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The Portland daily press. [volume] (Portland, Me.) 1862-1921, August 16, 1867, Image 1

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PORTLAND DAILY PRESS.
^_ »_ ^
"***“•*•* jm. 23,1862. You PORTLAND, FRIDAY MORnTnG, AUGUST 1o7 i807!
THE PORTLAND DAILY PRESS Is published
everyday, (Sunday excepted,! at No. 1 Printers*
Exchange, Exchange Street, Portland*
N. A. POSTER, Proprietor.
1 erha : —Eight Dollar? a year in advance.
THE MAINE STATE TRESS, is published at the
same place1 every Thursday morning at $2.00 a year,
n variably in advance.
Kates of advertising.—One inch of space,in
leuslhoi column, constitutes a “square.1”
$1.50 per square daily first, week: 75 cents per
week after; three insertions, or less, $1.00; continu
ing every other day after first week, 50 cents.
Hall square, three insertions or less, 75 cento; one
W »ek, $1 00; 50 cents per week alter. _
Under head ol “Amusements," #2 00 nor square
per week; tlifco insertions or less, fi.5u.
Spkoi vi. Notices,$1.25 per square lor the first in
sertion, and 25 cents per square for each subsequent
ius rii.m. „
Advertisements inserted in the “MAINE STATE
Press” (which lias a large circulation in ever, par
ol the 81atel for (1.00 per square lor first insertion*
and .'i0cuts per sqnare for each subsequent insir
tlon.
BUSINESS CARDS.
Charles P. Mattocks,
Attorney and Counselor at Law,
CANAL. BANK BIJII.UINC,
No. MU Middle Mtreet - - - Portland.
I'eblldti_
M. W. MYMONBS,
CJonnwelloi* at I>aw,
MU) Middle Ml, (Canal Bunk Building,)
May 11-dU PORTL.AN 1>.
I)KS. CHADWICK & POCJU
KOI 1-1 CONOBEMM HTHEET,
HROWE’S K£W BLOCK.
May 18-dtl _
O. J. SCH UMAGHEBi
FRESCO PAIITER.
Odce at, the Drug Store of Messrs. A. G. Schlotter
* beck & Co.,
KO.I CengrroH Mt, Portland, Wo,
JaV2dtf One door above Brown.
W. P. FREEMAN & CO.,
Upholsterers
and Manulaclurera ol
FURNITURE, LOUNGES, BED-STEADS
Spring-Beds, Mattrensea, Pew Cushions,
No. 1 Clapp’s Block, foot Chentaat Street,
Portland.
Freeman, D. W. Beane. C. I.. Quinbt.
tl n
HOWARD & CLEAVES,
Attorneys & Counsellors at Law,
PORTLAND. M INE.
Office No. 30 Exchange Street,
•Joseph Howard, jy9ti n Nathan Cleaves.
DKS. PEIRCE & FERNALD,
DEHTISTS,
NO. I» MIDDI.K MTBEET.
O. N. 1‘eirce. S. C. Fernald.
February 21. dtf _
Deering, Milliken & Go.,
Wholesale Dry Goods,
as Ot 60 Middle Street.
augSI -dtf Portland, Maine.
A. WILBUM & CO.,
No 111S Tremont Street, Boston,
Importers and Dealers in
WEtsa AND AMERICAN
H oofing Slates !
HT3All colors and slating nails. Caretjl attention
paid to shipping. warlSdtim
DAV 18, MEBERVE, HASKELL & 00,,
importers and Jobbers of
Dry amZ H elens,
Arcade 18 Free Street,;
K. DAVIS, ]
l. SS \ PORTLAND, MB.
E. CHAPMAN. ) novA*G5dtl'
W. F* PfJfLlrlPS db CO.,
Wholesale Druggists,
JOHJf W. Li AN A,
(’ounsollw and Attorney at Law,
No. 30 Exchange st.
Dec C—ilic _
ross a weery,
PLEWTEKER8,
plain and ornamental
8TU000 AMD MASTIO WORKERS,
Oak Street, between, Congress and Free Sta.,
PORTLAND, MB.
Coloring, Whitening and White-Washing prompt
y attended to- Orders Irom out oJ townsolicited.
. T i. - ,
O. «. DOWNES,
MERCHANT tailor,
«* HAS REMOVED TO
No. 233 1-2 Congress Street,
August
WM. W.WHIPPEK & CO.,
Wholesale Druggists,
^ MAl^T SQUAEE,
PcE'IHKD, ME.
April 13. tf ,/!«»»#3»* Mitt- > .
O pi J. JRa IMODSDON, It
Hoop Skirt MnnnfiictnrOr,
•;I 1>E-Al-Eli IN 1 lh " '
English, frengt j^K^nssrican Oorsets,
Taney Roods
AND LACES, HOSIERY, GLOVES,
And all kinds or-XHJLJSIM.U'IGS and lircss Buttons.
gy~"H aml-l^nfl ffe go njafftV Pirated Garments made
to order. {a^Hoop Skirts made to order. £fA
tfo. <* Clapp’s Bloch, CONGRKSS STREET,
leb!3_ fO^TLA-fl, MEdt 1
J. «!• HdokoN, JR.,
A R T I w T .
Studio No SOI 1-2 Congress Street.
KF^Lesaous given in JpaiBting and Drawing.
February few Cl hi'**
J. J* MAYBURY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
170 FOBE STREET.
April 3 dtf
HOLDEN & PEABODY,
Attorneys and Counsellors at Law,
OJ]lce, 229 1-2 Congress Street,
Near the Court House.
A. B. HOLDEN. fcOpStfil If. V. PEABODY.
F. W. GUPTILL,
Attorney and Counsellor at Law,
'-AND -
Solicitor in Bankruptcy,
No. 8G Main Street,. . . Sa<*'-, Me.
June 8. d3m.
WRIGHT.& BUCK,
Proprietors of Greenivood Mill,
BDVKITItliE, 8. c.
DEALERS in Yellow Pine Timber and Ship
Stock. Orders solicited.
References—K. P, Buck & Co., New York;
Wm. McGilvery. Esq., Searaport; Ryan & l>avis,
Portland. mar26dtf
11. M. PATSON,
STOCK Kit OK UK.
No. GO Exchange Street,
_ PORTLAND ME I102ldt
Gny, Lufkin & Perry,
MAJS UFACl VliEJtS
AND JOBBER* OF
HATS, CAPS, FURS,
St>a\v (joods !
54 At 50 IHiditoSuover Woodman,True&Co*s,
P O It If, AND, MAINE.
Apr 9-dtf
DJEKUING MILLIKEN & C O.,
-’OBBEHS OE -
»» Y GOODS,
' AND —
WOOLENS,
Have this day removed o the new and spacious store
erceiet for them
Hiut 60 Middle St.,
great fire.^^ ***** oecupita hy -hem previous to the
Portland, March 16. tf
M. F. KINO,
PHOTO GRAPHIST,
Middle street,
PORTLAND, ME.
June 12dtf
JOHN E. DOW, Jr.,
Counsellor and Attorney at Law,
And Solicitor in Bankruptcy,
JAUNCJSY COURT,
43 Wall Hired, ... New York city.
^^Commissioner for Maine and Massachusetts
Jan. 29 dtf
BOTSKESS CAKOS.
OEOMGE W. COOMBS,
Deputy Sheriff
-FOB
Cumberland and Androscoggin Counties.
Impost Office address. Lisbon Palls, Me.
aul5d3t*
HOWE Or WOODBURY,
Civil Engineers and Architects t
Office No. 17 Exchange Street,
Ocean Insurance Building.
C. H. HOWE. F. P. WOODBBURY.
Aug. 10-dlm
HANSON BROTHERS,
Sign and Window Shade Painters,
3 Free St. Block, Portland, Me.
Show Cards, Glass Signs, ami all kinds of
Ornamental Painting done in a superior manner.
The shop will always he found open irom 7 A. M,
toCPM. All orders promptly attended to.
august 1 d3in
flr^r-sDr. W. R. Johnson,
"HKm DENTIST,
Office No. 13 1*3 Free Street,
Second House from H. H. Hay’s Apothecary Store.
|3P“Ether administered when desired and thought
advisable. jyWeodil
€S CORGI: 1 . ICKETT,
Successor to Stephen Gale,
Druggist and Apothecary,
aiul denier in English and American Fancy Goods,
NO. 1411 CONGREHS,
Near Washington Street,.Portland, Me.
JUr'Pliysicians Prescriptions carclully compound
ed. july 13. dti
BRADBURY& BRADBURY.
Counsellors at Law,
MariugixBank Itnilding, Exebaage St,
Bion Bradbury, 1
A. W. Bradbury. } PORTLAND.
June 27-dtf
W. T. BROWN & UO.,
General Commission Merchants,
No. 90 1-4 4’om mere ini Street,
(Thomas Block,)
Willard T. Brown, 1 PnRTr . VT>
Walter H. Brown, ) Portland.
Sole Wholesale Agents for the Boston Match Co.
for Maine. By permission r Ter to Dana & Co., J.
W. Perkins & Co., Josiali H. Drummond, Burgess,
Fobes & Co. june26dtf
S. FREEJWAN & CO.,
Commission Merchants l
U91 Broad street,
Samuel Freeman, 1
E. D. Appleton. } NEW YORK.
Y3F*Particular attention given to the purchasing
of Flour and Grain.
References—Da> Id Kcazer, Esq , F.. McICenney &
Co., W. & C. R Mitliken, J. B. Carroll, Esq., T. H.
Weston & Co. jnnelldtf
B. D. A O. W. VERRILL,
Attorneys & Counsellors at Law,
No. 17 Exchange Nt., Portland, Me.
Ocean Insurance Building.
March Ik dGm
A. N. NOYES & SON,
Manufacturers ami dealers in
Stoves, Manges Jb Furnaces,
l Can be found in their
MW BUILDING ON LIMB IV.)
(Opposite the Market.)
Where they will be pleased to see all their former
Customers and receive orders as usual. augl7dtf n
J. D. & F. FESSENDEN,
COUNSELLORS AT LAW,
{59 Excliangc st*9 -
JAMES D. FESSENDEN, )
FRANCIS FESSENDEN. ) PORTLAND, ME,
June 17d3m
G. A. SUSSKRA UT,
IMPORTBtt,
, MANUFAOTITUER AND DEALER IN
Furs, Hats and Caps,
136 Middle Street,
PORTLAND, - - - MAINE.
(jp^'Cask paid for Skipping Furs. mi 21dt!
“ WALTER COREY & 00.,
MANCFACTCKEIH AND DEALERS IN
FintWITUKE !
Lookiii>? Glasses, Mattresses,
Spring Beds, die.
Clupp'M Block, Kenu.bec Street.
(Opposite Foot of Chestnut,)
FebSdtfPORTLAND.
jrggju Kimball & Prince,
Dentists.
No, ll Clapp's Block, Congress Street,
C. Kimball, D. D. S. orlOeo'lti Fred A. Prince
\V. W. llAlt vDEN.
Ship and Steamboat Joiner.
Extension ami Sale Tables, Writing i)csks, Ward
robes of all kimLs made of \Valunt„ Oak, or
Chestnut; Stores fitted out. and*$OT>
bing at'cuied to.
Car. af Parle & t'oiuuiercial §Ih, Portland.
Refers by permission to Capt. J. B. Coyle and
Ross & Sturdivant, Jyls.oelfiWt
WIIjLIAM LOWEJjJ^Tk
DEALER ill
NEW AND SECOND HAND
FCRIITITRE
Crockery, Corpthp.
Paper llunsitigS) Window Sbadei;
.. —Ar>—
House Furnlshinjj Goods,
NO. 11 Preble St., Portland, Hie.
May 18. cbdtiin
THOMES, SMARDOF & CO,
jobbers of
WOOWjMWS,
AND
Tailors’ Trimmings!
AGENTS FOR THE
Ne Plus Ultra Collar Comp’y,
UIDDEFOKD, ME.
56 Union Street,
(First Boor from Middle.)
Francis O. Thornes. jc20Tr&8tf Geo. H. S mar don.
C. iVlNKlUr & CO.
Arc prepared to-do all kinds of
Slate or .Tin Roofs,
At short no;ice in the best maimer. All orders
promptly af ten Jed to.
ry-Orders can be left at No. 1, corner of Green
and Congress streets, or No. 5 Plum street.
May Is. eodSni*
J. A. FENDERS ON,
Wholesale Dealer in
Foreign and Domestic Fruit,
Fancy Groceries,
Onions, Sweet Potatoes, Cheese, Pickles, Pure Spi
ces, Fancy Soaps, Cigars, Tobacco, Confectionery,
Nuts, Dates. Prunes, Fruit Baskets, &c.
No. O Exchange Wired, Portland.
May 24-cod* wti
GAS FIXTURES!
JOHN KINSMAN
has a good assortment of
6A8 FIXTURES
of all kinds, ami will sell them as low as they can he
bought in Boston, New York or elsewhere.
JOHN KINSMAN, llnira Street,
mchtdtf PORTLAND, Mb
Packard Book-Store!
- AND -
Maine Sabbath School Depository,
337 VonyrcHtt Street,
I'ORTLkNIk
E. S. Hoyt, Samuel Fogg,
iNcceiHOrt lo II. Packard.
Particular attention given to the selection of Wab
bath School Iiibrnric*, and to the furnishing ol*
Religion** and Theological Works.
lySame discount made to Schools, Ministers and
Teachers as in Boston.
School and Miscellaneous Books,
STATIONERY ,
BLANK BOOKS, ALBUMS, CARD PHOTO
GRAPHS, and evt-ry thing pertaining to a flrst-class
Book Store at Wholesale and Retail.
Juiv 10-endif
-I
Yacht Nettle,
Is now ready to take Pleasure Partie
to the islands! and lor deep eea fishing
or to charter by the day, week or month
Fo* further particulars inquire at No
' n- *• Commercial St, or at the St. Law
rouce House on India st.
jylleoJtf B. J. WILLARD.
MISCELLANEOUS.
LORING & CROSBY,
Slaters and Tinners.
WOULD respectfully announce to the citizens of
Portland and vicinity, that they are ready to
attend to all orders for Slating or Tinning on ‘the
shortest notice.
Tin and Slates,
Of all kinds, constantly on hand. All work warrant
ed.
ty Orders from nut of town attended with
promptness.
OUice IVo. lot Federal Street.
Post Office Box 102!) Portland. Maine.
Reference—C. R. & I,. K. Frost, Kobt A Bird,
Custom House,Bishop Bacon and Hon John Mussey.
May C—dtf J
JORDAN & RANDALL
HAVING REMOVED TO THE
Store No. 145 Middle St.,
(livBUH Black,)
Would respectfully invite tlic trade to examine their
stock of
Tailors’ Trimmings,
Selected Expressly for tliis Market.
I8F* By personal attention to business we hope to
merit a share of public pat rouge.
WILLIAM P. JORDAN,
GEO. A. RANDALL.
Portland, March 18,18$7. dtf
X 331
1 OongieBS
St,
Portland
Maine.
L. B. FOLLETTE,
HOSIERY AND GLOVES,
HOOP SKIRTS 4ND CORSETS,
Ladies’ k Children’s Underflannels,
WHOLESALE AND KETA1L.
IW Corner of Congress St. and Xolnian Place.
.Feb 7, 1867.—dly
PAINTS AND OILS,
Drugw, Medicines, Dye
stuffs, Window Glass.
AOENTSVOK
Forest River «C- Warren Lead Co.’s
C BAFTS A- WILLIAKIg,
BTos. 5 and 6 Commercial Wbarf, Boston.
Dec!—TuThSlly
SEl iTilN W OXJT.
A. I). KEEVES
Will sell for cash bis entire stock, consisting of
French, English, Gcrmnn and American
Broadcloths, Cassiuieres, Vestings,
and make them up in the
Lati:.t and Most Approved Styles,
as cheap as ready made clothing can be bought in this
cily, as he is to make some change in his business
this Fall. Please call at No. l(i Free Street, end
see hi.s prices.
A* D. REEVES, Tailor.
April 23. dtf
L O R I N G’S
Iron Water stop
THRESHOLDS
Patented 1863.
TOM "ItW
The Object of this Patent is to prevent rain and
molting snow frtm entering houses from beneath
doors afid windows. It has been thoroughly tested
and is warranted not to tail.
This Tbiesbold is admirably adapted to that
much-desired style of windows called Casement or
French windows, for by tbftMroverition all tbo disa
greeable features of that style ot window are obviat
ed, and there can be no reason now why if cannot be
brought into general use.
Certificates unnecessary, for. all that is needed is
to see the operation of one during a storm, or to ask
those who have tried them.
Orders addressed to
JAMEM A. FOSS,
Middle* near Hampshire street, promptly attended
to. jy20-d3tn
Boots and Shoes
AT RETAIL.
NO. 8 EXCHANGE STREET.
J. & C. J. BARBOUR,
HA VINO made large additions to their stock have
now in store a good assortment of
BOOTS AID SHOES,
Suitable for
Men, Women, Misses,. Boys and
Childrens Wear,
To which they invite the attention of their friends
and me public generally.
JOHN BARBOUR. O. J. BARBOUR. B. R. BARBOUR.
May 25-eod 3m
8,000 FAIRS
- OF MEN’8 -
Seweil Army Shoes!
JB’ O It SALK
$1.75 PER RJA.TR !
•— px —
0. F. MOULTON & CO.
icH • *—
alien’s Patent Leather Boots
per pair, $3.00
Boys’ Patent Leather Bal
morals, per pair, 1.00
Boys’ Patent Leather Web
ster Ties, per pair, 1,00
Youth’s Patent Leather
Buckle Shoes, per pair, .75
. By We shall sell all of out summer goods very
low, to make room for our Fall and Winter stock.
C. F. Moulton & Co.,
•190 Congress St., and 111 Federal It.
July 20. eod2w
Window Shades J
House and Store Shades Made to
Order ami Constantly on lland.
iy ALSO, FIXTURES, TASSELS. CORD, &c.
Wire aud! Gloth Fly Screens, at
STONE HAM & BAILEY’S,
jy23eod3m 168} Middle st, Portland.
Manufacturing: Jeweler.
G REEVES*, manuiact are r of every disrip
• tion of Jewelry, having established himself at
335 Congress Street, is now prepared to make any
thing in the line. croons tarnishing their own gold
can have their jewels made to order. Diamonds and
Pearls.reset. Hair braided and mounted in the lat
est styles. Jewelry, fans, canes, pipes, 8te., repaired
and mounded. A large assortment of cheap Jewelry
for sale. G. REEVES,
junc24dtf No. 335 Congress Street.
LANE’S IMPROVED
Patent Lever Set
Circular Saw Mills!
WITH PATENT FBIOTION FEED.
The Cheapest and Best!
Simple, Accurate and Durable !
In Quantity and Quality of Pro
duction unsurpassed.
Send for Descriptive Circular and Price List to
LANE, PITKIN & BROCK,
July 29. d&w2in _ Montpelier, Vt.
MH. REDDY,
• MERCHANT TAILOR,
AND DEALER IN
GENTS’ FURNISHING GOODS,
No. 107 FEDERAL STREET.
We have in store one of the finest assortment of
ENGLISH, GERMAN, FRENCH and DOMESTIC
CLOTHS, CA881MERES, &c., that can be found in
Portland. These goods have been selected with great
care and especially adapted to the fashionable trade,
and at prices that cannot fail to please, and all goods
thoroughly shrunk' and satisfaction guaranteed.
A call is respectfully solicited. Thankful to friends
for past patronage, hoping to merit a continuance of
the same.
janOdtt M. H. REDDY, Proprietor.
Taunton Copper Co.
Yellow Metal and Copper Sheathing,
Nails, Spikes and Bolts,
FOB SALE BY
LYWAN HON & TOBKir, Agents,
115 Commercial st.
Portland, May 22, 1867. may23dtt
NITROUS OXIDE OAS !
A safe and pleasant Anesthetic in tUe extraction of
Teeth. Administered every
TUESDAY AND FRIDAY
—BY—
Dr* Kimball A Prince. Dentists,
S* Clapp’s Black, C engross Street,
lebsMtf PORTLAND, Me.
AUSC£LJLAN£0(Jg.
WESTBROOK SEMINARY
- AND -
Female Collegiate institute.
THE Fall Term ot this Institution will commence
Wednesday, August 21st, and continue twelve
week.
|3T"The Winter Term will commence Wednesday,
Dec. 4th.
aul5dlw G. M. STEVENS, Secretary.®
Bishops College School,
iennaKfillr, Canada Knit.
RECTOR --Rev. R. H. Walker, M. A., late
•Scholar oi Wadham College, Oxford, and for nine
years Profeessor ot Mathematics at the Royal Military
College, Sandhurst.
Sub-Rector——Rev. W. Richmond, M. A, Trini
ty College, Dublin.
There are four assistant Masters, three of whom
are Graduates, who devote their whole time to the
work of the School. The object of the S hoot is to
impart a liberal anti gentlemanly education on the
public School system.
Boarders taken by the Rector, and at the Sohool
house. and other licensed houses. Testimonials re
quired from every boy admitted.
fJpTuition fee, $65 per annum.
For prospectus, &c., apply to Rev. the Rector,
Bishop’s College. aug6J2w
Young Ladies* Seminary.
THE Misses Symonds announce the opening of
their Fall Session, at No. 40 Danfnrth Street, on
Thursday, Sept 19th. On account ot the change in
place there will be some change in the general ar
rangement of the school and iu the tui'ion. A very
few boarding pupils will be received.
For further particulars and for catalogue address
the principals, Box 2059, or apply at their residency
No. 43 Danforth Street, after September 1st.
August 6. eodtillsepl9
A or way Academy I
—IT—
NORWAY, MAINE.
THE FALL TERM ot this Institution will com
mence on Wednesday, September 4th, 1867, and
continue eleven weeks.
0HARLE8 D. BARROWS, A B„ Principal.
EDWIN F. AMBROSE, A. B Associate Principal.
MRS. MARION M. BARROWS, Preceptress.
MISS H. E. DENISON, Teacher of Music.
__—, Teacher of Drawing and Painting.
Acsistant Teachers ot acknowledged ability and
experience will be secured.
Tuition—Common English, - - $4.00
Higher English, - 5.00
Languages, - - - 6.00
The Classical Department affords Students wish
ing to fit for College every facility for a thorough
course in those studies.
A Teachers’ Class will be ormed especially adapt
ed to the needs of Students desiring to teach during
the ensuing winter, or fir a longer period.
French and German Classes will l>e formed each
term.
There will bo a Piano in the. Music Room of the
Institution for the use of those taking lessons in that
branch.
Ample provision for hoard lias been made lor a
large number of students.
lip* Board, including everything, ivood, lights,
washing, tfc., three dollars per week.
Rooms on reasonable terms lor students wishing to
board themselves.
The Bakery and Market render it easy lor Stu
dents at a long distance troui home to board them
selves, if they w isli.
Application should be made in person or by letter
to the Principal, to Rev. N Gunnison, to J. A. Den
ison, Esq., or to Freeland Howe, Esq., at Norway.
July 17-eod6w
Maine State Seminary
-AND
Nichols Latin School.
THE Fall Term ot.13 weeks comiAences Thurs
day, Aug 29, 1867.
J. A. LOWELL, Secretary.
Lewiston, Aug 8,1867. auglOeodSw
Bri<l gton Academy.
THD Full Term will commence on Tuesday, Sept.
3d, and continue eleven weeks.
JOHN CL WIGHT, A. M., Principal.
Competent Assistants in the several Departments
WjH secured.
SEIT* Text Books furnkhed by the principal at
Portland prices.
THOMAS H. MEAD, Soc’y.
North Bridgton, July 1, 1867. |y4eod&wt sepS
Waterville Classical Institute.
THE Fall Term will begin the second day of Sep
tember.
For further particulars send for Catalogue.
J. H. HANSON, Principal.
aug9-eod&w3w
HARPS WEh L AC AIDE MY,
North HitrpNwell, HI nine
THE FALL TERM of this Institution will com
mence TUESDAY, Sept. 3.1867, under the in
struction of J. L. GOODWIN, Principal. Miss
MEDAF. M1LLEXT, Assistant and Teacher of
Music. Board t an be obtained for $3.00 per week,
inclitling tue', lights and w ashing.
For further particulars address J. L. GOODWIN,
or THOMAS PENNELL, North Harpswell Me.
Ilarpsweil, Aug. 1, 1867. au2eod3w
-;-#
Franklin Family School,
FOR BOVS,
TOPSHAM, - - - MAINE.
N ne Miles trom Bath, 26 miles from Portland, on
the Iv. & P. U. R. Established in 1857.
WINTER TERM commences Sept. 18th. Thor
ough and Systematic Discipline in Moral, Men
tal and Physical Culture.
Especial attention is paid to manners.
A well appointed Gymnasium is connected with the
School.
For Circular p'ease address
jv23d8w H. A. RANDALL, Principal.
Oread College Institute
For Y01 u 1 n' Ladies,
WORCESTER, MASS.
ONE of the oldest and most flourishing Lad les
Seminaries in New Englaiid'. Send for Cata
logue. Fall term begins Sept. 5th.
REV. H. r; GREENE, A, M. Principal.
July 20 d‘2ni _
Western Normal School,
FARMINGTON, ME.
THE Fall Session will begin Aug. 21, under the
direction ot
MR. GEORGE M. GAGE, Principal,
EDWARD BALLARD,
Superintend cm. of Common Schools.
July 30-dtd
Mercantile Library Association.
Organized and Incorporated 1851.
This Association having
Re-Established its Library
With about I MM) Volumes ol New and Desirable
Books, to which additions will constantly be made,
and having secured temporary accommodations ou
market St, (between middle nod Federal,)
Would inform its members and the public that the
Room will be open for the delivery of Books, every
WEDNESDAY and SATURDAY afternoon from 2
lo C o'clock. Also Saturday Evenings from 7 to 10
o'clock.
Any person wishing to become a member of this
Association,the annual assessment ol which is Two
Dollar* per year, or w ishing to avail themselves
of the Ufee of the Library, will please leave tlieir
names at Library Room as above, or with cither ol
the following: O. M. Maruktt, John C. Proc
tor, M. N. Rich. apr20dfcf
GREAT BARGAINS
-AT
300 Congress st.
JUST OPliNED AT
STEVENS & CO’S
300 Congress Street,
A LABOR LOT OF
New Groods!
SELLING OFF AT
GREAT BARGAINS!
CALL AND SEE!
HEAVY BROWN SHEETING, 124 els; Fine
WMte Brilliants, double width, 25 cts; Fiue
Colored French Brilliants, 32 inches wide 30cts.
While Marseilles, Cheap!
A large lot of Brown and Bleached TABLE
DAMAnK, by the yard, selling oil* VERY LOW.
Printed mid JEinbosscd Wool Table
Covers :
IFhite and Colored Marseilles
QUILTS !
Lancaster and Neotcla Quilts!
A large stock of Silver Plated Ware, ot the
very best quality,Britannia Tea and Coffee Pots;
a large lot of Huckaback Towels very cheap;
Cloths for Men’s and Boy’s Wear t
Shirting Flannels, Denims, Bleached Sheetings, Par
asols, and Umbrellas, large Stock of pcfttimery,
Gloves, ildks., Hose, <Xrc. &c.
July l»-dtf
RANDALL A CO.,
LATE S. F. RANDALL,
Have taken the uew store
N"o. 87 Middle Street,
Opposite the Canal National Bank, where will be
found a good assortment of
Ready-Made Clothing;
—AND—
FURNISHING GOODS l
-ALSO -
Broadcloths, Tricots,
Cassimeres and Vestings,
Which they will
Wake to Order as Cheap as the
Cheapest I
mEfrii oturt'‘' *'*u services ot Mr. AR
THUR NOBLi,, who vviil continue to superintend
the business as heretofore.
. RANDALL & CO., 87 Middle st.
July 1st, 1887,-dtf ’
RGnovm
K E M OVAL.
it. m.bbe web,
. iSucraaor tn J. Smith & Co.)
Manufacturer of Leather Belting,
Has removed to
NO. 02 MIDDLE STHEET,
Marrett & Poor’s New Block, where may be 1'cund a
lull assortment of Leather Belting, as cheap, and
oqur.l to any in New England. Belting and Loom
birapa made to order. Also tor sale. Belt Leather
Bar1-* and Sides, Leather Trimmings, Lace Leather,
Belt Hooks, Copper Rivets and Burg._j\19dtf
REMOVAL!
EDWIN A. MARREtT
H44 REMOVED BIB
Dry Goods Business
to the new store
No. 85 Middle 8t., op. Canal Not. Book.
August 5. d2w
REMOVAL.
DEB LOIS & WEBB,
Counsellors & Attorneys at Law,
Have removed to
No. Ol Exchange St.
July 8-dtl
HfrNKV P. MERRILL, HI.
Physician and Surgeon,
168 CONGRESS STREET.
July 9-dtf
A. MERRILL,
Counsellor and Attorney at Law,
has removed to 144J Exchange Street, opposite pres
ent Post Office. july9dtf
JABEZC. WOODMAN,
Counsellor & Solicitor in Bankruptcy
Mo. 144 !•') Exchange M.
July ‘•-/a.t
BEMtVAL.
E. S. HATCH, M. IT.,
PHYSICIAN & S UJRGEON,
OFFICE IN BOODY HOUSE,
9X3 CO.MORE89 STREET.
iyK> lence 42 Franklin St. jy8d2m
R I3 M O V A
W. F. TODD,
Has Removed bfs Stock of
Watches, Clocks and Jewelry,
From 25 Free street, to the new and commodious
Store,
No. 09 Exchange St.,
Where he wiii bo happy to see his old customers and
to receive uew orders.
Portland, April 25,1$G7. ap*7dtf
A E M OVAL. t
JAMA —1 omONNELL,
Con tsellor at Law,
Notary Vnt «ie * CoaaaalMioaer «f Deeds,
Has -j-MOycd to ClaM>'* New Block,
COR. KXOIt -JOE AND FEDERAL STREETS,
Jau 16. lOycr Sawyer’s Fruit Store.) dlt
B E M O V A L. I
U II. CLIFFORD,
Counsi'llor at I^aw,
And -4 »ticitor of Patent«,
r lias Removed to
Oornej' of 1 own aul Oou^ress Streets,
jal6 BI! VN’S NEW BLOCK._dtf
Harr. «£• Waterhouse,
.TON BE US OP
Hats, laps and Furs.
PORTi.AVn, Deo. 3r> 18W.
HARRIS & Tv V TERMOUSE, Wholesale Dealer*
in Hats, Caps, a i Furs, have removed to their New
Store, _
No. it" Fxeltange Street♦
W, E. HARRIS. do4tf J. E. WATERHOUSE.
CARD
To the Public and the Trade.
Paper Collars the Issue!
ON account of the attempted monopoly in llie sale
ot Paper Coliars in Ibis city qnd State, and-that
•custom «ro nnn th© trade generally may purchase
good* VEST ADAPTED to tncir own wants,
and 01 the beat quality, 1 have, with tho advice oi
our manufacturers, and the New York Paper
Celia* Manufacturing Am«i iait©w,n con
cluded to put the “Nanpareil Linen Surface" and
Nonpareil Marseilles Collars into the market (for the
present) at the wholesale price,
25 Cents per Box !
The great success attending the sale of these
Collars since their introduction into Portland, is
sufficient proof of their ftaperiarity ever any
other Collars iu this City. Call and get a
Vox oa Trial.
We offer all other Collars at the Wholesale
Prices.
We have also another entirely new pattern of Lin
en Surfiice,
The Nonpareil Magenta,
Which iu beauty, strength and finish are nutur.
POnhaUd 1,000,006 *• N.nparail tellurs,”
which w'e offer to the trade at Lewer rale, than
any ether Anuti in Maine.
gru.ll far the Nonpareil I.ineu Surface
Cellars. ’
Wanted, n smart, active man, well acquainted with
the trade, to travel through the Slate.
H. W. RIPLEY,
No. 300 Cougfress Street,
(First Door-above Citv'[Hotel,)
SOLI AGENT FOB MAINE
“NonpareU Collars.”
August 8. dtt _
Draper collars!
Cloth at the Button Hole.
TT^VERY one who wears paper coUars should, be
Xj tore purebasug, examine the
NEW COLLAR,
With Cloth at the button hole, which makesa paper
collar the name strength as linen.
The finish ot this collar gives the same beauty and
appearance of the finest linen collar made.
Linen Finished Byrons, Oxford Enameled, Shake
spear Linen Finished: all with cloth button hole, tor
sale by all the first class clothing and tarnishing
goods dealers.
The Trade supplied by
WOODMAN, TRUE A CO.,
junelld3m Agents for Maine.
THE PORTLAND
Kerosene Oil Conip’y,
Would inform the public that they continue to
Manufacture
Portland Kerosene Oil,
Fr.m Albert I'.al Exclusively.
The prevalence of a large quantity of inferior and
dangerous oils in the market, at a cheap price
many of which are little better than Naptha itself—
and the exis ence of false reports in regard to the
PORTLAND KEROSENE OIL, render it a matter
of justice to ourselves, as well as saioty
to consumers, that sonic notice should be
taken of theso facts. Therefore, we again
present an advertisement, and would call
attention to the high st.udard of our Oil, tlio
Are test of which is 13$ degrees of Fahrenheit, and
often reaches considerably higher; also, we would
say that we are determined to maintain its long es
tablished reputation.
Portland Kerosene Oil Coi^Many.
POBTI.AND, Mb., Aug 4th, 1867.
augl4<lly.
Drawing Jraper I
Just received a large assortment of
Whatman’s Drawing Paper,
Trade Liaea aad t aaliuuauR Drawing
Paper.
BAII.EI <k NOYES,
jv22»odlm New Black Exchange at
J. S. IIUNT & CO'S
Independent Detective & Inquiry
Office,
Ra. 3 Tremaal Raw, Raaa Na 4,
Opp. head of Hanover street, BOSTON.
All business entrusted to this office will be
promptly attended to and striclly confidential.
F July 8 d3m_
~~~~l?OIt SALE.
BARK ST. JA<3(>, 222 tons new meas
urement, now lyiug at Merchants
Wharf.
For i erms Ac. apply to
flUORCHlLB, BROWNS A MANSON.
May tf__
TIN TYPES,
IWBKTV-F1VB CENTS PER DOZEN
At A. S. DAVIS’ Photograph Galleries, No. 27
Market Square opposite Preble Street. Iy»»
Magic Arrows.
«tOR sals by W. D. ROBINSON,
T JulylTdsw 49 Exchange St.
DAILY PRESS.
PORTLAND.
Friday Mor ing, Augu t 16, 1867.
IU’PUBLIOAN NOMINATION.
FOII GOVERNOR,
JOSHUA L. CHAMBERLAIN
OF BRUNSWICK.
Election, Monday, September 9, 1867.
OJillBKBlihND COUNTY
- AND -
Second Senatorial District Convention.
The Union Republican voters of Cumberland Coun
ty are requested to send Delegates to a Convention,
to lie bob'en iu Portland, in the SONS OF TEMPER
ANCE HALL, on THURSDAY. August 22nd, 1867,
at ten o'clock »n the forenoon, for the purpose of
nominating candidates for Judge of Probate, Regis
ter of Probate, Register of Deeds, County Commis
sioner, County Treasurer, and four Senators; and
also to select a County Committee for the enduing
year.
Eacb city and town will be entitled to two dele
gates, and an additional delgate for every 75 votes
east tor Joshua L Chamberlain at the Gubernatorial
election in I860, and a fraction of 40 votes will be en
titled to un additional delegate.
Baldwin,. 4 Bridgton,.7
Brunswick.9 Cape Elizabeth,.7
Casco,.—3 Cumberland,.4
Falmouth,.5 Freeport.7
Gotham,.8 Gray,.5
ITarpswoll,.4 Harrison,.4
Naples,.3 New Gloucester,.5
North Yarmouth,-4 Otistield,.4
Portland.39 Powual.4
Raymond,.3 Scarborough,.. .4
Sebago,.3 Stan dish,.6
Westbrook,.lft Windham,.7
Yarmouth,.5
The County Committee will be in session at the
Hall on the day of the Convention, at 9 o'clock A.
M.
The Chairmen of the several Town Committees are
requested to forward the names of their delegates to
the Chairman of the County Committee as soon as
chosen.
Per Older of the County Committee
Jamfs F. Miller, Chaitman.
Portland, Aug. 3, 1867. d&wtd
Preparing Tar the Fall Elrctiaas.
Nothing can be more cheerful than the
prospect for the fall elections. Everything
seems to conspire to render certain a recur
rence of that sweeping Republican victory,
which has become a fixed feature of the sea
son, and is as confidently looked forward to
as the ripe fruits, pure air and clear skies o^
September. Among the blessings that Hea
ven bestows in autumn, this clearing up of the
moral atmosphere by a solemn reaffirmation
of a just political faith on the port of a whole
people, is not the least. If free institutions
had been coexistent with papacy In the time
of Its power and splendor, voting would have
been made a sacramental rite as well as mat
rimony and numbers of less important
things. It may be said with truth that there
is often an element'of noise, wrangling, brib
ing, bullying, lying, drunkenness, revolvers
and buncombe that disturbs the religious sol
emnity of the election. Cut, nevertheless, it
requires no acute understanding to perceive
that there is eliminated from all these ob
noxious features of popular assemblies, which
are, alter all, superficial and accidental, a re
newed consecration to truth and right—or
unhappily, sometimes to falsehood and
wrong. The unpleasant concomitants of
elections are exaggerated by our sense cf the
importance of the occasion, Just as an inno
cent whisper becomes a flagrant outrage in
church.
It is not often that all the auguries are so
faiorable for a triumph, of that Radicalism
which has become a synonym for righteous
ness. The most efficient auxiliary we hare
in the impending conllict is the President of
the Unite! States. If he were a sworn foe
of tho Democratic party, holding secret
consultations with Butler and Stevens tor
the purpose of devising schemes tor its utter
annihilation, he could not injure it so much
as he is now doing --.-bile endeavoring to be
of the greatest possible service to the lost
cause. The forced retirement of the Secre-,
tary of War is sure to increase the Republi
can strength considerably in every State. If
Sheridan is likewise rewarded for ids invalu
able services by a severe visitation of the
Executive displeasure, still larger additions
wiU Wiuado to Republican majorities already
sure. If the “clean sweep” is made which
the Copperheads anticipate with ao much
satisfaction, Mr. Johnson will secure an anti
administration vote in most of the States
that will approximate very closely to unanim
ity. If men like Seward and Randal, who
have exhibited a devotion to the PiesideDt
that has approached servility, are driven Into,
a hostile attitude by his recklessness and his
criminal disregard of law, who that has in
his nature a remnant of political honor will
link his fortunes with the madman whom
chance; has made Chief Magistrate? The
people will not identify themselves with a
party that is so far wanting in sagacity and so
blind to the spirit of the age as to give it sup
port to a President who requires special ses
sions of Congress to prevent his setting at de
fiance the laws he has sworn to execute.
Charles I. and James 11. have been regard
ed as affording very tolerable examples of sui
cidal obstinacy,though the Stuarts can hard
ly be considered of sufficient mental capacity
to entitle them to rank even with notable
failures. But the man who boasts of his for
mer municipal greatness, and brings it to no
tice as an evidence of his ability to cope with
the greater difficulties of his present position,
wiH stand peerless in the list of historic block
heads. This summer tor the second time he
is devoting his whole soul to increasing the
power of antagonists who are already too
strong for his safety. His tour to Chicago
last year, with the incoherent speech which
marke I his progress, was not a more stupid
supplement to the 22d of February phillipic,
than is the war upon the cabinet and militaiy
commanders to the Stanbery plot which ne
cessitated an extra session of Congress.
It is hardly surprising that the Republicans
in some States (eel secure enough to indulge
in the pleasant diversion of quarrelling among
themselves. It is, however, a kind oi dissipa
tion in which only a moderate indulgence is
quite sale even under the most serene politic
al skies. But when the arch-Conservative of
the nation gratuitously furnishes all the Radi
cal thunder than can possibly be required, and
when the opposition is eominittiug itself to
the open advocacy of repudiation and the use
of force against Congress, if the Republicans
of California do get jo calling each other
“short hairs” and “long hairs,” in the words nf’
the immortal Richard Swiveller,—whw can
wonder at their weakness?”
Dixtnnrra on the Knllrerd.
Ths New York Eve^S Post prints the dis
tances from plac'*0 place on this road. It I*
quite a curWty its way and is worthy of
some —udy. The distance from New York to
sen Fianciseo, by the way of Chicago, is three
thousand throe hundred miles—a miguty
stretch over prairie, river and mountain. To
run a train on railroad from the Atlantic
to the Pacific at the rate of twenty miles per
horn, would require about seven days to ac
c, uiplish the dist ance. In riding this distance
the traveller will ascend from the level of tide
water at New York or San Francisco
to a height of eight thousand t wo hundrtd
and fort y two leet or over a mile and a half at
Evans Pass.
Tills contemplated railway across the con
ticcnt is a magnificent enterprise and seems
to throw all oilier enterprises into the shade,
and yet the people talk but little about It and !
are not aware of the progress it has made.
Somehow, since the rebellion was crushed
out and the gigantic war brought to a close,
the public mind is not easily moved at any
tiling The people view things from a philo
sophical stand point and wonder at nothing.
If an enterprise were started to bridge the
Atlantic ocean, or construct a railway to the
moon whose cool regions might become a re
sort for summer travel, our people would not
be much moved, but take It lor granted that
the enterprises would be carried out. We
surely live in a fast age.
—Charles Sumner has written an interesting
historical paper for the September t an C,
entitled ‘ Prophetic voices about America.
Nolen by th* Way f.,-. M . *.
T ,r*1* NI line |o W ■«€•!!
•in.
To the Editor of the Press:
Every person who travels meets with inci
dents worth placing upon lecord as beacons to
others who are to pass over the same route to
show the dangers to which they may be ex
posed, or as guides to the best places of rest
and (pilet repose.
While passing on the Grand Trunk liailroad
from Montreal to Sarnia recently, I saw an
exhibition of the danger to which women
are exposed when travelling alone, especially
on night trains, that sent a chill through ev
ery nerve and fibre of my body. At every
station passengers were changing, some going
and others coming in. As the duik of even
ing was approaching a young man who had
recently entered the car, accidently displayed
the handle of a dirk knife and a revolver, to
which the attention of the conductor was di- j
rented. At the next stopping place an cflicer
came into the car, arrested the man, took charge
of his weapons, and escorted him out of the
car. There were two others in the car who
manifested some slight disposition to get up a
row, hut on discovering that the police out
side was strong they sat quietly.
At this station a very richly dressed young
lady came into the car and took a seat hack
of the one in which 1 was sktln g. About 11
o’clock I made a pillow of my satchel, drew
myself up into as small compass as possible,
and attempted to get some sleep on the seat.
I had probably been two hours or more in
this condition, being tossed and jammed and
shaken by the trundling of the cars over an
exceedingly rough road, when I heard some
one ask the lady in the seat behind me if she
was to leave at the next station, to which she
answered no; other questions followed winch
I did not distinctly hear, but I felt sure it was
not the conductor who was making the en
quiries, and I raised myself up tuining partly
round laying my arm over the back of the
seat and my head turned as though I was
looking out of the window. My position af
forded me a perfect view of every motion that
was made in the seat behind me. One ot the.
roughs I had before noticed bad unceremoni
ously taken a part of the seat and the lady
had drawn her veil over her face and her
shawl more closely around her, holding it
with her hands aud moved snugly to the end
of the seat so as to protect herself Irom any
demonstration he might make. He first made
an attempt to draw her attention, and then
tried the same thing on me with no very
flattering prospect of success. For more tbau
two hours we three persons remained in
much the same position. Occasionally the
man would make an effort to draw the atten
tion or the lady and myself to some object
that would cause a change of position, but In
this he did not succeed. The lady was too
much frightened at his presence and I was too
firmly determined to guard, her Irom any evil
be might intend to commit, to have pur at
tention diverted from the point at issue. His
comrade came in from the car behind, and
some rather unintelligible talk passed between
them. He went forward into the car ahead
of us, and alter a time returned and sign i lied
that he could not accomplish h’S intention,
and seated himself quite near to us. Day
light began to be visible which made them
more anxious and ns less. They appeared to
realize' that their opportunity was passing,
and what they did must be done quickly
The man in the seat back of me stared at me
with a pair of eyes that emitted a degree of
venom almost uncontrolled and a countenance
depleting the elements of the infernal regions.
Ij looked firmly and steadily into bis eyes
which in a few seconds dropped their lids,
and he turned his head from me. I then per
ceived that he was a coward and we had
nothing more to tear from him. At this mo
ment several persons near us awoke and sat
up in tteir seats. In a short time the cars
stopped and the conductor called out “change
cars fop: Buffalo.” This gave oor travellers
an opportunity to decamp, for they saw their
character was known and they doubtless fear
ed bein { arrested if they remained longer on
that tn in.
Aftei they left I enquired of the lady If the
man woo bad sat in the seat was an acquaint
ance of hers. She replied that she never saw
him before and believed him to be a pick
pocket and U he bad succeeded in attraciuig
our attention he would have robbed her of
her watch. I have no doubt that he Intended
robbery!, if no wane. She determined that
she should never travel alone on the cars
again, and especially on a train that went by
night This I consider a wise determination
and adfise all ladle* to adopt it M. S.
_, ■ _. i. i
, Improving Perfect inn.
Can perfection be improved? It would
seem so by the disposition which some men
have to experiment on what has been proved
to be the best results of art or science. In
England, France and Germany great pains
have been taken, by systematic crossings
which have required perhaps some fifty years
to perfect, to build up or produce the best
forces and qualities of animals for specific
purposes; such, for instance, as Merino Bheep
lor the fineness of wool, the Leicester^ for
mutton, Alderney cows for dairy purposes,
the Aypshires for free milkers, the Durham
cattle tqr beef, .Suffolk swine for early fatten
ing, the Bnrkbires for size, &c. Now when
such pains and expense have been incurred to
build up a perfect force or to produce the
most profitable qualities, why is It that about
every body who procures au animal of this
breed should set himself forthwith at work,
knowing nothing of the laws which govern
the subject, to produce some better variety
by crashing it hap-hazard with au interior
sort? Of course all animals thus produced
must be' inferior to the pure breed, aud the
offspring from these again cau never be de
pended upon. True, a grade animal may
happen to be better than its ancestors; but
should this ever be the case, its progeny will
be likelV to trace back to some obnoxious
characteristic. This is the reason why pure
bred animals, whose pedigree can be proved,
whose biood has not been mixed with aD in
ferior rajee for fifty years or more, is so much
more valuable than perhaps one equally
handsonge animal that is of a mixed blood,
for instance, it is not .the one that is larv "1’
best proportionedJ">d fairest, but th<- that
will be sure «> propagate onlv desira,'!e
points i this can bed*- “ded uf*,D only
iwvBe cise or thorom- animftls who9e
pedigree can be Tbax i.
A T,fAfrican—Dumas has a rival.
A fuu Sed negro, named Said, baa been
duwJersd upon one of the Sea Islands of South
Carolina who rivals in the extent and variety
ot bis learning the most eminent tavans ol tbc
world. His history is romantic. Born in Cen
tral Africa, ho was captured when a boy of
fourteen by the Bedouins and carried to Trip
oli. Thence he came to Constantinople, where
he became pipe cleaner to the Turkish Min
ister of Foreign Affairs by whom he was in
some way transferred to the Russian Embassa
dor. After traveling with the Embassador
and his son over all the countries of Europe lie
came to America in 1869. He subsequently
went to Hayti, but returned to this country iu
X8G3 to enlist in the tifty-Bfth Massachusetts
Regiment. After the war, being without em
ployment, he was forced to lure himself out as
a plantation hand. Iu this condition he was
found by one Dr. Sim, who established him iu
a small cblored school on St. Andrews Island,
which he is now teaching. He has also been
appointed by Gen. Sickles to a position on the
board of registration In the parish to which
he belongs. He knows, In addition to English
and his native tongue, Arabic, Tur is , us
sian, Hebrew, Greek, German French and
Italian—some more perfectly that others, but
iu most cases, so that he can tead and write
and speak them with ease and accuracy. Nor
is it a merely a parot-like faculty of immita
tion, for he has deep perception of their genius
anil affinities, and iu some instances a fair, in
others a profound acquaintance with their lit
erature.
He is a firm believer in the doctrines of the
Swedenborgians, and holds the religious expe
riences of his brother Africans in profoun
contempt. When asked what the negro relig
ion meant, he replied that, so far as lie could
see, “there ii nothing spiritual about it—It is
mainly animal magnetism, or a morbid condi
tion of the nerves.” He is, withal, rather con
servative in politics, and lias misgiving as to
the working of universal 8 mirage among the
negroes.
The Westminster Review, for July,
(American reprint) is received. It opens with
a very remarkable article entitled “Mimicry,
antl other Protective Resemblances among
Animate," giving numerous illustrations of
l io operation of the Darwinian law ol natural
selection in perpetuating and multiplying oer
ain protective resemblances between differ
en species of animals, and also between cer
taui animals and certain vegetable products.
The article will be read with much interest,
not only for tho great number of curious facts
in natural history which it presents, but also
for the ability with which these facts are made
to illustrate and support the theory by which
the increasing school of Darwinians explain
[ to us the principles of creation. “The Last
Great Monopoly” is another interesting paper,
referring to file Hudson’s Bay Company and
their territories, which, the writer thinks,
ought immediately to be withdrawn from the
exclusive control of the company and thrown
ope,n to settlement under the protection of tho
government. If this be not speedily done
the writer in the Westminster foresees
that the great tide of immigration
sottiug into Minnesota and vicinity
will overflow the territories of the com
pany, especially in the Red River district, to
such an extent as to make that virtually an
Americau colony, then the cry for annexation
will bo raised and tho whole rich region will
be forever lost to British control. “The Futnro
of Reform,” touches on some of the measures
likely to come before the tlrst. reformed House
of Commons, and also illustrates the rapid pro
gress of the Reform principles in the last few
years, and “The Religious Side of the Italian
Question,” is by Joseph Mazzini, and has al
ready been presented to American readers in
the Atlantic Monthly. “Lucius Annaeus Sen
eca,” “Lyric Feuds,” and “Jamaica," are the
remaining papers, which with the nsnal able
and interesting review of contemporary litera
ture, complete the number. (Reprinted by
the Leonard Scott Company, 140 Fulton street,
New York.
"V arietiom.
—Some editor says that the destiny of the
world often hangs on the smallest trifles. A
little miff between Charles Bonaparte and his
love Letitia might have broken off a marriage
which gave birth to Napoleon and the battle
of Waterloo. To which the Chicago Adver
tiser says: “Yes, that is a fact. Suppose a
“little miff” bad taken place between Adam
and Evel What tlien?”
—The official investigation of the case of
Bev. S. M Merrill took place at Plattsburgh
on the 6th inst. The accused pleaded guilty
to all tiie charges, and ail the specifications,
except three; affirming that he was entirely
unprepared for the iuvt stigation of these, and
asked (liat his case go then to the committee,
and lit surrender his credentials. This was
consented to by the prosecution, provided the
depositions now taken and the testimony of
witnesses now bresent, be placed in the hands
of the chairman, and presented at the ensuing
session of the Conference. This was consent
ed to by the accused. The case then went to
the committee, who, after consultation, unani
mously suspended Bey. 8. M. Merrill from tha
ministerial service and church privileges in
the M E. Church until the ensuing session of
the 1 i cy Annual Conference.
—A relative ot the Great American Fie
Biter,” at Lee, Mas*., the ether day undertook
to eat forty-eight clams while another fellow
was opening six, and was beaten by only lour
points; the opener having having completed
his task while the eater was bolting his forty
loorth clam. The pie-biter wiil bite through
sixteen bakers’ turnovers placed in a pile at
once.
—Great interest, says the Chicago Tribune,
is felt In the “ Minnesota Northwestern Rail
road," which is chartered to run from the state
line (wkcre it unites with aroad from McGreg
or, Iowa,) through Austin, Geneva, Wilton,
Winnebago, Agency, Mankato, New Ulm, Red
wood, to Big Stone Lake, connecting there
with thp great Northern Pacific railway, which
.passes through the gold mining region to the
Pacific coast. The country over which it will
pass is comparatively level and of easy grade,
and is also among the most fertile lauds in the
State.
—A Western paper thus hits off a popular
fashion: “The attention of the police should
be directed to Pant A. Loon. He’a tight on
the streets daily—awful tight.”
A “ox Wond du lac, Mich., took a per
cussion shell, which her husband, .u„ be re
turned from ths war,brought home from a bat
tle field of the South, to fill up a broken placa
in the stove, in consequence of which an ex
plbsion took place, tearing the stove to atoms,
blowing the windows of the house out, and
playing sad havoc generally. Fortunately
none of the family were injured.
—In the outskirts of Philadelphia there ia a
small Episcopal church entitled “ The Church
of Saint James the Less;” but the irreverent
nrchins'uf the neighborhood call it “The Little
Jimmy.” In the neighborhood of the same
eity there ia a ohurch which was largely bnilt
by the funds of an eminent American finan
cier, who sold great quantities of government
bonds, and this church by the irreverent has
been dabbed “ The Church of the Holy Five
Twenties.”
—The bridle path from the Crawford Houss
to Mount Washington is reported to ho in a
very dangerous condition, and several severe
accidents have recently occurred there.
—Chatrcoal is found not to be the perfect
water purifier it was thought to be. Alter a
time it i returns to the water the impurities it
once had separated.
—Walt Whitman has written “A Carol of
Harvest, lor 18t>7,” which will appear in the
September Galaxy. %The poet celebrates the
retnrn of peace and plenty, and glorifies the
agriculture of America in a stormy and joyous
carol. The poem will occupy five or six pages
of The Galaxy.
—The Russian and French papers are engag
ed in an animated controversy, respecting the
result of the trial of the assassin of the Csar.—
Thu Russian papers hold that the mild sente'*4
of imprisonment for life, was an insult
in
sist. On the other hand, the
sist that the laws were amplvr ti'e pubijgber.,'
—TheVaris correspond^,ri(,an pab|ilbcrs
Gazette complains the Great Ex
have almost en^, n,,ws|,aperi and period!
hibitiou. unrepresented in the Exhtbi
cals artL'iv.inks this is quite lamentable, teud
lower the estimation of the United
States i u the minds of foreigners who have a
s^,ng conviction that the United States pub
lish few books and have no literature.
—A New York letter gives tms bit of gossip:
“On Friday morning, ns a Seventh avenue car
was going down town, a young woman enter
ed, clad in white. As the day was unpropi
tio’us for white raiment, she attracted some no
tice. After riding down several streets a car
riage drove along, having in it a young man
and two young women. The car was stopped,
the “woman iu white” got out and entered the
vehicle, which drove away. The sequel of the
story is that a young pair were “joined in the
bonds of holy matrimony,” that forenoon. The
“old folks” had no more to do afterward but to
swallow their anger and give their blessing.”
—The Paris correspondent of a London
morning paper writes:—“General Sherman
and his family have arrived for the purpose of
visiting the World’s Fair. This is the second
timo the general has favored J'1
since the American war. He «■£*»*£*
age autl looks as young uu‘ .
.. - thp correspondent a liuagina
The vividness oi tnc iorr«.»i •
tio* appears great, when one reflects that
General Sherman is still on our western bor
deIlColo»el Long’s i ufant daughter was riding
in a baby carriage along the brink of a preci
pice eighty icet high at Cincinnati Furnace,
Ohio, on Thursday last, when the nurse left it
for a moment. A gust of wind came along
and forced the vehicle, with its baby occupant,
over the fearful height, when, strange to say, it
was found unhurt and the child ““ “J"™ •
Whou found its dress was over its eyes aud it
was indulging In a lit*1" cry
-The Tallahassee (Fla.) Sentinel of the 8th
savs “Madame O. I>. Murat, relict of the
Prince Achille Murat, died at her Jefferson
County plantation, on Tuesday morning last,
after an illness of several mouths’ duration.—
At the advanced age of 60 years and over, one
of the rarest gems that ever ornamented the
society of the South, one of tho purest-minded
and most unselfish of her sex, a blessing and
au honor to the age in which she lived, has
gone to reap the reward of her fervsn p J
j and her wide-spread benevolence.

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