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The Portland daily press. [volume] (Portland, Me.) 1862-1921, December 10, 1862, Image 1

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PORTLAND DAILY PRESS.
YQL- !• _ PORTLAND, ME., WEDNESDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 10, 1862. NO. 14oT
PORTLAND DAILY PRESS,
JOHN T. OILMAN, i
JOSEPH B. HALL, ! Edltor»
It published at No. 82} EXCHANGE STREET,
in FOX BLOCK, by
FOSTER. OILMAN and MALL,
Under the firm name of
N. A. FOBTE R A CO.
Terms:
Tn* Portland Daily Press in published every
morning, (Sundays excepted), at #6.00per year in ad
vance, to which will be added twenty-five cents for
each three months’ delay, and if not paid at the end
of the year the paper will be discontinued.
Single copies three cents.
Rates of Advertising:
Transient Advertisements, #1.00 per square,
for three insertions or less; exceeding three, and not
more than one week, #1 25 per square; 76 cents per
week after. One square every other day one week,
•1.00; 60 cents per week after.
Exhibitions, Ac., under head of Amusements,
00 per square per week.
Special Notices, #1.60 per square for first week,
#1.00 per week after.
Business Notices, in reading columns, 12 cents
per line for one insertion. No charge less than fifty
cents.
Legal Notices at usual rates.
Advertisements inserted in the Maine State
Press (which ha* a large circulation in every part of
the State) for 88 cents per square in addition to the
above rates fbr each insertion.
Transient advertisements must be paid for in ad
vance.
or All communications intended for the paper
should be directed to the “Editors qf the Press," and
those of a business character to the Publishers.
HTThe Portland Dailt and Maine State
Press Office, in Fox Block, No. 82$ Exchange
Street, is open at all hours during the day and eve
ning, from 7 o'clock in the morning to 9 in the
evening.
€3^ Job Printing of every description executed
with dispatch; and all business pertaining to the of
fice or paper promptly transacted on application as
above
Wednesday Morning, December 10,1862.
The National Finances.
REPORT OF THE TREASURY DEPARTMENT.
The voluminous report of Secretary Chase
of the Treasury Department, is twice as long
as the President’s message, and would fill two
solid pages of our paper. Of course its publi
cation will not be expected in onr columns.—
Below we give a condensation of this elabor
ate report, embracing the important points of
Its estimates, its plans of revenue, and its views
upon the financial condition of the country.
THE PUBLIC DEBT.
The amount of the pubfic debt on the 30th
of June, 1862, was $514,211,371 92. It is esti
mated that on the 1st of July, 1863, the public
debt will be increased to $1,122,297,403 24; and
on the supposition that the war may continue
with undiminUUed disbursements until the 1st
of July, 1864, the debt likely to have been then
incurred must be estimated at $1,744,885,586
80. The average rate of interest for the whole
loan thus far incurred is four and three-fifths
per cent.
RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES.
The aggregate receipts for the fiscal year
1862 (from July 1,1861, to June 30,1862) were
$583385,247 03; the aggregate expenditures,
$570,841,700 25. The receipts for the first quar
ter of the fiscal year 1863 were $180.495345 60.
The estimated receipt* for the remaining three
quarters will Increase this amount to $511,046,
259 96. The actual and estimated expendi
tures for the year (from July 1,1862, to June
80,1863) are stated as follows:
For the civil service, $32,811.543 23
For the interior department, 5,982,906 43
For the war department, 747.359,828 98
For the navy department, 82,177.510 77
For interest on public debt, 25,340,321 38
Total, $893346,321 48
The estimated receipts for the fiscal year
1864 are $223,625,000 00. The estimated ex
penditures, provided the war continues, are
$1,095,413,183 56. Though the continuance of
the war is very properly assumed as the basis of
estimates intended to cover all contingencies,
yet the Secretary expresses the confident hope
that it is a contingency destined never to be
realized.
TREASURY NOTES, STAMPS AND CERTIFI
CATES.
The Secretary justifies at length the finan
cial system of the Government, in the issue of
treasury notes and postal currency. Of the
former, Congress at different times authorized
the issue of $150,000,000, to meet the daily in
creasing demands on the Treasury-, and subse
quently the issue of a second $150,000,000, of
which $50,000,000 were to be reserved till ac
tually required for the payment of deposits.—
The use of postage and revenue stamps was
also authorized as currency—this expedient
being preferable to the issue of metallic tokens
reduced in value below the existing standards.
These measures have all worked well—more
than fulfilling the anticipations of the depart
ment. Congress further authorized the issue
of national bonds to the amount of $500,000,
000, into which the United States notes Issued
might be converted at the will of the holder.
It was provided that these bouds should carry
an interest of six per cent in specie, ami lie
redeemable after live and payable in twenty
years.
IS THERE AN EXCESS OF CURRENCY?
The secretary does not concur in the opin
ion that the segregate currency of the coun
try, composed of the United States notes and
the notes of corporations, is at this moment
greatly in excess of legitimate demands for its
employment. Much less does he concur in an
other opiuiou, not unfrequently expressed,
that any actual excess is due to the issues of
the United States notes already in circulation.
It is true that gold commands a premium in
notes. But it is also true that on the suspension
of specie payments and the substitution for
coin of United States notes, convertible into
six per cent, specie bonds as the legal stand
ard of value, gold became an article of mer
chandise, subject to the ordiuary fluctuations
of supply aud demand, aud to the extraordi
nary fluctuations of mere speculation. That
the consequent rise in the marketable value
of gold is not due wholly or mainly to the in
crease of the currency, is evident from the
facts, (1) That the whole quantity of circula
tion did not at the time exceed the legitimate
demands of payment. (2) The whole, or
nearly the whole, increase in the volume of
the currency which has taken place, was, it is
believed, legitimately demanded by llie
changed condition of the country in the year
between the two dates. (3) That on the 15th
day of October, when the actual circulation,
national and corporate, was about $330,000,
000, the premium on gold was 37 5-8; where
as, on the 29th day of November, w-hen the
circulation had increased by more than
millions, the premium on gold was 29 to 30
percent. But if the fact of considerable re
dundancy in circulation be conceded, it by no
means follows that it is the circulation of the
United States notes which is redundant, anil
upon this point the secretary concludes that it
1* the part of wisdom and duty to support the
United States circulation, and reduce the bank
note circulation.
uniformity of circulation.
He still adheres, however, to his opinion be
fore expressed, that a circulation furnished by
the government, hut issued by hanking asso
ciations, organized under a general act of con
gress, is to be preferred to either. The central
idea of the proposed measure is the establish
ment of one sound, uniform circulation, of
equal value throughout the country, upon the
foundation ol national credit combined with
private capital. These associations would be
entirely voluntary, aud every dollar of circu
lation would represent real Capital, actually in
vested in national stocks, and the total amount
issued could always be pasily and quickly as
certained from the books of the treasury.
The plan is recommended by various reasons,
but chiefly by the firm anchorage it will sup
ply to the Union of the states. Every individ
ual who holds a dollar of the circulation se
cured by such deposit; every merchant, every
farmer, every mechanic, interested in transac
tions dependent for success on the credit of
that circulation, will feel as an injury every
attempt to rend the national unitv, with the
permanence and stability of which all their
interests are so closely and vitally connected.
Had the system been possible, and had it ac
tually existed two years ago, can it be doubted
that the national interests and sentiments en
listed by it for the Union would have so
strengthened the motives for adhesion derived
from other sources, that the wild treason of
secession would have been impossible?
GOLD AND SILVER A PERMANENT BA9I9. |
The secretary recommends, therefore, no
I mere paper money scheme, but, on the contra
ry. a series of measures looking to a safe and
gradual return to gold and silver as the only
permanent basis, standard, and measure of
values recognized by the constitution — be
tween which and an irredeemable pa|ier cur
rency, as he believes, the choice is now to be
made. No country possesses the true ele
ments of a higher credit—uo country, in ordi
nary times, can maintain a higher standard of
payment and currency than the United States.
The government is less costly tlian that of
most other great powers. The expenditures
of the current fiscal year, excluding those of
the war and navy departments, can hardly
equal those jif the last year, w hich amounted
to $24,511.47d 0fi. Estimating those of these
departments at double theexjienditurcs of the
la«t year before the rebellion, they would lor
the current year, had the war ended before last
midsummer, as was anticipated at the date of
the last report, amount to the sum of $55,
845,834 48. The interest ou the public debt is
for the current year estimated at $25,041,532.
07, and will probably go over that sum. The
whole expenditures ol the government for the
current year, on the supposition of peace,
would, therefore, not exceed *105,371.843 21.
This aggregate must be increased hereafter by
the addition of the interest on the loans of the
current and future years, and by pensions, the
precise amount of which cannot be foreseen.
Estimate the former at fifty, and the latter at
I ten millions a year, and the total annual ex
penditures in peace will reach, omitting frac
tions, to $105,000,000. The expenditures or
(Jreat Britain during the year ending March
31. 1802. were *3t$4.43fi.rt821 those iit fi’ptini’n
| for 18(12, according to French official esti
mates, will reach $421523,980; ami the annu
al expenses of Russia, according to the best
accessible information, do not full short of
$230,000,000. To meet our atiuual expendi
tures, and to ensure lieyond contingency the
punctual discharge of the interest of the pub
lic debt, and the creation of a sinking fund
for its reduction. Congress has provided a rev
enue from customs even now reaching nearly
seventy millions a year, and a revenue from
internal duties which will not probably full
short of one hundred aud fifty millions a’year.
Without reckoning any other resources than
those already provided, tile revenue, therefore,
will annually exceed the expenditures by tlf
j ty-flve millions, which sum may he used for the
reduction of the public debt. If, then, the
war shall be continued, contrary to hope and
expectation, to midsummer of 18(14, and the
public debt shall reach the utmost limit now
anticipated, of seventeen hundred and Hfty
millions of dollars, the excess of revenue will
reduce that debt, during the first year of peace
more than three per cent.
RESOURCES OF THE COUXTRT.
But tlie American republic possesses im
mense resources which have not yet been call
ed into contribution. The gold-hearing region
of the United States stretches through near 18
degrees of latitude, from British Columbia on
the north to Mexico on the south, and through
more thau twenty degrees of longitude, from
the eastern declivities of the Rocky mountains
to the Pacific ocean. It includes 'two states,
California and Oregon; four entire territories,
Utah, Nevada, New Mexico ami Washington;
and parts of three other territories, Colorado,
Nebraska and Dakota. It forms an area of
more Hum a million of square miles, the whole
of which, with comparatively insignificant ex
ceptions, is the property of the nation. It is
rich, not only in gold, hut in silver, copper
iron, lead, aud many other valuable minerals.’
Its product of gold and stiver during the cur
rent year will not much, if at all, probably fall
short of one hundred million dollars; ami it
must long continue gradually, yet rapidly, to
increase. If this product bo subjected to a
reasonable seignorage, as suggested by some,
or tl, as suggested by others, Hie mineral lands
he subdivided and sold in convenient parcels,
with proper reservations in favor of the miners
now in occupation of particular localities, a
very considerable revenue may lie derived
from this region without hardships to the
actual settlers aud occupiers. And there are
other miners than those of gold or silver, or
copper or iron, in the wide territory which in
cludes the public lands of the United States.
Every acre of the fertile soil is a mine which
only waits for the contact of labor to yield its
treasures: and every acre is ojien to the fruit
ful contact by the homestead act. When the
opportunities thus offered to industry shall he
understood by the working millions of Europe,
it cannot be doubted that great numbers w ill
seek American homes, in order to avail them
selves of the great advantage tendered to their
acceptance by American law. Every working
man who conics betters the condition ol the
nation aN well as his own. 11c adds in many
ways, seen and unseen, to its wealth, its intel
mate the contribution which immigration,
properly encouraged by legislation anil admin
istration, will make to revenue; but directly
and indirectly, it cannot be reckoned as less
than that which may be expected front the
metallic products of the gold-bearing region.
With siicli resources at the disposal of the re
public, no one need be alarmed lest the United
States may become unable to pay the interest
on its debt, or to reduce the principal to what
ever point the public interest may indicate.
The republic is passing through the pangs of
a new birth to a uobler aud higher life. Twice
already she lias paid oil' a national debt con
tracted for the defence of her rights; the
obligations of that which she now incurs for
tlte preservation of her existence will be not
less sacredly fulfilled.
SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS.
The general views of the Secretary* may
therefore be thus briefly summed:
He recommends that whatever amounts
may be needed, beyond the sums supplied by
revenue and through other indicated modes,
be obtained by loans, without increasing the
issue of United States notes beyond the
amount fixed by law, unless a clear public ex
igency shall demand it. He recommends, al
so, the organization of hanking associations
for tlte improvement of the public credit and
for the supply to the people of a safe aud uni
form currency. And he recommends no
change in the laws providing for the negotia
tion of bonds, except the necessary increase of
amount, and the repeal of the absolute restric
tion to market value, and of the clauses au
thorizing convertibility at will.
If Congress shall concur in these views, the
Secretary, though conscious of the great diffi
culties which vast, sudden, and protracted ex
penditures impose upon him, ventures to hope
that he may still be able to maintain the pub
lic credit and provide for the public wants.
An assay office or branch mint is recom
mended in Nevada territory.
A change in weights, measures, and coins is
recommended, and the report suggests that
the present demonetization of gold may well
be availed of for the purpose of taking one
considerable step towards these great ends.—
If the half eagle of the Union be made of
equal weight aud fineness witli tlte gold sove
reign of Great Britain, no sensible injury
could possibly arise from the change; while,
on tlte resumption of specie ^lymetits, its great
advantages would be felt in the equalization
of exchanges and the convenience of com
merce.
The operations of the Coast Survey, the
course of trade with the insurgent States, and
the management of contrabands on planta
tions, are referred to.
An assistant collector is recommended in
New York.S.The purchase of the Exchange is
advised.
The demand for postage currency will soon
I be met. The Secretary has contracted for pa
! per, and has authorized the preparation of
1 small notes as substitutes for revenue stamps,
substantially like the small notes now substi
! tuted for postage stamps, and indulges the hope
] that results will commend his action to the ap
proval of Congress, and that the necessary
modification of the provisions relating to
stamps and engravings, will receive its sanc
tion.
The Secretary refers to the labors of his sub
ordinates, and says that a larger clerical force
is demanded. He suggests that authority be
given him to appoint commissioners to exam
ine and audit the claims of the several States
now referred to that office for settlement.
The bureau of internal revenue has been
organized under the act of last session, and is
now actively engaged in the labors assigned
to it. Collectors and assessors have been ap
pointed in all the. districts of the loyal
and the revenue from the duties imposed By
the law, is steadily and rapidly increasing.
MISCELLANEOUS.
UNION FOREVER I
RALLY TO THE FLAG!
NEW EEOEUITS WANTED!
Latest from Headquarters !
GREAT EXCITEMENT
AT BURLEIGH'S,
163 HVliddle Street.
UILITAK GOODS,
Of every description,
EOR SALE AT BURLEIGH'S.
Summer Clothing
Is selling, regardless of Cost,
AT BURLEIGH'S.
MILITARY UNIFORMS,
For officers, made to order, from the best material,
with dispatch, and at low prices.
CUSTOM WORK,
Of every description, made to order and warranted
to fit.
The largest and best selected stock of
READY-MADE CLOTHING,
- A1CD
Gentlemen’s Furnishing Goods,
i
-Ever offered in Maine, can be obtained at- j
BURLEIGH’S,
All of which will be sold so as to warrant entire sat
isfaction to the purchaser.
OUR STOCK OF CLOTHS
AND TRIMMING GOODS
Are unlimited in quantity, qnality or price, and will
be sold very low, at wholesale or retail, for cash.
Buyers will do well to look at our stock before pur
chasing elsewhere, as it was bought before the great
rise on goods.
103 [Middle Street,
JOSIAH BURLEIGH.
Portland. July 22. 18«2. d6m
SAIL CLOTH

__ • I
DLMl lion FLA A Jill, mill t>Ll L MKIrLS,
(A substitute for Cotton.)
HBIEACHED CASTAS, WITH BED STRIPE,
Of various descriptions.
ALL Mton A O Nos. 1 TO 6.
ALBO ON HAND
BOLT ROPE CORDAGE, &C.,
For sale by
LE MESURIEIt & CHAMPION,
St. Peter Street,QUEBEC.
FT*Samples on hand, and orders taken bv
J. T. FATTEN & CO.,
Oct. 11—6m Front Street, Bath.
STATE OF MAINE.
Adjutant General’s Office, I
Augusta, Nov. 29, 1862. I
GENERAL ORDER NO. 61.
A COM FAN V of Cavalry will be enlisted in this
State, to serve for three vears, or during the war
unless sooner discharged, to be attached to a Cavalry
Regiment now being raised in the New England
.States, and intended for the expedition under Get.
Banks.
State Bountv of will be paid before the compa* '
ny leaves the State, to each man who shall enlist
therein during the month of December next, and
Government Bounty of S100 will be paid each at the
expiration of the period of his enlistment, or, in case
of his death, to his familv or heirs ut law.
If, from any cause, u full company shall fhil of be
ing raised, the men will be attached to the Maine
Cavalry Regimeut, or to the Maine Batteries of
Mounted Artillery, at their optiou.
Enlistments will be made in the eastern section of
the State bv Henry W. Farrar, Bangor; in the cen
tral by F. A. Metcalf. Datnariscotta; and in the wes
tern by John L. Meserve, Cortland.
By orderof the Commander-iu-Chief.
JOHN L. HODSDON, Adj’t General.
dec4 d& wlw25
rilliE subscriber hereby gives public notice to all
A concerned, that he Lias been duly appointed and
taken upon himself the trust of Administrator with I
the will annexed of the estate of
EDWARD N. JORDAN,
.late of Westbrook in the County of Cumberland, de- '
ceased, by giving bond as the law directs; be there
fore requests all persons who are indebted to the j
said deceased's estate, to make immediate payment; j
and those who have any demands thereon, to exhibit j
the same for settlement to iilRAM 11. DOW. I
Wostbrook, Nov. 18,1802. 28 w3w* r
BUSINESS CARDS.
WILLIAM F. PABKEB,
UPHOLSTERER
-AND
Manufacturer of
FURNITURE,
Lounges, Bedsteads,
SPR/Nd-BEIJS, MATTRESSES, PEW-CVSH
IONS, tfc., fc.
148 Exchange Street, Portland.
Hair Mattresses renovated.* (Furniture re
paired aud varnished. Chairs re-caned in an im
proved manner. Second-hand Furniture bought,
sold or exchanged. jul30d6m
Copartnership Notice.
WE have this day associated ourselves together
under the name aud style of
FROST A FRYE,
and have taken 8torc
No. lOO Commercial Street,
near Commercial Wharf—where wo shall keep con
stantly on hand.
Flour, Corf?- Meal, Oata, Rye, Feed,
Ground Rock Salt, Ac.
„ AMAIIIAH FROST,
Portland, Nor. 1,1862. ADDISON FRVE.
Messr*. Flost k Frye having leased mv Mill and
purchased my stock and trade, I cheerfully rccom
mend them to mv customers.
Portland. Nov.' 1,1862. W. C. BRADLEY.
novS tf
ALBERT WEBB A CO.,
-DEALERS is
Corn, Flour and Grain,
HEAD OF MERRILL’S WHARF,
Commercial Street,. - Part land. Me.
je23tf
ARMY AND NAVY
TAILORING ESTABLISHMENT,
— »T —
A. D. REEVES, ... Tailor,
98 EXCHANGE STREET,
Portland, Ang. 6.1862. dly
toms, raws, vests. Jackets,
-LL Ladies’ Riding Habits, &c.,
Cut, made aud trimmed by
A. D. REEVES, - - Tailor,
98 EXCHANGE STREET,
Portland, August 6,1862. dly
JOHN B. BROWN A SOYS,
Sugar Refinery,
YORK STREET, PORTLAND, ME.
_ Je28dtf
1STew Drug Store!
CROSNIAY A POOR,
HAVE taken ftore, Na. 7 5 Middle Street,
(fox Block,) and respectfully invite public at
tention to their large aud well selected stock of
Drags, Chemicals, Fancy Goods, Ac.,
And solicit a share of public patronage, trusting
that by furnishing thepurest chemicals and best stock
of drugs the market affords, and a careful attention
in the dispensary department, to merit the contidence
cham. r. oromxah. je34tf thom.h.poor.
DOLE & MOODY,
GENERAL
Commission Merchants,
A HD WHOLESALE DEALERS IH
FLOUR, CORN AND PRODUCE,
No. 6 Galt Block Commercial Street,
PORTLAND, Me.
AHDREW T. DOLE. EBAHKLIE C WOODY.
June 23. eodtf
JOHY W. PERKIYS A CO.,
WHOLESALE DEALERS IE
Paints, Oils, Varnishes,
DRUGS. DYE STIFFS, GLASS WARE,
FLUID, KEROSENE OIL, Ac.,
AG Commercial Street, Thomas Block,
ju!29d*wly PORTLAND. ME.
YEATOY A HALE.
Commission Merchants,
SHIP BROKERS, CHANDLERS
— AND DEALERS IH —
Ship and Cabin Stores,
MOULTON'S BLOCK,
Corner Commercial St. and Long Wh’l,
Portland, Me.
JOHN TEATOH, JOMErn HALE.
•.•Particular attention paid to procuring Freights,
and purchasing Cargoes aud Charters for vesMela.
au^'iici i. iiianouu
"photographs.
MJ. U. P. BURNHAM give* lio-a.
tice that he ha* resumed business at
hi* former place. No. 96 Middle aj
where he is prepared to execute SHy
LIKENESSES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION,
From Minature to Life size,
PHOTOGRAPHS
In India Ink, Water, or Oil Colors.
Special attention paid to copying old Daguerreo
types, A mb rot y pcs. k c.
The subscriber has made some important changes
in his Rooms, which facilitate the makiug of the
“Carte* de Visit©,”
which he is prepared to make satisfactory at short
notice.
Z JT^sick or deceased persons’ pictures taken at
their residence.
The largest collection (of Pictures of the various
kinds) in the city may be seeu at hi* Reception Room,
96 Middle Street, up one short flight of stairs, oppo
site Casco Rank.
Rooms free to all for examination of Specimens.
J. V. P. B1RMIA1I.
oct7 tf
L. J. CROSS,
141 Middle Street, — - Portland, Me,
Watch-Maker,
w'hfl x. B.—All work being promptly and person
ally attended to, is warranted to give thorough satis
faction. je28tf
J. L, WIXSL.OW, Agent,
MANUFACTURER OF
Steam Engines, Steam Boilers,
AND EVERY DESCRIPTION OF MACHINERY,
Steam Cock,, Valve,, I*ipesand Connection,, Whole*
sale or Ketail.
STEAM AND GAS FITTING,
Done in the best manner.
Works 6 Union St., and 233 & 235 Fore St.,
JnUdtr PORTLAND, ME.
DR. C. H. OSGOOD,
SURGEON t MECHANICAL
^Bdentist,
No. 8 Clapp’s Block, Conjprs* Slrwt,
orr. OLD CITY HAW.,-PORTLAND, ME. ’
Artitleial Teeth i user ted on Gold, Silver and Vul
cauite base,
dmd&woo
BUSINESS CARDS.
JOHN LYNCH A CO.,
"Wholesale Gt-rooers,
-and
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
GRANITE STORES,.... COMMERCIAL 8TREET,
(Opposite head of Widgery’s Wharf,)
Portland, Me.
JOHN LYNCH, PKLEG BARKEN, TH08. LYNCH.
_ Je23dtf
HENRY L. PAINE & CO.,
(Formerly WILLIAM C. HOW A CO.,)
-Dealers in
Coal, Wood and Roofing Slate,
275 Commercial Street,
Opposite Smith's Wharf..Portland, Ma.
HENRY L. PAINE, 1
WILLIAM C. HOW, ) DOvl tf
JOHKSON A 4/HEYERY,
-DBA LERA IN
CHOICE FAMILY GROCERIES,
PROVISIONS, FRUIT, VEGETABLES,
AND COUNTRY PRODUCE,
294 Cornered* Street, Portland, Me.
sep6—3m
W. II. KENNEY A CO,
-DEALERS IS
MEATS OF ALL KINDSj
Poultry, Vegetables, Country Produce, 4c.,
Nos. 2, 4 A 6 IVarren Market, Portland.
W. B. EKSSKT. A. W. POUTER,
UT~ Goods delivered iu any part of the city, free
of charge. sepd—8m
I). REEVES,
The Tailor,
— HAS JDST RETIJRXED PROS! —
NEW YORK AND BOSTON,
With s large and well selected Stock of
Cloths, Cassimeres and Vestings!
Also a full assortment of
Military Cloths,
And is prepared to make them up at short notice.1
Call and See,
AT No.!« EXCHANGE STREET.
Portland, Sept. 24.1862. dtf
L. H. TITCOJIB,
Apothecary,
-A (SENT FOR
PALMER’S
ARTIFICIAL LI JIBS,
-ALSO,
Sheet Gntta Fercha for Splinta,
AND CRUTCHES, FOR SALE.
SPECIMEN LIMBS MA T BE SEEM AT
373 rongrew Street, - - - Portland.
luiidtf
IP YOU
-WAKT Till
Best Ambrotype or Photograph,
DO not fail to call at No. 27 Market Square, where
they take PEUFECT LIKENESSES, and war
rant satisfaction, at pricer vhich defy competition.
N. B.—Large Ambrotypee only Fifteen Cents.
TRASK A LEWIS,
27 Market Square, h’d Preble St.
July 14tb. 1862. dtf
CHASE BROTHERS A C O.,
Widgerya Wharf, Portland, Me.,
IMPORTERS,
AND GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
aep6—8m
WILLIAM A. PEARCE,
PLUMBKU,
-MAKER OF
FORCE PUMPS AND WATER CLOSETS,
No. 124 Exchange Street, Portland, Me.
IPami, Cold and Shower Roths, Wash Bowls, Brass
and Silver dated Cocks.
EVEKY Description of Water Fixtnre for Dwell
ing House*, Hotels, Public Buildings, Ship*, Ac.,
arranged and set up in the best manner, and all or
ders in town or country taithfuliv executed. All
kinds of Jobbing promptly attended to.
Constantly on hand. Lead Pipe* and Sheet Lead,
and Beer Pumps of all kinds. jul\29dly
Trunks! Trunks!
VALISES, P0RTMAHTEAU8,
-AND
Carpet-Bags,
-AT
DURAN'S MANUFACTORY,
ltu. 11W Mll/L/LCi CUIiLM.
4 LA R ’• and Fashionable Stock of the above ar
J\. ticW ma> In* found at this establishment, com*
prising every cle crlption for a traveling outfit
Ju. A). 1SS>. dbm J. R. DL’RAN.
J. I?I. BAKER,
CORNER OF EXCHANGE tf FEDERAL STS.,
- DEALER IN -
Choice Family Groceries,
PROVISIONS, FRUIT, VEGETABLES,
And Country Produoe,
CT* His friends and the public are invited to give
him a call. sept 10—3m
Marble Work.
J. R. THOMPSON,
Is prepared to receive order* for
Marble, Free Stone, Soap Stone,
Marble Chimney Pieces, Monumental Work and
Grindstones.
Corner of Pearl and Federal Sla..
je23tf PORTLAND. ME.
H. €. LOVELL A SON,
—DEALERS IN—
Foreign and Domestic
DRY GOODS,
ISiO Middle Street,
Would inform the pubiic that having purchased the
stock of
S. B. GO WELL,
And takeu the store recently occupied bv him, (12®
Middle Street.) are prepared to furnish Mr. Gowell’s
former customers, as well as their own friends and
the public, with
NEW AND SEASONABLE GOODS,
and at AS LOW PRICES as the same quality and
style can be purchased, at any other place'iu the
city.
fciT"No trouble to show goods: call and see before
purchasing elsewhere. ocl8
TWITCH ELL A CH4HPLIN,
Commission Merchants,
—AND DEALERS IN -
FLOUR AND PROVISIONS,
85 Commercial St., opp. Thomas Block,
PORTLAND, ME.
John Q. Twitchell. jul81d6iu Ja’a I*. Champlin.
BOOKS & STATIONERY.
S. II. COLES IV O It THY,
Has remove*! Ins stock of
BOOKS, STATION UR Y, PICTURES,
Pidire Prime*, PiperRin irn Fury Mi, te„ie.,
TO No. 92 EXCHANGE STREET,
Next door above the British and American Express
Oliice, where he will acc* tniuodate all who may do in
want of goods in his line, at very low prices.
Book-Binding ar»d Picture-Framing,
Done neatly as usual.
GENUINE HOMEOPATHIC MEDICINES,
For sale at t’ c above store by
M. SHAVE Y.
Phyaiciana and Kumiliea -applied with Medicines and
booka. Caaea renewed and riala refilled.
June 24. 18<g._ eoddm
New Works !
SEW El) nos OP
CASEY'S U. S?. TACTICSj
Army Regulations.
HALL L. DAVIS.
S3 Errhange Street
Sect. 27.1892. dti
HOTELS.
“ELM HOUSE.”
I THE undersigned respectfully Inform* the
public that ho has leased the above House,
on Federal Street, Portland, nd invites
the travelling community to cal) and see it
be knows “how to keep a hotei.” Clean,
airy rooms, good beds, a well-provided t ible, atten
tive servants and moderate charges aro lbe induce
ments he holds out to those whose business or pleas
ure call them to the “Forest City.’*
JONATHAN BLISS, Proprietor.
Portland, Aug 19, 18*12. dtt
BATH HOTEL,
i. By C. M. PL U M M K
RjBLjl 390, WAamaoTOK 8t., Hath.
1a"'I •••Tcrma (1 per day. SUble conne d
withbouae.
-- air
SAOADAIIOCK HOUSE,
AlfVeil Carr, • - Proprietor. I
BATH. MAINE.
THE rity of Hath to one of thm hmmlthiemt i
lucmliti.-. on thr comat of Xmine—ilelightftU
ly situated ou the Kennebec. twelve mile# i
—- from the mi, and affords one of the most
inviting retreats from the dust aud turmoil of our
large cities.
The 8 aoa da hock is one of the finest, most spa
Cious, and best appointed Hotels in the .state, located
within thaee minutes walk of the Depot, Steamboat
Landing, Tost Office, Custom House, kc., being di- '
rectly iu the business centre of the City.
Term* Moderate by the Week wr Day. i
Bath, June 23.1802. dtf
CENTRAL HOUSE,
K. G. Mayo, - - . . l^roprietor. 1
PASSADUMKEAO, MAINE.
►THE subscriber would very respectfully an
[nounce to his numerous friends, and’ the t
i■ public generally, that during the temporary
Ukomptibory suspension of Ids business he
imbibed this well-known bouse anew, and is
now better than ever prepared to wait upon his cus
tomers, and hopes by strict attention to their wants
to merit a continuance of the patronage which he has i
hitherto received. £. MAYO
Tassadumkeag. June 23,18G2. dbwtf
The 3Iodel Cook:!

AN AIR TIGHT STOVE
Willi Two Ovens,
The greatest of modern improvements in the line ef
Cook. Stoves,
EVER OFFERED TO THE PUBLIC.
Manufactured by the
Barstow Stove Company,
Whose Castings stand unrivalled throughout New 1
England.
The senior partner of the Company, whose experi
ence of nearly a quarter ofaceutury iu the Stove
Manufacture, says—that by an
AIR TIGHT STOVE
we meau a stove so perfectly fitieiU** to place the
draft of the stove entirely withiu the coutrol of the ;
persou using it; enabling him to preserve either a ,
wood or coal tire for many hours, by simply closing
the draft slide, thus socunug gn at economy iu time,
and iu cost of fuel, a-* well as avoiding the dust con
sequent upon rekiudiiug.
ROASTING AND BAKING.
Bnt the novel—the peculiar feature of the MODEL
COOK—that which distiugtitshe* it from all others—
is the additiou of a Ventilated Roasting Oven with!]
the body of the stove aud in front of the tire; so ar
rarged that it can be used separately for roasting, or
(by the removal of a simple plate) in connection with
the larger oven for baking.
Wherever these stoves have been used, they have
giveu universal satisfaction.
rUK BALK 1ST
F. A. HOWARD,
—DEALER IN—
Stoves, Furnaces and Ranges,
From the celebrated Barstow Stovr Co.
—A LSO
A Complete Assortment of
HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS,
Reyislrrs Ventilators, Ac.
-ALSO, AGENT FOR
The Vetrified Water and Drain Pipe.
UNDER
Lancaster Hall.
ET All kind»of TIN »nd SHEET IRON WORK
done to order, at short notice. not20
WAR CLAIM AGENCY.
8100 Bounty Money, Bnek Pay,
And Pensions.
THE undersigned is prepared to obtain from the
United States Government, 8100 Bounty Money,
Back Pay. Ac., for heirs of Officer* or Soldier* dying
in the U. S. service.
Invalid Pensions,
Established for Officers and Soldier*, wounded or
di*abled by sickness contracted while iu the service
of the United States, iu the line of duty.
Pensions
Procured for widows or children of Officer* and Sol
dier* who have died while in the service of the Uu>
ted State*.
Prize Money, Pension*, Bounty and Back Pay cu
lected for Seamen ami their heir*.
Fees, for each Pension obtained, Five Dollars.
All (Maim* against the Government will rece
prompt attention.
Post Office ad«liv*B
SETII E. HE EDI
Augusta, Me.
(Office No. 9 State House.)
REFERENCE*:
Hon. Lot M Morrill, Hon. Joseph B. Hall,
U. S. Senate, Sec’r of State,
Hon. James G. Blaine, Hon. Nathan Dane.
*ep20dAwl4tf State Treasurer. j
mHE subscriber hereby gives public notice to al
X concerned, that he ha* been dulv appointed and
taken upon himself the trust of Administrator of
the estate of
SAMUEL NOKT11,
late of Westbrook ,iu the Count' of Cumberland.mer
chaut. deceased, by giving bond as the law directs;
he therefore request* all persons who are indebted to
the said deceased’> estate to make immediate pay
ment; and those who have any demand* thereon, to
exhibit the same for settlement to
NATHANIEL BROWN.
Westbrook, Nov. 18,1862 . 28 w8w
_INSURANCE.
bath mutitai,
Marine Insurance Company.
OFFICE under the sagadahock houbk,
FRONT STREET.
T ?ircc*or* of,he Mutual
ipi“‘s;<iteuruc.r,,“y,iT*DoMe,‘ta*,wr
#2200,000 ;
mui'JlV ,h*T f™ P"?*"'1«» make insurance on tba
mutual principle, agaiu.t marine risk*, not exceeding
• 10,000 in any One Risk.
DIBgCTORS:
?.?■ „,,n' ?'m Drummond, G. E R Patten
Olner Moses, Sani'l I Robinson, F. K Harding ’
M- I1. Gannett, Arthur Bewail, J I* Morse *’
J. U McLellan. Lewi, Bl.ckmer, DaVid^Sten
Ja*. I. Fatten, S A Hoagbton. „. C. Jameson
E. K. HARDING. Frmideut,
Rsih r I . lie UVDE, Secretary.
Bath, July 8. 1SB2. d6m
Mutual Life Insurance.
!Vew 1 ork Lift* Insurance C omp'y,
Established in l*4d-Net Capital over
TWO KILLIOHS AKD A QUARTER.
TH18I Company ha* paid since ita organisation to
Widows, orphans and Creditors of the Assured
upward* of
Twelve Hundred Thousand Dollar*.
It is one of the rpdeet. Safe,! and motl Sueeet.CuI
Lite I nmpaniee in the United States, and affords to
persons wishing to participate in the benefits of Lift
Insurance, advantages not excelled, and in some ro
speels not eg nailed by any other in this country.
Strict Economy—Car, i* it, Mteke. and Safe Invest
ment,. characterize ite management
It Is a purely mutual company, all ite pro ft, being
divided among its members annually.
In addition to all the various form* of Wools
Lira. Short Thru, Drpownt.Tr and A.smitt
policies which It issue., we invite tperia! retention to
a nem/e,Unre in Life Insurance introduced by this
Company some two yean since, via? the issuing of
Life Policies not subject to Forfeiture,
and upon which the premium, eease at the end often
years, whereby ui der any and all eirrumetanc*, ths
money paid cannot he lost, but the original design of
the assured be a mined, either in whofe or in part, in
e-\2c,.l’rop‘’rt'"n t0 *1** amount of premium paid
No better evidence la needed of the prosperity and
success ol this Company than the fact shown by tha
recently published official reports, riz: thaj
IT ISSUED A LARGER XUMBER OF LIFE
cvt.it ir.x Kl.yti THE T EAKTHSl. THAN
ANY OTHER COMPANY IN THE
UNITED STATES.
Furthtr information wilJ be ehceifiilly fhrtiishad
on application by mail or otherwise to
WABREN SPARROW,
(itFRRAL A (IK ST ROB THE STATIC OR MAIFa.
Office >o.74 Middle st..opposite Poutofhce.
I’ortlsud, Oct. 17,1*3. ocl7dkw
FIRE INSURANCE.
h akbes sparrow.
Office 7 4 .Middle, ccr* of Excksscc I|„
PORTLAND. MF..,
Agent of the following Kibrt Class Insurance Co’s:
National Insurance f'ompony.
Of Boston. - - Cash Capital sad Surplus *400,000.
Republic Fire Insurance Cotnpanr.
Of Now York. -- Cask Capital sod Surplus, 4112,000.
Relief Fire Insaianee Company.
Of Sew York. -- Cash Capital and Surplus, 140,000.
Equitable Fire and Marino Ins. Co.,
Of ProTidenee.
Prfrrct SacraiTT. which ought always to os the
flrtt cfmtidfmtlrm Id effecting Insurance, is here of
fered to the publle, at the hw.it rotes or premium
adopted by sound and retpowsiW* worn panics
Office in "Boyd’s Building," opposite Post Offloa.
June 23. dkwtf
OFFICIAL.
CITY OF PORTLAND.
In the Year One Thousand Eight Hundred and
dixty-two.
AN ORDINANCE relating to an Ordinance en
titled "An Ordinance amending the Ordinance
ou Health.*»
Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Com
mm Conned rf the City of Portland, in City Conn
eil assembled. as follows . —
Section l. That an ordinance entitled "An Or
dinance amending the Ordinance on Health," ap
proved June 4th, I960, be aud the name in hereby re
pealed .
Section 2. That section* 19. 20. 21 22 and 23. of tha
revised ordinance* on Health be. and the hum am
hereby revived aud in full force, provided, that anr
person may cau-e hie own swill to be removed in »ucn
manner a* he doeut proper, upon obtaining therefor,
a permit from the City Clerk. And tho City Clerk
•hall keep a record oi the permit* so granted.
In City C ouncil. Nor. 24.1982.
Thi* bill haring been read twice passed to be or
dained.
Nor V. 1982—Approved hr the Xavor.
Attest J. M HE A1H, City Clerk,
no. 27 2w
DiH<«olation of (opartnenhlp.
NOTICE is hereby riven that the copartner*nip
hitherto existing b**: ween the subscribers under
the linn name of BROWN & PERKINS, is dissolv
ed by mutual consent on this 25th dav of October.
The .1 flairs of the late firm will be settled by W T
Brown & Co. \V T BROWN.
Portland. Oct. 25. 1*G2. Roll T H. PERKINS.
Portland Matoh Company.
1111E undersigned having assumed the business of
the late firm of Brown & Perkins, aud having
Increased our facilities for the manufacture of our
ItintOVED HATCH,
wearu now prepared toaupplr the trade iu larre or
■mall quantitii* with an article which we warrant
•upe-ior to any oflhred in the market, it being the
O.VL r RELIABLE MATCH IX THE MARKET,
of American mami(before, for
Sort Use,
by Tint being impaired by age, dampness or changa
ol climate; and the proprietor*, ever grateful tor lib
eral uafro .age received, feel confident that, bv giv
ing their personal attention to the manufacture,they
will continue to me. it the confidence of their former
patrons and of the trade iu general.
No. 21 Fore Street, Portland, .He.
X. B. Be sure and get the POR TL ASD MA TCB,
as th**re are other matches offered to the trade pur
porting to be our match. We have no connection
with any other manufactory.
W. T. BROWN * CO.
no\25 d8w
DK. E. O. CSOELD'S
IPin-'W'orm Syrup
Is the first and only remedv ever offered to the pub
lic for the effectual removal of the Ascaride*, or Pin
Woms, from the human system. The high reputa
tion it ha?* « stab!isbed in the last taro year*, and tha
fact that it is fa*:sup reeding all other worm reme
dies. is the beat test of its great merit.
nffiords RELIEF in ttemfy-four Knurs. and
an entire cure is warranted, when taken according
to directions, which accompany each bottle.
This Syrup is also a most valuable family cathartic,
to be always need when physic is required, especially
for children. It corrects the secretions, give* tone
to the stomach and bowel*, assisting nature in her
efforts to restore health. It is purely of Veyetabtu
Betcisets, and always $<\fc and reliable.
Sold in Now York by Uall k Kuchcl.218 Green
wich street: iu Boston by <i*o. C. 1«oodwix A Co.,
12 Marshal! street, and other Wholesale Druggist*.
At retail by U. H. HAY, 1‘ortlaud. deefi 8m
For Sale.
THE HOUSE on the corner of Pro#
poet and Casco streets—the basement
fiuidled for a Store. A good stand for
a family Grocer.
—also—
Two Lot* of Land, one on Spring and one on
Spruce street. Either would be exchanged for ft
giHHi Dwelling House.
For particulai* pka.0 apply »t 127 Middle Street,
rortlnnd. N. X. MITCUEX.L.
novteodtf

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