Prwrl and Federal Si«.,
Je23tf PORTLAND. ME.
Shirtu, Shirts.
GENTLEMEN,
IF you want a cheap and perfect fitting shirt, please
leave your measure for Mr*. A MoFForr* cele
brated Oval Yoked Shirts, made from the Imt cloth*,
and good custom work, at the very lowest price*.
rr Remember the place, "
MRS. A. ROFFOTn,
No. VJT Murkrt Stiunre,
Order* respectfully solicited bv Mr*. Moffhtt. who
will pay personal attention to the same. aul2eodtf
JOllV L1M1I A to..
'\ft7’h.olesale Grrocers,
- AMD
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
GkAHlTE STORES. ..COMMERCIAL STREET.
(Opposite head of Widgery’* Wharf.)
Pwrllwad. Me.
JOHN LYMC'B. PELEO BARKER. TBOB. LYNCH
jeSSdtf
YCtTOV A hale;.
Commission Merchants,
SHIP BROKERS, CHANDLERS
— AMD DEALERS IM —
Ship and Cabin Stores,
MOULTON'S BLOCK, *
Corner Commercial SI. and Long Wh’t,
Portland, Me.
JOHM YEATOM, # JOSEPH HALE.
Particular attention paid to procuring Freights,
and purchasing Cargoes aud Charters tor vessels.
August 2, 1*52. d&w6m7
GRANT’S
Coffee and Spice Mills,
13 dt 15 UNION STREET,
PORTLAND, ME.
CONSTANTLY on hand, and for sale, at wholesale
market prices, in the crude state or manufactur
ed, every description of
COFFEE,
SPICES,
CREAM TARTAR.
SALE RAT US,
SWEET HERBS, tfc., fc.,
Packed in every variety of packages to suit dealers.
Coffee and Spices ground for the trade at
short notice. .
All goods warranted as represented
1 aug4—8mcodfcw J. GRANT.
BOOKS & STATIONERY.
53 EXCHANGE ST. 53
BLANK BOOK AND STATIONERY,
—AND—
PA PER HANGING
WAREHOUSE !
E-tablUhrd ia 1825.
Premium Blank Books on hand and made to order,
of every variety of style and finish. From our long
experience, we are enabled to offer to the trade and
our customers better bargains in quality and prices,
than can be found in any other establishment in the
State. Our stock of
STATIONERY
Is selected with the greatest care from the best For
eign and American Houses, and embraces every arti
cle needed for public offices, Countiug Houses and
private uses, and at lowest prices.
ROOM PAPERS
Of every variety, quality and price, embracing all
the various styles of gold papers manufactured, to
gether with a frill stock of Sating, mediums and com
mon papers—the largest stock to be found in this
market, at lowest market prices. School Books of
every kind in use at wholesale prices.
HALL L. DAVIS,
63 Exchange Street.
Portland June 23. 1862.
S. II. COLES WORTHY,
Has removed his stock of
BOOKS, STATIONERY, PICTURES,
Picture Frames. Paner Hamrin?* Finer f.imk kr kr
TO No. 92 EXCHANGE STREET,
Next door above the British and American Express
Office, where he will aoconunodate all who may be in
want of goods in his line, at very low prices.
Book'Binding and Picture • Framing,
Done neatly as usual.
GENUINE HOMEOPATHIC MEDICINES,
For sale at the above store by
M. SEAVEY.
Physician, and Families supplied with Medicines and
books. Cases renewed and vials refilled.
Jane 24.1862, eodfim
BLANK ACCOUNT BOOKS !
Manufactured and for Sale by
BAILEY A AO YES,
66 AND 68 EXCHANGE STREET, PORTLAND.
Journals, Ledgers, Invoice, Sales, Memorandum,
Cash, Record, Dockets, Letters, Masonic
aud Church Collectors Books.
We make to order every kind of Blank Book used
by Banks, Insurance and Railroad Companies, Ho
tels, Steamboats, Factories aud Countiug Houses.
STATIONERY.
Letter, note. Cap and Record papers, Envelopes— i
white aud buff, Gold Fens, Steel Vans, ke., Ac. Ev
ery article at lowest rates. Wx But for Cash and ;
Sell Cheap.
BAILEY A NOYES,
66 and 68 Exchange Street.
Portland, June 23,1862. dtf
Eaton Boarding School.
WINTER SESSION.
fTIIIE Winter Session of the Eaton Hoarding School
A for Boys, located at Keut* Hill. Keadticld, Me.,
will commence Monday, Nov. 10th, 1963,and continue S
twenty weeks.
The best of reference cau be given. Please «end I
for a Circular. H M. EATON k SON.
Kent's Hill, Oct. 13,1*62. ocl7 d2w
BOOTS, SHOES & RUBBERS
E. SHAW & CO
No. 88 MIDDLE STREET,
«Ai As usual, ketj> constantly supplied with fresh
Ml and fashionable BOOTS and SHOES, in eve- i
f rv variety and style for gentlemen's and ia
^^dies wear, and invite all their old customers
and the public generally to give them a call whenev
er they desire to replenish their "understandings."
E. S. k Co. are ag-nfs for the Leavitt and Wilcox
k Gibb* SEWING-MACHINES. aug&-6md
Turner’* American Eipma.
fwi-’HB PARCELS. Packages, and all other
article* usually sent by Express
^**^*^**fc' will be forwarded between this city, f
St. John. N. B , and all parts of the Province*, mith
despatch.
The subscriber solicits the patronage of the public.
ANSEL LOTHROP, Agent.
Portland, Sept. 30.1*2. d2tn
COAL A WOOD,
CHEAP FOR CASH,
DELIVERED TO AN Y PART OF THE CITY.
SPRING MOUNTAIN LEHIGH,
HAZEL TOX L EHIG//.
COLEEAIXE LEHIGH.
LOCI'a T MOL'S TAIX,
JOHS S.
THE <1 EXCISE LOB BERT, 1
Pure and Free Burning.
CUMBERLAND COAL
FOR SMITHS’ USE.
THESE Coal* are strictlv of the best quality, and
warranted to give satisfaction.
Also, for sale, best quality of Nova Scotia and other
Hard and Sort H ood.
The public are renwested to call, as we are deter
mined to give good bargain* to those who pay cash. |
Office, Commercial St., head of Maine HTf.
SAWYER A W IIITXEY.
jnl81tf
WASTED.
M SMALL KKNT, of five or six rooms, near
tin* business part of the city, Enquire at
this office (
Gill Framrt,
TNOR PORTRAITS OR LANDSCAPES of any
A iize or style df«ired—lateet pattern. and beat
workmanship—made to order bv
MORRISON & CO.. 96. Market Square
HOMESTEADS FOR $20.
THE MISSOURI LAND COMPANY have pur
chased from the Hannibal A St. Joseph Railroad
Company a large tract of laud iu Northern Missouri,
adjoining the flourishing town of Hamilton, Caldwell
County, for (arming and manufacturing purposes,
and have divided their property into lots and farms.
They are offered to subscribers in shares of #90 each.
Maps. with foil information, can be had by calling on
EDWARD SHAW. Agrat,
102 Middle Street, Portlahd.
one dtf
A. W. BANFIELD,
(Saoceeaor to P. J. Forriatall and Milit k Forriatall,
IMPOSTER AND DEALER IN#
ENGLISH, FRENCH AND GERMAN,
FANCY GOODS,
Pocket and Table Cutlery,
YANKEE NOTIONS,
CLOCKS, WATCHES AND JEWELRY,
STATIONERY, TOYS, Ac.,
28 and 80 Ftderal and 106 Congress Streeti,
ADDISON W. BANFIELD. . Boston.
P J. Forri.tall can be found at the above place.
Juno 2S. wly
HOTELS,
“EL1*I HOUSE.”
I TH E undersigned respectfollv Informs tbe
, public that !,<■ has leafed the abovAlouse,
I n'.' ,Fo,I'T?!1 Portland, and invW
i-i the tr»\ filing community to call and see if
he knows "how to keep a hotel.” Clean
airy rooms, good bod*, a well-provided table atten
m».nJCKraL,t,I^nd charges are the induce
»' P'*~
Portland. Augl'lAim1*^ “US8' ,''3ffr,M0'
UEiVTHAL HOUSE,
K. G. Mayo, - • - • Proprietor.
PASSADUMKEAQ, MAINE.
fj*CE»THE subscriber would very respectfollv an
Jrtl«lrilnn?;icp *° '•** numerous friends, and iho
1 MM'*1pub c ">*» during the temporary
f r—: 1 acompiilsnry suspension of bis business be
house anew, all a
V K P^purod to wait upon his cus
tomers and hopes by strict attention to their su it
hitherto‘r££“e °f'he ^'Tg'ma Yn“
Passadumkeag, June 23,1862. ' di wtf U'
CITY HOTEL, - - PORTLAND.
AMASA T. C. DODOE,
HAVING assumed the proprietorship of
tins house, promises to spare no paiix to
accommodate its former patrons, as well aa
liis old friends and the public generally
Haring had an ex| erlenceof sixteen yeara
be thinks lie can now "keep a hotel "
Tins house is one of the best in tbe city, and very
Obui y loc,ted on Congress, corner of Greea
Portland, Aug. 23, 1862. d3wfcw3m
AMERICAN HOUSE,
Bostos, Mass.,
I IS the largest and best arranged Hotel la
the New hnglaud States; is centrally loca
ted. and easy of access from all tbe roulca of
(ravel. It contains the modern imprnve
neiits, and every convenience for tbe com*
loil ai.u accommodation of the travelling public.
I he sleeping rooms are large and well -enti ated;
ttS&TVS!* wel1 arranged, and ompletely
fu”l|*ll,'d for families and large travelling panic,
and the bouse will coutiuue to be kept as a Hist els..
»** e*crj respeci.
„ LEH IS RICE, Proprietor.
Boston, January, 1S62. diu.a
bath hotel,
By C. M. PLUMMER.
886, W ash isoton 8t., Bath.
•.•Term* SI per day. Stable connect-^
with house.
Bath, June 28,1862. dtf
SAOADAHOCK IIOl'SE,
Alfred Carr, - - Proprietor,
BATH, MAINE.
tPn.hM Bath la one of the healthiest
RJaLja oca. dies ou the coa.1 of Maine—delightful
t'SHM'I / "<u*,wl uu *he Kennebec, twelve miles
from the sea. and affords one of the moat
large eftiem'**** frum the dn*‘ *nd ofo^J
eilnlf UAHnc^s on® of ,h* finest, mo<t ~.
,Kd bM,.1PP°i»ied Hotels In the Slate, located
within thaee minutes walk of the Depot, Steamboat
C,“tom House, Ac., being di
rectly in the business centre of the City. *
Terms Moderate by Ibo Week or Day.
Bath, June 23.1862. dtf
~ INSURANCE.
Mutual Life Insurance.
New York Life Insurance Coinp'y,
Established in 184&—Xet Capital orer
TWO MILLIONS AND A QUARTER.
THIS Company ha. jiaid since lti organization to
upwards of"’ Aud <-'reiliIur« of the Assured,
Twelre Hundred Thousand Dollars.
t tr Sttfetl and most Sncctttfnl
Life (.ompauies in the l nited States, and affords to
Dersous wi.-hing to participate in the benefit* ot Lift
Insurance, advantages not excelled, and in some re
spect* not equalled by any other in this country.
Strict Economy—Care in its Risks, and Setfe Incest
men/s. characterize Us management.
lyj* f purely mutual company, all its profits being
divided among it* members annually. *
In addition to all the various forms of Whole
Lifm, Short Term. Endowment and Annuity
pnlicie* which it iwnw. we invite special attention to
• ***'J,*U*re in Life Insurance introduced by this
t ompany some two years since, via: the i«*aibg of
Life Policies not subject to Forfeiture,
and upon which the premiums cease at the end of tea
years, whereby under nay and all rtrnaitasr,i the
money paid cannot be lost, bat the .hemal design ot
the aesured be attained, either in whole or ia part in
exact proportion to the amount of premium paid.
No better ovidence is needed of the prospeiitv and
success of this Company than the /.icf .bown by the
recently published official reports, *U: that
IT I SSI' Eft A L.l RUE It MEMBER or LIFE
POLICIES DL’RIXO THE TEAR mi. THAX
AXT OTHER COM PAX T IX THE
rxiTED STATES
Further information will be cheerfully furnished
oa application by mail or otherwise to
WARREN SPARROW,
CzxtRAL Aoext rt.R the Statb Or MaIXS.
Offlce X0.74Middle si..opposite Pontotoc.
Portland. Oct. 17, l*ta. oel7 dk w
FIRE INSURANCE.
WARREN XPARROW,
r«r. mf Cirha*|* St.,
roRTLAXD, ME.,
Agent of the following First (lam Insurant* Co'i:
^rational Invamars r<imnni.«
Or Boston. - • Cuh C apital mud Sarplu. MOO.OOO.
Republic Fire Insurance Couipnnv,
or »w York.. - Cuh Capital and Sarplu. $812,000.
Relief Fire Insurance Company*
Of New York. - - Cuh Capital and Surplus, $260 000.
Equitable Fire and Narine Ins. Co.,
Of Providence.
1*KRr*<T SrrrniTY. which oaght always to t>a tba
firtt comsuIrratwH in rdt-ciui* iasarauca,' is here ot
tered to the public, at the Writ ralrt of premium
adopted by found and retpontiblr cotnpsnin
Office in “Boyd's Building,“ opposite Post Offiaa.
Anna 28.dkwtr
BATH MUTUAL
Marine Insurance Comiuny.
OFFICE UNDER THE $ At-A I>A HOCK HOUSE.
FRONT 8IRKET.
THE President and Directors of the Bath Mutual
Marine Insurance C ompany give notice that their
Capital Stock amounts to
$200,000;
And that they are prepared to make iusuraneeon the
mutual principle, against marine risk*, not exceeding
• 10,000 in any One Risk.
MRKCTUK8 :
John Patten, Wm. Drummond. G. E. R. Patten.
Oliver Moses, Sara'I I. Robinson, E. K. Harding.
M. F. Gannett, Arthur Sewall. J. p. Morse,
J. U. McLellan, Lewis Blackmer, *Hvid Patten
Ja». F. Patten. 8. A. Houghton. C. Jameson
E- K. HARDING, President,
... _ ____ ®. C. HYDE. Secretarv.
Bath, July 8, 1862. d6m
On Hand.
A CONSTANT supply of best Extra Deep Gold
Leaf, and at low rates at
26 Market Sqcxan
PLEASURE PARTIES.
Excursionists visiting the islands, supplied
with stores at the shortest notice.
Orders solicited.
180 Fore Street near foot of Exchange.
CALDERWOOD * BECKETT.
Portland. June 28. dtf
nU Coats, Pants, Vents, Jackets,
-22. Ladie* Biding Habits, An,
Cut, made and trimmed by N
A. D. REEVES, - - Tailor,
98 EXCHANGE STREET,
Portland, August 6,1862. dly

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