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The Portland daily press. [volume] (Portland, Me.) 1862-1921, December 21, 1865, Image 1

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PORTLAND DAILY
.... »_
EMWshe**«, **#*• rw. PORTLAND, THURSDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 21, 1865. »8pw „*0~
- _ - - ~ _- - - - -- ... _■ *
PORTLAND DAILY PRESS:
JOIlX T' GILMAX, Lditui',
PUBLISHED AT S2\ EXCHANGE STREET, BY
N. A. FOSTEll & CO.
TnB Portland Daily Press is published at
$8.oO per year m advance.
The Maine State Press is published every
Thursday morning, at $2.00 per annum, in advance;
$2.25. il paid within six months; and $2.50, if pay
ment be^ delayed beyond six months.
Business Cards.
HENRY P. WORCESTER,
GENERAL
Commission ^Forwarding Merchant
„sar Merchandise ot all kinds bought and sold on
Northern account.
Office—No. 12 Campbell’s Wharf,
Norfolk, Va.
* Consignments solicited.
Refers, by permission, to Messrs Me srs. Lowell &
Senior; Gerrlsli & Pearson; John Dennis & Co.;
Clark, P.cad & Co., Portland, Me. no.8dGm
J. EDWARD GOVE & CO.,
PRODUCE
Commission Merchants,
*SU WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Butter, Cheese, Eggs, Lard, Beaus,
DRIED APPLES, &c.
No. 3 Lime Street, - - Portland, Me.
Siu'clal attention paid to consignments of all kinds
of Produce.sep20dlyr
BOSS & EEENY,
PLASTERERS,
PLAIN AND ORNAMENTAL
STU0CJ0 AND MASTIC W0HKEBS, .
Oak Street, between, Congress and Free Sts.,
PORTLAND, ME.
Coloring, Whitening and White-Washing prompt
y attended to. Orders Irom out ot town solicited.
May 22—-dtt
J , K. F I € K E T T,
Dealer in Photographic Goods,
Mirrors and Engravings.
M inifnoturer of Mirror & Picture Frames,
No. -iS MARKET SQUARE,
jmneUtf Portland, Ur.
KING & DEXTER,
Succes sore to Chase, Littlefield & Co.f
Importer* of nud Dealer* in all kiuil* ol
Hardware & Window Glass,
175 Middle and 118 Federal Sts.
Oetober 2—d3m
Leering, Milliken & Co„
Successors to G. L. Storer $ Co.,
JOB13ER3 OF
Dry Goods, Woolens,
And Gents' Furnishing Goods !
Manufacturers of and Dealers in
CLOTHING AND CLOAKS,
Agents for EMPIRE SEWING MACHINES for
State of Maine.
BS ndd GO Middle St., PORTLAND
Sept 7—dtf
CHASE, CRAM k STURTEVAKT,
GENERAL
Commission Merchants,
tvldgcry's Whart,
ocilcdt.Portland, Ml,
DANA& CO.,
Fish and S alt,
PORTLAND, MAINE.
Lctheb Dana, Woodbuby S. Dana,
june ldtf John A. S. Dana.
CHAS. J. SCHUMACHER,
Fresco and Banner Painter,
NO. 144 MIDDLE STREET.
Portland* Maine*
Work executed in every part ol the State.
juneldtf
WILLIAM H. CLIFFORD,
COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
Solicitor of Patents,
No. 105 Middle Street,
PORTLAND, MAINE.
. Aug 28—dtf
WILLIAM A. PEARCE,
P L U M B E R!
MAKER OF
Force Pumps and Water Closets,
NO. 124 EXCHANGE STREET,
PORTLAND, \1E.
Warn, Cold and Shower Baths, Wash
Bowla, Brats Sc Silver Plated Cocks.
EVERY description of Water Fixtures lor Dwel
ling Houses, Hotels, Public Buildings, Shops,
&c., arranged and set up in the best manner, and all
orders in town or country faithfully executed. All
kinds of JOBBING promptly attended to. Constant
ly on hand LEAD PIPES, SHEET LEAD and BEER
PUAIPS ol all descriptions. aprfhi M
C. P. KIMBALL,
MANUFACTURER OF
CARRIAGES AND SLEIGHS,
PREBLE STREET, (Near Preble House.)
PORTLAND, ME.
Sale Rooms, 110 and 112 Sudbury St., Boston, Mass,
juneltf
DAVIS, MESERVE, HASKELL &^0o7"
Importers and Jobbers qf
Dry Goods and Woolens,
Arcade 18 Free Street,
F. DAVIS, )
t SX5E£ \ PORTLAND, MB
E. CHAPMAN. J 110V9’C3<ltf
SINGER’S
SEWING MACHINES!
wqodmanTtrue & co.,
. Agents, .
Mom. 54 and 56 - - . . Middle Street.
Needles and Trimmings always on hand,
marlbtf
JOHN F, ANDERSON,
SURVEYOR & CIVIL ENGINEER
OFFICE, CODMAH BLOCK,
mch 17 diwtl' Tcmj ic street.
DAVIS & BUTLER^ '
Counsellors at Law,
PORTLAND, MAINE,
Woodbury Davis, I
Moses M. Butler. ) Office HO Exchange St.
Dec 7—dtf _
WARREN’S IMPROVE!*
FIRE AND WATER-PROOF FELT
COMPOSITION,
— AND —
Gravel K ooting
FOR flat BOOFS.
K. MERSEY, Agent,
JanSodtl__ Ho 16 Union Street.
FOR SALE !
Christmas Presents I
WHOLESALE AINU RETAIL
CHEAP FOB CASH, BY ’
w. L>. ROBINSON.
Hot 28—dim 80 E*cl*««e Street.
Clothing.
LOOK AT THIS!
GREAT TRICES GIVEN
-FOE
Second-Hand Clothing,
Of all descriptions,
WM. BROWN, No. 91 Federal Street.
Clothing of all kinds Cleansed an<l Repaired in
good style, and at short notice. Second-hand Cloth
.ng bought and sold. gept20dU
NEW STORE, NEW STORE!
W. F. CHISAM,
Merchant I’ailor,
HAS npr-ned a FIRST CLASS CLOTHING
STOKE, at
No. 90 Exchange Street,
recently occupied by Messrs. MCCARTHY & HER
KY', where may be found all tbe LATEST STYLES
of
Woolens, Foreign & Domestic,
which will bo manufactured into Garments which
cannot l»e surpassed for style and make in the city.
Also a Fine assortment of
Gents’ Furnishing Goods.
Particular at ention paid to HOYS* CLOTHING—
Cutting done to go out ot the Store.
By strict attention Jo wants of customers and prices
reasonable, a share of pa.ronage is solicited.
Remember the place
No* 06 Exchange Street,
Nearly opposite Pest Office.
Portland. Nov. 9th, 18G5. nolStl
NATHAN GOOLD,
MERCHANT TAILOR!
131 Middle St.,
KEEPS constantly on hand A FINE ASSORT
MENT of
Broadcloths,
Doeskins,
Cassimeres, &c.
Which he mami&ctures to order iu the LATEST
STYLES, and at FAIR PRICES.
rS?** He Cuts and superintends his work himseli,
and guarantees satis taction in all cases.
N* B* Cutting Doue far Others to Make*
The public are invited to CALL.
Portland, Oct 20, lSGo. eod2in
/Shirt Patterus,
CUT FROM MEASURE,
By CHARLES CUSTIS & CO.
May 3—dtt Morton Block.
The best of french, English and
AMERICAN
PAN T a O OD S,
At A. D. REEVES’.Tailor,
Nov 4—dtt No. 98 Exchange St.
A FINE ASSORTMENT of VELVET, SILK,
CASS1MERE, and
FANCY VE8TING8,
At A. D. REEVES’, Tailor,
Nov 4—dtf 98 Exchange St.
QENTLEMEN, get your
OVERCOATS
At A. D. REEVES’, Tailor,
Nov 4—dtl 98 Exchange St.
NOW IS THE TIME
TO PURCHASE
FRAMED ENGRAVINGS !
CHE A.P !
The following, together with
One Thousand More
CHOICE ENGRAVINGS
Are offered, for a short time,
FREE OF COST,
The purchaser being required
To Fay for Framing Only !
The Following are the regular retail
price* of iouic of the Picture* we are
now
GIVING AWAY !
Full length Engraving of Washington. $3.00
Full length Engraving ol Lincoln,. 3.00
General Grant, on Horseback,. 2.00
General Sherman,. 1.00
General Sheridan,. 1.00
Mrs. Lincoln,. 1.00
President Johnson,. 1.00
Hon. Wm. H. Seward,. 1.00
General McClellan,. l.f 0
non. Edward Everett,. 1.00
Beautiful English Farm Yard,. 1.00
Beautiful English Homestead,. 1.00
George and Martha Washington (ea). 1.00
Archbishop Hughes,. 1.00
Feeding the Horses, (very fine). 1.00
Village Blacksmith, (very fine). 3.00
Fine View of Portland,. 5.00
Departure of the Pilgrims,. 3.00
Landing of the Pilgrims,. 3.00
Court of Death,. 1.00
First Prayer in Congress. 2 00
Washington’s last interview’ with his Mother, 3.00
I Washington’s first inverview with Ids Wife,_ 3.00
Washington’s Inaugural,. 3.00
I Washington’s Adieu to his Generals. 3.00
AL S O ,
A CHOICE SELECTION OF
Pictures iu Oval Frames,
Walnut and Gilt!
Eight by Ten.$1.50
Ditto in Rosew ood and GUt,.*. 1.25
The Public can now procure Pictures ot
IR. 3E3 .A. 3L, 3VC ERI T 1
At LOWER PRICES than ever before offered in
Portland. As the subscribers wish to reduce
their Stock, and as they Manufacture
their Frames, they are enabled
to give
GOOD BARGAINS!
R. J. D. Larrabee & Co.,
No. 09 Exchange Street,
Nov 25—d4jy PORTI AND.
PORTLAND CITY LAUNDRY,
JNo. 3(i Hanover St.
Linen Of all kinds WASHED and CLEANSED
without injury to the finest fabrics.
GENTS’ LUSTED
Got up in the Best Possible Manner,
vt Short IVotlce,
And Satisfaction (Inarantrcd in nil Cur*.
c. PARKER.
N. B.—Special attention paid to cloasina Bed and
Mattress Ticks. *
Noy 4—dtf
TIP TDWN
Boot, Shoe & Rubber Store,
No. 353 Congress Street.
NT RAMDEL IIELE’S
CAN be found one of tho best selected stocks
ol BOOTS. SHOES and RUBBERS that can be
found in this city, w hich, will be sold at the lowest
cash price, at 353 Congress Street, near Green St.
SAMUEL BELL*
Oct 24—dtl
Miscellaneous.
1 I
Is open Day and Evening, for a full and thorough
BUSINESS EDUCATION, located on Middle St.,
No. 161, opposite U. H. Hay & Co., Apothecaries.
The Principal has had 21 years* exiierience.
I do not pretend an extension of Gold Linked Se
ries of Colleges into the other Continent; and that my
Diplomas and full Scholarships, are good mil
over this great world ; but 1 do claim they will
prove intrinsic to the Students (either LADIES
or GENTLEMEN) in any part of the United States
of America; and also that our Counting Booms
lor inductive training (without any copying,) both in
Accounts and Native Writing, Mercantile Law, tfc,
tfc., offer as full, thorough, complete, practical and
expeditious facilities lor BUSINESS EDUCA
TION, as any College in the U, S.
This is the only Commercial College in the State
where a full and complete Scholarship fctt Book-keep
ing, Writing, Ac., is taught without copying, so that
no one can pass through the course without ob
taining a thorough counting-room education.
Mr* Brown would present to the Citizens
of Portland and vicinity, his warm gratitude tor
their kimlness and liberal patronage f he past fi teen
years; and with the promise of faithfulness, so
licits other favors !
R. M. BROWN.
Portland, September 18,1865. sepl9deod&wly
Colored Photographs !
FROM Locket to Lite Size, by the best of Artists. |
All coloring done in my estabishmont where I
kee s constantly employed a number of colorists, t all
and* examine specimens at my Photograph Exhibi
tion Rooms.
A. M. McKEXNEF,
284 Congress St., opposite Preble House, Portland.
Oct 3—eod&eow3m _
Military and Naval Claim Agency.
TV. II. FESSENDEN,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR,
Mo. 65 Exchange Street,
(Formerly Agent U. S. Sanitary Commission,)
PROCURES Pensions, Bounty, Back Pay, and
Prize Money, at th; shortest i>o8sible notice. In
formation obtained of missing soldiers. Personal
property of deceosed soldiers obtained and forward
ed to heirs.
The Sanitary Commission being about to close its
local agencies,*Mr. Fessenden will continue to prose
cute claims in the different departments ol the Gov
ernment.
Refers to Hon. W. P. Fessenden, Washington,D.C.
Dec 15—eodiw
Albums, Engravings9 Crayon
AND FANCY ARTICLES, for sale at
A. M. McKEMMEY’S,
Oct 3—eod&eow3m 284 Congress St.
A. M. McKENNEY’S
Frame [Manufactory!
284 CONGRESS ST., Cor. of Centre.
ALL kinds of Mirror and Portrait Frames, made
in the best manner.. Gilding done in a superior
style, under the charge of Mr. JAMES TODD, who
has had torty years experience. Square Frames of
all kinds made to order, in a neat manner,by the best
ol workmen. A large a£Sortment constantly on hand
lor wholesale and retail trade. oc3eod&eow3m
DR. F. WADSWORTH, JR.,
Physician and Surgeon.
Office, 3531-2 Congress Street.
Residence, Cor* of Oxford and Cedar Sts*
Nov 7—eodtf
Copying Pictures
OF any kind done at A. M. McKENNEY'S, 284
Congress St., by a new method, in a superior
manner; call and try it. oct3eod&eow3m
W. C. COBB,
HAVING purchased the Retail Business of
Messrs. PEARSON & SMITH, together with
their City Carts, intends to carry on the
BAKING BUSINESS !
At Xo*.12 Willow Street,
Where he hopes that by strict attention he may be
favo ed with the patronage of their former custom
ers. ,
lie would also respectfully invite all others wish
ing Bread to give him a call, as no pains will be
spared to till all orders for Bread with neatness and
dispatch.
Portland, Dec 12,1865. dcl4tf
The Only Perfect Piano Porte!
PARMELEE'S Patent Isolated Piano. Call and
be convinced.
A. M. McKENXEV, Agent,
oc3eoJ&eow3m 284 Congress St., cor. of Centre
NEW PERFUME
FOR THE HANDKERCHIEF.
A Moat Gxqn'milP, Drlicalc nn<l Fin.
Kraut Perfume, DiKlillfil from Ike
Rare nnd llcnutiful Flower from
which it tnlcefl its name.
Manufactured only by PIIAJLOX 9c SOX.
OP Beware of Counterfeits.
Ash for l*hnlonfs—Tnhe no other*
Sold by druggists generally.
J ulyl—eodGm
Storage !
TjlOR RENT, a new building on Union Wharf, 50
J? feet square, fitted for grain; privilege of rail and
water communication. Apply to
decl2d3weod. EDWARD FOX.
Dr. Fred A. Prince,
I>entist,
NoSll Clapp’s Block, Congress St,
PORTLAND, ME.
Sept 29—eodtt
1. N. NOYES & SON,
No. 35 Exchange Street,
PORTLAND . • • MAINE,
Manufacturers of and Dealers In
FURNACES, RANGES,
0joking;, Office and Parlor Stoves,
And WORKERS OF HEAVY IRON.
PUMPS, LEAD PIPE, SHEET LEAD, and
all kinds of Tin, Copper and Sheet
Iron, in quantities to suit.
Sole Agents in Portland for the Celebrated
Magee Furnaces and Stoves.
Orders from the Country respectfully solicit
ed. Job Work done to order. aug9dtl
T. B. MARSHALL & BR0„
Commission k Lumber Merchants,
DEALERS IN
West India, Rio, and Ship Lumber.
With our facilities tor getting Lumber and from
our long experience in the business, we believe we
can detv all competition in filling Ship orders.
Consignments, Orders and Agencies solicited. At
tention given to receiving and forwarding goods to
and from the interior.
Savannah, Ga., Dec. 2,1865.
Refebences—Brigham & Baldwin, N. A. Har
dee, Ervin & Hardee, E. C. Wade & Co., Savannah;
FliDg <£ Drew, Portland. do4dtf
sotTthern pinei
BRADFORD A RENICK,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 71 Broadway, New
York, execute orders lor Sout hern Timber of any
required dimension with despatch, and on the most
tavorable terms. Shipments made directly to all do
mestic and foreign porta. They are aiao prepared to
furnish Oak and Northern Pme Timber, hewn or
sawn to order. oclldlm
Miscellaneous.
STATEMENT
Of the condition of the
NATIONAL INSURANCE CO.,
OF BOSTON, MASS.,
On ike First day of November, 1865.
Incorporated June 18, 1866.
Amount of Capital,.$300,too
Amount of Capital actually paid in, . 300,000
Number or Shares and par value, 10,000—$30
ASSETS.
Amount of Cash on hand, 1,033 09
Amount of Cash deposited in Hamilton
Bank, 20,683 93
Amount of Cash in hands of Agents, 1,947 64
Amount ofloan.s on Real Estate secured by
Mortgage, 68,000 00
2142 SbaresHamilton Bank, Boston, par $100,
market value, 113, 242,04G 00
170 Shares Shoo and Leather Dealers Bank,
par 100, market value 130, 22,100 00
237 Shares State Bank, Boston, par 100, mar
ket value 1032, 24,659 12
184 Shares Webster Bank, Boston, par 100,
market value 101, 19,136 00
150 Shares Bay State Bank, Lawrence, par
75, market value 73, 10,960 00
80 Shares Atlas Bank, Boston, par 100, mar
ket value 103, 8.210 00
70 Shares Market Bank of Boston, par 100,
market value 103, 7,210 00
66 Shares Shawmut Bank, Boston, par 100,
market value 100, 6,600 00
187 Shares Boston and Maine Railroad, par 100,
market value 116, 21,692 00
160 Shares Boston and Providence Railroad,
par value 100, market value 125, 20,000 00
70 Shares Boston and Worcester Railroad,
par 100, market value 128, 8,960 00
30 Shares Port. Saco and Ports. Railroad,
par 100, market value 95, 2,850 00
$15,900 U. S. Cs 81 Registered Bonds, par
15,000, market value 15,900, 15,900 00
$10,0iK) U. S. Cs 81, Coupons, par 10,000, mar
ket value 10,CO 50, 10,662 5 0
$15,000 U. S. 5-20 Bonds, par 15,000, market
value 15,150, 15,150 00
$11,200 U. S. 7 3 10 Bonds, par 11,200, mar
ket value 10,S67, 10,867 00
$10,000 City of Boston, par 10,000 market
value 10,600, 10,600 00
$100 Bond, Town of Brunswick, par 100,
market value 100, 100 00
Amount loaned on collateral securities, 27,300 00
Amount Premium Notes on hand for Marine
risks, 27,991 64
Amount Loan to Suffolk Bank, Boston, 4,763 20
Amount Premium Notes du* and unpaid, 744 25
Amount Loaned on personal security, 67,300 00
Total Assets. $687,201 54
LIABILITIES.
Am't of Losses which have not been settled, 33,000 00
Amount Dividends declared due and unpaid, 2,466 00
Amount Premiums undetermined, 102.633 60
$138,096 60
A. H. BEAN, President,
GEO. W. KUHN, Secretary.
State of Massachusetts, » __
County ol Suffolk. ) ss*
[Stamp.] Dec. 14, A. d. 1865.
Then personally appeared Aaron H. Bean, Presi
dent and George W. Kuhn, Secretary, of the Nation
al Insurance Company oi Boston, and severally made
oatli that the foregoing stateiueut by them subscribed
is true. Before me,
CHAS. B. F. ADAMS,
Justice of the Peace.
JOHX now, Agent,
90 and 98 Exchange St.,
Dec. 18—d3w. Portland.
The Eye, Ear, Catarrh
-AND
THROAT!
TUB INDEPENDENT
CLAIRVOYANTI
-AND
Electric Physician 1
From 618 Broadway, Now York, has returned to
Portland, and can b? consulted at her office, No. 11
Clapp’s block.
A Clear Case of Clairvoyant Sight.
Dear Madam .-—Permit me to tender you my sin
cere thanks for the cure you have effected on my
child. My daughter, ten years old, was taken sick !
last January in a very singular manner. We called
in six of the best Physicians in the city; they said the
case was a very singular one—they never saw one like
it—and came to the conclusion they could not teH
what the disease was. Some triends advised that we
should call on a Clairvoyant; there being none in
Providence that we could roly on, we wrote to Mrs.
MANCHESTER, in Portland, describing her symp
toms. She immediately examined her case and told
that she had a Snake in her stomach, told where she
drank it, and that it has been growing, and from the
best of her judgement she should thiuk it ten or
twelve inches long. 1 gave the child her prescription
and in a few hours the child ejected the snake alive
trom the stomach; it was measured and found to be
eleven and a half inches long. We have it preserved,
that all may see for themselves that thi9 statement is
really so. I am confident that the child could not
have lived, had it not been for Mrs. Manchester, and
we feel as though she never could be repaid for her
skill. MARY RAY,
GEORGE W. RAY.
Providence, R. I., Nov. 10,1866. dcl2tf
Half Million Dollars Worth
TO BE DISPOSED OF AT
ONE DOLLAR EACH,
Without Reyard to Value, Not to be Paid
for until you know what you are
to receive.
SPLENDID LIST OP ARTICLES!
All to be Sold for ONE DOLLAR Each!
300 Musical Boxes, $20 to $150 each
150 44 “ with Bells and
Castinets, 200 to 600 44
500 Silver Teapots and Coffee Urns, 20 to 53 44
500 44 Chafing Dishes, 30 to 100 44
1000 44 Ice Pi cliers, 20 to 50 44
2500 44 Syrup Cups, with Sal vers,20 to 50 44
600* 44 Goblets & Drinking Cups, 5 to 50 44
3000 44 Castors, 15 to 20 44
2000 44 Fruit,Card &CakeBaskets20 to 5J 44
5000 Doz:n Silver Toa Spoons, 10 to 20 doz.
10000 44 44 Tal>leSpoons&Forks20 to 40 44
250 Gents* GoldHuntfg-CascWatcliesSO to 100 each
250 Ladies' Gold & Enameled Hunt
ing-Case Watches, 35 to 70 44
500 Gents’ Hunting - Case Silver
Watches, 35 to 70 44
200 Diamond Kings, 50 to 100 44
5000 Gold Vest and Neck Chains, 4 to 30 44
3000 Gold Oval Band Bracelets, 4 to 8 44
5000 Jet and Gold Bracelets, 6 to 10 44
2000 Chatelaine Chains&Guar<lChains,5 to 20 44
7000 Solitaire and Gold Brooches’ 4 to 10 44
5000 Opal and Emerald Brooches, 4 to 8 44
5000 Mosaic, Jet, Lava and Florentine
Eardrops, 4 to 8 44
7500 Coral,Opal & Emerald Eardrops, 4 to 6 “
4000 California DiamondBreast-pins2.50 to 10 44
3000 Gold Fob and Vest Watcli-keys2.50 to 8 44
4000 Fob and Vest Ribbon-slides, 3 to 10 44
5000 Sets Solitaire Sleeve-buttons,
Studs, Arc., 3 to 8 44
3000 Gold Thimbles, Pencils, &c., 4 to 6 44
10000 Minature Lockets, 2.50 to 10 44
4000 44 *« 4 magic spring, 10 to 20 44
3000 Gold Toothpicks, Crosses, ȣc, 2 to 8 44
5000 Plain Gold Rings, 4 to 10 44
10000 Stone Set and Signet Rings, 2.50 to 10 44
5000 Chased Gold Rings, 4 to 11 44
10000 California Diamond Rings, 2 to 1C t4
7500 Sets Ladies, Jewelry—Jet and
Gold, 5 to 15 44
6000 Sets Ladies* Jewelry—Cameo,
Pearl, Opal and other stones, 4 to 15 4*
10000 Gobi Pens, Silver Extension
Holders and Pencils, 4 to 10 44
10000 Gold Pens, and Gold Mounted
Holders, 6 to 10 44
5000 Gold Pens and Gold Ext: nsion
Holders, 15 to 25 44
5000 Ladies'Gilt and Jet Buckles, 5 to 15 44
5000 44 44 44 Hair Bars
and Balls. 6 to 10 44
Certificates of the various articles ai e first put in
to envelopes, sealed up and mixed; and when order
ed are taken out without regard to choice, and sent
by mail, thus giving all a fail chance. On receipt of
the certificate, you will soe what vou are" to have,
and then it is at your option to send the Dollar and
take the article or not. Purchasers may thus obtain
a Gold Watch. Diamond Ring, or any set of Jewelry
on our list for One Dollar.
Seufi 25 Cents for Certificate*
In all transactions by mail, we shall charge for ior
warding the Certificates, paying the postage and do
ing the business, 25 cents each, which must bo enclos
ed when the Certificate is sent. Five Certificates
will be sent for $1; 12 for $2; 30 for $5; 100 for $15.
AGENTS—We want Agents in every Regiment,
and in every Town and County in the Country, ar.d
those acting as such will be allowed 10 cents on every
certificate ordered by them, provided their lemii
tance amounts to One Dollar. Agents will collect 25
cents lor evevy certificate, and remit 15 cents to us,
either in Cash or Postage S amps.
BRYAN BROS. <C CO.,
68 Liberty St.. New York City.
Not 4—-dJmot
Miscellaneous.
Bradford’s Medicated Tonic!
And Life lnvigorator,
Li the only reliable and sure cure for
Consumption, Bronchitis, Sore
Throat, Coughs and Colds.
In the above cases the Medicated Tonic and Liie
lnvigorator should be taken together. For an adult
a wine glass full of the Medicated Tonic three or four
times a day; if the patient is much reduced, a large
spoonful once in two or throe hours.
The Lite lnvigorator is a very powerful Tonic, and
should be taken with more care. A half teaspoonful 1
should be taken three times a day, in a little water,
alter eating. It is purely vegetable and is sure to add
tone and vigor to the whole system. One botttle of
the Liie lnvigorator, accompanied according to di
rections, with the Medicated Tonic, is warranted to
eure in moat eases. It is Certain to restore vitality
and vigor 19 the system which will conquer and
throw off the disease, restoring the pationt to perfect
health and strength.
In offering these medicines to the public I am not
speaking too highly of their merits, when I say that
there is nothing in the whole catalogue of remedies
for the cur* of Consumption, that will any where
near approach lx in efficacy or real merit.
Having suffered for two year.- with the terrible dis
ease— Brou^W^i Consumption— in its worst form^nd
having exhausxUPthe ful'Mt ^Sources of the medical
department for that special disease, employing the
best DoctoJ^ i* the city, aid my case given up by
them as befog perfectly hopeless, I then resorted to
the trial of patent medicines; having tried thorn
thoroughly and receiving no benefit whatever from
them, I became disheartened and discouraged, antic
ipating that the fullest expectaliou; of my Doctors
and friends would be realized.
Through my whole sickness I have studied fully the
working of this terrible disease through all its vari
ous changes, And am prepared to say that no one,
unless having the expedience and chance of study
that I have had, is as well prepared to manage and
cure the disease. Therefore having merited the po
sition I take, through actual experience. I announce
to the public my competency to warrant cure of Con
sumption in all its various forms. This terrible dis
ease is considered the greatest scourge to health in
the New England States, because it has not been
treated in a proper way. This I have learned by sub
mitting to a general treatment for the disea*c and
realizing no benefit whatever, but continued to grow
worse, until mf case was considered hopeless.
I therefore,hi consideration of my returning health
and oi the agencies that have been the cause of its
restoration, do announce to the public that I am pre
pared to supply medicines to order, to any part of the
country,and also hold myself in readiness to examine
and treat personally or by letter any case of a con
sumptive tendency,that proves obstinate and uny .eld
ing under other modes of treatment.
M. A. BRADFORD,
Portland.Maine,
OFFICE—13 DOW STREET,
Where all letters for advice or business should be
directed.
I may be found there everv day to examine pro
fessionally cases of consumption, Bronchitis, or dis
eases of a consumptive nature.
Advice fbee.
Board, with treatment, if desired, at $2.50 per day ;
horse and carriage furnished daily in fair weather
for out-door exercise, tree of charge.
I would invite patients from sbr >ad being afflicted
with this disease to visit me, where they can tind a
home, and all the care and attention will be paid
them to make them at once realize that they are rapid
ly regaining their lost strength and health.
I will warrant a cure in most cases. Call and let
me examine your case, or write by letter, enclosing
two postage stamps, and I will inform you at once.—
I would also call the attention of thj public to
Bradford’s Diphtheria Remedy!
Warranted a sure cure in all cases. Directions given
with every package. The only sure remedy used by
army surgoons during the war. and am safe in war
ranting every case if Ihe directions ore followed.
Every family should have it on hand, as this dis
ease is most terrible, and sudden in its effect, and this
is the only remedy now known that gives linme<U*ite
and substantial relief. ‘ •
TRY IT! TRY IT!! TRY IT!!!
Orders received from any part of the country will
bo promptly attended to. Every article is put up and
packed in the best manner.
Address all letters to
M. A. BRADFORD,
** Pertlasd, Malae.
No. 13 Dow Street.
These medicines are kept constantly on hand at
H. II. HAY & Co.'s, Wholesale Druggists, Portland;
ami Dn^gbts generally throughout the county.
Bradstreet’s Rubber moulding
AND
Weather Strips!
ARE warranted when properly applied to Doors
and Windows to effectually exclude the Wind,
Dust, Rain, Snow and damp. It Ls far more desira
ble than double windows, and afforded at one-fourth
the cost. 11 has never in a single instance foiled to
give satisfaction—and pci feet satisfaction is guaran
teed or the money will be refunded.
Persons who consult their interest will not fail to
have it applied to their Dwellings not only as regards
health and comfort, but as a matter of economy, for
in a room requiring to be constantly warmed it will
in a single season save one-half the fuel that would
otherwise be required to make the appartment com
fortable.
Every one interested are invited to call at No.
80 FEDERAL ST., INVENTOR’S EXCHANGE,
and satisfy themselves of its practical utility.
Orders for the Weather Strip** and Mouldings so
licited—will be fitted to housees if desired.
Parties in the State desiring large or small quanti
ties of
Weather Strips and Mouldings!
Will please address the undersigned, through whom
all orders will be filled for the .State of Maine;
when sent by Express Companies t. O. D. In all
other cases the money must accompany the order.
Agents Wanted throughout the State. Infor
mation will be given in regard to terms upon applica
tion by letter or in person.
WHITTEN & SHEPARD,
80 Federal Street, Portland, Me.,
__ _ _ Gen. Agents for Maine.
Nov 28— d3m
Notice.
AT the next session of the Legislature of Maine a
Petition of which the following is a copy will be
Presented.
'o the Hon. the Senate and House of Representa
tives qf the State qf Maine, in Legislature As
sembled.
The undersigned, petitioners, respec' fully repre
sent, That for a Ion-* time prior to the year 1*61 there
was abridge leading from a point in 'Westbrook, in
the County of Cumberland, to Falmouth, across tide
water, and called Martin's Point Bridge: That
said bridge was carried away by a storm in Novem
ber of said year and has never been iebuilt. That a
bridge in that place, crossing tide water, would be a
great convenience and is called tor by the necessities
of the public:
Wherefore they pray that the County Commission
ers of Cumberland County be authorized, if they see
fit, to cause a bridge to be built and maintained there
as a public and free bridge.
And in duty bound, &c.
GLENDY MOODY, and others.
Dec 4—dlaw3w
Great Inducements
FOB PABTIES WISHING TO BUILD.
fpHE subscribers offer for sale a large quantitv of
X desirable building lots in the West End of the
city, lying on Vaughan, Pine, Neal, Carlton, Thomas,
West, Emery, Cushman, Lewis, Bramhall, Monu
ment, Danforth, Orange and Salem Streets.
They will sell on a credit of from one to ten years,
if desired by the purchasers, and to parties who will
build houses of s&tisfhctory character, the v tv ill ad
vance, if desired, one fourth oj the cost qf building, on
completion qf the house. From parties who build im
mediately, NO CASH PAYMENTS REQUIRED.
Apply every day except Sunday, from nine to ten
A. M., at the office of the subscribers, where plans
may be seen, and full particulars obtained.
J. B. BROWN & SONS.
Portland, May 3, 1865. *nay4tf
$100.00 Reward!
STOLEN or taken through mistake from Commer
cial Wharf,
Three Hilda. Cienftiegos Molasses,
No. 55, Gauge, 149.
No. 31, Gauge, 145.
No. 104, Gauge, 143.
Whoever will give information where the property
can be found, will receive the above reward by ad
dressing
THOS. LYNCH, or
BRIGGS & CRESSEY.
Doc 14—dtf
Pitch, Tar, Turpentine <f Lumber.
i nn non ACRES yellow pine tim
1UV1.UV1U ber land in Georgia,
for sale.
This tract contains the finest l»ody of native growth
uncuJIed Yellow Pine Timber on this continent.—
Two railroads to Brunswick and Savannah, run
through it, as also the Satilla and Altamoha Rivers.
The timber is unsurpassed, the soil and climate ex
cellent, and it is offered very low. Title unquestion
able. For maps and particulars apply to
G. D. ROGERS,
decl9dlw Basement 142 Broadway, New York.
Copa rtnership.
THE undersigned have formed a copartnership un
der the name and firm of
KING & DEXTER.
And having purchased the stock of Chase, Littlefield
& Co., will continue the general HARDW ARE BU
SINE S at the old stand, ITS Middle and 118 Federal
Streets.
JOSEPH A. KING.
J. D. DEXTER.
Portland, Sept. 22,1886.
Mr. D. D. Chase, so long and Ikvorably known
to the Hardware trade of Portland, will remain with
the new finp sep2S ’to tf
Dry ana Fancy Goods.
W. R. HOWARD,
166 Middle Street,
WOULD respectfully announce to the Ladles ol
Portland that he will sell for the
NEXT TEN DATS,
HOOP SKIRTS,
Hand-Knit Breakfast Shawls,
AND
Fancy Goods !
AT COST!
TO MAKE KOOM FOE HOLIDAY GOODS.
Hoop Sk>rts made from Washburn and Moen’i
best wire, at coat for a few days only.
Fancy Goods, of overy description, at prlceB to salt
everybody.
Hf- Don’t forget tbe number, 100 Middle Street,
next above Hay’s Drug Store.
NoviO-dtl W‘ R‘ “OWARD.
ALL BIGHT AGAIN!
~ MERRILL & SMALL
\\rOULD inform their friends and the Trade gen
▼ ▼ erally that their spacious store, lately damaged
ny fire, is again in complete repair, and are now pre
pared to show a
Xew and Complete Stock
FANCY#,GOOD8,
Hosiery, Gloves, Yarns,
Cloak, Dress, and Tailors’ Trimmings,
HEAD NETS,
Beltings, Belt Clasps, &c., &c.
For variety and comprehensiveness we think our
stock equal to any in our largest cities, and will be
offend to the trade upon such terms as will secure
their patronage.
Fancy Goods Headquarters,
145 Middle St., Portland.
Ang. 26—dtf
Holiday Presents.
i _____ t
Great Prize Distribution
-BY THE
New York Gift Association!
713 Broadway, New York. '
EACH.
12 Rosewood Pianos, worth from $280.06 to 500.00
15 Melodoons, Rosewood Cases, 125.00 to 225.00
150 Music Boxes, 15.00 to 45.00
100 Silver Revolving Patent Castors, 15.00 to 40.00
100 Silver Fruit and Cake Baskets, 15.00 to 35.00
500 Sels Silver Tea and Table Spoons, 15.00 to 30.00
100 GoldHunting Case Watches, 75.00 to 150.00
150 Diamond Rings, Cluster, &c., 50.00 to 200.00
200 Gold Watches, 60.00 to 100.00
300 Ladies’ Gold Watches, 60.00 to 85.00
500 Silver Watches, 25.00 to 50.00
Diamond Pins, Brooches and Ear Drops, Ladies
Seta of Gold and Coral; Jet and Gold, Florentine,
Mosaic, Jet, Lava, and Cameo; Sets oi Studs, Vest
and Neck Chains, Plain and Chased Gold Rings,Gold
Thimbles, Lockets, new stvleBelt Buckles, Gold Pens
and Pencils, Farcy Work Boxes, Gold Pens with
Gold and Silver Extension Holders, and a large as
sortment of Fine Jewelry oi every description, of the
best make and latest styles, valued at
8500,000,
To be Sold foy One Dollar Each!
Without reword to value, and not to be paid for until
you know what you are to receive.
■*" ag those who have ifflknowledged the receipt
suable G\flt drawn trom this Association re
cently, the following kindly permit their nameB to be
used: —
Robert H. Hotchkiss, New Haven, Conn., Melode
c" value $150. W. F. T. Willis, W. 22d St., New
York, Diamond Cluster Pm, valued $200. Mrs. R.
G. Tappan, 16 York St, Gold Watch, valuo $125.—
Miss Ellen F. Dickerson. Blnghampton, N. Y., Melo
dcon, value $100. Mr. E. H. Stone. 52 Tenth St,, N.
Y., Piano, valuo $350. Mrs. Teresa A. Miller,Scran
ton, Pa, Diamond King, value $175. .Miss Ellen J.
Peck.Springlield, III., Mclodeon, value $125. Dr. I.
Vail Riper. Washington, D. C. Gold Hunting Cased
Watch, value $150. Edward H. Lindsay, Worcester.
Mass, Plano, value $25,1. Miss I). H. Farwell, Du
buque. Iowa, Diamond Ear Drps, value £250.—
Francis I. Moran, 13; Pearl St, Albanv, N. Y„ Music
Box, value $40. Mrs. R. C lngersoll," brbana, Ohio.
Sliver Set, value $60. Lieut. B. F. Hendricks! Will
ard’s Hotel, Washington, D. C . Silver Patent Lever
Watch, value $55. Many persons who have drawn
vauable prizes, do rot wish their names published or
we might extend this list.
MANNER OE DISTRIBUTION.
CERTIFICATES naming each article and its
value, are placed in Sealed Envelopes, which are well
mixed. One of these Envelopes, containing the Cer
tificate or Order for some article, (worth at least one
dollar at retail,) will be delivered at our office, or sent
by mall 'o any address, without regard to choice, on
receipt of 25 cents. The purchaser will see what ar
ticle it draws, and its value, which may be from ONE
TO FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS, and can then
send One Dollar and receive the article named.
iy No Blanks—Every purchaser gets an article
ol' value.
Parties dealing with us may depend on having
Bt returns, and the article drawn will be Imme
' sent to any address by return mall or express.
Esllrs Satisfaction Guaranteed in nil
Cases.
Six Certificates foi $1, Thirteen for:$2; Thirty
three for Five Dollars.
AGENTS WANTED. Send tor a Circular
AU letters should be addressed
T. lik.VTOV & CO.,
Box 5507 Post Office, New York.
Dec 2—dim*
U. S. Marshal’s Notice.
United States of Amebica, i
District qf Maine, ss. J
PURSUANT to a Monition from the Hon. Ashur
Ware, Judge of the United States District Court
within and for the District of Maine, I hereby give
{rnblic notice that the following Libel has been filed
n said Court, viz:
A Libel against 170 gallons qf Gin, with seven
teen Kegs containing the same; seven Kegs, contain
ing seventy gallons qf Whiskey; one Keg, containing
ten gallons qf Alcohol; ten Barrels qf Pickled Her
rings ; seized by the Collector of the District of Paa
samaquoddy, on the twenty-seventh day of Novem
ber, at Eistport, in said District.
Which seizure was tor a breach of the laws of the
ui11,ted States, as is more particularly set forth in
said Libel; that a hearing and trial will be ha-1 there
on at Portland, in said District, on the twenty-sixth 1
day qf December current, where any person interest
ed therein mav appear and show cause, if any can be
shown, wherefore the same should not be decreed for
feit, and disposed of according to law.
Dated at Portland, this eleventh day of December.
A. D. 1866. F.A. QCINBY.
Deputy U. S. Marshal, District of Maine.
December 11. dl4d
PIANO ^FORTES.
The undersigned begs leave to an
nounce that they are manufacturing and
* ILkeep constantly on hand
Piano Fortes,
with all the modern improvements, which they can
sell as LOW as can be pnrchase-1 elsewhere, ol the
same quality. We have made arrangements, also, to
keep an assortment of New York and Boston Piano
Fortes, among which are
Steinway <£ Sons, of New York.
All instruments sold by us are warranted to give
satisfaction.
Pianos to be let, and tuning done by experienced
Tuners. CALVIN EDWARDS & CO.
March 8—d&wtt
BETTER HURRY UP
And get a snpply of those
TT nder-Flannels,
Selling so LOW by
P. MORRELL & CO.,
At 113 Exchange St.
Dec 6—dtf
BUCKLEY &_ BANCROFT.
SINCE the recent fire at our old stand, over the
Worcester Passenger Station, we have taken the
large and beautiftil Halls over the
Boston and Maine Passenger Station
Hayusarket Square,
where we have opened with a now and fresh stock of
goods.
Our stock, mostly manufactured by ourselves in
the most fhitbful manner, of the Latest Desl-ns com
ras'SKauST*1’ Mi™
Furniture!
In every variet ■, cannot foil to command the lavor of
^ Strienor°Pr“UreWll0ther regard to gua.
Evory article warranted as recommended. Grate
mi ror the liberal patronage of the last Twenty years,
we hope for the continuance ol the fhvors o» our old
friends and the public.
Boston, September 30, 1865. ocl8d3mos
Hallotypes!
THE most beautiftil picture ever made. The only
place In Portland to get them is at
A. M. HcKENXirs,
284 Congress St., cornor of Centre Street.
Oct 8—eodaeowta
DAILY PliJSSfcSj
PORTLAND.
" ----
Thursday Morning, December 21,1865.
n, Uth, ■»« O, Pr,,, b
k‘"/ rmkl»< o/aH «*, m Ut c l)
Terms-$8,00 per V'nrin adeanre.
VT Readinx Matter on all pour Pace3_
Letter from tho Federal Capital.
Proposed Amendment to the Constitution—
The Stevens Resolution—The Predicted
Quarrel—Free Suffrage.
Washington, Dec. 18,1885.
To the Editor of the Press:
The general direction which Congressional
action has thus far taken during the present
session, is not destitute of significance, or bar
ren of suggestions. No less than sixteen joint
resolutions have been introduced, proposing
to submit to the Laghlatmei of the States
amendments to the Constitution of the Unit
ed States. Several of these, however, are to
the same or similar effect. Pour resolutions,
Introduced respectively by Messrs. Sumner of
the Senate, and Schenck, Stevens and Broom
hall of the House, propose the appointment
of Representatives in Congress aecording’to
the number of legal voters, and not according
to population. Three, introduced respectively
by Messrs. Stevens,Bingham and Farnsworth,
propose the prohibition of the payment of the
rebel debt, or any part thereof. Another, by
Mr. Stevens, proposes to make all laws, state
and national, equally applicable to every citi
zen, without distinction of race or color. Ouc,
by Mr. Jencks, proposes the election of Presi
dent and Vice President by a direct vote.
Two, introduced respectively by Messrs. Ste
vens and Bingham, propose the removal of all
export duties. Another, by Mr. Hubbard pro
poses to extend the elective franchise to all
who have served in the army or navy of the
United States during the late rebellion. One
by Mr. Bingham proposes to forbid all expend
itures of money from the United States treas
ury, otherwise than in pursuance of appropri
ations made by law, except in the payment of
the interest on the national debt. Another,
by Mr. Wilson of the Senate, proposes to pre
vent the sale of rebel notes, bonds, &e.—a
needless precaution, one might suppose —
which with two more, one by Mr. Stewart of
the Senate, declaratory of the supremacy of
tne f ederal government over tne state govern
ments, the other by Mr. Delano of the House,
looking to the security of personal rights in
the late rebellious states, complete the rather
long list. Few of these proprosed amend
ments, I apprehend, will be submitted to the
states, for ratification, and fewer yet will proba
bly be accepted by them. It would be strange,
indeed, if the tremendous stress and strain to
which the Constitution has been exposed dur
ing a few years past, should not have revealed
some points where it may be*improved and
strengthened, and it should be our first care to
make all the repairs really needed; but on the
other hand, we should deal very carefiilly with
a bark that has 'borne us so safely through
such a tempest. However strongly the pres
ent exigency nuisyjjpne us toward centrali
zation and consOTKnttion of political power in
the genera^ govern men t, and the tendency in
that direction is unmistakable, we should pro
ceed only with the greatest care, and no far
ther than is unavoidable.
The adoption of the Stevens resolution by
the Senate, on the 12th inst., by so decisive a
vote as thirty-three yeas to eleven nays, is a
very significant fact. The passage of this
resolution by the two Houses is by tar the
most important action taken the present ses
sion. The Senate amendment which strikes
out the clause forbidding either branch of
Congress to admit members until the com
mittee of fifteen shall have reported, is im
portant only as removing a theoretical objec
tion. I believe no one, at all acquainted with
the views'of leading statesmen in both the
House and the Senate, supposes the amend
ment detracts anything from the practical ef
ficiency of the measure, or that, in its prac
tical results it will make one hair white or
black. Each House is made by the Constitu
tion the exclusive judge of the election and
qualifications of its own members, and be
cause this right and duty is still preserved
where the Constitution places it, we are not to
infer that the Senate declines to act with the
House. They will undoubtedly proceed in
concord and harmony iu the work of recon
struction, and in those who think otherwise,
the wish is probably father to the thought.
In the admirable speech of Senator Fessen
ilen upon the resolution, he said: “Ido not
agree with the honorable Senator from Wis
consin, that by passing a simple resolution
raising a committee of its own body, and re
ferring to it certain papers, if we conclude to
do so, we are infringing on the rights of any
body, or making an intimation with regard to
any policy that the President may have seen
fit to adopt and recommend to the country.
Sir, I trust there are no such things as exclu
sive friends of the President among us, or
gentlemen who desire to be so considered. I
have as nfheh respect for the President of the
United States probably as any man. I acted
with him long, and I might express the favor
able opinions which I entertain of him here if
they would not be out of place anil in bad taste
in this body. That I am disposed and ready
to support him to the best of my ability, as
every gentleman around me is, in good faith
and kindly feeling in all that he may desire
that is consistent with my views of duty to
the country, giving him credit for intentions
as good as mine, and with ability far greater,
I am willing to asseverate. Now, therefore,
sir, I hope that, laying aside all these matters
which are entirely foreign, we shall act upon
this resolution simply as a matter of business.
No one has a right to complain of it that we
raise a committee lor certain purposes of .our
own when we judge it to be necessary. It is
an imputation upon nobody; it is not any
thing which any sensible man could ever find
fault with, or be disposed to do so. It is, in our
judgment, our deliberate judgment,our friend
ly judgment—a course of action adopted from I
regard to the good of the community, and
that good of the community comprehends the
good of every individual in it.”
The Copperheads are about as busy as ever
upon their favorite undertaking, that of set
ting the President, and the party which elect
ed him at variance. Thus far their success
has not been very flattering. The ingenuity
and pertinacity, however, with which they
prosecute their amiable and patriotic endeav
ors show no signs of abatement, while their
talent for misrepresentation, liypocrital pre
tentious, and miscellaneous lying grows bright
er every day. Whatever reward may be prop
er, will, so we trust, eventually crown the dis
interested efforts of these gentlemen in their
pursuit of mischief under difficulties.
A vigorous and energetic movement in fa
vor of impartial suffrage in the District is
now going forward. Gen. Banks addressed a
large meeting on the evening of the 14th inst.,
In which he advocated negro suffrage in the
rebel States, as necessary to their political
stability and permanent peace, and also to
their industrial interests, and social prosperity.
A bill was introduced into the Senate on the
first day of the session providing “That no
person, in other respects qualified to tote with
in the District of.Columbia, shall be excluded
from that right by reason of his rocs or
color.
Upon Thursday evening last, the “Old
Tammany War Dorse,” Daniel S. Dickerson,
who was stopping at Willard’s, was called up
on by numerous friends, headed by the Ma
rine Band, and made a very pithy and char
acteristic speech. Mere is oue sentence:
‘Since the drowsy shepherds at the rock
bound city of Bethlehem were awakened to
rtfiqicq in the birth of a Savior, no people hate
had such cause of gratitude and adoration be
fore Ood as our own for their deliverance."
A good sentiment that for the coining holi
days. T. S. P.
The Training of Clerks.
A gentleman who thinks the interests of
young men, particnlafly'clerks, are neglected,
and that in Portland they do not differ very
materially from those or New York in their
wants and power to resist temptation, has re
quested us tfjypubllsh the following article
from the Journal of Comments. We comply
with ills request cheerfully^ (
Ypusto Men in New York.—The young
men of to-day are to be the old men of the tu
ture. The clerks of our time are to be the
merchants of times to come. II the great city
of New York is to be a city of honest eminent
merchants thirty years hence, it must be by
the young men now learning the lessons of
life. The counting-rooms and business houses
of to-day are, so to speak, nurseries from which
saplings are to be taken to supply tbe places
of those sturdy oaks that time will soon re
move. If these saplings are found rotten to
the core, how will they grow upV Or. if by
chance they have sufficient vitality to peach
maturity, are they fitted to become strong and
maintain a vigorous growth in tne midst of
storm and sunshine ? To leave metaphor and
speak plainly, the morals of too many young
men filling subordinate positions are tending
downward and call for immediate measures or
correction. Time was when this was not so,
and when the case of a youug employee de
tected in immoral peactices was something
out of the common run. Bnt that a change
has certainly taken place, the dally records of
courts, and the private experience ofynany
employers will show. Nor has.this condition
of things been suddenly produced—although a
few recent marked cases have, perhaps, caused
it to appear so. It has been coming upon us
step by step—so gradually indeed, as tip pre
vent any systematic attempt to advise paeans
for its correction. Now, however, that the
evil stare3 us irnthe face, it must be met and
recognized. While it is needless to detail at
length the causes that have conspired to bring
it about, yet a few of them may oe presented,
and probably some remedy may thus be pre
sented.
, The present system ol training clerks is rad
ically different from that which obtained in
what is terms# the “old fashioned times,” and
which made the merchant princes—a lew of
whom yet remain among us. The clerks then,
after a day’s work, were accustomed to spend
their evenings either in hearing instructive
lectures, or in the families of their employers,
or others; in reading works of history, biogra- •
phy, and general instruction, or in pleasant
social life. No time was wastttl^ither in the
counting-room or at hoine-njninhls expres
sion, at home, gives another explanation of
the difference so observable betweabthe^oung
clerks of the present and those of the okl regi
me. For the clerks of that day had. frjfaes.—
The general, indeed the universal cusfftn was
for the clerks to board in the' family'their
employers. The merchant considered himself
•Responsible not only for the business habits of
tue youth intrusted to his care, but fbr their
moral also. Hence ensued a personal super
vision over the young men on the part of the
employers. Where there evenings were spent,
what books they read, and with whom they
associated, were generally known. That the
case is widely different at the present day it
plain. A lew old merchants, perhaps, may
yet have such “old fogy” notions, and pursue
the same ‘ "rani with most of the employ
ers and employees at tb„ present time, the
bare suggestion of such a relation existing
between them would be received by both par
ties with a smile of derision. Merchants now
hardly think they have a right to inquire
where their clerks spend the time after office
hours. Provided the work Is done satisfacto
rily in the office, that is sufficient; and, in
deed, so false a notion of the true relation be
tween employer and clerk has now obtained,
that even a suggestion on the part of the form
er would be deemed by the latter a piece of
impertinence. The consequence is seen In
the increased vitality ot billiard and drinking
saloons, so observable of late years. It Is pos
itively (rightful to look into any of the many
hundreds of drinking and billiard saloons in
ourcity at any hour of the evening. Occasion
ally one secs a middle-aged man engaged at
the game, but the great majority are clerks—
some mere striplings—who daily, from one
years end to another, play Irom seven in the
evening to one o’clotk at night, not neglecting
the bar, which is a part of every billiard saloon.
If it is said that there are more temptions for
young men at the present day than formerly,
the answer is plain—if a young man’s moral *
principles forbid him to give encouragement
to these glittering dens of vice, they would in
a great measure cease to exist. The tastes of
young men should be directed aright If the
employers of the city furnish no guide, offer
no inducements, lend no aid to the employed
in cultivating pure and elvated tastes, social M
well as literary, they must expect the young
to yield to tempations.
tine cannot out view witn alarm tne singu
lar apathy with which several developments
of crime have been received by the communi
ty; and so long a3 public feeling on this sub
ject is so dead, just so long will one great In
centive to do right be taken away from those
who have no higher motive. Employers owe
it to themselves, as well as to others, to In
troduce a change in the relations which sub
sist between them and their subordinates.
It is to the change in our city social system
that very much of the new state of affairs is
due. The houses of wealthy merchants, In
stead of affording means of social pleasure and
profit to the young men in their employ, too
frequently remain closed to them, except on
occasions of great display, when admittance is
gained only at heavy cost, with the disadvan
tage added of temptation of other expenses on
the part of the young. The old social system
has given place to the new order ot conven
tionalism which we call society. Young men
can eutw it only at the highest price by cloth
ing and ornament. The subjects of conversa
tion are too frequently confined to such sub
jects as the young men can master only by
expensive living. To talk of the opera he
must go to the opera. To talk ot driving in
Central Park he must have or hire * horse.—
The extravagance of social life is unquestiona
bly a great injury to the young men of the ci
ty
S|The subject is not exhausted, but we pause
ere. The moral is bi telly stated. We can
not hope to reform the states of society In
Mew York. But we can hope to interest mer
chants in the morals of their clerks, in their
employments and enjoyments. We have often
taken occasion to speak of the Mercantile Li
brary, and its excellent provisions for young
men. This is pne of the many points towards
which attention sbopld be directed. The great
point is to establish a interest be
tween merchants and the young persons in
their employ, and if these remarks set some
good men to thinking on the subject we shall
have served our purpose.
Difficult Problem to Solve.
A poor man who kept but a single horned
animal in his barn, when complaining of the
cost of hay, was advised to‘'shorten his stock,”
He replied that he knew of bat one way in
which he could do this, and that was to cut qff
his cote’s tail /
“A Pastor’s Wife,” writing to a religious
journal, seems to have met with even a more
difficult problem to solve. She says:
“1 am a pastor’s wife, and the exclamation,
‘we must retrench, dear,’ is continually sound
ed in'my ears. If you, or any of your worthy
readers can inform me of an-' way in which I
can help the pastor to ‘retrench expenses,’ I
shall be under lasting obligations. The Cas
tor’s house-rent, fuel, house-keeping, flour,
meat, ("the little we have,) butter, (once a
weekj consume the entire sum stipulated lor
our support, so that each week and month
find us minus, sometimes more, sometimes less,
and then comes that old exclamation for the
one hundred and forty-ninth time: “My dear,
we must manage to retrench.’ The pastor,
my excellent husband is ‘a man of God,’ giv
ing himself wholly to the work of the mlnia
tery. All these little secular affairs, that
smell of money, he leaves with me to manage

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