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The Portland daily press. [volume] (Portland, Me.) 1862-1921, January 13, 1868, Image 1

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Established June 23, MS3 Tot. 7._PORTLAND, MONDAY MO RN1NG, JANUARY 13, 1868 Term,Eightl>ollar*peran„um,inadva*<e.
THE PORTLAND DAILY PRESS ’» puMiioea
every day, (Sunday excepted,) at No. I Printers
Exchange, Exchange Street, Portland.
N. A. POSTER, Proprietor.
1kbx8:> Eight Dollar? a year iu advance.
THE MAINE STATE PRESS, if* published at tbe
rxmc (dace every Thursday morning at $2.00 a year,
^variably in advane*._
Kates of advertising.—-One inch 01 space,In j
length o< column. eoasutute* ;i ‘Square."
jf!.$0 jwr square daily first week. <5 pent? pet
w< ek after; three ioserUons, or leas, $1 00; routine*
Inp every other day alter first week, 50 rents.
Halt square, three insertion* or lew, 75 cents: 0®«
week. $1.00; 50 cents per week alter.
- Under head of ‘‘Aminemkntk,” $•’ 00 net square
tier week; three insertions or less, $1.50,
Sfkoial Notiorh,$1 .25 per square lor the first in
sertion, and 25 cents per square for each subsequent
insertion.
Advertisements inserted in -the 44 M Anne Stat*
Press”(which ha* a large circulation in every per
X the Slate)for $1.00 per square for first insertion*
t !<l r>Goents per square tor each subsequent nisei*
lou.
BUSINESS fARIMt
O. & J. T. DOIfPTEI.il,
BATH, ME.,
Cortlfipre Manufacturers,
Inclu ling Fall Gangs, Fishermen’s Hawssrs, Bolt
!£..(«, Point Kope, Trawl Warp, I.ath Yarn,&e.
Oraers solicited. jan8U6m
WEBB, FOGG & FREEMAN,
(Successors to A. WEBB & Co.,)
163 Commercial St., Portland, Me.,
DEALERS IN
cjourN,
Flour, Ileal,Oats,
la Large ar Small Qaaniitlea
ALSO,
Shorts, Fine Feed & Or Corn
{^“Choice Family flour by the single barrel or in
bags.
8. HI WEBB, J. L. FOGG, H. C. FREEMAN.
Dee 28, 1867 dtf__
ZALOO, FESSER & CO,
General Commi -sion Merchant?,
II A V A IV A |
December 23. dim __
^drTbuzzell,
Has resumed his residence.
Comer Park and Pleasant Streets.
gyoffice hours from 8 to 9, A. M. 2 to 4, P. M.
November 11. dtf _
WRIGHT & BUCK.
Proprietors of Greenwood Mill,
ItlK K.VI I.I.K, 8. C.
DEALERS In Yellow Pine Timber and Ship
Slock. Orders solicited.
Kkffrknceh—R. P. Buck <Sr Co., New York;
Wm. McGilvery. Esq., Searsport; Ryan 6e Davis,
Portland. mai26dtl
C. a. DOWNES,
MERCHANT TAILOR,
HAS BEHOVED TO
No. 233 1-2 Congress street,
CORNER OF CHESTNNT
August 30, 1866. n _dtt
Gray, Lufkin & Perry,
MANUFACTURERS
AND JOBBERS OF
4ATS, CAPS. FURS,
-AND
(Straw Goods I
64 A' 50 Middle*i,over Woodman,True A* Co^s,
PORTLAND, MAIN K .
Apr y-dtf
DUCKING, MILLIKEN & CO.,
- JOBBERS OB -
DRY GOODS,
AND -
WOOLENS,
Have this day removed to the new and spacious store
erected tor them
58 and GO Middle 8tM
On the Old Site occupied by them previous to the
great tire.
Portland, March 16. tf
>1. F. KING,
PHOTO GRAPH TST,
137 Middle street,
PORTLAND, ME.
June 12dtt
JOHN E. DOW, Jr.,
Counsellor and Attorney at Law,
And Solicitor in Bankruptcyt
JAUNCfiV COURT,
43 Wall Street, - New York City.
gSP^Commissioner for Maine and Massachusetts.
Jan. 29 dtf
w. T. BROWN & CO.,
General Commission Merchants,
JYo. 90 1-4 Commercial Street,
(Thomas Block,)
Wtjlard T. Brown, )
Walter H. Brown, ( Portland.
Sole Wholesale Agents tor the Boston Matcli Co.
tor Maine. By permission r< ter to Dana & Co., J.
W. Perkins & Co., Josiah H. Drummond, Burgess,
Fobes & Co. june26dtt
W. H. PHILLIPS,
CARPENTER, BUILDER,
And Ship Joiner.
HT^Circular and Jig Sawing done with despatch.
Moiih.ings ot all kinds, Doors, Sash and Blinds made
or furnished to order.
338 Commercial St , (foot of Park St.,)
Portland, Maine, au29dtt
NATHAN WEBB,
Counsellor and Attorney at Law,
No. Ol Exchange St.
.Iuly8-atl
C. J. SCHUMACHKR,
FSi ESC© PAIWTEIt.
Otfce at ibe Drug Store of Messrs. A. G. Scklotter
beck & Co.,
Congreni Ht, Portland, lie,
Jal^dtt^ue door above Brown.
Charles P. Matlocks,
Attcrncy and Counselor at Law,
C.I.NAL HAMl BUILDING,
No Mi Middle Hired • • Portland*
lebl-Mtj
G. A. SUSS KB A IT,
liUPOfiTEIt,
MANUFAOTUttEB AND DEALER IN
Furs, Hats and Caps,
130 M l<i die St reet *
PORTLAND, - MAINE.
KF'Oasii paid for Shipping Furs. sep20dtf
HOWARD <k CLEAVES,
Attorneys & Counsellors at Law.
PORTLAND, M NE
Office No. 30 Exchange Street,
*Jos«i b II < ward, jy'.f67-ly Nathan Ch aves.
WALTER COREY & CO., ’
Mancfactueers and Dealers in
FURNITURE !
Looking Glasses, Mattresses,
Spring Beds, die.
Clnpp’a Block, K&cnuebcc Street*
(Opposite Foot of Chestnut,)
FebSdtf __ PORTLAND.
S. FREEMAN & CO.,
Commission Merchants !
131 Broad street,
Bamcel Freeman, I
K. D. Appleton. ( NEW YORK.
Bg&v-Farricular altention given to die purchasing
efFlour ami Orain.
BehreDCCS—Dm id Kcazvr, Es, , E. McKemiey &
Go., W. & C. K Alillikeii, J. it. Carroll, l.-ip, x.‘ H.
Weston & Go.__juneUdtf
A. N. NOTES & SON,
Mann tactureris and dealer* in
dtoves, Manges & Furnaces,
Can be IouikI in their
NKW BI ILDI1VG ON I. JMK «T.,
(Oppositethe Market.;
Where they mid be pleased to see all their former
to.4 timers and receive order* as usual. augUdtt a
ir. m. paysojn.
STOCK BROKER.
No. OO Exchange Str«et,
__PORTLAND MB U021dt
M. B. L. LANE,
Attorney and Counsellor at Law,
No. 150 Nassau Street,
!»*£«' Vo Kit.
November 27.__ eod2m
1. F. PINOHIck ~
Pattern and Model Mnicer,
So. 4‘ Exchange St. Portland Me.
Spirit Levels, Hat, Bonner and Wig blocks made
and repaired Arris.r, Surgeons, Musicians, hiyen
ters, Manuacturers, and Miscellaneous Orders, per
son ally executed.
January 2. dim
NISOELLAAl
THE LARGEST
RLA.\lt BOOK
MANUFACTORY
- IN -
MAINE!
HALL L. DAVIS,
Bookseller and Stationer,
Still continues to make the manulacture ot
Blank Account Books
A SPECIALITY.
Also constantly on hand a large assortment of
STATIONERY!
- AT -
Wholesale and Retail.
DESK FURNITURE !
The most complete assortment that can be found in
MaVINE, embracing every!hing useful
and ornamental.
MERCANTILE PRINTING!
Of every description promptly and faithfully execut
ed. We are also prepared to fill or
ders for all kinds of
LITHOGRAPH
-Ann
Copper Plate Engrav Ing I
New Publications!
We shall be ready to supply our patrons with alt
new publications as soon as issued, from all
the publishing houses In the country
PUBLIC and PRIVATE
LIBRARIES SUPPLIED.
IN FACT,
Everything Pertaining to n Pint Class
BOOK STOKE
CAN BE FOUND AT
HALL L. DAVIS’,
No. S3 Exchange St.
Portland, Dec. 20,1807. diw
SPLENDID
CHRIS TII AS
AND -
NEWY \R’S GIFTS
Ladies’ Travelling & Shopping Bags,
LARGEST ASSORTMENT
IN THE CITY,
Selling Very Cheap /
-at
NO. 172 MIDDLE STREET.
H. Dunn & Son.
December 16. dim
Ferreotypea and Tin-Types
can be had by calling at
PECK’S NEW BOOMSf
No* 174 Middle Street opp. U. 8. Hotel.
Ladies and gentlemen of Portland and vicinity,
call in, and you shall be suited iu quality and price.
Copying neatly done. J. hi. PECK.
December 2s. d4w
SWAN A BARRETT,
BANKERS & BROKERS,
NO. 15 EXCHANUE STREET,
OFFER FOR SALE
5-20’s of 1864, 1865 and 1867 !
STATE OF i?I A INF BONDS,
C ITY OF FOIST LAND BONDS.
C ITY <*F ST. LOUS BON Os.
CITY OF CHICAGO 7 PEH CENT.
SCHOOL BONOS.
This bond is protected by an ample sinking fund,
and is a choice security lor those seeking a sale and
remunerative investment.
June and July 7.3()’si
Converted into New 5.20’s,
On Very Favorable Terms.
Holders of S F. VEX- THITl TIES
gain nothing by delaying
conversion.
Holder, of 5.’AC'sof I Mli'J, will And n large
profit iu exchanging for other Gor
ernmeut Honda.
September 20, dtf
JP- I*.
Paper* Pantalets.
TV, -j FURLONG
p*Pl tl pAXTALET ^JOTIPANV
Arc now prepared to supply the Market through
their agents tor Maine,
DEERING, MILLIKEN & Co.
PORTLAND,
With this superior article. They are the cheapest
and most economical Paper Goods ever put on ihe
market! -
Furlong Paper Pantalet Co.,
MECKI.4NIC FALLS, HE.
II. B. CLAFLIN & CO, New York, General
Agents for United States. dcGcod3m
SJJH UFL F. COBB,
No. 355 Coneri*eis8 Street,
NEAR HEAD Of GREEN STREET.
|>IANO FORTES. Meiodegns. Organs. Gnitars,
„ viullns Banjos, Flutnas^, Music Boxes, Con
certinas, Accorueons, TamborlfeijFrTutcs, Flageo
lets, Picalos, Clarionets, Violin Bows Music Stools,
Music Stands, Drums, Files, Slieet Music, Music
Books, \iobn and Guitar Strings, Stereoscopes and
Views, Umbrellas. Canes, Clocks, Bird Cages, Look
ing Glrsses, Albums, stationer,a Pens, Ink, Hocking
Hcrser, Pictures anrt Frames, Fancy Baskets, Chil
dren’s Carnagesaiid a great variety of other articles.
Old Piano. Tnl.cn ... Exchange for New.
gF^Fianob and MeJudeous tuned aud to -*nt„
April 6—it_
The Cooking Miracle of the Age.
Zl MM Ell MAX’S
Steam Cooking Apparatus.
Cheap, Simple, Economical!
A DINNER COOKED lor twenty persons over
ONE hole of the Stove. Can be put on any
Stove or Range ready for instant use.
Water chainred to a delicious Soup by distillation.
I>paves the entire house tree trom offensive odors iu
cooking Jtk results astonish all who try it.
EB^Bend for a Circular.
For salr, as a Do Town and County
Righia iu the Ninie, by
t JOHN COUSENS,
/an 3-dtf Kennebunk, Me.
I COFAHTNEKHUir.
Dissolution of Copartnership.
THE copartnership hcretefore existing under the
firm name and style of CHASE, ROGERS &
HALL, is this day dissolved by mutual consent.
ALBERT f. chase,
CHAS, B. ROGERS,
FKEDK I\ HALL.
Portland, Jan 1,18G8.
Copartnership Notice.
rpHR undersigned haring purchased the interest of
jL Chas, B. Rogers, in the late firm of Uhase, Rog
ers & Hall, will continue the
Wholesale Flour Business,
- AT -
Ofd Stand No. 1 Long Wharf,
under firm name of
CHASE, HALL &, CO.,
and will settle all accounts for the late firm.
ALBERT F. CHASE,
F. P. HALL.
January 1,1868. janSdtf
Notice.
PoBTi AND, Jan. 1,1868.
THE Undersigned having formed a pirtnership
to carry on the Stove, Tin-Ware, and Plumbing
business, un ler the firm and style of M. E Thomp
s n & Co., solicit the patronage afthe public gener
ally. Head quarters at the old Stand, j’emple St.
M.E. HOMiSON,
J. S. KNIGHT.
Jan. 3. eodlm*
copartnership Notice.
THE undersigned have this day formed a copart
nership under the firm name of
Donnell, Greely & Butler,
And taken the store No. 31 Commercial st., corner
ot' Franklin and Commercial, where they will ion
tinue the business as
Commission Merchants,
And Wholesale Dealers in ORGJERIES. FLOUR
FORK, LARD, FISH, &c.
J. B. DONNELL,
JUSTUS GREELY,
A. BUTLER.
Portland, Ann. 1, 1867. auSeodtf
DISSOLUTION.
THE Copartnership heretofore existing under the
name and style ot Tarbox Sc Clieover is this
day dissolved by mutual consent.
G. W. TARBOX,
J. S. CHEEVER.
The bu Incas will be continued by Tarbox Sc
Brackett at the same place.
Portland, Jan. 3, 1868. jan 7-dlw*
Copartnership.
MB WU.TKK **. ITlOltBIMi is part
ner in ourfirm from this date under the style
of Hillman Mellen Sc Co.
HILLMAN & MELLEN.
Portland, Jan. 1, 1808. jan. 7-dCt
Dissolution of Copartners hi
THE Copartnership heretofore existing un er the
name and style oi A. S. Shurtleff, is hereby
mutually dissolved. The business of said firm w
be settled by Sylven Shurtleff.
Alva Shurtleff, Jr.
sylven Shurtleff.
Portland, Jan. 1, 1868. 2w
Copartnership Notice.
THE subscribers have f rated a copartnership un
der the firm name of
EDWARD U. BUBGTXdb CO.,
will continue the business ot
Corn, Meal, Flour and Grain,
—AND—
Manufacture of Dairy and Table Salt,
At old stand
No. 130 Commercial Street.
EDWARD H. BURGIN,
K. S. GERRISH,
EDWARDS. BURGIN.
Portland, Sept. 30, 1867 oct. 5,-eodtf
Copartnership Notice.
THE subscribers have thite day formed a copart
nership under the name of
Evans & Greene,
And will continue the business of
COAL AND WOOD!
At the old Stand
381 Commercial t*i, Head Smith’* Wharf.
We have on hand and oiler for sale at the low
est rash prices, the different varieties of Hard and
Soft Coals, all ot the first quality, and delivered in
tlie best, possible order. Also
HARD AND SOFT WOOD,
Delivered in any part of the city.
WM. H. EVANS,
CHAS H. GREENE.
Portland, Nov 1st, 1867. poldrf
NEW FIRUI.
THE subscribers have this day formed a copart
nership for the purpose of conducting the retail
Boot, Shoe and Rnbber Business,
Under the firm name of
ELWELL & BUTLER,
And taken the store recently occupied by Messrs.
Elliot Sc McCallar,
No. 11 Market Square.
Having added a large stock ot goods to that purchas
ed ot Messrs. E. Sc M., we are • prepared to turnish
every st' le and description oi Boots. Shoes and Rub
bers, which we shall se'l at ttie verv lowest cash
prkes. hopine thereby to retain all former patrons
and give our iriends and the public generally an op
portunity to buy good goods ai desirable prices.
• A. LEWIS ELWELL.
J. F. BUTLER.
Portland, Oct 15, 1867. ocl8dtf
Portland, January 1st, 1868.
THE Copartnership heretofore existing between
Aaron B. Holden and Henry C. Peabody, under
the firm name of Holden & Peabody, is this day dis
solved by mutual consent.
AARON B. HOLDEN,
HENRY C. PEABODY.
Until further notice, Mr. Holden may be found at
the Probate Office, and Mr. Peabody at the office |of
the late firm, No 229$ Cor gress st. dc313w
BLACK ASTRIO AN
-AND -
OTTER CAPS !
iv__
ALL STYLES!
HARRIS’S.
January 8. dlwis
THE BEST
CHRISTMAS
- OE -
New Y ear’s
PRESENT
any one can give their trlends will be a
PHOTOGRAPH!
and will be prized as such. Go to
E. S. WORMELL’S,
No. .316 Congress Street,
where you can get all kinds of such work done in the
best mannor, and for prices that defy competition.
Photographs in nil their Styles. Tin
Type* and Pci reo ypes, th ■ cheapest that can be
made in this city, and perfect satisfaction wai ranted.
Remember the place.
E. 8. WOR.HELL,
dec25dtf 316 Congress Street.
Clnis. Dickens’ Books!
FOR SALE VERT CHEAP,
0. B. CHISHOLM & BROS.,
307 Congress Street and Grand
Trunk Depot.
TICKNOR FIELD’S
DIAMOND EDITION
8ingle Copiea, 81.70 Pnb’» price *1.50.
C»mpl-leSet(14 Tola.)14.00 “ “ 21.00.
Also ou band
T. B. PETEB30F3 AND APPLETON’S
Editions of the same works, in different styles of
binding, as low as
Twenty-Five Cents Each l
Also a choice assortment of
Albnms, Glove and Hdkf. Boxes!
Eadies’ C ompanions, Dressing Cases,
Ac. , Ac,, Ac.,
suitable for Christmas presents. Now is the time to
^ItCKiei2lM;r tbe P*ace, 30r Cougrt w Hu
December 20. dtf
OYSTKBS!
.Tildt revived, a cargo of Ol'STKRS
ygTC\\wi'.”i(i>"8‘<;1'’ ‘“r ea'e ttf No- 2 Union
^JAMES FREEMAN.
December 28.
JLtEIllO V ALSt.
REM O V A. L .
Emery, Walcrhonsc & Co.,
DG4LEBS IN
IIAKDWAlt E !
CUTLERY, GLASS, &c.,
have this day removed to their
NEW STORE,
Nos. 53 <R 55 Middle St..
First It lock East of the Post Office*
E. W. A Co. have ar-anged in connection with
their jobbing business a
RETAIL DEPARTMENT,
in which will be found a complete stock of
House-Building Hardware,
TOOLS, &c.
January 7,1S67. dlw
REMOVAL.
WOODMAN,“TRUE & 00,
I1CPORTER3 AND DEALERS IS
DRY GOODS!
WOOLENS,
Gents’ Furnishing Goods,
AND SMALL WARES,
Have this day removed to Woodman’s Block,
Corner of Middle and Pearl Streets,
Nearly opposite their old site.
Agents tor Maine for the World-renowned
Linen Finish Collar I
With Cloth at the Button Hole, and
dray’s Patent Molded Collar
—ALSO—
Agents for Sirgers Sewing Ms chine.
WOO DU AN, TREE & to.
Portland, Dec 2d, 1807. dec3d4m
REMOVAL.
S. W. LARRABEE
HAS removed from Central Wharf to Bichard
son’s Wharf Commercial Street, opposite Cot
ton Street, where he will be happy to see all his oId
customers, and to serve hosts of new ones. Orders
tor
Dimension Lumber, Pine, Spruoe, Ac.,
SOLICITED.
CLAPBOARDS. SHINGLES.
Doors, Sash and Blinds I
— AND —
Building* Material
furnished at short notice.
October 19. dtf
R E 31 O y A L .
JET. M. Bit E WEE,
(Successor tc J. Smith & Co.)
Manufacturer of Leather Belting,
Has removed to
NO. 92 MIDDLE STREET,
Marrett & Poor’s New Block, where may befeund a
full assortment of Leather Belting, as cheap, and
equal to any in New England. Belting and Loom
Si raps made to order. Also for sa!e, Belt Leather
Backs and Sides, Leather Trimmings, Lace Leather,
Belt Hooks, Cupper Rivets and Bui*. jyl9dtf
A. MEBKIIiL,
Counsellor and Attorney at Law,
has removed to 144$ Exchange Street, opposite pres
ent Post Office. July9dtf
REMOVAL.
JAMES O’DONNELL,
Counsellor at Law,
Notary Public <3k Commimioncr of Deeds,
Has removed to Clapp’s New Block,
OOR. EXCHANGE AND FEDERAL STREETS,
Jan 15. (Over Sawyer’s Fruit Store.) dtf
R E M O V A E !
W. K. CLIFFORD,
Counsellor at Law,
And Solicitor of Patents,
Has Removed to
Corner of Brown and Congress Streets.
Jftl6 BROWN’S NEW BLOCK. dtf
At the New Store
169 Middle St.,
JUST RECEIVED
Black all-wool Poplins,
TAKO CLOTH,
(Something New.)
WRITE ALP ACC A,
FOR EVENING WEAR,
— AT THE -
Lowest Possible Prices!
Jan 11-dtf
Go to the New Store
Where you can buy
Long Shawls
New and Fre'h Goods Just opened
For #5.00 Each.
169 Middie Street.
Jan 11-dtf
Good Prints
And Cottons,
NOW OPENING,
At 6 1-4 Cents a Yard,
AT TBE NEW STORE,
169 Middle St.
Jan 11-atf
Proof Furnished
- OF TUE -
Reduced Prices
-OF -
Crockery Ware !
AT WHOLESALE AND RETAIL BY
ELSWORTH & SON
market Square,
Jail W&S3w Opposite Deering Hall Entranee.
Now for a Merry Sleigh Ride
- IN THAT -
Boat Sleigh Enterprise.
THE subscriber lias ha 1 the above Sleigh repainted
and put in fine or.ier throughout, and is now
prepared to
Talte Parties out of Town
at short notice. Also,
On Wednesday and Saturday Afternoons,
when pleasaut, will make a cruise about town, leav
ing corner of Congress ami Statj Streets at 2 P. M.
Adult* 25 eta per hour. Children under 12,15 cts.
*9- Orders left at 425 Congress or 103 Brackett
Street, will receive immediate attention,
janbdtf N. S FERNALD, Proprietor.
FOR SALE!
MjA Two Brick Houses in a block of three, on
• • Cumberland,coin r of Pearl street; two stories
iLwith French root, gutteia lltmd with galvan
ized iion, cement cellar doors, with brick cisterns.
One containing 10 finished rooms, and th* other nine
rooms—all above ground—with liard and soil water
brought in the kitchen—thoroughly built and con
venient.
Also a block of two bonses thoroughly built ol
brick, and convenient; two stories with French roof,
hard and soft water brought in the kitchen; contain
ing twelve finished rooms each, on (Myrtle st. For
further particulars enquire on 'he premises cr to
CHAS. RICHARDSON,
dclSdtfis 133 Cumberland St.
foarse Salt.
IIHDS. Coarse Salt, lu store and for
** "WALDRON & TRUE,
jan‘J<J4w* ftos. 4and 5 Union Wharf.
real, estate.
$1800 fora good 11-2 story House
a And One Aero of l.mid. in Westbrook,
within three minutes walk of the Horso Cars.
The house is modem and convenient. Plenty
jnt Soit Water at the door. Has a good barn
and wood-house. Only $1000 cash required down.
Apply to W. H. JERRI"!,
_dc-30d3w» Real Estate Agent.
Valuable Real Estate lor Sale.
The three story bri» k house on Free
Street, now occupied by the Right I ev.
'Bishop Bacon, is now otlered for sale. *1 lie
house contains thirty rooms, and is a very
desirable lacaiion for a
First Class Hotel or Genteel Board
ing House,
Itbut a lew step, irom the centre of business.
The lot is Very large, containing more than nineteen
thousand square leet. This is a rare opportunity to
purchase one of the best locations in Portland. Ap
P'y <" , WILLIAM H. .JEKB1S,
oci&dtl___ Real Es.aie Agent.
For Sale—One Mile from Port
land.
I beautiful residence occupied by Iiev. W. P.
Merrill, situated in Westbrook, bn the Back
Cove road, known by the name of the Maclngonne
V .u’ Jhe S10110* tastefully laid out with
walks, flower beds, splendid evergreens and shade
trees; about 200 pear, apple, plum and cherry trees
In bearing; plenty!of currents and goosebeiries;
about n acre ot strawberries—raised 1.G00 quarts
this year. The lot embraces nearly tour acres, with
directs GO feet wide all round it. The buildings—a
nnc h >use with 15 rooms, French root and c >pola,
and a piazza round throe sides; warmed with tur
n-.ice, good well and cistern in cellar; gardener’s
house and summer house, and good stable well
finished with cellar.
Terms easy. For particulars euquire on the pre
mises, or ot WH1TTEMOKE & STARRIRD, on
Comiuere al street; or FERNALD & SUN, corner
ot Preole and Congress stieets.
Sept. 3. dtt
Genteel Residence lor Sale in Gor
ham.
One of the Fine*! Residences
in Gorham,
Now occupied by Major Mann i s ot
tered for sale. The house is two
_ storic . thoroughly finished inside
and out, and in situation is unsurpassed In that
beauitlul village.—The lot is large, upon which is
fruit trees of various kinds, shruberry,&c. A nice
spring of excellent water is liandv to the door, and
large cistern in cellar, it also has a fine stable. This
excellent property will commend itself to any man
who is in want of a pleasant home within 30 minutes
rule of Portland.
For farther particulars cnouiroof W. H. Jerris, Re
al Estate Agent, at Horse Railroad Office, Opposite
Preble House._ jySOdtf
Valuable Hotel Property for Sale.
fflHE Oxford House, pleasant ly situated in the vil
I lage 01 Fryeburg, Oxford county, Maine, is of
fered for sale at a bargain, il applied for soon.
Tbe House is large, in good repair, with furniture
and fixtures throughout, together with all necessary
outbuildings.
For full particulars inquire of
HORATIO BOOTHSY,
v Proprietor.
Or Hanson* Dow. 54J Union st.
Fryeburg, Sept. 29,18G6. dtf
To be Sold Immediately.
ffWO Houses and lots In City. Price £900 and $1,
A 600. House lots in Cape Elizabeth $5fi to $100.
JOSEPH REED,
Real Estate Agent, Oak and Congress sis.
Octobes 2. dtt
To WIIJJAM II. UICCRILLV4, F«q., a
Justice of the Peace tu and for the
Comity of Penobscot.
WHEREAS at a meeting of the Directors of the
European and North American Railway Com
pany, held at the oifice of said Company at Bangor,
at No. 92 Exchange street, on Monday, the 23d day
of December, 1867, an application was made to said
Directors for a stockholders’ meeting, in the woids
and fig >res following, viz:
“To the President and Directors of the European and
“North American Railway company.
“The undersigned Sfockbc l»ier=», owning or bolding
“more than one-twentieth ppitot the Capital Stock
“subscribed lor in said Ceutp. ny, request you to call
“a meeting of I he Stockholuers of said Company, to
“be held at Bangor, at the office of said Company,.at
“No. 92 Exchange street, in said citv, on the thir
teenth day of Janu try next, at 8 of the o’clock in
‘•the afternoon, to act upon the following matters:”
“1st. To choose a Chairman or Moderator to pre
side at said meeting.”
“2d. To fill any vacancy or vacancies that may
exisit in the Board oi Directors.”
“3d. To se • if the stockholders will accept the sev
“oral acts of the Legislature of Maine, authorizing
“the city ot Bangor 10 loan its credit to said railway
“company to aid the construction of its line by aii
“issue of its Bond-, and authorize the Directors to
•make the necessary mortgage or mortgages to se
cure i ayment of the same on the Railway of its
“Company a- provided by law.”
“4th. To see if the stockholders will authorize the
“issue of construction lam Bonds secured on the
“lino of said Railway, and on tiie timber and lands
“granted it by the State of Maine, and authorize tbo
•Directors to secure the same by mortgage, lien or
“seciulty on said timber and lands and railway ot
“the company.”
“5th. To see it the stockholders will authorize the
“Diretors to purchase any existing line or lines ot
“railway as authorized by law, or lease tbe same or
“enter into any other contract of sale or lease of its
“line, or for operating the same by any other com
pany or parly.”
“6th. To see if the stockholders will make any
“change in the officers or appointees of the company,
“ami adopt such other measures as the exigencies of
“the company seem to require.”
“Bangor Dec. 2d, 1867.”
“Pierre and Blaisdell, - - 574 Shares.
“John A. Poor, h tiling, - - - 43 Sharee.
“Charles J. Gilman, “ - - 33 Shares.
“All n Ha nes, “ - - - 5 Shares.
“Eben S. Po r, “ - - - 50 Shares,
“.wargarot F. Poor, holder ot - - 50 Shares.
“Henry V. Poor, “ “ - 7 Shares ”
And whereas the said Directors of said Company
by a majority vote on said 2 Id day of December, re
-used to crant said requast, as required by tbe bye
laws ot said Corporation which says it shall be the
duty of the Directors to call a speeia* meeting
of the Stockholders. “Whenever requested, on the
written application qf Stockholders owning not less
than one twentieth qf the whole of Capital Stock sub
scribed for.”
The undersigned Stockholders, three members ot
the corporation owning more than one twentieth
oi the whole amount, of the Capital stock subscribed
for, reqnest you to i sue your warrant iu due lorm ot
law as in such case provided, uotifymg tbe Stockhol
ders to meet at the Bangor House in the city o Ban
gor on th thirte uth dry cl January next at eight
o’clock in the afternoon to act upon the following
matters.
1st. To choose a Chairman or Moderator to preside
at said meeting.
2d. To till any vacancy or vacancies that may'exlst
in the Board ot Directois.
3d. To see if the stockholders will accept the sever -
al acts of the Legislature of Maine authorizing (he
citv of Baugor to loan its credit to said Railway Com
pany to ail the construction of Us line by the issue
of ns bonds, and authorize the Directors to make
the necessary mortgage or mortgages to secure pa ;
meat of the same on the Railway of the Company,
as provided by law.
4th. T see if the stockholders will authorize the
issue of construction Land Bonds, secured on the
line of said Railway, and on the timber and lands
£ ranted it by ihe State of Maine, and authorize the
dree tors to secure the same by mortgage or lien or
security on said timber and lands and Railway of
the Company.
5tb. To see if the stockholders will authorize the
Directors to purchase anv existing line or lines of
Railway, as authorized by law, or lease the same, or
enter into any other contract of sale or lease of its
line, or for operating the same by any other Company
or party.
6th. To see if the stockholders will make any
change in the officers or appointees ot the Company,
and adopt such other measures as the exigencies of
the Company seem to require.
Bangor, Dec. 24,1867.
CHARLES J. GILMAN, holder of 33 shares.
JOHN A. POOR, owner of 93 shares.
PEIRCE and BLAISDELL, holding 574shares.
EBEN S. POOR, by his Attorney,
John A. P«»or, bolding 50 shares.
ALLEN HAINES, 5 shares.
State of Maine, Penobscot, ss.
Bangor, December 24, 1807.
[Seal]
To Hon. Charles J. Gilman, of Brunswick, Maine:
You are hereby requested and directed to notify
the stockholders ot the European and North Ameri
can Railway Company to meet in special meeting, at
the Bangor House, in Bangor, on Monday, the thir
teenth day of January next at the time and pb:ce
and for the purposes set forth in said application, by
causing tbe toregoing application *nd this warrant
to be published ‘wo w eks successively in two, at
least, of the public newspapers printed in this State,
Ghe Bangor Daily Whig and Courier and the Port
land Daily Press, the first publicali m to be fourteen
days at least before the day ot such meeting.
WILLIAM H. McCRILLlS,
Justice of the Peace.
In pursuance of the foregoing warrant to me di
rected, I hereby notity the stockholders of the Euro
pean and North American Railway Company to meet
at the time and place and tor tbe purposes above
mentioned. CHARLES 0. GILMAN.
dec26dtd
«/• & t7# (7jB^
No, 8 Exchange street.
Have for retail a large Stock of
Boots, Shoes and Rubbers
For Men’*, Women’*, Misses’, Boy’s and
Childercu’s mar.
RUBBER GOODS!
Belting, Packing, Hose, Clothing,
Spring-, doth, itlats. Tubing, Ac.
G3T* All descriptions of Rubber Goods obtained
from Factory at Buoft notice and ai. lowest rates.
Oak Leather Belts.
DOIT'S
Premium Oalt Leather Bella!
The most perfect article in the market. Also,
Page's Patent Lace Leather, and
Blake’s Belt Studs.
Dec 10,18G7.-iseod3rn
LUMBER
Drying and Planing Mills,
It. J. D. Larrabee & Co.,
Wcst Commercial street.
Kiln-nried Lumber tor Sale.
PERFECTLY Dry Pine Lumber planed and ready
for use.
Dry Norway Pine and Spruce Boards planed and
jointed, for flours. All kinds of lumber furnished at
low piices. Various Wood Moul lings for house-fin
ish and tor pxture frames on hand and ma le to or
der. We can do job work, such us jig sawing, turn
ing, planing, sticking moulding, &c, in the best
manner.
f#~Prompt personal attention.
R. J. D. LARRABEE & CO..
dc24d3m_West Commercial St., Portland.
w. w7~haknden7
Ship and Steamboat Joiner
Extension and Sale Tables, Writing Desks, Ward
robes of all kinds made of Walnut, Oak, or
Chestnut; S*ores fitted out, and Job
bing atxnded to.
Cor. ofPnrk Ac Commercial Mu, Portland.
Refers by permission to Capt. J. B. Coyle and
Ar Sturdivant. jy18eod0m
NOTICE. I Will sellon favorable terms as to
payment, or let for a term of years, the lots on
the corner of Middle and Frauklfn streets, and on
Franklin street, including the corner of Franklin and
Fore streets. Apply to WM. HILLIARD. Bangor
or SMITH & REED, Attorneys, Portland. Iyl2tf
DAILY PRESS.
PORTLAND.
Monday Morning, Januu-y 13, 18C8.
Revenue Report of Comuiisainncr Well*.
We have previously spoken in terms of high
commendation of the report of David A.
W ells, special commissioner of the revenue.
There can perhaps be no better test of the
value of this document than the manner in
which it is received by members of the two
political parties. Party feeling runs so high
at this time that it might be doubted if Ste
vens and Brooks or Sumner and Hendricks
could by any means reach coincident conclu
sions upon any matter less capable of exact
determination than the existence of Washing
ton as au historical character. 5fet members
of both parties quote Mr. Wells' facts and fig
ures with equal confidence, and no more think
of disputing him than a good wile would
think of disputing the almanac. Besides the
accuracy and lucidity which characterize the
report, it contains so large an amouut of
financial and statistical information and phi
losophy which is absolutely fresh, and so
much that is calculated to soothe the excite
ment of the public mind on monetary affairs,
that Us perusal cannot fail to give great satis
faction to middle aged gentlemen of moder’
ate means who have grown nervous over the
situation.
FUNDING THE NATIONAL DEBT.
The commissioner makes it his first care to
defend the policy ot the Treasury Department
in funding the national debt. “ What do you
understand, Sir, by the expression • Funding
the debt'?’” one Congressman asked another,
in the course of a debate in the thirty-niDtb
Congress. The disclosure of a feeling of un
certainty on the part of so exalted personages
with reference to the meaning of an expres
sion which has been in everybody’s mouth for
several yeat s renders it probable that the com
pendious explanation incidentally given by
Mr. Wells may be of value to many persons:
Without attempting to enter into any dis
cussion of, or even to question, in this con
nection, the policy which left the treasury at
the close ot the war with so large an amount
of early maturing indebtedness, it see s ob
vious, on reviewing the financial condition of
the Gove'nment as here presented, that but
one line of policy was opcu for adoption;
which was to convert, as rapidly as possible,
so much of the temporaty debt as could not
then be paid, in to such a formas to prevent its
existence from continually threatening, or ul
timately proving a source of serious embar
rassment to the Treasury. The nation, in
fact, was in the conditiou of au individual
who, with abundance of assets, was threaten
ed with loss and possible bankruptcy through
inability to seasonably realize upon them.
The course thus indicated, and which is pop
ularly known as the “ funding process,” was
adopted, and has up to the present time been
steadiaslly pursued; a policy the wisdom of
whieh time, it is believed, will most fully
justify.
RESOURCES AND EXPENDITURE.
.Mr. Wells is directed by the' law which
creates his office “to investigate the sources
of revenue, the best modes of collecting the
revenue and the administration of existing
revenue laws.” In pursuance of these in
structions he considers at great length the pur
poses for which a revenue must be raised,
and the sources from which it can be derived
so as to do the least injury to the productive
industry of the country.
The first item in the annual expenses of
the government is the Interest on the nation
al debt, and the commissioner endeavors to
calculate the sum that will be approximately
near what is required for that purpose, by de
termining the exact condition of the debt it
seit. On the 31st of August, 1865, the period
of maximum indebtedness, the sum was $2,
757,689,571, but on the 1st day of November
last it had been reduced by $266,185,151, an
average reduction of over ten millions a
month, which in the aggregate gives an an
nual saving of $15,971,107. When the fund
ing process is completed it is estimated that
the annual interest to be provided for will be
one hundred and thirty million dollars. Hav
ing established a fixed sum fir interest Mr.
Wells adds to this the sum of fifty million
dollars for the annual reduction ofthe nation
al debt, and both the sums taken together
constitute an “annual constant” of one
hundred and eighty million dollars of expen
diture for which a corresponding “annual
constant” of revenue must be provided. This
recommendation of a large yearly payment
on the principal of the debt is the point in
the report which has elicited the most unfa
vorable comment, but from the following ex
tract ft appears that the case has been exam
ined in all its bearings before arriving at a
conclusion:
Although a rapid reduction of taxation,
rather than a rapid reduction of the debt,
would seem to be, at the present time, the
true policy of the government, yet the pre
cedent which the United States—in honora
ble exception to nearly every other nation—
has thus tar established, viz.: of reducing an
nually the principal of the debt by some ap
preciable and signficant amount, is one far
too valuable, and brings with it too many
prospective advantages ."to bo hereafter light
ly disregarded.
The amount necessary for the annual in
terest and reduction of the debt havlDg been
determined, it only remains to fix the sum
which the government will probably require
for its current expenses. Last year these ex
penses were $191,564,677, exclusive of boun
ties which were $11,382,859. Mr. Wells be
lieves that one hundred and forty millions
might be made sufficient to cover these ex
penses under a proper sys’em of retrench
ment. With this in view he makes the fol
lowing suggestions:
First. That all ixpenditures for the navy
may be restricted to an amount merely suffi
cient to maintain the police of the seas, and
preserve the public property from deteriora
tion.
Secondly. That the numerical strength of
the army be not increased, but reduced, as
soon as practicable; that no appropriations
be made for ordnance except what is neces
sary for immediate use, or for the lortifica
tions beyond what is required to keep the
same in repair.
Thirdly. That no appropriations be made
for public works, other than fortifications, ex
cept such as are of the most urgent necessity.
Fourthly. That, so long as the necessities
of the nation are paramount to those of in
dividuals, no claims for damages sustained in
consequence of the rebellion, be either paid
or considered.
Fifthly. That the heads of the. various
departments be required by Congress to prac
tice the most rigid economy, and to reduce
their employees to the minimum number
requisite tor the discharge of the public ser
\ke.
L.V-11. i.. mL.i__ i • . -l
*uwu»,j uc latcu
fbr the further purchase of foreign territory,
that no commercial treaty with any foreign
nat.on be ratified of a character calculated
materially to diminish the customs revenue.
In this way he would save 30 millions in
She expenditures of the war department, 16
millions in the expenditures of the navy de
partment and 15 millions in the expenditures
of the civil service—in all, 60 millions. We
can now determine the gross annual revenue
required by the governmant for its expendi
tures ot every kind: tor interest, 130 millions;
for application to reduction of debt, 60 mil
lions ; for ordinary expenditures, 140 millions;
total, 320 millions. That no mote than this
total will be required in any contingency is
shown in the following paragraph from the
report:
It should he noted in this calculation that
the difference between the actual “ordinary”
expenditures tor 1867 (one hundred and nine
ty-one mtlliors) and the reduced estimate
(one hundred and forty millions) is very near
ly equal to the sum proposed by the Commis
sioner to be set aside tor the redemption of
the principal of the debt, viz., tiitv millions.
Induction of expenditures to the exteut indi
cated may not, however, be practicable, or, by
reason of uuIon-seen circumstances, possible;
but reduction ot the debt is a matter subject
to no contingencies, and is entirely within
tlie control of Congress. The element of un
certainty on the one hand may be considered,
therelore, as entirely balanced by the element
ol certainty on the other; or, in other words,
it the ordinary expenditures should not be re
duced, any deficiency ironi this cause may be
amply provided lor fiom the sum set apatt for
the reduction of the debt—a result which
leads to the conclusion that the sum of three
hundred and twenty millions ot dollars is the
maximum amount which it will be necessary
to raise by taxation under any circumstances
in estimating the requirements lor revenue
tor the fiscal year 1868—0.
Of the 320 millions required it is shown that
150 millions may be confidently relied upon
from the tariff, leaving 170 millions to be de
rived from other forms of taxation. Mr.
Weils believes iu the existiug tariff und will
hear of no considerable reduction ol the rev
enue coming from this source. He reasons
in this way:
In determining, moreover, for the future
what shall be the average rate of the tariff, it
is important to bPar in mind that the practi
cal question presented is not so much what
the respective advocates of free trade and
protection may desire, or what abstract econ
omic science may teach, hut rather what under
l existing circumstances is mast expedient.
! And viewed in this light it seems certain,
that with all its objectionable features, we
have as yet devised no system, as a whole,
which operates with so much of certainty and
equality as the system of taxation levied
through the tariff. In proof of this, we have
only to cite in general the recognized failure
to collect the internal revenue; and, in par
ticular. the wide discrepancy in the receipts
ol the income tax from different sections of
the country— a single district in the State oi
New York having paid during the last fiscal
year nearly five and a hal 1 mi 11 ions ($5,490,2331
to the credit of this account, while the whole
income tax collected trom the eleven States
ot Yirgiuia, Texas, Tennessee, South Caroli
na, North Carolina, Mississippi, Louisiana,
Alabama, Georgia, Arkansas and Florida
during the same period was only $2,300,931.34,
<»n the other hand, it is not at all probable
that the amount indirectly paid by the people
of these same States lor the same period
through their voluntary consumption of arti
cles taxed uuder the tariff, such as tea, coffee,
sugar, spices silks, &c , was any less, propor
tionately. than that levied and collected
through the same agencies in other sections
of the country.
The 170 millions to be raised from other
sources than the tariff Mr. Wells thinks it
possible to collect, and at the same time to re
move nearly all of what are understood to he
industrial taxes and the tax upon raw cotton.
Countingnp the whole list of estimates and
recommendations, the result is exhibited in
the following table:
ESTIMA'ED RECEIPTS.
Slit Ilona.
From cus'oms, ..... 130
Internal revenue, viz:— - Millions.
From spirituous liquors, - - CO
“ Fermented 44 - - - - 6
44 Tobacco, 20
44 Income and salaries, - - 36
44 Gross receipts, ... 74
44 btamps, ----- l;
44 Special taxes and sales, - 29. ^
44 Legacies, &c., - - - 2
44 Banks, &c., - - - 13,5
-181.4
Millions, ------ 331 4
EXPEND.TUBES i • BFDUCED, FOB USUAL YEAR
1868-9.
Millions.
For iniorest of debt, - - - - 130
Millions.
44 Civil service, - - - - 40
44 War,.53
44 Navy, ------ 21
44 Pensions, - - - - - - 21
44 Indians, ----- 5
—140
For redemption of debt, ... 50
Baatice,. 114
Millions, 331.4
GRATIFYING CONCLVION8.
Among the encouraging statements to be
found scattered through this eminently hope
ful report are the following, which, though
taken out of their logical connection, will be
found ofinterest:
The most noticeable results, drawn from
purely domestic sources, which present them
selves as evidence upon the subject of the
present condition of the industry and capital
ot the country, may be grouped as follows:
First—Immigiation, which continues to
flow with uninterrupted Volume, at the rate
of over 300,000 per annum; making a positive
yearly addition to the wealth and producing
capacity of the country of not less than one
hundred and fitly millions of dollars.
Secondly—A continued increase in the in
vention ot machinery, and the perlectiug of
processes for improving and cheapening pro
ducts; as is more especially made evident by
the returns of the Patent Office—the whole
number of patents issued for the eleven
months ending December 3,1867, being 10,
907, as compared with 9100 issued during the
corresponding period of I860, 6220 tor the en
tire year 1806, and 4637 tor the year 1864.
This very* remarkable increase must not,
however, be accepted in its fullest extent, as
illustrative of substantial progress. It is so,
undoubtedly in great part; but, on the other
hand, the real value of many patented im
provements, as additions to the substantial
wealth of the country may well be doubted.
Thirdly—All increase in the quantity and
value of the natioual agricultural products—
the aggregate crops of all kinds for the year
1867, although less In some respects than was
anticipated, having exceeded, both in quan
tity and value, those of any previous year.
Fourthly—An increase in the capital invest
ed, and in the number and capacity of estab
lishments lor manufacturing purposes. In
order to obtain some certain'information on
this subject, the Commissioner, at the com
mencement of the last calendar year, institu
ted measuieslor collecting and recording such
data relative to every department of industri
al progress' as were la vailable. The reuslts
thus obtained would require a volume for
their publication; and. although somewhat
impertect and miscellaneous in their charac
ter, they establish, nevertheless, beyond a
doubt and in a most curious and interesting
manner, the fact that great and substantial
progtess in manufacturing industry has been
achieved in nearly every section of the coun
try.
* • * •
The United States ig the only one of the
leading nations of the world which is, at pres
ent, materially diminishing its debt and re
ducing its taxes; and the only one, moreover,
which offers any subtlantial evidence at its
ability to pay its debt within any definite
period, or even anticipates the prooabilty of
any such occurrence.
THE EXISTING COMMERCIAL DEPRESSION.
The commissioner takes a different view of
the present business stagnation from that
usually entertained by the public. He says:
In presenting a picture so full of encourage
ments in respect to our financial and indus
trial future, the commissioner does not need
to be reminded of the depressed condition of
commercial, mercantile, and industrial affairs,
for a reference to his former reports will prove
that much of what has of late occurred was
both loreseen and predicted. An analysis of
the causes — immediate and direct—which
have led to this depression will, however,
show that they are In no small degree general,
and not local, in their character; confined to
no one country, and the result of a natural
and not unexpected reaction trom a period of
high prices, speculation, and overproduction.
In fact, the people of the United States have
great cause of congratulation that the waveot
commercial depression which, since the ter
mination of tl.eir war, has swept over the
commercial centres of the whole civilized
world has brought so little of disaster to theiT
interests, inasmuch as there is not to day a
country in Europe in which the paralysis of
industry is not greater, the failures more nu
merous, and the prospect of an early return
of commercial prosperity and activity less en
couraging than in the United States.
THE CURRENCY.
The relation ot the contract ion of the cur
rency to the extent of four millions per
month, as authorized by Congress and effect
ed by the Secretary of the Treasury, to the
existing commercial depression is discussed
in the following manner:
it is not easy to see lu wliat manner the
shrinking of values—the immediate cause ol
the present industrial aud financial depres
sion—could have been averted by any recent
legislation ot Congress, even ii It had been
deemed desirable; or what connection, other
than purely imaginary, there has been be
tween the policy of the Treasury, as regards
con traction or funding, and the paralysis of
business which is an invariable accompani
ment of a fall in prices. Tims, for example,
cotton, both in the form of tabric aud ra y
material has declined because it seemed cer
tain that the season ot 18t>7-f> is to close with
a stock of mow than a million of bales in
excess of the requirements of Europe
and the United States for consumption;
wool, because the great wool producing coun
tries of the world have within a compara
tively few years again and again doubled
their entire product and export; paper, be
cause the capacity to manufacture has been
augmented hom to thirty per cent, within
the last sixteen mouths; li-eights on the
noitheru lakes because more tonnage has
been put alioat than war required to trans
port the cm ire product that required to be
transported; copper, because of the excessive
and cheap product ol the Chilian mines,
and coal because I wice as many mines have
been o;>ened, and twice as much capital in
vestee! as was necessary to supply the proeluct
needed. And this detailed exemplification
might be further extended if deemed desira
ble. In short, the immediate cbiel cause of
the tali oi prices has be n an over-prcduc
tion, which the great profits of former high
pilces have both stimulated and occasioned;
and it cannot be shown that the consump
tion ot any one of the great staple commodi
ties [wool possibly excepted) has during the
last year materially diminished; while the
consumption of some is known to have large
ly increased.
Reviewing the events of the past yea", it
would seem, furthermore, that- so tar from
there having been any adverse influence ex
erted upon prices through a contraction ot
the currency , the tendency, in truth, has been
entirely in the opposite direction; tor it can
B3t be doubted, that a fall of prices eqviva
lent, on the whole business of the country, to
at least ten per cent, must have been equiva
lent to a large addition to the machinery of
exchange before existing. What the practical
increase of the currency effected indirectly in
this manner lias amounted to, canuo' be defi
nitely stated, but in the opinion of the Com
missioner, it has not been le ss, during the last
twelve months, than one hundred million of
dollars.
The true theory of legislation under the
present condition of affairs would seem to be,
not to delay recovery—painful though it may
be—from abnormal prices and over produc
tion by fu'ther inflation, but that rebel should
be afforded to the greatest extent possible by
the removal ol taxes which impede production
—taxes which, when first imposed, were
drawn from profits, and were therefore, to a
ccrtrin extent, justified, but which with the
present reduction of values, fail mainly upon
capital.
V tU U'UC$.
—The American Athcneum, started for the
weekly discussion of philosophical and kin
dred topics, and The Revolution—the new
woman’s rights organ—are among the addi
tions made to New York journalism during
the first week of the year.
—The TJnivcrs, a French ultramontane
journal, in a published account of a visit to
the field of Montana, describes a dead Pontifl -
cal Zouave as wearing a smile on his face,
while a dead Garibaldian by his sids “looked
damnation."
—The Messager de Toulouse says: “During
the last few days a woman clothed in the garb
of the ancient pilgrims has attracted attention
here. She is a young and handsome Spanish
lady, named Saturnine Lopez y Alonzo. Hav
ing been attacked by cholera at Madrid, she
made a vow that, should she recover, she
would make a pilgrimage on foot to Rome and
Jerusalem. She has performed her pious un -
dertaking with astonishing courage. Setting
out in March, she arrived at Rome on the 27th
of June, and witnessed there the fete* of the
canonization,reached Jerusalem in due course,
whore she visited all the holy places, and is
now returning home.”
—“Father” Malane, a Roman Catholic cler
gyman, has been forbidden, by the Soman
Catholic Bishop of Glasgow, Scotland, to de
liver a lecture which he had announced on
the “Right of Man to the Fatherland.”
—A Boston paper thinks that the reason
why Goliah was astonished when David hit
him with a stone was that such a thing had
never entered his head before. The same pa
per tells (he story of a Sunday School pupil,
who, in the course of examination on the
Psalms, was asked, “What is the pestilence
that walketh in darkuess?” “The reply was,
“Please, s'r, bed bugs.”
—Another “tin mountain" has lately been
discovered in Madison county, Missouri, that
is said to be of great richuess. Tills late dis
covery, in appearance somewhat resembles
Pilot K nob, and it is said that trorn its base to
its summit rich tin ore can be found in untold
quantities.
—Joshua Hill is reported iu a late speech to
have said that he thought it would be a bless
ing to the people of Georgia if a thunderbolt
from Heaven should strike off the stage of ac
tion every politician iu the State above fifty
years of age. The Columbus Sun is willing
“to see i. tried on Josh.”
—The state of the wounded patriots in Romo
is said to be sad indeed. Hospital gangrene
sweeps them off by scores. They are still left
in their battle rags. At night there is no at
tendance. The ladies’ committee iu Florence
had sent in clothing aud £10, but funds are
low and access difficult.
—Some one given to the consideration of
the correctness of small things, has come to
the concision that the expression “Grin and
bear it,” is not only frivolous, bnt incorrect.
He amends it to “Groan and bear it,” a recom
mendation much easier to iollow.
—A Hartford (Ct.) gentleman, on Saturday
evening, had an interview with Mr. Dickens,
and offered him $3,000 to give one reading in
Hartford. Mr. Dickens said he had resolved
to make no engagements in this country, bnt
to go wherever he thought best, and would not
engage to come to Hartford for $100,100, but
added, “I shall come to Hartford.” He is to
read there on the 18th ot February. Mr. Dick
ens has declined, we understand, to make any
engagement to come to Portland, but he has
not declined to come without an engagement.
- Livonia is making an earnest effort, by* an
address to the Czar through its Parliament, to
have the German language continued as the
official tongue iu the Baltic provinces.
—“A Subscriber” wants to know how to
reckon interest at 7.3 per cant for months and
days. As 730 is twice 383, it is evident that
7.30 per cent. Is just two cants a day on a hu n
dred dollars.
—A singular discovery has just been made
at Chagny (Saone-et-Loire), by workmen en
gaged in digging the foundations of a railway
shed. At a depth ot about nine meters, in a
stratum of sandy clay and ferruginous oxides,
remains of proboscidians (elephants, rhinoce
roses, &o ) were brought to light, comprising
several back teeth and a formidable tusk in
large fragments, which, on being put together,
constituted a length of seven feet. The depth
at which this was found was still six metres
higher than the level of the most considerable
inundations of the Dheune, aud iu an undis
turbed stratum. So far, there is nothing ab
solutely extraordinary; but who would have
thought of finding underneath the bed con
taining these fossils of the tertiary period,an
aqueduot ot the most primitive kind and of
human workmanship? Yet such was the
case, the only instance ot the kind on record.
It is explained by M. Tremaux, who relates
the circumstance, by supposing that the ter
tiary fragments above alluded to have been
washed into the trench by a violent inunda
tion, and thus filled up the aqueduct.
—A lady-resident ut one of the fashionable
np-town hotels in New York says that a dinner
there, and a subsequent drawing-room parade,
differ only from a manaverie performance iu
that at the former they first feed and then ex
hibit, and at the latter they first exhibit r.a 1
then feed,
—A Roman Catholic damsel in Connecticut
was beloved by a Protestant youth, aud lov> d
in return, whereat her parents arranged for
her taking the vail. Having the bridal in
stead of the conventual veil in view she ran
off to Hartford the day before that arranged
for her farowell to the world, and is now sup
posed to be happy.
—Denmark is scandalized by the puhlica
iou of gossip about the notorious Oountesst
Danner, the morganatic wife of King Freder
ick VI. The particulars are as bad as a Chi
cago divorce case. It is sufficient to sav that
her birth was of the most illegitimate sort,
her life dissolute, and that she was never di
vorced from her husband, a tavern keeper at
Mulheim.
—rope rius IX is doscribed as a Tory good
looking man, with wonderfuHy graceful man
ners, stout aud corpulent, though of a yory
agreeable exterior, aud clothed as he is in
white, from the shoes to his capote, with gild
ed crosses embroidered on the fore part of his
shoes, and his rich white hair falling npon his
shoulders, he impresses those who see him
first as having an uncommonly venerable ap
pearance. His white, transparent cheeks be
come slightly colored by the effect of the air;
his face is of a beautiful regularity, and in
spite of his acquillne nose and his rather
piercing eyes, meekness and benevolence are
the very characteristics of his features.
—Miss Kate Fields, in a letter on the Dick
ens readings, written to the Springfield Re
publican, gives the following hard hit: “Ithr.a
often been remarked that there is a vast differ
ence between tweedledum and twecdledee;
consequently no one ought to be surprise l
that Mr. Beecher, who has never been inside
a theatres and who, therefore, has the best
reasons in the world for condemning this In
stitution, should allow Plymouth church to be
used by Mr. Dickens for his readings. We ail
know the marked distinction between the Bos
ton museum anti the Boston theatre: one is a
lecture-room and the other is a devil's onrlor.
Mr. Dickens's pertormanco is not theatrical,
of course not! He reads, he does not act,
they do on the accursed stage! So Plymouth
church will welcome and applaud Mr. Dickens
most deservedly, and will throw odium npon
the profession ot Macready and Ristori most
undeservedly. Consistency, thou art a jr*wel!”
—Another mot of the bright little Princess
Beatrice is reported by a Lcndo i letter writ
er. She is declared to have addressed hernia
in the following precocious a> d humorous
fashion: “Ma, wouldn't it be a good thing, to
save fighting with Theodore, for one of us to
marry him,insteadof your finding out another
German prince? I am snro it woull be a
good chang . Germans are so common. 1
would rather you should bring me a husband
from Japan. But Theodore's a capital
thought ; isn't he ma?H

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