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The Portland daily press. [volume] (Portland, Me.) 1862-1921, December 20, 1865, Image 1

Image and text provided by Maine State Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016025/1865-12-20/ed-1/seq-1/

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PORTLAND DAILY PRESS:
JOII-V T. GILMAN* l&ditor*
PUBLISHED AT 82* EXCHANGE STREET, BY
N. A. FOSTER & CO.
Thk Portland Daily Press is published at
§8Ah) por year m advance.
Thu Maine State Press in published every
Thursday morning, at $2.00 per annum, in advance;
$2.25, !l paid within six months; and $2.50, if pay
ment be delayed beyond six months.
Business Cards.
HENRY R. WORCESTER,
GENERAL
Commission &Forwardmg Merchant
„S3T Merchandise of all kinds bought and sold on
Northern account.
Office—No. 12 Campbell's Wharf,
Norfolk, V*.
13?” Consignments solicited.
Refers, by permission, to Messrs Messrs. Lowell &
Renter: Gerrish & Pearson; John Dennis & Co.;
Clark, Read & Co., Portland, Mo. not8J6m
J. EDWARD GOVE & CO.,
PRODUCE
Commission Merchants,
AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Butter, Cheese, Eggs, Lard, Beaus.
DRIED APPLES, Ac.
Jsro. 3 Lime Street, - - Portland, Me.
Special attention paid to consignments of all kinds
of Produce._sep20dlyr
ROSS & FEE\ Y,
PLASTERERS,
PLAIN AND ORN AM ENT AL
STU000 AND MASTIC WOEKEES,
Oak Street, between, Congress and Free Sts.,
PORTLAND, ME.
Coloring, Whitening and White-Washing prompt
s' attended to. Orders from out oi town solicited.
May 22—dti
J, K. FICKETT,
Dealer In Photographic Goods,
Mirrors and Engravings.
Minaf»oturer of Mirror & Pioture Frames.
ATo. 28 MARKET SQUARE,
)mnel2tf Portland, M*.
KING & DEXTER,
Successors to Chase, Littlefield & Co.,
importer* of and Dealers in all kinds of
Hardware & Window Glass,
175 Middle and 118 federal Sta.
October 2—d3m
Deering, Milliken & Co.,
Successors to C. L. Storer $ Co.,
JOBBERS OF
Dry Goods, Woolens,
And Gents’ Furnishing Goods !
Manufacturers of and Dealers in
CLOTHING AND CLOAKS,
Agent* for EMPIRE SEWING MACHINES for
State of Maine.
68 mid. 60 Middle St., PORTLAND
Sept 7—dtf
CHASE, CRAM & STURTEVANT,
GENERAL
Commission Merchants,
Wldgery’s Wharf,
octlOdUPortland, Me.
JJ .VTsTA. & CO.,
F i s li a n d N alt,
PORTLAND, MAINE.
Lutiieh Dana, Woodbdey 3. Dana,
June ldtf John A. S. Dana.
CHAS. J. SCHUMACHER,
Fresco and Banner Painter,
NO. 144 MEDDLE STREET.
Portland* Maine*
Work executed in every part of the State.
juneldtf
WILLIAM H. CLIFFORD,
COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
Solicitor of Patents,
No, 10S Middle Street,
PORTLAND, MAINE.
Aug 26—dtl ♦
WILLIAM A. PEARCE,
P L U M B E R!
MAKEJl OF
Force Pumps and Water Closets,
NO. 124 EXCHANGE STREET,
PORTLAND, ME.
Warn, Cold and Shower Baths, Wash
Bowls* Brass & Silver Plated Cocks*
IjlVEBY description of Water Fixtures tor Dwel
ls ling Houses. Hotels, Public Buildings, Shops.
&c., arranged ana set up in the best manner, and all
orders in town or country faithfully executed. All
kinds of JOBBING promptly attended to. Constants
ly on hand LEAD PIPES, SHEET LEAD and BEER
PUMPS ol all descriptions. aprddti
C. P. KIMBALL,
MANUFACTURER OF
CARRIAGES AND SLEIGHS,
PREBLE STBEET, (Near Preble House.)
PORTLAND, ME.
Sale Rooms, 110 and 112 Sudbury St., Boston, Mass.
Juneltf
DAVIS, RESERVE, HASKELL A 00.,
Importers and Jobbers qf
Dry Goods and Woolens
Arcade 18 Free Street,
F. DAVIS,
PORTLAND, MB
E. chapman. nov9’65dtf
SINGER’S
SEWING MACHINES!
W00DMAW, TRUE & CO.,
Agents,
No*. 54 and 50 - - - - Middle Street.
Needles and Trimmings always on band.
marlHtf
JOHN F. ANDERSON,
SURVEYOR & CIVIL ENGINEER
OFFICE, CODMAN BLOCK,
inch 17 d&wtt' Temj le Street.
DAYIS & BUTLER,
Counsellors at Law,
PORTLAND, MAINE,
Woodbury I>avis. 1
Moses M. Butler. ) Ojjtce Bit Exchange St.
Dec 7—dtf
WARREN-S IMPROVED
FIRE AND WATER-PROOF FELT
COMPOSITION.
— and—
03- ravel Roofing
FOR FLAT ROOFS.
E. IIERSEY, Agent,
j“Ii2G,ltl_No l6 Union street.
FOB SALeT
Christmas Presents I
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL,
CHEAP FOR CASH, BY
W, U. ROBINSON.
„ .. 20 Exchange Street.
Nov 28—dim m
Clothing.
LOOK AT TIilSV
GREAT PRICES GIVEN
-FOB
Second-Hand Clothing,
Of all descriptions, by
WM. BROWN, No. 91 Federal Street.
Clothing of all kinds Cleansed anti Repaired in
good style, and at short notice. Second-hand Cloth
ing bought and sold. sept20dtl
NEW STORE, NEW STORE!
W. F. CHISAM,
31erehant. Tailor,
No. 96 Exchange Street,
recently occupied by Messrs. MCCARTHY & BER
RY, where may be timed all the LATEST STYLES
°f
Woolens, Foreign & Domestic,
wliich will be manufactured into Garments which
cannot be surpassed lor style and make in the city.
Also a Fine assortment of
G«nts’ Furnishing Goods.
Particular at ention paid to BOYS* CLOTHING—
Cutting done to go out of the Store.
By strict attention to wants ofcuetomersaud prices
reasonable, a share of patronage is solicited.
Remember tbe place
No* 96 Exchange Street, > ,
Nearly opposite Prat Office.
Portland. Nov. 9th, 1865. nol5tf
S li ir t Patteriig,
CUT FROM MEASURE,
. By CHARLES Cl/STIS Ac CO.
May 3—dtl Mobton Block.
rpilE BEST OF FRENCH; ENGLISH AND
X AMERICAN
P A N rJ’ O OODS,
At A. D. REEVESM'iiiler,
Nov 4—dtl No. 98 Exchange St.
A FINE ASSORTMENT of VELVET, SILK,
CASS1MEUE, and
FANCY VESTINGS,
At A. D. REEVES', Tailor,
Nov 4—dtf 98 Exchange St.
QENTLEMEN, get yonr
OVERCOATS
At A. D. REEVES’, Tailor,
Nov 4—dtt 98 Exchange St.
NOW IS THE TIME
TO PURCHASE »
FRAMED ENGRAVINGS !
CHEAP !
~ mi -
The following, together with
One Thousand More
CHOICE ENGRAVINGS
Are ottered, for o short time,
FREE OF COST,
The purchaser being required
To Pay for Framing Only t
The Following arc the regular retail
price* of woiue of the Picture* we arc
now
GIVING AWAY!
Full length Engraving of Washington... $3.00
Full length Engraving ol Lincoln,.. 3.00
General Grant, on Horseback,... 2.00
General Sherman,. 1.00
General Sheridan,. 1.00
Mrs. Lincoln,. L00
President Johnson,. 1.00
Hon. Win. H. Seward,. 1.00
General McClellan,.. l.( 0
Hon. Edward Everett,. L00j
Beautifol English Farm Yard,.. 1.00
Beautiful English Homestead,. LOO
George and Martha Washington (ca). 1.00
Archbishop Hughes,. 1.00
Feeding the Horses, (very fine). LOO
Village Blacksmith, (very fine). 3.00
Fine View of Portland,. . 5.00
Departure of the Pilgrims,. 3.00
Landing of the Pilgrims,..... 8.00
Court of Death,... 1.00
First Prayer in Congress. 2.00
Washington’s last interview with his Mother, 3.00
Washington’s firstinverview with his Wife,.... 3.00
Washington’s Inaugural,... 3.00
Washington’s Adieu to his Generals,. 3.00
' AIj S O ,
A CHOICE SELECTION OF
Pictures in Oval Frames,
Walnut and Gilt!
Eight by Ten..$1J50
Ditto in Rosewood and Gilt,. 1.25
The Public can now procure Pictures ot
REAL MERIT 1
At LOWER PRICES than cyer before offered in
Portland. As the subscribers wish to reduce
their Stock, and as they Manufacture
their Frames, they are enabled
to give
GOOD BARGAINS!
R. J. D. Larrabee & Co.,
No. 09 Exchange Street,
Nov 25—<14.wPORTI AND.
PORTLAND CITY LAUNDRY,
No. 36 Hanover St.
LINEN of all kinds WASHED and CLEANSED
without injury to the hntst fabrics.
GENTS’ LIT^ETsT
Got up in the Best Possible manner,
At Short JVotloe,
And Satisfaction Guaranteed In all Cases* I
C. PARKER.
B.—Special attention paid to clcasing Bed and I
Mattress licks.
Nov 4—dtf __
BETTER HURRY UP
And get a supply of those
TJ nder-Flannels,
Selling so LOW by
P. MORRELL & 00.,
At 113 Exchange St.
Dec 6—dtf
Copartnership Notice.
THE undersigned having formed a copartnership
under the style of
Pettengill & Fuliam,
and having purchased of Goo. L. Churchill his stock
nnd stand will continue the Grocery and Provision
business, at 374 Congress Street, where by a strict
attention to business, we hoJV° h> merit a continuance
oi the patronage bo liberally bestowed upon him.
J. C. PETTENGILL.
O. W. FULLAM.
Portland, Nov. 20,1866. dclCdlw*
Proposals for Fuel.
Assistant Quartermaster's Office, U. 8. A.
Portland, Maine, December 11. 1885.
PROPOSALS will bo received by the undersigned
until December 20tli, 18C5, for furnishing One
Hundred (100) Cords Merchantable Hard Wood, at
Fort Sullivan Eastport. Maine.
Proposals will also be received for furnishing Mer
chantable Hard Wood far tWs Port (Portland JHalne.)
Capt. and A. Q. M., 17. S. A.
Dec 11—dtd
Boots and Shoes.
PT T. E. Moseley & Co,,
BOSTON,
INVITE ATTENTION TO THEIB
Large aud Well Selected Stock
-OF
BOOTS AND SHOES,
To which we are >A
Constantly Making Additions
TOR
Ladies,Misses & Children
We have aU the
MOST APPROVED STYLES,
Suck as are Sold in New York or Pkll*
adelpkia.
FOR
GENTLEMEN & BOYS,
We alio have a great variety of
Calf and Patent Leather
BOOTS AND SHOES,
JYonlvle and Single Soles,
BALMORAL BOOTS,
Buckled Boots and Shoes,
Oxford Ties* &cM &c*
Ife also Manufacture to Order in
the best possible manner far La
dies, Gentlemen, Misses and
Children.
WE HAVE COXSTANTY FOE SALE
A LARGE STOCK
-OF
FRENCH BOOTS AND SHOES.
A. 11 Oux* Goods
BOUGHT FOR CASH,
AND WE SELL THEM AT THE
Smallest Possible Advance,
So that all who buy our goods ore sure of getting
Full Value
FOR THFIR MONEY t
We invite all who are visiting Boston to call at our
Store, and assure them they will never be urged to
buy.
ONE PRICE. TERMS CASH.
THOMAS E.M0SELEY&CO,
SUMMER STREET,
(Comer qf Hawley),
B O S T O 1ST . : I
Oct 23 —eod3mos
B. H. JONES,
Manufacturer and Dealer in
Boots, Shoes & Rubbers,
No. Ill Federal St.,
POETLAND, ME.
custom: work,
For Ladies and Gentlemen, from the very best
stock to be found in the metropolitan and torelgn
markets, made to order, and warranted to give en
tire satiK&ction.
All First Class Hoots Made
Wltlx Fair Btltolx.
None but the best workmen employed, and the
shop constantly supplied with the best of stock, re
gardless of expense.
Mr. J. L. WILLEY, who has had long experience
in manufacturing custom work in this city, has
charge of the manufacturing department.
PUNCTUALITY is tho motto of this establish
ment, and all work ready for delivery when prom
ised.*
REPAIRING neatly done at short notice.
nov20eodtf
Chas. A. Rackleff & Co.,
Corner Brown and Congress Sts.,
PORTLAND, MAINE,
WOULD most respectfullwive notice to their
friends and the public £nat they have bought
the stock and taken the store recently occupied by
the late WM. GERR1SH, and secured the services
of Mr. CALEB S SMALL to select and buy our
stock of
•Boots, Shoes and Rubbers!
We can, we think, (without fear of being contra
dicted,) give our friends and the public greater in
ducements to give us a call before purchasing else
where, and for many other reasons: First, our ex
penses aTe light. Second, our store Is centrally lo
cated, convenient for all. Third, we shall adhere
strictly to the PAY DOWN SYSTEM, and being
determined to be as good as onr word we defy all
competition, and w ill not be undersold at any rate.
N. B.—The old stock of the late Mr. Gerrish we
have marked down to Lets than Half the Cos', and
would invite the attention of the ladies who are in
want of House Shoes or Slippers to look at them im
mediately, and by so doing they w ill secure the best
bargains.
Remember, corner of Brown and Congress Sts.
CHAS. A. RACKLEFF & CO.
Nov 30—eoO&wtf
TTB TOWN
Boot, Shoe& Rubber Store,
No. 353 Congress Street.
A.T SAMUEL BELL’S
CAN lie found one of the best selected stocks
of BOOTS. SHOES and RUBBEltS that can he
found in this city, which will be sold at the loweat
cash price, at 353 Congress Street, near Green St.
SAMUEL BELL.
Oct 24—dtl
PIANO ROUTES.
jr era The undersigned begs leave to an
nounce that they are manufacturing and
li*. * cLkeep constantly on hand
IMm.ho Fortes,
with all the modem imj»rovemente, which they con
sell as LOW as can be purchased elsewhere, oi the
game quality. We have made arrangements, also, to
keep an assortment of New York and Boston Piano
Fortes, among which are
Steinway <8 Sons, of Netv York.
All Instruments sold by ns are warranted to give
satisfaction.
Pianos to be let, and tuning done liy experienced
Tuners. CALVIN EDWARDS & CO.
March 8—d&wtf
(Bit) An/v A YEAR made by any one with
Stendl Tools. No experience
necessary. The President*, C**hiers, and Treasur
ers of three Banks Indorse the circular. Sent free
with samples. Address the American Stencil Tool
Works, Springfield, Vermont. oe5d3m
<BiO/w BUSINESS SUITS, of the best Canada
l Grey, made to order, at
A. D. BEEVES,
novtdtf 22 Exchange St,
Miscellaneous.
Messrs. W. M. Shute & Son
f Annoimc3 $Le opening of their
NEW FUR-ROOM,
At their Old Location,
17S and 175 Washington St.,
, , BOSTON.
The ifevr sAlds-room is on the ground floor, occupies
an area of nearly one thousand square feet, and is
PERFBOTLY WELL LIGHTED.
They propose to keep a full stock of the best goods
in their line of business, and respectfully request a
continuance of the patronage so long bestowed upon
them.
--.
Siberian Sables.
We offer this season a large stock of the above
choice Fur in the newest styles, and of very superior
quality.
We also have a few carefully selected Skins,the best
imported, which we propose to make up to order.
i --« Wl H. ’ SHUTS A 80N,
173 & 175 Washington St*, Boston#
--I— -•-«-♦ os*-—---i
Ermine.
Messrs. SHUTE & EON
Call attentlou to their display of RICH ERMINE
GOODS, made in various styles, for the street or in
door wear.
We have also a few sets of same Fur, in very small
sizes, for Young Children.
173 6b 175 Washington St## Boston#
-h-——
Choice Sleigh Robes.
Arctic Fox, - - (Pure White.)
Canadian Bear, - - (Jet Black.)
Superior to any thing of the kind ever offered in this
market*
Also, ENGLISH RUGS or CARRIAGE BLAN
KETS, in many pretty designs.
W. M. SHUTE cC SON,
173 & 174 Washington St., Boston.
-.--;
Squirrel Cloaks
OP ALL SIZES AND QUALITIES,
Constantly on hand. Our long experience in the iran
ufheture of these garments enables us to offer (hem
of the best possible make, and upon advantageous
terms. _
W. M. SHUTE A SON,
173 k 114 Washington Si., Boston.
American Sable
Clonks* Capes* Victorines*
Collars# Caffis* Gloves*
Mittens# Muff*.
LARGE ASSTORMENT, PRICES MODERATE.
W. M. SHUTE h SON,
173 6b 175 Washington St#* Boston#
Astrachan
Or Persian Lamb,
In Black or Gray.
FULL SETS OR SINGLE ARTICLES.
These Furs arc much used as trimming for outside
garments. We cut the trimming and put it on, or
sell the skins, as may be desired.
W. M. SHUTE & SON,
173 & 175 Washington St*, Boston*

Heaver and Otter
Collars, Caps, Gauntlets, Mittens, &c.,
FOR GENTLEMEN’S WEAR.
Choice qualities always in stock.
CFSP Special styles or sizes made to measure.
W. M. SHUTE & SON,
173 Sc 175 Washington St*, Boston*
--
English Silk Umbrellas,
“BLOCKADE RUNNEKS,”
MADE O.V FOX’S PATENT FRAME,
NEAT, USEFUL, DURABLE,
$5.00 EACEf.
Also,
English Alpacca Umbrellas,
SCOTCH GINGHAM UMBRELLAS,
And a great variety of the cheaper grades.
W. M. SHUTE & SON,
173 & 175 Washington St*, Boston*
Boston, Nov, 27,18C5. dc73taw5w
Half Million Dollars Worth
TO BE DISPOSED OF AT
ONE DOLLAR EACH,
Without Regard to Value, Not to be Paid
for until you know what you are
to receive.
SPLENDID LIST OP ARTICLES!
All to be Sold for ONE DOLLAR Each !
300 Musical Boxes, $20 to $150 each
150 “ “ with Bells and
Castinets, 200 to 500 44
500 Silver Teapots and Coffee Urns, 20 to 50 44
500 44 dialing Dishes, 30 to 100 44
1000 44 Ice Pi chei s, 20 to 50 44
2500 44 Syrup Cups, with Salvers,20 to 50 44
500t 44 Goblets & Drinking Cups, 5 to 50 44
3000 *4 Castors, 15 to 20 44
2000 44 Fruit,Card &CakeBaskets20 to 5 » 44
5000 Doz ?n Silver Tea Spoons, 10 to 20 doz.
10000 44 44 Table Spoon s& Forks20 to 40 44
250 Gents’ GoldHunt’g-CaseWatche*50 to 100 each
250 Ladies’ Gold & Enameled Hunt
ing-Case Watches, 35 to 70 44
500 Gents’ Hunting - Case Silver
Watches, 35 to 70 44
200 Diamond Rings, 50 to 100 44
5000 Gold Vest and Neck Chains, 4 to 30 44
3000 Gold Oval Band Bracelets, 4 to 8 44
5000 Jet and Gold Bracelets, 6 to 10 44
2000 Chatelaine Chains* GuardChains,5 to 20 44
7000 Solitaire and Gold Brooches’ 4 to 10 44
5000 Opal and Emerald Brooches, 4 to 8 44
5000 Mosaic, Jet, Lava aud Florentine
Eardrops, 4 to 8 44
7500 Coral,Opal & Emerald Eardrops, 4 to 6 44
4000 California DiamondBreast-pins2.50 to 10 44
3000 Gold Fob and Vest Watch-keys2.50 to 8 44
4000 Fob and Vest Ribbon-slides,’ 3 to 10 44
5000 Sets Solitaire Sleeve-buttons,
Studs, &c., 3 to 8 44
3000 Gold Thimbles, Pencils, &c., 4 to 6 44
10000 Minature Lockets, 2.50 to 10 44
4000 44 44 magic spring, 10 to 20 44
3000 Gold Toothpicks, Crosses, &c, 2 to 8 44
5000 Plain Gold Rings, 4 to 10 44
10000 Stone Set and Signet Rings, 2.50 to 10 44
5000 Chased Gold Rings, 4 to 11 44
10000 California Diamond Rings, 2 to 1C •*
7500 Sets Ladies, Jewelry—Jet and
Gold, 5 to 15 44
6000 Sets Ladies* Jewelry—Cameo,
Pearl, Opal and other stones, 4 to 15 4‘
10000 Gold Pens, Silver Extension
Holders and Pencils, 4 to 10 44
10000 Gold Pens, and Gold Mounted
Holders, 6 to 10 44
5000 Gold Pens and Gold Ext nsion
Holders, 15 to 25 44
5000 Ladies’Gilt and Jet Buckles. 5 to 15 44
50 0 0 4 4 44 44 Hair Bars
and Balls. 5 to 10 44
Certificates of the various articles ai e first put in
to envelopes, sealed up and mixed; and when order
ed are taken out without regard to choice, and sent
by mail, thus giving all a fair chance. On receipt of
the certificate, you will sec what you are to have,
and then it is at your option to send the Dollar and
take the article or not. Purchasers may thus obtain
a Gold Watch. Diamond Ring, or any set of Jewelry
on our list for One Dollar.
Send 25 Cents for Certificate*
In all transactions by mail, we shall charge for for
warding the Certificates, paying the postage and do
ing the business, 25 cents each, which must be enclos
ed when tbo Certificate is sent. Five Certificates
will be sent/*r $1; 12 for $2; 30 for $5; 100 for $15.
AGENT S—We want Agents in every Regiment,
and in every Town and County in the Country, and
those acting as such will be allowed 10 cents on every
certificate ordered by them, provided their remit
tance amounts to One Dollar. Agents will collect 25
cents lor every eertifleate, and remit 15 cents to ns,
either in Cash or Postage S amps.
BRYAN BROS. & CO.,
58 Liberty St*, New Fork City*
Nov 4—d3mos
SHERIFF’S SALE.
Cumberland, sb.
TAKEN ON EXECUTION and will he sold at pub
lic auction on Saturday, the 20th day of January,
A. D., I860, at ten o’clock in the forenoon, at the
Sheriff's Office in the city of Portland, in said County,
all the right in equity which Enoch Dyer of Cape I
Elizabeth, has or had on the 14th day of April, A, D
1865, at 11 o'clock in the forenoon, being the lime of
the attachment of the same on the original writ in
tills action to redeem the follow ng described real es
tate situated in the town of Capo Elizabeth, in said
County, to wit s A certain piece of land situated in
Cape Elizabeth, and bounded on the south and west
by land belonging to Edward Dyer, on the north by
John Maxwell’s land, and on the east by said Edward
Dyer’s land, contanuig one acre with the buildings
thereon.
The above named lot of land being subject to a
mortgage to Joseph T, Mitchell for fifty-four dollars
and eighty four cents, datel February lst, 1859. pay
able in six months from date, Recorded In book 292,
pace 128.
The above deed and mortgage are hereby referred
to fora more particular description of the above de
scribed real estate.
Dated at Portland the 9th day of December A. D.
1865.
dccUdtd £, E, PERRY, Deputy Sheriff.
Holiday Presents.
Holiday Presents.
— great sale of
Watches,Chains, Diamond Rings,&c.
ONE MILLION DOLLARS’ WORTH!
To 1>e disposed of at
ONE DOLLAR EACH!
Without regard to Value! Hot to be.paid for -until
you know what you are to receive
Splendid 1.1st or Articles!
All to be told at Ont Dollar Each !
300 Musical Boxes, $20 to $150 each.
15« “ “ with Bella &
... Castlnets, 200 to 600 “
600 Silver Teapots and Coffee
„ Urns, 20 to 60 “
500 Silver Chafing Dishes, 30 to 100 “
1000 “ Ice Pitchers, 20 to 50 “
2500 “ Syrup Cups with Salvers, 20 to 60 “
6000 “ Goblets and Drinking
Cups, 5 to 50 «
3000 Silver Castors, 15 to 50 “
2000 “ Fruit, card and Cake
Baskets, 20 to 50 “
5000 Dozen Sliver Tea Spoons, 10 to 20 doz
1000 Table Spoons &
Forks, 20 to 40 “
250 Gent’s Gold Hunting-Case
, Watches, , „ 50 to 150 each.
250 Lames’ c»old and Enameled
Hunting-case Watches, 35 to 70 44 i
500 Gent's Hunting-case Silver
nrxn „.Wat0l»e8». 35 tO 70 “
200 Diamond Rings, 50 to 100 44
5000 Qold Vest and Neck Chains, 4 to 30 “
3000 “ Oval Band Bracelets, 4 to 8 44
5000 Jet and Gold Bracelets, jq <«
2000 Chatelaine Ghains and Guard
Chains, 5 to 20 44
7000 Solitaire and Gold Brooches, 4 to 10 44
5000 Coral, Opal and Emerald
Brooches, 4 to 8 44
5000 Mosiac. Jet, Lava & Floren
tine Ear Drops, 4 to 8 44
7500 Coral, Opal, and Emerald Ear
Drops 4 to 6 44
4000 California Diamond Breast
pins, 2,50 to 10 44
3000 Gold Fob and Vest Watch keys, 2,50 to 8 44
4000 Fob and V«'st Ribbon-slides, 3 to 10 *•
5000 Sets Solitaire Sleeve-buttons,
Studs. &c, 3 to 8 44
3000 Gold Thimbles, Pencils, &c, 4 to 6 44
10000 Minature Lockets, 2,50 to 10 44
4000 44 44 Magic
Spring, j0 to 20 44
3000 Gold Toothpicks, Crosses, &c, 2 t* 8 44
5000 Plain Gold Rings, 4 to 10 44
5000 chased 44 4 to 11 ‘4
10000 Stone Set and Signet Rings, 2,50 to 10 44
10"00 California Diamond Rings, 2 to 10 44
7500 Sets Ladies* Jewelry — Jet
and Gold, 5 to 15 44
6000 Sets Ladies Jewelry—Cameo,
Pearl, Opal and other stones, 4 to 15 44
10000 Gold Pens, Silver Extension
Holders and Pencils. 4 to 10 44
10000 Gold Pens and Gold Mounted
Holders, 6 to 10 44
5000 Gold Pens and Gold Exten
sion Holders, 15 to 25 44
5000 Ladies* Gilt and Jet Buckles, 5 to 15 44
50 0 0 44 4 4 44 44 HairBars *
& Balls, 5 to 10 44
ARRANDALE & Co., Manufacturers Agents,
No. 167, Broadway, New York,
Announce that all of the above list of goods will be
sold for One Dollar each.
In consequence of the great stagnation ol trade in
the manufacturing districts of England, through
the war having cut off the supply of cotton, a large
quantity of Valuable Jewelry, originally intended
for the English market, lias been sent off for sale in
this esuntry, and MUST RESOLD AT ANY SAC
RIFICE! Under these circumstances, ARRAN
DALE & Co., acting as agents for the principal Eu
ropean manufacturers have resolved upon a
GREAT GIFT APPORTIONMENT,
to be divided according to the following regulations:
Certificates of the various articles are put into en
velopes indiscriminately, sealed up, and when order
ed, aro taken out without regard to choice, and sent
by mail, thus showing no favoritism. On receipt ot
the certificate, you will see what you are to have,
and then it is at your option to send ,he dollar and
take the article or not. Purchasers may thus ob
tain a Gold Watch, Diamond Ring, or any set of
Jewelry on our list mr One Dollar.
Send 25 cents fob Cebtificate.
In all transactions by mail, we shall charge for
formarding the certificates, paying postage and do
ing the business, 25 cents each, which must be en
closed when the Certificate Is sent for. Five certifi
cates will l>e sent for $1, eleven for $2, thirty lor $5,
sixty-five lor $10, one hundred tor $15.
WHAT THE “PRESS” SAY OF US.
The Lafayette (Ind.) Daily Courier, Mar. 18, 1865,
says:
“A better selected, more varied or fashionable as
sortment of jewelry cannot be found on the conti
nent than Arrandaie & Co. are now offering. Messrs.
Arrandaie & Co. occupy a high position in commer
cial circles as men entirely above the common tricke
ry of trade. Their statements may be implicitly re
lied upon, both as to the character of their goods and
the manner of disposal. Ladies especially, in all
parts of the country, are realizing handsome profits
as agents, and if any of our fair readers desire to in
terest thomselves in the enterprise, they may do so
with perfect confidence.
Great Gift Distribution.—A rare opportuni
ty is offered for obtaining watches, chains, diamond
rings, silver ware, etc., by Mess s Arrandaie A Co.,
at No. 167 Broadway. They have an immense stock
of articles, varying in value, and all areofi'ored at one
dollar each. The distribution is very fairly done—
you agree to take a certificate of a certain article, en
closed iiv an envelope, and arc not required to pay
your dollar unless you are satisfied with the article,
which will certainly be worth more than the amount,
and may be $50 or $100. An excellent mode this of
investing a dollar.—Sunday Times, N. Y. City, Feb.,
1865.
Messrs. Airandale & Co. have long been personally
known to us, and we believe them to be every way
worthy of public confidence.—New York Scottish
American Journal, June 11, 1864.
We have inspected, at the office of Arrandaie &
Co.’s Agency, lor European Manufacturing Jewel
lers, a large assortment of fashionable and valuable
jewelry of the newest patterns. We also noticed a
large quantity of silver plate, and understand that
the whole of these newly imported articles are to be
disposed of on a novel principle, giving great advan
tages to buyers, and affording extensive employment
to agents. We know the firm In question to be very
respectable and thoroughly worthy of public confi
dence, and recommend our friends to read their ad
vertisement.— If. Y. Albion Sept. 8,1864.
Employment fob Ladies.—The most eligible
and profitable employment we have heard of for la
dies is the sale of certificates for the Great Gift Dis
tribution of Arrandaie A Co. A lady of our ac
quaintance has been very successful in this way, not
only I', filling her own purse, but also in doing a good
turn to those to whom she sold the Certificates, as
will be seen by our advertising columns. Gentbmen
can also thus be engaged. If. Y. Sunday Mercury,
Aug. 14.1865.
The British Whig of Kingston, C. W., says, Nov.
26th, 1864, “One of our lady subscribers became an
agent for Arrandaie A Co., and by request brought
some twenty articles sent as prizes for her agency, to
this office for inspection, and without hesitation we
can state that each and all ot the articles were worth
treble the amount of cost to the recipients, and some
of them six times.’’
We have seen some very pretty specimens of Table
and Teaspoons, Gold Watches, Ladies’ Chains, Pins,
Bracelets, etc., which have been sent by Arrandaie
A Co. to this place tor $1 each,—Angelica Reporter,
N. r. State, Feb. 15, 1865.
AGENTS.—We want agents in every regiment,
and in every town and county in the country, and
those acting as such will be allowed 10 cents on every
certificate ordered by them, provided their remit
tance amounts to one dollar, also other inducements I
which can be learned on application. Agents will (
collect 25 cents for every certificate, and remit 15
cents to us either in cash or postage stamps.
Alt HAND ALE A Co..
167, Broadway, New York.
dec7d&wlm.
SPLENDID JEWELRY,
Watches, Diamonds &c.
For the Holidays!
THE HOUSE of BOSANQUET, GIRAUD & Co.,
have the pleasure of announcing that they have
opened an Agency in the city of New York, for the
sale of their widely known JEWELRY, WATCHES,
&c., and tor the purpose of making \ heir goods as ex
tensively known and appreciated m the United States
as they now are, and have been for over 70 years, in
Europe; they have determined on a plan by which
poor and rich alike may have the advantage of their
splendid styles. Asa preliminary, they would re
mark that they manufacture and sell no imitation
Jewelry or Watches, but
All are Warranted Gold of the
Finest Workmanship.
Our customers will also have the great advantage
of a constant succession of new and recherche stvles
and patterns with which we shall keep our New Vork
Agency supplied.
We have adopted the plan of sale now so popular,
of charging a uniform price, and this price will inva
riably be %2 for each article, no matter how costly it
may be. The expenses of conducting our New fork
Agency are paid by tin? sale of CertUicates or Coupons
representing the various articles. These Certificates
are sold at 50 cents each, or five lor $2, and each Cer
tificate will show the holder the particular article he
or she is entitled to, on payment of an additional M
If the article named on the Certificate Is not desired
the holder will oblige us. when he returns the Certif
icate, by stating wliat otncr article of the same value
he or she may prefer, and it will be sent with pleas
ure. OUR AIM IS l’O PLEASE, and every means
to that end will be exerted. We solicit a trial from
every one who reads this notice as we are confident of
giving the utmost satisfaction.
THE ST00K 00MPBISES
Amongst other articles, Splendid Clocks, Gold and
fliver Watohes, Rings set with Diamonds, Rubies,
earls, Garnet and oth.r Stones, (solltahe and in
clusters). Ladies' sets of Jewelry comprising Pins and
Ear Rings of the most fashionable styles, set In Prec
ious Stones of every variety, together with a large as
sortment of Gold ami Enamelled and Pearl Sets,
Gold Studs and Sleeve But tons of the most beauttful
patterns. Gents’ Bosom and Scarf Pins, and «n end
less variely of Bracelets, Chains, Musical Boxes,
Head Dresses, Combs, Charms, &c, In case any of
our patrons are not in want of Articles of Jewelry,
anl would prefer SUverwaro, wo will send, for A try
Certificate returned to us, a richly engraved SET OF
CASTORS or BU1TER DISH, beautifully ohaaed
and plated.
Agents are Wanted
In every port of the United States and Provineee,
and to a'l such very liberal Inducements will be offer
ed, and, on application, a circular of terms will be
forwarded, we prefer money sent In Post Office Or
ders where they can be obtained, or by Bank Draft
to our order. Address all orders to our Agency,
which will be conducted by
Messrs. JAHUET, STERLING tc CO..
decTdandwlm 189 Broadway, New York,
Dry ana Fancy Goods.
W. Ft. HOWARD,
166 Middle Street,
WOULD respectfully announce to the Ladies ol
Portland that he will soil for the
NEXT TEN DAYS,
HOOP SKIRTS,
Hand-Knit Breakfast Shawls,
AND
Fancy Goods !
AT COST!
TO MAKE ROOM FOR HOLIDAY GOODS.
Hoop Sk(rts made from Washburn and Moon’s
best wire, at cost for a few days only.
Fancy Goods, of every description, at prices to suit
everybody.
iif~ Don’t forget the number, 166 Middle Street,
next above Hay's Drug Store.
Nov 10—dti W* R* HOWARD.
ALL BIGHT A GAIN!
MERRILL & SMALL
WOULD inform their friends and the Trade gen
erally that their spacious store, lately damaged
Uy Are, is again in complete repair, and are now pre
pared to show a
New and Complete Stock
FANCY GOODS,
Hosiery, Gloves, Yarns,
Cloak, Dress, and Tailors’ Trimming3,
HEAD NETS,
Beltings, Belt Clasps, <tc., &c.
For variety and comprehensiveness we think our
stock equal to any in our largest cities, and will be
offered to the trade upon 9uch terms tu will secure
their patronage.
Fancy Goods Headquarters,
145 Middle St, Portland.
Aug. 26—dtf
Holiday Presents.
Great Prize Distribution
-BY THE
New York Gift Association!
713 Broadway, New York.
„ , ... EACH.
12 Rosewood Pianos, worth from $26fl.M) to 500.00
15 Melodeons, Bose wood Casta, 125.00 to 225.00
150 Music Boxes, 15.110 to 45.00
100 Silver Revolving Patent Castors, 15.00 to 40.00
100 Silver Fruit and Cake Baskets, 15.00 to 35.00 !
500 Sets Silver Tea and Table Spoons, 15.00 to 30.00
109 Gold Hunting Casa Watches, 76.00 to 160.00 |
15 > Diamond Rings, cluster, &e., 60.00 to 200.00
200 Gold Watches, 00.00 to 100.00
300 Ladles’ Gold Watches, 60.00 to 83.00
500 Silver Watches, 25.00 to 50.00
Diamond Pins, Brooches and Ear Drops, Ladle?
Sets of Gold and Coral; Jet and Gold, Florentine,
Mosaic, Jet, Lava, and Camen; Sets ot Studs, Vest
and Neck Chains, Plain and Chased Gold Rings,Gold
Thimbles, Lockets, new Btvle Belt Buckles, Gold Pens
and Pencils, Farcy Work Boxes, Gold Pens wfth
Gold anil Silver Extension Holders, and a large as
sortment of Fine Jewelry ot every description, of the
best make and latest styles, valued at
8500,000,
To be Sold for One Dollar Each!
Without retjard to value, and not to be paid /or until
you blow what you are to receive.
Among those who have acknowledged the receipt
of Valual.le Oi/t> drawn trom this Association re
cently, the following kindly permit their names to be
used: —
Robert H. Hotchkiss, New Haven, Conn., Melode
on, value *150. W. F. T. Willis, W. 22d St., New
York, Diamond Cluster Pin, valued *200. Mrs. R.
G. Tapiian, 16 York St, Gold Watch, value *125.—
Miss Ellen F. Dickerson. Blnghampton, N. Y., Melo
deon, value *100. Mr. E. H. Stone. 52 Tenth St„ N.
Y., Piano, value *350. Mrs. Teresa A. Mll'.er.Scran
tou. Pa, Diamond Ring, value *175. Miss Ellen J.
Peck.Spriugdeld, HI., Mclodeon, value *125. Dr. I. 1
Van Riper. Washington, D. C. Gold Hunting Cased
Watch, value *150. Edward H. Lindsay, Worcester,
Mass, Piano, value *250. Miss D. H. Harwell, Du
buque, Iowa, Diamond Ear Drpa, value *250.—
Francis I. Moran, 135 Pearl St, Albany, N. Y., Music
Box, value $40. Mrs. B. C inter soil, Urbaiiu, Oliio,
Silver Set, value $00. Lieut. B. F. Hendricks, Will
ard's Hotel, Washington, D. C . Silver Patent Lever
Watch, value $65. Many persons who have drawn
valuable prizes, do r.ot wish their names published or
we might extend this list.
MANNER OE DISTRIBUTION.
CERTIFICATES naming each article and its
value, are placed in Sealed Envelopes, which are well
mixed. One of these Envelopes, containing the Cer
tificate or Order for some article, (worth at least one
dollar at retail,) will be delivered at our office, or sent
by mail to any address, without regard to choice, on
receipt of 25 cents. The purchaser will see whaf ar
ticle tt draws, aud Its valuo, which may be from ONE
TO FIVE HUNDRED pOLLABS, and can then
send One Dollar and receive the article named.
HF"No Blanks—Every purchaser gets an article
of value.
Parties dealing with us may depend on having
prompt returns, and the article drawn will be imme
diately sent to any address by return mail or express.
Entire Satisfaction Guaranteed in all
Cases,
Six Certificates fox $1, Thirteen for,'*2; Thirty
three for Five Dollars.
AGENTS WANTED. Send lor a Circular
All letters should be addressed
T. JBE.VTON & CO.,
Box 5567 l’oat Office, New York.
Dec 2—dim*
U. S. Marshal’s Notice.
United States of Amebic a, i
District qf Maine, ss. }
PURSUANT to a Monition from tlio Hon. Ash nr
Ware, Judge of the United States District Court
within and for the District of Maine, I hereby give
Subllc notice that the following Libel has been Sled
i said Court, viz:
A Libel against 170 gallons qf Gin, with seven
teen Kegs containing the same; seven Kegs, contain
ing seventy gallons qf Whiskey; one Keg, containing
ten gallons of Alcohol; ten Barrels of Pickled Her
rings ; seized by the Collector of the District of Pas
samaquoddy, on the twenty-seventh day of Novem
ber, at Eistport, hi said District.
Which seizure was tor a breach of the laws of the
United States, as is more particularly sot forth In
said Libel; that a hearing and trial will be had there
on at Portland, in said District, on the twenty-sixth
day qf December current, where any person interest
ed therein may appear and show cause, if any can bo
shown, wherefore the same should not be decreed for
feit, and disposed of according to law.
Dated at Portland, this eleventh dav ot December.
A. D.18C5. F. A. QUINSY,
Deputy U. S. Marshal, District ot Maine.
December 11. dl4d
Vegetable Pulmonary Balsam !
For Coughs, Colds and Consumption S
ESTABLISHED ill 1832, and still the best known
remedy for all affections qf the Lungs, Throat and
Chest. Be carelul to get the genuine.
REED. CUTLER & CO., Boston, Proprietors.
Large Bottles, $1.00. Small, 50 cents.
Pure Cod. Tjlver Oil
Bottled expressly for Medicinal use by REED,
CUTLER & CO., who have facilities for obtaining oil
ot the most reliable quality. Large Bottles, $1.00.
Nov 10-ttewGm
BUCKLEY &_ BANCROFT.
SINCE the recent fire at our old stand, over the
Worcester Passenger Station, we have taken the
large and beautiful Halls over the
Boston and Maine Passenger Station
flsyuurket Square,
where we have opened with a new and fresh stock of
goods.
Our stock, mostly manufactured by ourselves, in
the most faithful manner, of the Latest Designs,com
prising DRAWING ROOM, LIBRARY, DINING
ROOM and CHAMBER
Furniture !
In every variefc cannot Call to command the iavor ol
all in want of Furniture whether iu regard to Qual
ity, Style or Price.
Every article warranted as recommended. Gratc
lul for the liberal patronage of the last Twenty years,
we hope for the continnance ol the favors ol our old
friends and the public.
Boston, September 30, 1865. ocl8d3moa
W. C. COBB, .
HAYING purchased the Retail Business of
Messrs. PEARSON & SMITH, together with
their City Carts, intends to carry on the
BAKING BUSINESS !
At N*. 12 Willow Street,
Where he hopes that by strict attention he may be
lave ed with the patronage of their former custom
ers.
He would also respectfully invite all others wish
ing Bread to give him a call, as no pains will lie
■pared to dll all orders for Broad with neatness and
dispatch,
Portland, Dec 12,1865. (lcUtf
Portland and Macliias Steamboat
Company.
THE undersigned, three of the persons named in
the Act ot incorporation of said Company, here
by give notice, that llie first meeting of said Corpo
ration, for the purpose of organizing the same, will
be held at the office of Ross & Sturdivant, No. 73
Commercial Street, in Portland, on WEDNESDAY,
the 20th day of December, A. D. 1665, at half past two
o'clock In the afternoon. ___
JABEZ TRUE,
W. F. MIL,LIKEN.
HENRY A. JONES.
Dae ll, 1666. dc!2dtd
DAILY PRESS,
1>0htland.
_■_
Wednesday Morning, DaoemW 20,1865.
n‘ '«« «t I*' Prf" ” ta»« Ham Ik. rom
Util circulation of all the other Juiliet f(.
Terms —$8,00 per tjeur in lldcauce.
ff“ Readine Matter on all Four Pa~es.
The War Debts of the States.
During the last Congress Mr. Blaine of this
State, ottered a resolution in the House—
which he hacked by an able speech—looking
to the assumption of the war debts of the
States by the General Government. We did
not at that time take much notice of the mat
ter, not from any objection to the thing itself,
but simply because we thought the time had
not come when the question Involved could
be acted upon and settled most understanding
ly and with the best effect. The war was
then in progress, and the contest was undecid
od, and r.o mortal man could then tell how
many more calls for men and money would
be required before the bow of peace would
again arch the political heavens. It was nec
essary then to guard wisely the national and
State credit, for both State and nation were
in the financial market as borrowers of mercy.
To increase the State debts by the assump
tion by the States of the debts of the towns
ami other municipalities, would possibly serve
to lower their credit and add to their embar
rassments in raising money, and to the rates
of interest or of discount to which they might
have to submit.
The same reasons existed why the national
Government should not at that time assume
the war debts of the States. Such assump
tion might unfavorably affect its credit, and
embarrass it in procuring the “sinews of war.”
It seemed wise to distribute the debts as wide
ly as possible. Then, too, the amount of the
debts proposed to be assumed, could not be
definitely computed. The war was still rag
ing, men and money were being called for, and
towns, cities, states and the nation an bend
ing their energies and pledging their faiths to
meet the demands and necessities of the times
All this is now changed. The war is closed;
peace has come—we trust to stay. No more
quotas are to be filled; no more bugle blasts
summon to arms; no more large bounties are
offered for men to swell the ranks; no more
soldiers’ families, in indefinite numbers and for
indefinite amounts,are calling for municipal or
State aid. We have touched bottom, and now
stand firmly upon a rock, and definite and ex
act estimates are within the reach of calcula
tion. Neither State nor nation, for war pur
poses, has to go into the market to borrow
money, so that the same reasons do not exist
uow that did for distributing the burdens all the
way down from the nation to the smallest
town, so as to keep the gross aggregate out
of sight of the sharp visuals of the monej
leuding Shylocks, who stood ready in Wall
street to take advantage of every nainable fact
by which they could depress the government
credit and thus buy up bonds for a speculation
on the rise.
There is no reason now, that we can see,
why the General Government should not as
sume the war debts of the States, the States
having first assumed and thus consolidated
the war debts of the cities and towns. True,
the adjustment of these debts would involve
a labor in details of no small magnitude,
and would require the exercise of no small de
gree of firmness and good judgement,—the
latter to discern the right and equitable scale
of adjustment, and the former to resist ail pres
sure made to get special advantages by cne
State or section over another. Towns and
States that have paid cxcesxive bounties rath
er than put their own “bone and muscle” into
the army, should bear the excess themselves,
while States and towns that have put their
own men into the fields, by the simple stimu
lus of patriotism, without the large bounties,
are none the less deserving of consideration in
the proposed adjustment. Let some basis be
adopted that shall apply to all the States and
all localities equitably, according to the results
which they have accomplished in supplying
the requisite material for our loyal armies,
and then on snch a basis let town, city and
borough debts be assumed by their respective
States, and the whole by the General Govern
ment, six or even five per cent, bonds being
issued for the amount, and a load would be
taken from the loyal people of the nation, is
the form of local and State taxes, that would
at once tell upon the prosperity of the land.
Local and State taxes, which now range from
two and a half to three or four per cent,
would be reduced to from three-fourths
to one and a half per cent., and the
burdens of our people would again be
light. With such a condition of things the
complaints of unequal taxation, growing out of
the exemption of national securities, would
cease,for these complaints derive their force not
so much form the fact of exemption itself, as
from the oppressive burdens of the taxation
imposed upon our people and their property.
Let Government provide for this assumption,
and then reduce its expenses to the lowest
practical standard, and the people will not
fail to experience relief; and then let it work
in earnest for a return to specie payments and
the redemption of its currency in hard cash>
and there will no longer be controversies about
the scantiness or the abundance of the curren
cy, for when reduced to a metalic value the
volume will be regulated by business, and cur
rency tinkers will UdJ their occupations gone.
The Case of Sturtevant vt. Allen.
“Some months ago,” says the Sew York
Tribune, “an action of slander was tried in
Boston, involving an accusation by Aaron H.
Allen that one Leonard Sturtevant was a trai
tor, or Copperhead, or something of the sort.
It was alleged that by reason of the slander,
plaintiff had been arrested and imprisoned fif
teen days in Fort Lafayette. It was farther
charged that he had suffered, greatly in repu
tation, in injury to his feelings, and in health.
For the injury to his reputation, the jury gave
Sir. Sturtevant $60; for the injury to his feel
ings aud other special damage, they awarded
him $32,500. Tnis enormous verdict was
trumpeted all over the country at the time,
to the peculiar delight of those unhappy gen
tlemen whom their more loyal neighbors had
stigmatized as Copperheads. Disloyal Jour
nals proclaimed it the forerunner of innumer
able other awards of exemplary damages to be
paid by all similar offenders. We should be at
a loss to compute the number of actions for
slander that have been brought in conse
quence. Mistaken patriots like Davlsand Lee,
Seymour and Lovell, saw a prospect of unlim
ited reimbursement for tire countless calum
njes ofthe press upon their spotless virtue.—
Who knows how many retainers the lawyers
have pocketed in such suits—sure they of
theii profits in advance, at any rate ?
"“It is painfal to pull down these castles in
the air, but truth and a sense of duty compej
us to say that the Supreme Court of Massa
chusetts has just set aside this iamous verdict,
on the ground of unreasonable, disproportion
ate, and excessive damages. The Court de
clares itself unable to find any cause for such
[ an award in the injuries the plaintiff may be
I piesmned to have suffered. There was no
proof, say the judges, that the plaintiff sus
tained any actual injury in reputation; no
pr-of that any direct and positive injury to his
health resulted from the alleged wrongful acts
of the defendant. There remained, therefore,
as the basis of the verdict, nothing but the
false imprisonment and injury to plaintiff’s
feelings. The Court computes the damages
for Imprisonment as equal to two thousand
a day for the time spent in Fort Lafayette—a
rate at which a considerable portion of the
loyal community might consent, perhaps, to
locked up for a longer time than Mr. Stun
tevant was. That estimate leaves several
thousand dollars over lor the mortification,
degradation, and outrage for which Mr. Sturtc
vant claimed compensation. The conclusion
of the Court is that the jury were greatly mis
led in the performance of their duty, and suf
fered themselves to be unduly influenced by
matters whicn ought to have had no place iu
their minds. That we take to be a mild and
judicial way of saying that the polities of the
jury ware no better than those of the plaintid;
aud were the real cause of this outrgeoua ver
dict.
“The plaiutifl' offered, to remit so much of
the amount as the Court might think exces
sive—a shrewd device for saving his costs and
the expense and risk or auother trial—but the
Court sahl no. Chief Justice liigelow, who
delivered the opinion of the bench, declared
in terms that the verdict was so unreasonable
as to show the jury incapable of rendering
any verdict on the issues involved, and he set
it aside and ordered a new trial of the whole
case. If Mr. Sturtevant gets $32,500 from the
next jury, he wiU be luckier than we think.’
Leoturoa at Boothbay.
Mb. £ditob:—I am requested by your sub
scribers at Boothbay to tell you something
about the course of Lectures the young men
of that neighborhood have just $>i under way.
The opening took place on Tuesday evening
last; and notwithstanding the unfavorable and
threatening weather, the muddy highways,
and the distances they had to come, varying
from one to three miles, they had what was
called an excellent house; and judging by the
countenances before me, of all age3 and of
both seres, are likely to find among their
“sturdy thinkers,” and earnest, intelligent
women, ali the encouragement they need.
They have just settled a young, well-educat
ed and able man, Mr. Coast, over two congre
gations’ hitherto estranged, and now united,
and it may well be hoped that he and they
wiil continue to work together, until a system
of mutual instruction has taken root among
them; and they have learnt their “duty to
themselves.”
All human acquisition is capable of being
funded as well as communicated. The more
we learn, the more we may. Science and lit
erature are not a fountain, which maybe ex
hausted, or even lowered by use—but a lamp
forever blazing, at which thousands of other,
lamps may be lighted, without diminishing
its original flame. Let all such efforts be en
couraged. J. N.
We reprint the above because of an error
which appeared In It on its first apperaanco.
English Lenity towards Babels.
The more the facts are brought to light in
relation to the Jamaica insurrection, the more
atrocious does the conduct of Governor Eyre
and his officials appear. The latest accounts,
derived from the Governor’s official report, re
veal the almost incredible tact that while less
than a score of persons lost their lives In the
outbreak Hseif, nearly two thousand have been
summarily put to death by the blood-thirsty
authorities, on charge of participation iu the
riot! A hundred lives for one. Some of the
English papers contain severe comments on
the condnct of Governor Eyre, but the gen
eral impression seemed to be that no action
against him would be taken by the govern
ment. The whole aifair certainly furnishes a
suggestive illustration of the manner in which
Englishmen practice the clemency to rebels
which they are so fond of recommending to
other nations. .
Letter from Boston
Boston, Dec. 17,1805.
To (he Editor of the Prett:
In the Bay State course of lectures, last eve
ning, we had Bayard Taylor. He is a large,
well-built man, bronzed by travel, with an easy
address, and an agreeable confidence in his
own judgment of things in general. He is an
eloquent, but not superior orator. His letters
are quite as pleasing a? hb discourse. The
present lecture appears to be upon analytical
politics, a subject which his extensive travels
and habits of discernment have rendered him
quite capable of discussing in a comprehen
give and instructive manner, and the marked
feature of the addresses was its independent
range of thought, and unprejudiced and fear
less expression. He evidently take',; an hon
est pride in his own unbiassed opinions. He
spoke freely oi the faults of our Government,
as well as its excelence, showing that in ita
earnestness to establish universal and individ
ual liberty our Government often neglected to
impose the necessary restrictions for protec
tion of life and property; as witness the un
paralleled loss of life upon our railroads Ac.—
He also alluded to the influx of the foreign vot.
ing population, who were ignorant of our lan
guage and laws, and spoke strongly of the dan
gers of unintelligent suffrage. He expressed
the sentiment that if the “Constitution as it
was,” could not save us from a civil war
there was need of a new one that contained
the elements of safety. He stated that while
the bluster and open insult of England dur
ing the war were so exasperating to us, the
secret hostility of the French Emperor was
far more dangerous to our cause. 'He was
listened to with interest and attention, as a
man who had chosen to go about the world
and see for himself, rather than trust to the
eyes and understanding of other people.
It can scarcely be a wonder that so many of
our deaths are from consumption, the changes
in the weather are so violent. Thanksgiving
Day we had snow and excellent sleighing, af
terwards mud, of a stickiness and sllperlness
that cannot be attained outside of Boston—
to-day frosted window*. Boston mud and the
Great Organ, are peculiar institutions; though
1 skilful artists profoss to say that the latter Is
I still out of tune.
Mile. Pare pa is announced again, under the
auspices of the Handci and Hayden Soeiety,
for three concerts of oratorio music. Tickets
at the moderate price of $1,50 and $2,00. If
Mosic Hall is crowded at this rate, yon may
believe that Boston has gone oratorio-mad.—
There will also be a new series of Batsmen
concerts with the same distinguished artiste.
Notwithstanding the many pleasantries di
rected towards Mtyor Lincoln’s alleged Puri
tanisms, he has been reelected t > the mayoral
ty for the seventh term, an honor never be
stowed before by the citizens of this city, an!
it speaks loudly for the faithfoiness and dis -ra
tion with which Mr. Lincoln has so long u'
filled its duties. Wendell Phillips was offered
the nomination to this office by the Working
men, which he declined.
The garroting mania has subsided since the
one-armed garroter was sentence ! to twenty
five years in the State Prison. John Long re
ceived a similar sentence the other day.
Never was the exit of a fashionable folly ga
gladly witnessed as the late sadden subsidence

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