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The Portland daily press. [volume] (Portland, Me.) 1862-1921, February 03, 1868, Image 1

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PORTLAND DAILY PRESS.
EstnMlshed June 23,1862. Vol.7. PORTLAND, MONDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 3, 1868. Terms $8.00per annum, in advance.
■- "' 1 -- - ■ — ..... - - __ _
THE PORTLAND DAILY PRESS is publish ed
every day, (Sunday excepted,) at No. 1 Printers*
Exchange, Exchange Street, Portland.
N. A. FOSTER, Proprietor.
Plums ‘.—Eight Dollars a year in advance.
THE MAINE STATE PRESS, is published at the
same place every Thursday morning at $2.00 a year,
i nvariably in advance.
Rates op Advertising.—One Jnch of space, in
length of column, constitutes a “square.**
$1.50 per square daily first week. 75 cents per
week after; three insertions, or less, $1.00; continu
ii g every other day alter first week, 50 cents.
Hall'square, three insertions or less, 75 cents: one
week, $1.00; 50 cents per week atlcr.
Under head of “Amusements,** $2.00 per square
per week; three iuserti ns or less, $1.50.
Special Notices, $1.°5 per square ior the first
insertion, and 25 cents per square lor each subse
quent insertion.
Advertisements inserted in the “Maine State
Press” (which has a largo circulation in every part
ot the State) for $1.00 per square ior first insertion
and 50 cents per square for each subsequent inser
tion.
BUSINESS CARDS.
BISE & NEYENS,
Mucrctmorii to Bj»J» Hill & ( o.,
Manufacturers aud Wholcsa’e Dealers in
COFFEE & SPICES,
Cream Tarter, Cayenne, &c.
liagte .TillI., Office 170 Fore SI.foot Exchange,
PORTLAND, ME.
t. u sise. _(jau£0dtn u. a. sevens
«. & J. T. OOIVXULL,
BATH, ME.,
Cordage Mauufaclurers,
Including Full Gangs, Fishermen’s Hawsers, Bolt
Rope. Point Hope, Trawl Warp, Lath Yarn, Ac.
Orders solicited. Jau8d6m
WEBB, FOGG & FREEMAN,
(Successors to A. WEBB & Co.,)
168 Commercial St.; Portland, Me.,
DEALERS IN
CORN,
Flour, Meat!, Oats,
lu Large or Small Quantities.
ALSO,
Shorts, Fine Feed & Cr. Corn
Of Choice Family flour by the single barrel or in
bags.
b. H. WEBB, ,T. L. FOGG, H. C. FREEMAN.
Dee 28, 18«7.-dtf
WRIGHT BUCK,
Proprietors of Greenwood Mill,
BDCKNVI1.LE, 8. C.
DEALERS in Yellow Piue Timber aud Ship
Stock. Orders solicited.
IttKxjti.NcKg—It. P. Buck & Co., New York;
¥»m. McGilvery. Esq., Searsport; Ryan & Davis,
Portland, mar26dtt'
C. O. DOWNES,
MERCHANT TAILOR,
HAS BEHOVED TO
No. 233 1-2 Congress Street,
CORNER OP OHESTNNT
August 30,1800. n iltl
Gray, Lufkin & Perry*
MANUFACTURERS
AND JOBBERS OF
•I ATS, CAPS. FURS,
-AND
Straw Goods !
34 A 5ti Middle over Woodman, True & Co’s,
PORTLAND, MAINE,
Apr 9-dtf
DECKING, MILLIKEN & CO.,
— JOBBBBB OE -
DRY GOODS,
AND -
woolens,
Gave this day removed to the now and spacious store
erected lor them
68 and OO Middle St.,
On the Old Site occupied by them previous to the
great tire.
Portland, March 16. tf
J Oil IN E. DOW, Jr.,
Counsellor and Attorney at Law,
And Solicitor in Bankruptcy,
JAUNCEY COURT,
43 Wall direct, - New York City,
BP“Commlssioner for Maine and Massachusetts.
.Tan. 29 dtf
W. T. BROWN & CO„
General Cow mission Alerchanls,
No. 90 l-‘i Commercial Street,
(Thomas Block,)
Willard T. Brown, ) Pinrpi
Walter H. Brown, J Portland.
Solo Wholesale Agents tor the Boston Match Co.
lor Maine. By permission refer to Dana & Oe., J.
W. Perkins & Co., Josiali H. Drummond, Burgess,
Fobes & Co. j une26dtf
W. II. PHILLIPS,
CARPENTER, BUILUER,
And Ship Joiner.
|g£r Circular and Jig Sawing done with despatch.
Mouldings ofall kinds, Doors, Sash and Blinds mode
or furnished to order.
33$ Commercial $t , (foot of Park Nt*,)
Portland, "Jaine, au29dti
NATHAN WEBB,
Counsellor and Attorney at Law,
TV <». <11 Exchange 8t.
July 8-iitl
C*. J. SCHUMACHER,
F R ESCO PAINTER.
Uiiceatthe Drug Store of Messrs. A. G. Sehlotter
beck & Co.,
3G3 Cougrcus $1, Portland, Me,
Jal2dtf One door above Brown.
Charles P. Mattocks,
Attorney and Counsellor at Law,
CANAL. RANK RCKLDING,
No. $0 Middle Ntreet - - - Portland.
febHdtl
G. A. SUSSKBAUT,
IMPORTER,
manufacturer and dealer in
Furs, Rats and Caps,
136 Middle Street,
PORTLAND, - - - MAINE.
mr^Casli paid for Shipping Furs. sep20dtf
lion’ARE .0 CLEAVES,
Attorneys & Counsellors at Law,
PORTLAND, M .!NE.
Office No. 30 Exchange Street,
Joseph Howard, Jy9’67-ly Nathan Cleaves.
WAITER COREY&C0,
MAHffEACTCBEBS AND DEALERS »N
FUBWITUSG !
Looking Glasses, Mattresses,
Spring Beds, Ac.
Clapp’s Block, Kennebec Street,
(Opposite Foot of Chestnut,)
Febodtf PORTLAND.
S. FltEEJUAN & CO.,
Commission Merchants l
1££1 Broad street,
Samuel Fheeman, I
E. D. Appleton. J NEW YORK.
yp*Particular attention given to the purchasing
of Flour and Grain.
References—David Kcazer, Esq , £. McKenney &
Co., W. & 0. It. Milliken, J. 13. Carroll, Esq., T. H.
Weston & Co. junelldtf
A. N. NOYttS & SON,
Manulacturers and dealers in
Moves, Ranges & Furnaces,
Can l>e found lu their
KKW BBHE.BtPH! ON ,.rMK 8T,f '
(Opposite the Market.)
• W hero they will be pleased to see all their former
Customers and receive orders as usual. augl7dtf n
IT. Jd. PAY SON,
»TO€KcBKOKEIt.
No. CO Exchange Street,
PORTLAND MB H021<lt
M. 1>. L. CANE,
Attorney ami Counsellor at Law,
No. ISO Nassau Street,
NEW YORK.
November 27. eod2in
jESg^Dr. W. 11. Johnson,
DENTIST,
OAct* Wo. 161 l-il Fra* Street,
Second House from H. H. Hay’s Apothecary Store.
tt^Ether administered when desired and thought
a«ivisabJe. _ Jy22eodtt
Coffins, Caskets, Desks,
Show Cases and Office Furniture,
Or Every Dmcriptiou,
Made from the best material and by EXPERIENCED
WORKMEN, at
C. H. BLAKE’H,
eept!8dtf No. 10 Cross St., Portland, Me
BUSINESS CARDS.
New Hair Dressing Saloon.
WILLIAM H. TANNERS,
SHAYINGj
AND
HAIR-RUES SING ROOM,
IN THE
Commercial House,
CROSS, NEAR tOK, COKE STREET.
Jan 2l-d2m
JOHN NEAL
Counsellor at Law, Solicitor and Attorney.
No. 16 Exchange street.
N. B. Ottlces and a large Hall to be let in same
bn:ltJll|g-jan20-dlaw6wM
GEO. W. TRUE & CO.,
116 Commercial Street, Hoad Long Wharf,
DEALERS IK
€OM, FLOUR,
Fresh Ground Yellow Meal,
Oats, Shorts, Bye Meal, die.
FINE DAIRY AND TABLE SALT.
W, H. WAS.DBON, GKO. W. TRU£.
January 20. 3tdteodtt
WEUB, FOGG Ac FREEMAN,
(Successors lo A. Webb & Co,)
ittM Commercial Ml., Portland, Me.,
DEALERS Ilf
Com,Flour,Meal, Oats,
In large or small quantities. Algo
Shorts. Flue Feed, uud Cr. Corn.
Hr Olioiee Family Flour by the single barrel or
in bags. ia2dtt'w
S. H. WEBB, J. L. FOGG, H. C. FREEMAN.
J. DOW & SON,
PORTLAND,.MAINE,
MANUFACTURERS OF
Half Oak Crop Sole Leather,
Bough and Finished “Backs” dc “Sides,”
EOlt BELTING !
Abo, Roller Mkiu*, Wax Graiu, Mplit and
Calf Leather.
(yOrders for Lea. Belting filled on most favorable
terms. jan31dlw&wt
GRODJINSKI BROS,,
Importers and Manufacturers of
CIGARS!
Meerschaum Pipes,
HOLDERS, &c.,
are now open at
Cor. Middle & Exchange Sts.,
Oppoaiic IfcavriN, the Hatter.
BSP*They respectfully solicit the public to exam
ine their stock.
January 9,1^68. dtf
COPARTNERSHIP NOTICES.
I) issolution.
THE Copartnership heretofore existitg under
the firm name of Low Plummer & Co., is this
day dissolved by mutual consent. The affairs of the
late firm will be settled by either partner at the old
stand No. 83 Commercial Street.
II. D. LOW,
L. F. PLUMMER.
A. J. PLUMMER,
H. B. KEAZfc.lt.
Feb 1. dlw
Copartnership Notice.
THE Undersigned have this day formed a copart
nership under the firm name of
PLIJ!UME(t & KEAZEK,
lor the transaction of the wholesale Grocery and
Flour Business, and have taken store No. >-3 Com
mercial St., formerly occupied by Low, Plummer &
Co. L.F. PLUMMER,
H. B. KEAZER.
Feb. 1, 18G8. dlw
Partnership Notice
JAMES B. DODGE has been this day admitted a
member of the firm or James Bailey & Co.
JAMES BAILEY,
JAMES B. DODGE.
Portland Jan. 1,1668. lebldlm
E3^Star copy.
Dissolution of Copartnership.
THE copartnership heretofore existing under the
firm name ot Benson & Houghton, is this day
dissolved by mutual consent. The affairs oi the late
firm will be adjusted bv A. M. Benson.
A. M. BENSON,
E. B. HOUGHTONi
Portland, Jan. 14, 1868.
Copartnership Notice.
We have purchased the stock and stand of Benson
and Houghton, and have admitted Mr. A. M. Benson
as a copartner. Our style from this time will be
Clement, Goodridge & Benson.
EDWIN CLEMENT,
GEO. GOODRIDGE,
A. M. BENSON.
Portland, Jau. 14, 1868. Jan21d4w
Copartnership Notice.
THE underSftned have this day formed a copart
nership under the name of
BIOHABDSON, HABEIS & 00.,
tor the purpose ot carrying on the wholesale
West India Goods, Grocery,
- AND -
Flour BiiNiness,
and have taken the store No. 143 Commercial Street,
heretofore occupied by Richardson, Dyer & Co.
K. M. RICHARDSON,
BENJ. F. HARRIS,
J. W. DYER,
HENRY LITTLEFIELD,
December 14. d&wistt
IMsolution.
THE Firm of Lamb & Simouton is this dav dis
solved by mutual consent. Mr. Lamb is to
settle all accounts. G. H. LAMB,
A. H. SIMON TON.
Jan. 17. dtf _
Copartnership Notice.
THE undersigned have this day formed a copart
nership under the firm name of
Donnell, Greely & Butler,
And taken the store No 31 Commercial st., eorner |
of Franklin and Commercial, where they will con
tinue the business as
Com mission MorclinutN,
Ami Wholesale Dealers in OROOERIES. FLOUR
FORK, LARD, FISH, Ac.
J. 15. DONNELL,
JUSTUS GREELY,
A. BUTLER.
Portland, Aug. 1,18C7. au3codtf
Copartner ship Notice.
TlHE subscribers have this day formed a copart
nership under the name of
Evans &. Greene,
And will continue the business of
COAL AND WOOD!
At the old Stand
*4SI Commercial 81, Head 8miili’ii Wharf.
We have on hand and ofler lor sale at the low
est cash prices, the different varieties of Hard and
Soft Coals, all ot the first quality, and delivered In
the best possible order. Also
11A 111) AND SOFT WOOD.
Delivered in any part of the city.
WM. II. EVANS.
CI1AS H. GREENE.
Portland. Nov 1st, 1867. _ noldif
SAMUEL E. COBB,
INo. : in f» Collarl'CKM Street,
NEAR HEAD OF GREEN STREET.
PIANO FORTES. Melodeons, Organs, Collars,
Violins, Banjos, Plutinas, Music Boxes, Con
certinas, Accordeons, Tamborines, Flutes, Flageo
lets, Ficalos, Clarionets, Violin Bows, Music Spools,
Music Stands, Drums, Files, Sheet Music, Music
Books, Violin and Guitar Strings, Stereoscopes and
Views, Umbrellas, Canes, Clocks, Bird Cages, Look
ing Glasses, Albums Stationery, Pens, Ink, Rocking
Horser, Pictures and Frames, Fancy iiasketR, Chil
dren’s Carriages and a great variety of other articles.
Old Piano# Taken iu Eulmuse for New,
yypiannd and Melodtous tuned and to r**nt.
A pril 6—tl ___
NOTICE.
Boots, Shoes and Rubbers.
HAVING bought the Stock of Boots. Shoes and
Rubbers of MCCARTHY & BERRY,
,114 f ougreHNHt, opp. Mechanic’* Building
would invite the public and his former customers In
particular to give him a call at 314 Congress street,
opposite Mechanic’s Hall.
CALEB 8. SHALL,
Jan 22, 18C8. Jy23eod3w
Yellow Corn.
f? AA/ v BUSHELS YELLOW CORN, in
IO.VJvJ store and tor sale by
WALDRON <& TRUE,
jan 29-d4w* Nos 4 and 5 Union Wharf.
HEAL ESTATE.
IV E W
First Flags Hotel
TO LET!
The subscriber bus nearly completed a
large and thoroughly appointed Hotel lu
the nourishing CITY OF PORTLAND,
MAINE. The building is situated in a
central and commanding position on the
Stonier of Middle mad Union site.,
two principal thorough lares; it is five stories high,
has a tree stem front, contains about 220 rooms, ami
is to be provided with all modern conveniences ami
improvements. It is | renounced the finest building
lor Hotel purposes in New England. The Hotel
can be ready tor occupancy by the middle of June.
At plications may he addressed to the subscribers
at Portland,
J. B. BROWN, or
„ , J. B. BROWN & SONS.
Feb 1-dtf
For Sale.
1MIE va’uable Farm of the late Dr. J. M. MUli
keu in Scarboro’, situated on the main road lead
ing irom Saco tofcPoilland. This farm comprises
about 2C0 acres of wood-land, a tine timber lot, til
lage, pasturage, and marsh. It is within one mile
or the depot, from Old Orchard Beach, and near
to church, school, and post office. This farm is in
excellent order, as alxo llie buildings upon it. A
well linislied brick house with all farming conven
iences, barn 8Ix3Gfeet; wood-house, granary, &c.
There are two fine orchards of choice varieties of
apples, pears and grapt s, This firm will be sold en
tire or in lots to suit purchasers. It is a dt sir able
location for a physician or any oue wishing a pleas
ant country residence. For particulars enquire of
WJf. S-MILLIKEN. Scarboro’, Me.
Ahne well privilege on said farm. Jan27dtf
New House for Sale.
ANEW two and a half story house, thoroughly
built, containing fifteen rooms, convenient for
ouc or two tamilies. located on Cumberland Street,
is offered for sale on favorable terms. It has gas,
marble mantels, an abundance of hard and sett wat
er, cemented cellar floor, brick cistern, etc. Apply
W, W. H. JERRIS,
Jan’.MSw Real Estate Agent,
FOR SALE!
MTwo Brick Houses in a block of three, on
Cumberland,corn- r of Pearl street; two stories
with French root, gutteis lined with galvan
ized iron, cement cellar floors, with brick cisterns.
One containing 10 finished rooms, and th^ other nine
rooms—all above ground—with hard and soft water
brought in the kitchen—thoroughly built and con
venient.
Also a block of two houses thoroughly built ot
brick, and convenient; two stories with French roof:
hard and soft water brought in the kitchen; contain
ing twelve finished rooms each, on Myrtle st. For
further particulars enquire on the premises or to
CHA&. RICHARDSON,
dclSdttis 133 Cumberland St.
For Sale—One Mile Irorn Port
land.
THE beautiful residence occupied by Rev. W. P.
Merrill, situated in Westbrook, on the Back
Cove road, known by the name of the Machigonne
Villa, The grounds are tastefully laid out with
walks, flower beds, splendid evergreens and shade
trees; about 200 pear, apple, plum and cherry trees
in bearing; plenty of currents and gooseberries;
about n acre ot st rawberries—raised 1,COO quarts
this year. The lot embraces nearly tour acres, with
streets CO feet wide all round it. The buildings—a
tine houso with 15 rooms, French root and cupola,
and a piazza round three sides; warmed with fur
nace, good well and cistern in cellar; gardener’s
house and summer house, and good stable well
finished with cellar, at the low price ot $7,500.
Terms easy. For particulars euquire on the pre
mises, or of WHITT EM ORE & ST ARBI RD, on
Commercial street; or FERNALD & SON, corner
ot Preble and Congress streets.
Sept. 3. dtt
NOT1CJB. I will sell on favorable terms as to
payment, or let for a term of years, the lots on
the corner of Middle and Franklin streets, and on
Franklin street, including the corner of Franklin and
Fore streets. Apply to WM. HILLIARD, Bangor
or SMITH & REED. Attorneys. Portland. iy12t!
To be Sold Immediately.
TWO Houses and lots in City. Price $900 and $ 1,
X 600. House lots in Cape Elizabeth $5.1 to $100.
JOSEPH REED,
Real Estate Agent, Oak and Congress sts.
Octobes 2. dtt
Laud for Sale.
APART of the lat« Mary S. Lunt’s Estate, near
Portland, via Tukey’s Bridge; in parcels to
suit Purchasers. Euquire in person or by letter of
JAMES JOHNSON,
Stroudwatcr, Westbrook Adm’r of said Estate with
will annexed. oct 22-d«&wtt
REMOVALS.
REMOVAL I
Mr. Geo. W. II. Brooks
WOULD inform his patrons and the public that
he ha a removed to his new and
Spacious Bakery,
No. 70 Brackett Street,
where he will be pleased to serve his old customers
and such new ones as may favor him with a call for
the Staff ol Life in all the branches that are usually
fouud in au establishment ot the kind. All orders
promptly attended to trom tbe shop or his carts.
All goods delivered free of charge in any part
of the city.
G. W. II. BROOKS.
F OUR.
I am now prepared to furnish the best grades of
Family Flour at its most re&sonab'e rates, delivered
free ot charge.jan22-lwodtcod3w
REM O V .A. L.
Swell & Brsidley,
DEALERS IX
COOK & PARLOR STOVES,
For Wood or Coal,
Have removed to
No. 134 Exchange Street.
C3^The public are respectfully requested to ex
amine the stoves aud prices. Uec30d3m
REMOVAL.
WOODMAN,“TRUE & 00,,
IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IX
DRY GOODS!
WOOLENS,
Gents’ Furnishing Goods,
AND SMALL WAliLS,
Have this day removed to Woodman’s Block,
Corner of Middle and Pearl Streets,
Nearly opposite tbeir old site.
Agents lor Maine for the World-renowned
Linen Finish Collar I
With Cloth at the Button Hole, and
Gray’s Patent Molded Collar
—ALSO—
Agents for Singers Sewing Machine.
WOODMAN, TRUE A CO.
Portland, Dec 2d, 1807. dec3dlm
R E M O V A L .
JI. M.BBE WEB,
(Successor to J. Smith Sc Co.)
Manufacturer of Leather Belling,
Has removed to
NO. MIDDLE STKEET,
Marrett & Poor’s New Block, where may be fcund a
lull assortment ot Leather Belting, as cheap, and
equal to any in New England. Belting and Loom
Straps made to order. Also for sate. Belt Leather
Backs and Sides, Leather Trimmings, Lace Leather,
Belt Hooks, Copper Rivets and Burs. jyl9dtf
A • III £ It It ILL,
eouu.se] lor and Attorney at Law,
lias removed to 144J Exchange Street, opposite pres
ent Poat Office. july9dtt'
IiEMO VAR.
JAMES O’DONNELL,
Counsellor at Law,
Notary Public & ConunisMionfr of Deeds,
Has removed to Clapp’s New Block,
OOR. EXCHANGE AND FEDERAL STREETS,
Jan 15. (Over Sawyer’s Fruit Store.) dtf
R EbTo V A. L. I
W. II. CLIFFORD,
Counsellor at Law,
And Solicitor of Pateutu,
Has Removed to
Comer of Brown and Congress Streets,
jal6 BROWN'S NEW BLOCK. dtl
THE BEST
C H RI ST MAS
- OR -
N e w Y ear’s
present
any one can give their triends will be a
PHOTOGRAPH!
and will be prized as such. Go to
E. fS. WORMELL’S,
-Vo, 310 Congress Street,
where you can get all kinds ofsuch work done m the
bcatmanner, and Tor prices that dely competition.
Ph.loarapb, i„ „,| ,u^Ir Niylm. Till
lyin’, au.t Fci rcoiypc, the cheapest that can be
luaiie in this city, and perfect srtidaction wai ranted.
Remember the place.
* H.WORJIB1.L,
dec25(1 if _ 31G Congress Street.
TIN TYPES,
TWENTV-FIVJS CENTS PER DOZEN
At A. S. DAVIS’ Photograph naileries, No. 21
arket Square, opposite Preble Stwei. jyatt
SCHOOLS.
Norway Academy !
- AT -
Norway, Maine.
THE SEEING TEEM, of this Institution will
commence on
Wednesday. February 2Gth, 1808,
and continue eleven weeks.
CHARLES D. BARROWS, A. B., Principal
Edwin, F. Ambrose, A. B. Assooiate Prin.
Assistant Teachers oi acknowledged ability and
| experience have been secured.
KfF^Music and Drawing by competent Teachers.
BOARD—including everything—wood, lights and
washing, three dollars per week.
Also Room* for Students wishing to hoard them
selves.
Application should be made in person or by letter
to the Principal, <o Rev. N. Gunnison, J. A. Deni
son, Esq, or 10 Freeland Howe, Esq., at Norway.
Jan 22-eod3w_
WATER VILLE
Classical Institute !
The Spring Term will begiu Tcbrunry
I Oil., 1SGS.
wM For fuller particulars send for Catalogue.
J. H. HANSON, Principal.
Jan 22-eod&w3w4
Bridgton Academy.
The Spring Term of this Institution will commence
Tuesday, Feb. £5th, 1S6S, and coutiuue
Eleven Weeks.
JOHN G. WRIGHT• A.M.,
PRINCIPAL.
Competent Assistants secured for the several de
partments.
Text Kooks furuisbod by the Principal at Portland
prices.
Board in the vicinity at reasonable rates.
THOMAS H. MEAD, Secretary.
North Bridgton, Jan. 28, 1868. jan31eod&wtd
540 itIILES
- OF THE -
UNION
Pacific Railroad
Running West from Omaha,
Across tlie Continent,
ARE NOW COMPLETED,
THE TRACK BEING LAID AND TRAINS RUN
NING
Within Ten Miles of the Summit
of the Rocky Mountains.
The remaining; ten miles will be finished as soon
as the weather permits thejroad-bed to be sufficiently
packed to receive the rails. The work continues to
be pushed forward in the rock cuttings oil tho west
ern slope with unabated energy, aud a much larger
iorce will be employed during the current year than
ever betore. The prospect that the whole
Grand Line to the Pacific
Will be Completed in 1870,
Was never better. Tte means so tar provided for
construction has proved ample, and there is no lack
ot funds for the most vigorous prosecution of the en
terprise. These means are divided into four classes:
1.—UNITED STATES BONDS,
Having thirty years to run, and bearing six per cent,
currency interest, at the rate of $16,000 per mile for
517 miles on the Plains; then at the rate of $48,000
per mile for 150 miles through the ltoeky Mountains;
then at the rate of $32,000 per mile lor the remaining
distance, for which the United States takes a second
lien as security. The interest on these bonds is paid
by the United States Government, which also pays
tho Company one-half the amount of Its bills in
money for trausportatmg its Height, troops, mails.
&c. The remaining half of these bills is placed to
the Company’s credit, and forms a sinking fund
which may finally discharge the whole amount of
this lien.
2—FIRST MORTGAGE BONDS
By its charter the Company is permitted to issue
ils own First Mortgage Bonds to the same amount us
tho Bonds issued by the government, and no more,
and only as tne road progresses. The Trustees tor
the Bondholders, are the Hon. E. D. Morgan, U. S.
Senator from New York, and the Hon. Oakes Ames,
member ot the U. S. House ot Representatives, who
are responsible for the delivery of tlieso Bonds to the
Company in accordance with the terms of the law.
3-THE LAND GRANT.
The Union Pacific Railroad Company has a land
frrant or ahnnlntp donation from the government of
12,800 acres to the mile on the line of tho »-o***i, which
wiH not be worth less than $1.50 per acre, at the low
est valuation.
4— THE CAPITAL STOCK.
The authorized capital of the Union Pacific Rail
road Company is $100,000,000, of which over $8,500,
000 have been paid on the work already done.
THE
Means Sufficient to Build the Road.
Contracts for the entire work ot building 914 miles
of first-class railroad west from Omaha, comprising
much of the most difficult mountain work, and em
bracing every expense except surveying, have been
made with responsible parties (who have already fin
ished over 540 miles), at the average rate of sixty
eight thousand and fifty-eight dollars'($68,058) per
mile. This price includes all necessary shops tor
construction and repairs of carB, depots, stations,
and all other incidental buildings, and also locomo
tives, passenger, baggage, and freight cars, and oth
er requisite rolling stock, to an amount that ahull
not be less than $5,000 per mile. Allov ing the cost
of the remaining one hundred and eighty-six of the
eleven hundred miles assumed to be built by the
Union Pacific Company to be $90,000 per mile,
The Total Coat of Eleven Hundred Mile*
will be ax follows i
914 miles, at $68,058 $62,205,012
186 miles, at $90,000, 16,740,000
Add discounts on bonds, surveys, &c, 4,500,000
Amount, $83,445,012
As the U. S. Bonds are equalfto money, and tlie
Company’s own First Mortgage Bonds have a ready
market, we have as the
Available Cash Kexourres for Building;
Eleven Hundred miles:
U. S, Bonds. $29,328,f00
First Mortgage Bonds. 29,328,000
Capital Stock paid in on the work now done,8,500,000
Land Grant, 14,080,000 acres, at $1.50 per
acre, 21,120,000
Total, $88,276,000
The Company have ample facilities for supplying
any deficiency that may arise in means for construc
tion. This may be done wholly or in part by addi
ditioual subscriptions to the capital stock.
Earnings of the Company.
At present, the profits of the Company are derived
only from its local trafic, but this is already much
more than sufficient to pay the interest, on all the
Bonds th j Company can issue, if not another mile
were built. It is not doubted that when the road is
completed the through traffic of the only line con
nectihg the Atlantic and Pacific States wi 1 be large
bejond precedent, and, as there will bo no compe
tition, it can always be done at profitable rates.
It will be noticed that the Uuion Pacific Railroad
i , in fact, a Government Work, built under the su
pervision of Government officers, and to a large ex
tent with Government money, and that its bonds
are issued under Government direction. It is be
lieved that no similar security is so carefully guard
ed, and certainly no other is based npon a larger or
more valuable property. As the Comp ny’s
First Mortgage Bonds
are offered for the present at 90 CT8.JON THE
DOLLAR, they are the cheapest security in the
market, being more than 15 per cent, lower than U.
S. Stoeks. They pay
Six Ber Cent, in Gold!
or over NINE PER CENT, upon the invest
ment, aDd have thirty years to run before maturity.
Subscriptions will be received in Portland by
SWAN A BARRETT,
NO. IS EXCHANGE STREET,
and in New York at the Company’s Office, No. 20
Nassau Street, and by
CONTINENTAL NATIONAL BANK, No. 7 Nas
sau Street.
CLARK, DODGE & CO., Bankers, No. 51 Wall
Street.
JOHN J. CISCO & SON, Bankers' No. 33 Wall
Street.
HENRY CLEWS <& CO., Bankers, No. 32 Wal
Street.
And by the Company’s advertised Agents through
out the United States. Remittances sliculd be made
indrallsor other funds par in New York, and the
bonds will be sent free of charge by return express.
Parties subscribing through local agents, will look
to them for their safe delivery.
A NEW PAMPHLET AND MAP, showing the
Progress of the Work, Resources tor Construction,
and Value of Bonds, may be obtained at the Com
pany’s Offices, or of its advertised Agents, or will be
sent free on application.
JOHN J. CISCO,
jan!4d&wlm Treasurer, New York.
MISCELLANEOUS,
iv<». n.
SIMILIA SIMIL1BUS OUSAIJTUR,
Humphrey’s Ilomceopatliic Specifics,
HAVE PROVED, irom the most ample experi
ence, u'i entire success; Simple—Prompt- Effi
cient, ana Reliable. They are the onlv Medicines
perfectly ad ipted to popular use—so simple that
mistakes cannot be made in using them; so harmless
as to be free Irom danger, and so efficient ua to be al
ways reliable. They have raised the highest com
mendation Irom all, and will always render satisiac
ion.
(Jts
No. I Cures Fevers, Congestion, Iutlamations, 15
“ 2 “ Worms, Worm-Fever, Worm-Colie, 25
“ 3 “ Crying Colic or Teething or infants, 15
“ 4 “ Diuvrfetcn ol children or adult■», 25
‘ 5 “ Dysentery, Griping, Billions Colie, 25
** 6 “ Cholera-’tlorbusNausea,Vomiting,25
“ 7 “ t 'oiigh.'*, (Joids, Bronchitis, 15
8 “ Nnira!»!a, Toothache, Faeenohe 25
“ 9 “ Blrn«(nciics,Sick-Headacl:c, Vertigo,25
“ 10 “ Dyspepsia, Billious Stomach, 25
** Nupprrsseo o*r painful Periods, 25
12 ‘ Whit*!**, too profuse Periods, 25
“13 “ Croup. Cough, difficult Breathing, 25
‘ “ »«lt »«l*eum,Erysipel;.s.Eruptiou8,25
15 “ IS lien amt ik in. Kheumatio Pains, 25
“ 20 “ Fever A Ague, Chill Fever, Ague, 50
“ 17 “ File*, blind or bleeding, * * 50
“18 “ Opthulmy, au l kore or weak eyes, r,u
‘*19 “ Catarrh, acute or cronie, lnllueii/.a,50
“20 “ Wboopiug Cougb.vioient Coughs,50
* 21 “ Axfbma, Oppressed Breathing, 61)
“ 22 “ Ear Discharge**. I in jaired Hearing,*0
“ 23 “ k*cr*fultt,enlarged<Haiids,Swellings, 60
“21 “ «cucral Debility,Physi alWeakness,f0
“25 “ Dropsy, ami scanty Secretion* 50
“28 “ *tcuMickne*a, sickness from riding, 60
“27 “ K.idncy-Di*ea*c, Gravel, 50
“ 28 “ Nervous Debility, fretuiua!
liuiisdous, Involuntary Dis
charges ] 00
“29 “ Sine Alonth, Canker, 50
!' “ 5cr*“:V y **oaknctt*, wetting bed, 50
31 ‘ Paiuful Period*,with Spasms. 50
“32 “ Suffering* at Change of 1 00
.! E pile pay, Spasms, St. Vitus' Dance,l 00
“34 Diphiheria,ulcerated Sore Tima., CO
FAltllliV CASES
Of .‘*5 large vial*, morocco com',
containing a •peeifftc: for efery
ordinary disease a family i* nub
jeet to, and a book of dircctionM, $10,00
Smaller Family and Traveling cases,
with 201 to 28 vials.,.from $5 to
Specifics lor all Private Discusc*, both
for Curiug and for Preventive treat
ment, in viate and pocket case*,.to $5
B3r"l'hese Remedies by the ease or single Box are
sent to any part of the Country, by mail or express,
freo ol charge on receipt ol the price. Address
Humphrey’** Specific
HOMOEOPATHIC MEDICINE COMP’V
Office and Dcnot No 562 Broadwav, New York
DIt. HUMPHREY is consulted daily at his office,
personally or by letter as above, lor all‘forms of dis
eases.
,S?r<T.lz#r and Croamau & Co, Agents.
dc6eodly 7
The Mercantile Agency,
47 CougreaM and Hi Water .Street, ISontoa,
Will have an Office First of March in Jose Block
No. 88 Exchange St., opposite the Custom
House, Portland.
This institution was established by Lewis Tappan,
in new York, in 184!; by him aud Edward E. Dun
bar in Boston, in 1843, and subsequently by them and
their successors in each ofthe principal cities of the
United States and Canada; and is believed to be the
first ami original organization In : ny partofihe
world, for the purpose of procuring in a thorough
manner, recording and preserving for Its patrons de
tailed information respecting tho home standing, re
sponsibility and credit of Merchants, Manufacturers,
Traders, drc., to aid in dispensing credit and collect
ing debts.
During the twenty-six years that the Mercantile
Agency has been in operation,there has been no time
that it has not enjoyed tbo confidence and patronage
of the most honored and sagacious business men in
each community where one of its offices has been lo
cated. With a determination, adhered to from the
first opening of this office to the present time, to se
cure the aid of reliable and painstaking correspon
dents, men of character and integrity, competent
assistants and clerks in all responsible positions, and
to be strictly impartial in our reports without fear
or favor, the business has grown to an extent corres
ponding to the increased teritory and extended busi
ness ofthe country; and never has the agency been
in condition to render such valuable service to its
subscribers as at the present .time.
In addition to the recorded reports, revised syste
matically twice a year by correspondence and trav
elling, we have, for the past three years, issued to
subscribers who desired it, they paying an addition
al subscription for the use thereof, a REFERENCE
BOOK, containing names of individuals and firms in
Mercantile, Manufacturing, Mechanical, and other
business, arranged in alphabetical order In their
respective towns or cities, with a double rating ap
pended, (as per Key furnished with the book.) show
ing, first, approximately the pecuniary strength,and
secondly, the mercantile credit. This work, now is
sued in January and July of each year, is kept use
ful to subscrllK'is by the issue ol weekly, (or more
frequent) notifications ol important changes which
affect the ratings.
Besides the GENERAL REFERENCE BOOK, of
whole U. S. and British Provinces, we issue a
BOOK OF PRINCIPAL CITIES, some 70 in num
ber, a
NEW ENGLAND REFERENCE BOOK, and a
WESTERN REFERENCE BOOK.
All of the three last named are included in the
first , and either c’an be supplied to a subscriber ac
cording to the wants of bis businoss.
Wc nitciii to ,-^rKsea t„exbib t the Kciereuce Book
and other facilities of tho Agency, and io answer
such questions as may be asked respecting oifr sys
tem and terms of subscription, upon application per
sonally or by letter.
EDWARD RUSSELL & CO.
January 1, 1SC8.
ASSOCIATE OITCE*.
E. RUSSELL & CO., Boston, and Portland4 R. G.
DUN & Co., New York City, Albany, Bullalo,
Philadelphia, Baltimore, Cincinnati, ‘Pittsbnrg,
Cleveland, Detroit, Chicago, Milwaukie,Chariest >n,
New Orleans, Louisville, Memphis, St. Louis, and
London, England. DUN. W1MAN & CO., Tor
onto, C. W , Montreal, C. E., and Halifax. N. S.
Jan 9 dtf
S T A T E M i: X T
Of the Condition ot the
Howard Insurant s Co,
OF NEW YORK.
On the 31st day ot December, 18G7,
Made to the Secretary of the State of Maine, Janu
ary 20th, 1868.
CAPITAL.
Authorized Capital, $530,000
Amount actually paid in, $500,000 00
Amount ot Surplus, 183,197
Whole ain’t of actual Capital and Surplu.%$683,197 23
ASSETS.
Amount of Cash on hand aud on deposit
in Phoenix National aud Manhattan
Banks, N. Y., - - - - - $27,202 37
Amount due from Agents, - 2,658 16
Amount of Real Estate owned by the Co.
in the City oi New York, - 90,000 00
Amount of 1st Mortgage on Real Estate, 52,300 00
Amount of Loans seeurert by Collaterals, 23,150 00
Amount invested in Bank Stocks *at mar
ket value). 31,500 00
Amount invested iu State,City aud Coun
ty Stocks (at market value] - - 59,00
Amount invested in United States Secur
ities, (market value) - 382.000 00
Amount of unpaid premiums, - - 2,004 28
Amount of all other assets, - 4,537 60
Amount of Interest accrued and Rents, 5,769 73
Total Assets,.$683,197 23
JLIAI5 VIjIfl'l(£M»
Amount ot Lanes acknowledged, - §4,494 51
“ “ “ unadjusted, - - 3,500 00
“ “ all other claims against the Co., 284 12
“ “ Cash Dividends unpaid, - 370 00
Total amount of Liabilities, - $8,018 03
HENRY H. OAKLEY, Vice-Pres.
T1IEO. KEELER, Sec’y.
State of New' York, I afl
City and Couuty of New York, |
Personally appeared before me, this 20th day ot
January, A. D. 18C8, Henry A. Oakley, Vice-Presi
dent, and Theodore Keeler, -Secretary, of the How
ard Insurance Company, of New York, and sev
erally made oath that the foregoing statement by
them subscribed, is true to the best of their knowl
edge and belief.
[Seal.] THOS. L. THORNELL,
Notary Public.
ACiENT IN UIAINK,
JOHN B. CARROLL,
PORTLAND.
January 25. d3w
obm«es,
OKAWGES!
Cheap, Cheap!
C)(\ (\nn MESSINA ORANGES just ar
KJ 3KJ\J rived fresh and nice at only
pev lOO,
Or .?<> Cents Per Dozen,
For Sale at
ALLEN9S ERUIT STORE,
jan3tdlw No. 11 Exclinuge »t.
Chance lor Business.
FOR SALE—stock and store situated in one of the
best locations for trade in Oxfor 1 Coun ty, and
now doing a largo business. For further particulars
enquire of True & Haskell, South Paris, or
STEVENS, LORD & HASKELL,
Jan27dtf _Portland.
Board
FOR Single gentlemen or a gentleman aipl wife
can be had by applying to rS. W. N. t Market
Square, between the hours oi 12 and 1 o’clock.
Jan. 14. dtf
DAILY PRESS.
PORTLAND.
Monday Morning, February 3, 1863.
The I’eiinliy.
A few mouths ago Gen. Grant occupied a
more enviable position than auy man in ex
istence. With his own people lie was like
Bayaid,‘ without fear and without reproach."
With foreign nations his military successes
had caused him to lie ranked with Welling
ton and Marlborough, and only a little below
those veritable war-gods, Napoleon and Fred
erick. The North was liis constant eulogist,
and the South owed him no malice. So soft
was the velvet that concealed the iron hand
that crushed the insurrection, so mild and
compassionate wa3 the victor with the sub
jects of his conquest, that they did not re
member Appomattox against him. The favor
ite candidate for the Presidency witli the
soldiers and sailoi-s was Grant. With the
millionaires of New York, the same great
name was invoked as that of one who would
prove the palladium of the country’s safety in
peace as he had been in war. Hence no one
was more welcome in the parlors of A. T.
Stewart and Ids mercantile associates than
the quiet tanner from Galena. The laboring
classes shared the feelings of the rich, and
made no doubt that the man who entered
upon the Vicksburg campaign with a field
glass and tooth-brush as his only personal
baggage, would administer llie affairs of the
nation wisely and successfully. The name of
Grant was so idolized that there was danger
of iis driving the saints out of the calendar.
Even the vices of the man were looked upon
witli such superstitious tolerance as the
ancients regarded the brutality of Mars
or the amours of Jupiter. The vice, we
should say, for the aggregate of Grant's
known dissipations was represented by
his cigar, and its complete identification
with his person. But it was no longer a ci
gar. It had experienced between his lips a
kind ot apotheosis; the cjuid divinum of the
man had attached to it. It was a conjurer’s
wand, that cast spells upon the enemy, sur
rounding him with impervious clouds and
bringing to naught his counsels. The ham
mer of Tlior was not more potent, nor the
enchanted sword of King Arthur. Many a
rash youth got himself headaches and heart
aches by devotion to tobacco under the im
pression that he was acquiring something of
Grant's inspiration, as the Boston lawyers
used to affect long hair, pale faces and a used
up ah- generally, imagining that they were
all Rufus Choates.
now does it Happen, then, that Gtn. Mc
Clernand dares to say, in short, that Grant is
“no better than lie should be”?—and the Bos
ton Post to give currency to a rumor that he
was recently drunk? It is but the same fate
that would befall the archangel Michael if by
a rare chance he should visit Washington on
an inspecting tour, and should have his name
mentioned in connection witli the Presidency
by some injudicious friend. All the satauic
powers that felt his blows in the old Miltoni
an war would be sure to rise in judgment
against him, and the public would be assured
that his services against the apostate ange's
had been immensely overrated, and that he
was nothing but a common-place sort of char
acter after all. Gen. Grant is merely begin
ning to pay tire penalty of being nominated
for the Chief Magistracy. As the campaign
progresses, the “babbling tongues” at the cap
ital will grow more and more slanderous. If
lie is nominated at Chicago on the 20lli of
May, from that time till his election in No
vember, which will follow as a matter of
course, he will experience what Scott passed
through in 1852 and Fremont in 1850. All
the McClernamls, who have for years been
obliged to conceal tlieir hatred by a public
sentiment not tol 'rant of slander against its
favorite, will acquire unwonted courage, and
throw their poisoned darts against the Gen
eral’s impenetrable armor. The old stories
that have hardly been whispered since Don
elson and Pittsburg Landing, will be revamp
ed and made available for campaign purposes.
But after election we shall all be once more
“original Grant men.”
l»fw SI mil, .
“OUB LIFE IN THE HIGHLANDS.”
Below we make a few extracts from Queen
Victoria's last venture in authorship, the
journal other visits to the Highlands, &c. It
seems the Queen and Prince Albert bad a
sincere liking for tlie Highlanders, and chose
them for their personal attendants. Two of
these trusty servants were the head-keeper
Grant and the well-known Highlander John
Brown. Of the former the Queen sjieaks in
warm terms, as “an excellent man, most
trustworthy, and of singular shrewdness and
discretion.”
BROWN’S HISTORY'.
“Mr. John Brown, in 1S5S, became my reg
ular attendant out of doors everywhere in tlie
Highland. He commenced as gillie in
1819, and was selected by Albert and me to go
witli my carriage. In 1851 he entered our
service permanently, and began in that year
leading my pony, and advanced step by step
by his good conduct and intelligence. His
attention, care and faithluh.ess cannot he ex
ceeded", and the state of my health, which of
late years has been sorely tried and weaken
ed. renders sucu qualifications most valuable,
and, indeed, most needful in a constant at
tendant upon all occasions. lie lias since,
most deservedly, been promoted to be an up
per servant, and my permanent personal at
tendant. (December, 1805.) He lias all the
independence aiid elevated feelings peculiar
to the Highland race, unu is singularly
straightforward, simple-minded, kind-hearted
and disinterested, always ready to oblige, and
of a discietion raiely to be met with. lie is
now in his fortfeth year. His father was a
small farmer, who lived at the Bush on the
opposite side to Balmoral. He is the second
ol nine brothers, three of whom have died,
two are in Australia and New Zealand, two
arc living in the neighborhood of Balmoral,
and the youngest, Archie (Aichibald) is valet
to our son Leopold, and is an excellent,trust
worthy young man.”
TliVtil-LING INCOGNITA.
The following is the Queen's account of
some of the incidents of the expeditions in
which she travelled incognita:
“A few seconds brought us over to the
road, where there were two shabby vehicles,
one a kind of barouche, into which Albert
and I got: Lady Churchill and Gtneral Grey
into the other—a break ;each with a pair of
small aud rather miserable horses, driven
by a man from the box. Grant was on oui
carriage, and Brown on the other. We had
gone so far forty miles—at least twenty on
horseback. We had decided to call ourselves
‘Lord and Lady Churchill and party’—
Lady Churchill passing as Miss Spencer, and
General Grey as Ur. Grey! Brown once for
got this, and called me‘Your Majesty,’ as I
was getting into the carriage; ami Grant on
the box once called Albert‘Your Royal High
ness;’ which set us oil' laughing, but no one
observed it.
“We had a long three hours’ drive; it was
0 o’clock when we got into the carriage. We
were soon out of the wood, and came upon
the Badnoch road—passing close by Kinrara
but, unfortunately, not through it, which we
ought to have done. It was very beautilul—
fine wooded bills, the high Cairngorm range,
and Ben Mulch Uliui, unfortunately much
obscured by the mist on the top, and the
broad Spey flowing in the valley, with culti
vated fields and fine valleys below. Most
striking, however, on our whole long journey
was.the utter, and to me very refreshing, soli
tude. Hardly a habitation, and hardly’meet
ing a soul. It gradually grew dark. We
stopped at a small lialt-way house for the
horses to take some water, and the few peo
ple about stared vacantly at the two simple
vehicles.
‘•The mountains gradually disappeared—
the evening was mild, with a lew drops of
rain. On and ou we went, till at length we
saw lights, and drove through a long and
straggling ‘toun,’ aud turned down a small
court to the door of the inn. Here we got
out quickly, Lady Churchill and General
Grey not waiting for us. We went up a
small staircase, and were shown to our bed
room at the top of it—very small, but clean
—with a large fourpost bed which nearly tid
ed the whole loom. Opposite was the draw
ing and dining room in one—very tidy ami
well-sized. Then came the room where Al
bert dressed, which was verysraall. The two
maids (Jane Shackels was with me) bad driv
en over by another road in a waggonette,
Stewart driving them. Made ourselves ‘clean
and tidy,’and then sat down to our dinner.
Grant and Brown were to have waited on us,
but were ‘bashful’ and did uot. A ringleted
woman did everything; and. when dinner
was over, removed the cloth and placed the
bottle of wine (our own which we had
brought) on the table witn tbe glasses, wbicli
was the old English fashion. Atler dinner I
tried to write part of this account (but the
talking around confused me) while Albert
played at ‘patience.’ Then went away to be
gin undressing, and it was about hall-past
eleven when we got to bed.”
“Wednesday, September b.
“A misty, rainy morning. Had not slept
very soundly. We got up rather early, and
sat working and reading in the drawing-room
till the breakfast was ready, foi which we had
to wait for some little time. Good tea and
bread and butter, and some excellent por
ridge. Jane Shackle (who was very useful
and attentive) said they had all supped to
gether—namely, the two maids, and Grant,
Brown, Stewart and Walker (who was still
there); and were very merry in tliecommer
cial room. The people were very amusing
about us. The woman came In while they
were at their dinner, and said to Grant,’Ur.
Grey wants you,’ which nearly upset the
gravity of all the others; then they told Jane,
Your lady gives no trouble;’ and Grant in
the morning called up to Jane, ‘Does his
lordship want me?’ One could look on the
street, winch is a very long, wide one, with
detached houses, from our window. It was
perfectly quiet, no one stirring, except here
and there a man driving a cart, or a boy go
ing along on his errand. General Grey
bought himself a watch in a shop for £2”
THE queen's DOMESTIC LIFE.
The book contains many simple and bcau
tilul little pictures of the domestic life of the
royal family in their Highland home. Iu the
passages which describe tbe first years at Bal
moral, the Queen often speaks of “Bertie”
(the Prince of Wales) and her daughter
“Vicky.” Thus:
“We got up at a quarter to six o’clock. We
breakfasted. Mamma came to take leave of
us. Alice and the baby (Prince Alfred) were
brought in, poor little things, to wish us
‘good-bye.' Tlieu good Bertie (the Prince of
\V ales) came to see us, and Vicky (the Princ
ess ltoyal) appeared as voyagtune, and was aJi
impatience to go.”
* * * “I said to Albert, I could hardly
believe that our child was travelling with
us it put me so in mind of of myselt when
1 was the ‘little Princess. '
* * “We got out at an inn, which
was small but clean, at Duukeld, to let Vicky
have some broth, Vicky stood ami bowed to
the people out ol the window. There never
was such a good traveller as she is, sleeping
in the carriage at her usual times; not put
out, not frightened at noise or crowds, but
pleased and amused.”
“Vicky ’ giew to womanhood, and here is
the story of her engagement:
“Our dear Victoria was this day engaged to
1 nnce Frederick William, of Prussia, who
had been on a visit to us siuee the 14th. He
had already spoken to us on the 20th of his
wishes, but we were uncertain, on account of
her extreme youth, whether he should speak
to her himself, or wait till lie came back
again. However, we felt it was better lie
should do so; and during our ride up Craigna
ban, this afternoon, be picked a piece of
white beatlier—the emblem of ‘good luck’—
which he gave to her, and this enabled him
to make an allusion to liis hopes and wishes
as they rode dow nGlen Girnocli, which led
to this happy conclusion.”
Maine Hoard of Agriculture.
This Board adjourned without day Tuesday
28thinstant. A very commendable spirit char
acterized their proceedings during their ses
sion. Many interesting subjects have been
brought before them and discussed with ear
nestuess and ability. The question of apply
ing manures was taken up. Mr. Carpenter
thought there was no better way to manure
land to be seeded down than to use green ma
nure, having it well mixed with the soil at
the time of seeding, Mr. Holmes experiment
ed with Coe’s superphosphate by the side of
plaster, under corn and saw no value from
the phosphate. Manuring in the hill with old
manure aud a little plaster produced the best
crop, green manure with plaster ilio next best,
aud Coe’s phosphate the poorest yield. Mr.
Wilder also had tried phosphate on different
crops and leceived no benefit from it. Fish
pomace applied to the soil and well worked in
produced heavy yields of potatoes aud those
free from rot. Of plaster he didn’t think
much.
Mr. Wasson made lengthy remarks on ma
nures and their application. In his section
pogy chum had risen from 25 ceuts per load
to $50 per ton. The Cumberland Bone super
phosphate had given satisfactory results.
Muck on the coast is valueless, hut in the in
terior it was no doubt valuable. Our farmers
must pay more attentiouito saving liquid ma
nures and construct their barns with that
view. The solid portions will take care of
themselves while the liquid will run to waste,
if not prevented. In Japan, Switzerland and
other old countries liquid manures were much
used and every particle of fertilizing matter
was saved, and ttielr lands wore growing bet
ter eycry year although cultivated ror ages.
Mr. Putnam of Aroostook said our farmers
had but just begun to make much account of
saving manures. He believed top-dressing
was the best. We suppose the farmers iu
Aroostook follow after the French Canadians
who used to be troubled to get rid of their
manure jus the heaps increased. We have
seen large heeps of it on the banks of the St.
Lawrence river, drawn there and dumped so
that the water might carry it down stream out
of the way,and this but a lew years ago. The
soil ou the banks of the St. Lawrence is nat
urally very rich, and so it is iu many portions
of the Aroostook country. But farmers there
now begin to see tho necessity of saving their
manure. It is of vital importance that oar
farmers should have their eyes open to this
subject. If you take from the land you must
carry back something as a compensation; if
not, your fields will run out and you must go
over several acres to get small crops.
The report on mixed husbandry was taken
up, and Mr. I'rince did not believe in it. He
thought to be successful in any branch of bus
iness a man must make that branch a special
ity. Look at the stock-growers in the State;
nearly all have boon successful He believed
in a man’s following his own taste, and when
he found out what that is, sticking to it. On
the contrary Sir. Ayer thought the farmer
who pursued a mixed course ot husbandry
was as generally successful as those who de
voted their time to the production of a single
crop or class of stock. Mr. Holmes also favor
ed the views of the report. Ill his sectiou tho
farmers raised great quantities of hops, still
they raised coru, grain and other crops. In
Livermore great attention is paid to dairy
products, hut the farmers do not neglect other
crops. Others expressed their approbation of
mixed husbandry. The culture of wheat was
taken up and Mr. l’oor spoke in favor of early
sowing and of preparing the laud in the fall.
And we say in many localities the wheat may
be sown in the fall to great advantage. Our
farmers will come to this before longMuine can
raise her own flour, and she will yet do it.
Mr. Wasson introduced a resolution in fa
vor of cultivating the cranberry, and he also
introduced one in relation to tho potato as it
occupies a very prominent position in the list
of the staple products of our State. As many
new kinds arc being raised from the seed
ball he recommended to the next Board to
hold a potato exhibition at the Agricultural
Boom in January ISlii), and exhibit the several
kiuds propagated in different localities. This
is a movement in the right direction.}
The vegetable gardens and apple orchards
were discussed. Messrs Breed & Co., show
ed a new method of attaching a yoke of oxen
to a cart or sled and also a new device for
loading hay and grain. These were examined
with much interest. Fruit culture was also
considered with much interest. Mr. Wasson
regretted that the lanner.s of Hancock were
not present to hear the discussion. He said
they grew some good fruit but the farmers
geueral’y in that section thought tho pursuit
not profitable. Mr. Dike spoke of the advan
tages of underdrainiug as necessary to the cul
tivation of fruit. Clean cultivation is also im
portant. With these two things he believed
any one could engage in fruit culture with
good prospects ot success upon most of the
soils in our State. Laud for orchards needed
to be tilled and manured ns much as tor oth
er crops. Little would he expected of a crop
of wheat or corn it treated as our orchards
are. Mr. Benson also made some interesting
remarks and said no crop in Maine paid so
good a return for the labor as the apple crop.
Our clixiate was favorable to winter fruit. He
had raised, the past season, one hundred bar
rels ot Baldwins, Greenings and Boxbury
Bassets. Apples from Maine invariably stand
higher in tho Boston market and will keep
longer than from any other State. Many oth
er gentlemen took part in the discussion, and
urged the raising of fruit. Mulching the trees
was highly recommended. Mr. Goodale be
lieved shelter vv as as tiocessary for trees as lor
cattle. With screens at proper distances, lie
thought we could raise almost any kind ol
lruit grown in New England. Our old or
chards are all dying out, and our wouder ia
| tiiutj they have lived so long without cultiva
tion and neglected as they have been. In
j many localities they are so situated that tha
i winter winds have a fair rake upon them.
Bee culture was up for discussion, and Mr.
| Paul, one of the largest and most successful
bee-keepers, made some valuable remarks up
on the subject. He allows no natural swarm
ing in his apiary, all the hives being divided
once a year. Other gentlemen also spoke on
producing honey. A dry cellar is considered
tile best place for wintering bees.
Mr. Goodale introduced some resolutions iu
relation to the trials of the speed ot horses,
recommending that the sums offered for these
trials should uot exceed the sums offered for
the culture of breadstuff's, and also that the
several county societies offer the current year
a sum iu premiums on wheat culture equal at
least to one-third of the amount of the State
bounty received during the year. And here
the question came up agaiu, “Ought trials ot
the speed of horses to have place in agricultu
ral exhibitions?" Mr. Goodale thought the
man who had a fast horse had asgoed a right
to exhibit that quality as one who had nice
sheep had to exhibit the character of the wool,
and yet lie believed the prominence given to
trials of speed at our exhibitions the past few
years had been productive of much evil. Tlicro
was a variety of opinions upon the question.—
Mr. Warren thought that the question of
horse-trotting had been for years a trouble
some one. People will turn out to see a liorse
trot iu greater numbers than for anything
else.
A cominitteo reported, advising that tha
Legislative resolves he so amended as to give
the power to the Board of Agriculture to apply
tea per cent, ot the State bounty for tlic pur
pose of encouraging Agricultural lectures
among the farmers at large. Mr. Bike favored
the report. On- motion of Mr. Goodale, “ten
per cent.” was stricken out and “a portion” of
the State bounty was inserted. Various opin
ions were expressed on the subject, and the
report was tabled. Afterwards the report was
adopted by amending it so as to authorize the
Secretary of the Board to draw five per ceut.of
the bounty.
A resolution of Mr. Goodale, recommending
a continuation of the Hydrographic Survey
and the commission on fisheries jyas adopted.
The reports on alsike clover, bee culture, root
crops, the culture of buckwheat and the ideal
farmer were adopted.
This session of the Board will, no doubt,bo
fruitful of good to the Agricultural interests ot
our State, and will enlighten our farmers and
give them a (resh impetus to proceed with their
work, and thereby strengthen the foundation
for other industrial interests.
W c are indebted to the Maine Farmer ior
most of the faotfc in the above report.
Agbicojla.
"Varieties.
—Not long since a distillery was iouud in a
coal mine near Peoria, Illinois—the most pro
fitable coal mine, if not the most profitable
distillery in the United States. A day or two
since a still was discovered in a dense jangle
in Woodford county, in that State.
—A long-bearded miller at Logan, Ohio,
the other day, carelessly suffered bis flowing
honors to get caught in a revolving shalt.
Bracing himself promptly his beard wont by
the roots. He will hereafter have hut little
more trouble in shaving than belore.
—The Prussian journals publish strong ap
peals to the public charity on behalf of the la
boring population of the Eastern provinces of
that kingdom, who aro not only already suffer
ing dreadfully from want, but threatened with
absolute famine from the scarcity of the late
harvest. Already the hospitals are crowded,
and typhus has made its appearance. The
Queen of Prussia recently invited nearly sev
enty ladies, chiefly the wives and daughters of
commercial men, to consult with her respect
ing the most proper means of aiding the ne
cessitous people. The holding of an immense
bazaar in the royal palace was determined on,
all the ladies engaging to assist.
—It is said that during the siego of Vicks
burg two balls, one a Miuie and the other
from aBelgiau rifle, fired from opposite jioints
met in mid-air and were almost completely
welded together.
—Judge Chapman, ot the Criminal Court,
Indianapolis, has sentenced Lewis Washing
ton, a colored preacher, to ten years in the
Penitentiary, and to pay a fine of $5,000, for
marrying a white woman to a colored man.
Isn’t this a case for suit under the Civil Rights
act?
—The large slate quarries of Grand Car
reaux, France, have been entirely buried by
an earth-slip and three lives lost. The works
on the previous evening were observed to bo
in a dangerous state, and all the laborers were
withdrawn. Uigkrcwu i...■ n i<,,.. tlnv^uver
seer, named Choinet, and two men were en
gaged in fixing barriers to prevent any one
from approaching the entry, when the earth
sunk in beneath them for an extent of two
acres, and to a depth of iwo hundred feet, and
buried them in the ruins,
—A few days ago a chicken llcw into a grain
bin in the elevator at Lacou, 111., was carried
down with the grain, and then carried up the
elevator, emerging at the top alive and well.
—Charles Mathews is said to be the author
of the following jcii Wesprit:
It horseflesh won’t suffice to feed the masses,
The next resource will certainly be asses;
And Heaven only knows when- that will end!
Some poop o won’t have felt a single trie ml.
—Mary Auu Fibbs, only sixteen, is charged
in New York with attempting, out ot reveuget
for a whipping, to poisou two little children.
—'There is every reason to suppose that tho
great Suez canal for the passage of vessels ot"
the largest size, between the Mediterranean
and the Red Sea, will be completed next year
at the specified time. This great work will
revolutionize commerce and reduce the dis
tance between Europe and the East more than,
one-half, with a corresponding diminution ot
expenses. It will also considerably reduce tba
distance betweeu New York uml the East, al
though its importance to America will ba
somewhat diminished by the completion of tba
Pacific Railroad.
—The Commonwealth, published at Lincoln
Nebraska,says: ‘‘A short time sinco wc saw a
man driving a team over the town site loaded
with lumber and household furniture. He hail
a plan of the‘city' in his hand, and every littla
while he would stop and examine the stakes.
After a long search he succeeded in finding
his lot. He immediately proceeded to unload
his wagon, and in five hours from that time ha
hud a house up aa<l was living in it.”
—White gunpowder which is entirely con
sumed and leaves no residuum in the gun id
the latest improvement in France.
—It is related that near Dantzig a young
man of tweuty-tour, who has just married :i
widow of forty-two, has discovered since thu
marriage that Ills wife was his wet nurse. A
French paper comments: “Thus it is! Oiu
always returns to his first love.”
—Alaska is a marvellous place. So we hava
all along believed, but we confess that the fol
lowing talo of its wonders surpasses our anti
cipations. Rasselus’ Happy V’alley is quitn
outdone. A Russian guide, it seems, being
lately asked by a traveller about a certain
mountain range in Alaska, replied:
They are mighty in size and cause much
cold. Wonderful things are told of them. Is
is said that in some places there are deep
pools and lakes in which dwell monsters—ser
pents as long as a fir tree, which, were they
iu the open sea. would commit mighty dam
age. One thing is certain—that yonder, lac
away to the north, in the heart of these hills,
there is a wonderful valley, so narrow that
only at midday is the face of the sun to ba
seen. That valley lay uuiliscovereil and un
known for thousands of years; no person
d earned of Us existence; hut at last, a long
time ago, two Indian hunters entered it by
chance, and then, what do you think they
found? They found a small tribe of uuknowu
people, speaking in an unknown tongue, win*
had lived three since the creation of the world
and without kuowijg that other beings ex
isted.
—The Providence Press tells the following
good story, which should convey its owu mor
al: “A member ot the General Assembly Iroiu
a‘rural district,’ who is something of a wag,
approached one of the officers ol the !lou*«
and with a very serious looking countcnanou
and subdued voice stated that he was, both M
a Representative and a man, in a serious diffi
culty. The official gravely inquired the cause.
The troubled member replied that he was un
der the necessity of being absent for threa
days. ‘Dig well,’ replied the official, ‘that bf
nothing, it’s a common occurrence.’ ‘Rut,*
said the disconsolate one, ‘that ain’t exactly
what’s the matter. Ye see, I’ve heard tbs I
member spent every day, and a great many
times a day, and I've kinder got used to it.
It’s as natural as hash lor breakfast. I shall
miss it if l go, and, see here,’—taking the offi
cial by the button-hole—‘d'ye think he’ll hav*
wind enough to hold out till 1 couie back, for (
do want to hear him once more,* ”

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