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The Portland daily press. [volume] (Portland, Me.) 1862-1921, February 25, 1868, Image 1

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Established June 23,1862. Vol. 7. PORTLAND, TUESDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 25 1868 '' -
——— -—-__—-_' ______ lerms vd.00 per annum, in advance.
THE PORTLAND DAILY PRESS is published
every day, (Sunday rxcepted,) ar No. 1 Prlntors’
Exchange, Exchange Street, Portland.
N. A. FOSTER, Proprietor.
Terms:—Eight Dollars a year in advance.
Single copies 4 cents.
THE MAINE STATE PRESS. Is published at the
same place every Thursday morning at $2.00 a year,
i nvariably in advance.
Rates or Adverthino.—One inch of space, in
let -gth of column, constitutes a “square.”
51.50 per square daily first week. 75 cents per
week after; three insertions, or less, $1.00; continu
ing every other day after first week, 50 cents.
Ilall square, three insertion'* or le.ss, '<5 cents: one
week, $1 00; 50 cents per week atier.
Unde • head of “Amesements,” $2.00 per square
per week; three insertions or less, $1.50.
Special Notices, $1.’ 5 per square h r the first
Insertion, and 25 cents per square lor each subse
quent insertion.
Advertisements inserted in the “Maine State
Press” (which has a large circulation in every part
of the State) for $1.00 pel squaie ior firs, insertion
and 50 cents i*»r equate for each substqoent loser
l»un.
BUSINESS CABDS.
TH0ME3, SMABDON & CO,,
JOBBERS OF
WOOIjEJYS,
AND
Tailors’ Trimmings!
AGENTS FOB THE
Ne Plus Ultra Collar Gomp’y,
BIIIDEFOKD, MR.
f>6 Union Street,
(First Door from Middle.)
Francis O. Thornes. Je20n&stl Geo. II. Sinai don
WEED, FOGG & FREEMAN,
(Successors to A. WEBB & Co.,)
16S Commercial St., Portland, Me.,
DEALERS IN
CORN,
FloiiF,Menl,$>sits,
lu Large or Small Quantities.
ALSO,
Shorts, Fine Feed & Cr. Corn
^“Choice Family flour by the single barrel or in
bags.
S. H. WEBB, J. L. FOGG, II. C. FBEEMAN.
Dee 28, 18UT dtf
WltlGHT & BUCK,
Proprietors of Greenwood Mill,
mjcHAViiii.it, s. c.
DEALERS in Yellow Piue TimbM and Ship
Slock. Orders solicited.
Rei'k.rknces—R. P. Buck & Co., New York;
Wm. McGilvery. Esq., Seal sport; Ryan & Davis,
Portland. raarl'6dtl'
C. a. DOWNES,
MERCHANT TAILOR,
BA8 REMOVED TO
No. 233 1-2 Congress Street,
COHN KB OF CHESTNNT
Anguat 30,1866. n dti
DECKING, MILL1KEN & CO.,
- JOBBBBS OB -
D It Y GOODS,
AND -
WOOLENS,
Rave this day removed to the new and spacious store
erected for them
S8 and OO Middle St.,
On the Oid Site occupied by them previous to tho
great tire. +
Portland, March 16. tf
GEO. W. TRUE & CO.,
116 Commercial Street, Fcad Long Wharf
DKALERS IS
CORN, FLOUR,
Fresh Ground Yellow Meal,
Oaia, Shorts, Bye Meal, dc.
VINK DAIRY AND TABLE HALT.
W, H. WALDRON, OEO. W. TRCR.
January 20 Snltcodtl
JOHN E. HOW, Jr.,
Counsellor and Attorney at Law,
And Solicitor in Bankruptcy,
JAUNCEY COURT,
4-T Wall Mired, ... New Yoeli CHy.
B^Commissioiier for Maine and Massachusetts.
Jan. gfldtf
W. T. BROWN & CO.,
tieneral Commission Merchants,
No. 90 1-*J Commercial Street,
(Thomas Block,)
Wu lard T. Brown, 1 ___ _
■Walter H. Brown, J Portland.
Sole Wholesale Agents lor the Boston Match Co.
lor Maine. By permission re ter to Dana Co., J.
W. Perkins & Co., Josiah if. Drummond, Burgess,
Kobe* & Co._ JuneAidtl
W. H. PHILLIPS,
CARPENTER, BUILDER,
And Ship Joiner.
Ug^Circular ati«l Jig Sawing done with despatch.
Motilulngs of all kinds, Doors, Saab and Blinds made
or furnished to order.
IWS C ommercial Nt , (fool of Park Nt.,)
P'oktlajnd, Maine, au2ik^
NATHAN WEBB,
Counsellor and Attorney at Law,
Mo. til Kxcimn{;c 8t.
July8-dti
C. J. SCHUMACHER,
nt ESCO PA INTEIt.
tiflet at the Drug Store of Messrs. A. G. Schlotter
beck & Co.,
VOX Ccugreis Portland, iTIe,
Ja1?dtf One door above Brown.
Charles P. Mattocks,
Attcrney and Counseller at Law,
CANAL. BANK BUILDING,
No. btt Middle Nlevel ... Porllaud.
tcbUfltl
G. A. SUSSKRAVT,
IMPORT EK,
KA-NHFACTUBEB AM) DEAI.KB IB
Furs, Hats and Caps,
136 Middle Street,
PORTLAND, - MAINE.
B^-OubIi paid »or Shipping Fura. sep20dtf
UOWAllD A CLEAVES,
Attorneys & Counsellors at Law.
PORTLAND, M NE.
Ofjlce iVo. 30 Exchange Street,
Joseph Howard, Jy9'67-ly Nathan Cleaves.
WALTER COREY & CO,
Madcfaotubkb* and Dealers i»
FUKI^ITUKE!
Looking Glasses, Mattresses,
Spring lieds, Ac.
Clupp’a Block, Kennebec Slreec
(Opposite Foot of Chestnut,)
FebSdtf PORTLAND.
S. FREEMAIf & CO.,
Commission Merchants l
ltJl Broad street,
Samfel Fkeemajs, »
E^D. Appleton. ] NEW YORK.
>W“ParTlwl*r,atleilUon S,VlT| to the purchasing
or Flour and Grain. *
Rei-D ncM-JLla) ill K«»zer. Esq , r. McKenney &
Co., W. it C. It. Millik.it, .1. II. Carroll, Esq , T H.
y>mum & < o. __jnneildti
A. N. NOYE8 At SON,
M&nn*»ctarcr3 and dealer* In
fttoves, Langes & Furnaces,
Can be found in their
NEW BUILDINU OIV I,r I*|JK *$T.,
(Opf-onite the MarkoC)
Wbete thoy will be phased to bee all their former
oasioiuMa and receive order* as usual. aug!7dtf n
If. M. PAY SON,
STOCK BltOKKlt.
No. 30 Exchange Street,
_rniTLAMp MB no21<lt
W.R. Johnson,
dentist
Office I'i*. 13 1**1 Fr. f Street,
Seeond House from H. 11. Hay’* Aoothccarv Ster,.
¥BT~ Hlher admlnisiered when desired nndtlioeclit
adelsal.le._ iv22eodti
Coffins, Caskets, Desks,
Show Cases and Office Furniture,
Of Krerr Description,
Made tram the best material and by EXPERIENCED
WORKMEN, at ‘
C. II. BLAKE’S,
*ep&16dU Nt. 10 Cross St., Portland, Ma.
BUSINESS CARDS.
__ . ♦_
FULLER, DANA & FITZ,
mpoivnut* or
IKON, STEEL,
XI IN PLATES,
SHEET IKON,
AN1) METALS I
HO forth St., Boston,
OFFER FOR MALE
Bes Refined Far Iron, Tin Plates,
Hoops, Bands and Scrolls, Terne Platts for Rooting,
Plate. Anil, and T Iron Kng. and Ame icau Sheet
Rivet Iron, Swarf Iron, Iron,
Bolt iron. Spike iron, Russia and R G Sheet Iron
Ship ai.d Railroad Spikt^s, Imitation and French Pol
Oval and hall round Iron, i.died she t Irou,
Shoo Shapes, Horse Na Is, Galvanized Sheet Iron,
Norway and Swedes Iron Sheet Copper and Zjic,
anc Shapes, lianca, Straits A Fug Tin.
Norway Nail Rods, Conpt'r Bottoms and Brass
Stool l every description, Kettles,
Tinmen's turnish'ggoods, Iron Wire, Ac , Ac.
Also agents for ihc sale of
Saylor Co. 's Cast Sleet,
Muntz’s Yellow Metal Sheathing,
February 18. dGrn
JOHN NEAL & MON,
Counsellors, £olicitors aid Attornies.
No. 16 Exchange street.
Offices and a largo Hail to be let in the same build *
lug.
John veal. j. p. neal.
February 14. dGw
G. & J. T. DONNELL.
BATH, ME.,
Cordnsro Miinufactururis,
Inclu Hug Full Gangs, Fishermen’s Hawser?, Bolt
H*»po, Point Hope, Trawl Warp, Lath Yarn,&e.
Orders solicited. Jan8t!6m
F. A. RICEEU,
No. :M Portland, corner ofPnirU Street,
DEALER IN
Groceries, Flour, Produce,
Tobacco, Te is, Coffee, Sugars, Spices, Apples, On
ions, Potatoes, Butter, Cheese, Pork,-Lml, &c.
ieb22 dlw* Portland, in®,
COPAKTNEItSHIP NOTICES.
Dissolution of Copartnership
THE partnership heretofore existing ai der the
style of
H. T. Cummings !U. D. Co.,
is this day dissolved. JOHN WILLIAMSON re
tires. The business will be continued at tLe old
stand by H T. CUMMINGS, M. D.
Portland, Feb 12. 18 8. feb24d.it
Notice oi Disolution.
THE partnership of Evans A- Barley i8 this
day dissolved by mutual consent. The affairs
of the Lto partnership will be settled by ARAD
EVANS, at the old stand.
A. EVAN-5,
K.A.BAYLEY.
Feb 24, 1888. fe23dtf
Copartnership Notice.
THE undersigned have this day iornicd a copart
nership urder the firm name of
Donnell, Oreely & Butler,
And taken the store No 31 Commercial st., corner
of Franklin and Commercial, where they will con
tinue the business as
Commission Moreliantw,
Ami Wholesale Dealers In GROCERIES. FLOUR
PORK, LARD, FISH, &c.
•I. B. DONNELL,
JUSTUS GREELY,
A. BUTLEll.
Portland, Au«. 1,18CJ. uulicodtf
Copartnership Notice.
THE undersigned have this da}' formed a copart
nership under tlie name of
BIOHABDSON, HAEBIS & 00.,
lor the purpose ot carrying on the wholesale
West India Goods, Grocery,
Flsur Business,
and have taken the slore So. 113 Commercial Street,
heretofore occupied by Richardson, Dyer & Co.
K. M. RICHARDSON,
liENJ. F. HARRIS,
J. W. DYER,
HENRY LITTLEFIELD,
December 14. d&«rfstt
Partnership Notice
JAMES B DODGE has been this dav admitLed a
member of the firm ot James Bailor & Co.
JAMES B'AII.EY.
James b. dodge.
Portland Jan. 1, 1868. lebtdlm
G3T"Star copy.
Copartnership Notice.
rpIIE subscribers have tliis day formed a copart
JL nership under the name of '
Evans & Greene,
And will continue the business of
COAL AND WOOD l
At the old Stand
981 fomtucreial Ml, Head Smith’* H'harf.
We have on hand and offer tor sale at the low
est < ash prices, the different varieties of Hard and
Soft Coals, all of the first quality, and delivered in
the best possible order. Also
HAUD AND SOFT WOOD,
Delivered in any part of the city.
WM. U. EVAN**,
CHAS H. GREENE.
Portland, Nov 1st, 1867. uoldtf
Daily Press Job Office,
No. 1 Printers’ Exchange,
Exchange Street.
EVERY DESCRIPTION ®E
BOOK, Hlill, A JOB PRfllM,
Executed with Neatness and Despatch.
Having completely refurnished our office since the
Groat Fire, with all kinds of New Material,
Presses, etc., wo are prepared on the short
est possible notice to accommodate our
friends and the public with
Posters, Programmes,
BILE-HEADS, CIKCULAItS,
Cards, Tags, Blanks, Labels,
Ami every description ol
Mercantile Erinting.
We have superior facilities for the execution of
BOOKS, PAMPHLETS
Catalogues, &c.,
Which tor neatness and dispatch cannot be surpassed
jgEf Orders from the country solicited, to which
prompt at tent ion will be paid.
Daily Press Job Ollice
No. 1 Printers* Exchange,
r xckange St., Portland.
N. A. FOSTER. Proprietor.
A SMALL LOT OF THAT
Choice Dollar Tea!
LEFT AT TUB
Japanese Tea Stove,
Nr> Federal St.
JUST RECEIVED A PINE LOT OP
Hew Turkish Prunes,
fire Pound* for One Dollar.
New Cask Raisins,
Mix rounds for One Dollar#
All other goods in my line as cheap accordingly.
Call and examine t« r jourselv 8.
tebltf _ WM, L. WILLSON.
I’VE GOT IT I
Davis’ Celebrated Catarrh Remedy!
M. S. WHITTIER,
JUNCTION FItEK A ND CONGRESS STREETS
TRV IT! TB1’ IT!
February 4. d3w*
DR. JOHNSON'S
Sea Foam Dentifrice /
THIS Preparation is lecommended by eminent
l>eniibts, Physicians and Chemists, as being se
cond to none in use, tor cleansing, polishing and
preserving the teeth hardening the gums, and im
parting a pleasant odor to the breath; in tact it can
not be excelled. 11 acts not only ns a powder, but as
a soap aud wash, three in one. Contains n > injuri
ous grit cr ac1<l. Try it. For silt* bv all druggists.
M. I> JOHNSON, Dentist.
October 30. d
Spring Style Hats
| FERRY* s, 290 Congress st,
Ovpv.il. Preble U.aav. lelldSu
j BEAL ESTATE.
Faun tor Sale.
j rjlHE subscriber. otter for sal a (hair place, well
, X known as the Whitehouse Farm, situated in
l , c ^°wn oi Cumberland, oil the county road lcad
ing iroin Gray to Pcrtland. Said farm contains
about 110 acres and is one of the best hay larms in
tne county. Ten miles trora Portland ainl two and
a ji!ii *,‘cm l^e Portland and Kennebe; Depot,
uuiiaings sair; house, two stories; barn, 41 by 81
t ‘ft, in good repair. This farm will be sold with or
without the stock and farm in? fools at a rare bar
8a”l. Title perfct. F r further particulars inquire
o' W. T. & K. T. HALL, at the larui, or R G HALL
Esq * Gray Corner. feh22dtt
For Sale.
HOUSE and Lot No G5 Park Street. Fou>e In
good order, furnished with Gas, Bath Room and
plenty oi Bolt and hard water.
Also Lot of Laud on India St, 120x100.
Apply to R. O. CON ANT.
felTdtf No 15i> Commercial St.
For ^3,500 !
ONE-HALF of a new two and a hall story resi
dence, Within live minutes’ walk of the P. O
containing ten finished rooms, all in complete order,
marble mantel in parlor, good cellar, cistern, &c —
House piped for gas. This property is offered at a
low figure and easy payments, as the owner is about
leaving the Sta'e. Apply to
GEO. R. DAVIS & CO..
teblTdlw Dealers in Real Estate.
House Lots.
TWO on Congress near State Street, and eight
A lots on Emery, Lewis and Thomas streets, lor
sale by W. II. STEPHENSON,
Fel' 10, 18C8.-tf At 2d National Bank.
Farm for Sale.
^ in Casco. A good farm contain
- b. lng about 50 acres ot good early
I land, one third fenced by Thompson
L_Pond, about 230 rods ot stone wall,
_■**_:'dvided Into tillage, pasturage and
woodland; is situated on a good, traveled road,
leading to Wee! aides Falls, one mile and a ha’I trom
Casco \ lllage, halt a mile from school house, and in
u pood ueighboihood. The land is early, good and
easy to cultivate, and will cut about twelve tons of
hav. On said farm there is a new barn, built in
1*66, a good wood house, and a small, convenient
liom-e, pleasantly situated; a good well of water on
the place. Will be sold at a bargain it appliei lor
soon. Inquire of L. P. HOOPER,
At No. 44 Brown Street, or address Box 987 P. O ,
Portland. febl2dlm»
IV E W
First €Ia^ Hotel
TO LET!
The pubacriber has nearly completed a
—large and thjrouehly appointed Hotel In
fiourisMng CITY OF PORTLAND,
.HMAIMi. Tlio building is situated in a
central and commanding position on tbe
, , V°! "iv of Middle and Caion Si..,
two principal thorougblares; It Is five stories high,
las a ireo tlon front, contains about 220 rooms, and
is to be provided witli all modera conveniences and
Improvements. It is pronounced the finest building
lor Hotel purposes iu New England. The Hotel
can be ready tor occupancy by the middle of June.
Ai plications may be addressed to tbe subscribers
at Portland,
J. B. BROWN, or
FebD.lt, __ J. B. BROWN & SONS.
For Sale—One Mile from Port
land.
THE beautiful residence occupied bylCev. W.P.
Merrill, situated in Westbrook, on tht Back
Cove road, known by tbe name of tbe Machjgonne
Villa, Ibe grounds are tastefully laid out with
walks, flower beds, splendid evergreens and shade
trees; about 200 pear, apple, plum and cherry trees
in bearing; plenty of currents and gooaebeiries;
about n acre ot strawberries—raised l,60o quarts
this year. The lot embraces nearly tour acres, with
streets 60 feet wide all round It. The buildings—a
fine houNO with 15 rooms, French root and cupola,
and a piazza rouud three sides; warmed with fur
nace, good well and cistern in cellar; gardener’s
house and summer house, and good stable well
finished with cellar, at tbe low price ot $7,500.
Terms easy. For p*rliculars euquire on the pre
mises, or of WH1TTEMORK & STAKBIRD, on
Commerc al street; or FEUNALD & SON. corner
ot Preble and Congress streets.
Sept. 3. iltt
NOTICK. L will sell on tavorable terms as to
payment, «r let for a term of years, the lots od
tbe corner ot Middle and Franklin streets, and on
Franklin street, including thecorncr of Franklin and
WM. HILLIARD, Bangor
»t vMl III * RKKD. Attorneys. Portland.' Ivt2tl
To be Sold Immediately.
rp\V° Houses ami tots In City. Price *900 and Si.
A6t0. Hoiuw lot, iu Capo Elirobeth *5 i to *100
_ , _ JOSEPH HEED,
_ x a Esfcate Agent, Oak and Congress sts.
Octobes 2. dtf
FOIl SALE!
Me., a valuable larni, containing
250 acres, cats at out Fcventv-flve tons ot 1 ay.—
House, woodhouse, stable, barn and out buildings,
all in first rate order, within three miles of South
Paris Station. Will be sold on lavorable terms, or
exchanged lor desirable real estate in Portland.—
For particulars enquire of J. C. PROCTER.
iebl2dtl_ No. 93 Exchange Street.
Land lor Sale.
A of the laic Mary S. Lunt's Estate, near
, Portland, via Tukey’s Bridge; In parcels to
suit Purchasers. Enquire in person or by lectei ol
I _ JAMES JOHNSON,
Stroud water, Westbrook Adm’r of said Estate with
will annexed._ oct 22-d&wti
Farm in Buxton
VKeA For Sale. Contains 120 acres, 40 of wood; cut*
[will 35,to40 tons hay. Buildings good, only two
.LMLmiles from the village of West Gorham, very
easy land to work. Apply to
_ __ W. U. JERRIS,
Real E>tate Agent, op *> Preble Home, Portland
j Feb 22-u3w&wlw*
The Mercantile Agency,
47 Congress and 40 Water Street, Boston,
Will have an Office First q/ Afar-h in Jose Block
No. 88 Exchange St., opposite the Custom
House, Portland.
This institution was established by Lewis Tappan,
in now York, in 1841; by him and Edward E. Dun
bar m Boston, in 1843, and subsequently by them and
their succosscrsjn each of the principal cities of the
United States and Canada; and is believed to be the
first and original organirat on In ; ny part of the
world, for the purpose of procuring in a thorough
manner, recording and preserving for its patrons de
tailed information respecting the home standing, re
sponsibility and credit of Merchants, Manufacturers,
Traders, &c., to aid in dispensingciodit and collcct
14ng debts.
During the twenty-six years that the Mercantile
Agency has been in op -ration,there has been no time
that it has not enjoyed tlio confidence and patronage
of the most honored and sagacious business men in
each community where one of its offices lias been lo
cated. With a determination, adhered to irom the
first opening of this office to the present time, to se
cure the aid of reliable and painstaking correspon
dents, men of character and integrity, competent
assistants and clerks in all responsible positions, and
to be strictly impartial in our reports without fear
or fhvor, the business has grown to an extent corres
ponding to the Increased teritory and extended busi
ness of the country; and never has the agency been
In condition to render such valuable service to Its
subscribers as at the present time.
in audition 10 me recorded reports, revised syste
matically twice a year by correspondence and trav
elling, we have, for the past three years, issued to
subsetibers wlio desired it, they paying an addition
al subscripliou for the use thereof, a REFERENCE
BOOK, containing names of individuals and firms in
MercanMle, Manufacturing, Mechanical, and other
business, arranged in alphabetical order in their
respective towns or cities, with a double rating ap
pended, (as per Key furnished with the book.) show
ing, first, approximately the pecuniary strength,and
secondly, the mercantile credit. This work, now is
sued in January and July of each year, is kept use
ful to subscribers by the issue ot weekly, (or more
frequent) notifications ot important changes which
affect the ratings.
Besides the GENERAL REFERENCE BOOK, ot
whole If. S. and Bri'.ish Provinces, wc issue a
BOOK OF PRINCIPAL CITIES, some 70 in num
ber, a
NEW ENGLAND REFERENCE BOOK, and a
WESTERN REFERENCE BOOK.
All of the three last named are included In Ihe
first, and either can be supplied to a subscriber ac
cording to the wants of -bis bnsiness.
Wo shall bo pleased toexhib t the Reference Book
arid other facilities of the Agency, and to answer
such questions as may be asked respecting our sys
tem and terms of subscription, upon application per
sonally or by letter.
EDWARD RUSSELL & CO.
January 1, 1868.
ASSOCIATE OFICES.
E. RUSSELL & CO., Boston, and Portland' R. Q.
DUN & Co., New York City, Albany, Buffalo,
Philadelphia, Baltimore, Cincinnati, Pittsburg,
Cleveland, Detroit,Chicago, Milwaukie,Charleston,
New Orleans, Louisville, Memphis, St. Louis, aud
London, England. DUN. WlMAN & CO., Tor
onto, C. W , Montreal,C. E., and Halitux. N. S.
Jau 9 tfeb27
The looking Miracle of the Age
ZIMMERMAX’S
Steam Cooking Apparatus.
Cheap, Simple, Economical!
A DINNER COOKED for twenty persons over
ONE hole of the Stove. Can be put on any
Slove 01 Range ready for instant use.
Water changed to a delicious Soup by distillation.
Leaves the entire house free trom offensive odors in
cooking. Its results astonish all who try it.
K^Send for a Circular.
For sale, an nUo Town and County
Rights in the Stale, by
John cousens,
Jan 3-dtf Kennebuuk. Me.
Flour, Wheat and Peas.
:iOO Bbla California Flour la Kucha.
300 Bbla. White Wheat Flour.
3000 Huah. Canada White Wheat.
1300 Buab. Michigan White Wheat.
1300 Bum. Michigan Amber Wheal.
3000 Uuah. Cunuda White Pear.
^“Cunu'iu, Spring, Keel, Wheat, Graham and
States Floor in Bags, and lor sale by
UPHAM & ADAMS.
Feb 21-#od2w
4-00,000. Jiricks /
rK SALE, tn lot* to suit purchasers, Annly to
WM. H. .ILHKIS; 3
Heal Estato Agent, opposite Preble House.
Fob 12-d3w*
| REMOVALS.
K E M O V A V .
W. W. THOMAS, ,Tr.,
LAW ¥ EH,
Has reu.oved to No 24 Exchange st., Thorn* a Build
Iebl8 ing, over Merchant’s Exchange. d3m
R E M O V A. L .
Gray Lufkin & Perry, <
Manufacturers and Jobbers of
Mats, Caps, Furs,
And Straw Goods l
HAVE REMOVED TO THEIR NEW STORE IN
THE
Woodman Blockf
Corner of Ailddle and Pearl Streets.
Feb 17-d&wlw
REMOVAL.
SMITH <* REED,
COUNSELLORS AT LAW,
Have Removed to
Cumberland Bank Building,
No. 08 Exchange Street,
folif Over Lowell & Senter's. d&wtm
Removal.
JJAVINQ leased for a terra of years the buildings
Head of Hobson's tVharf,
And Removed (o the
South Side of Commercial Street,
On said wharf, I am now able to offer to the t ade a
good assortment of Long and Short
L IT M B K R,
Under cover.
Spruce dimension, all kind.*, sawed to order.
Doors, Sashes and Blinds l
constantly on hand and tor sale by
B. DEEBING,
No. M2 Commercial Street, Holaon’n Whart, foot ot
High Street. fcblMtf
REM OVAL.
SPARROW’S
INSURANCE AGENCY!
Ol’l'IOIC
Is this Day Removed to
Sfo. 72 Exchange St.,
(BOYD'S BLOCK,)
Where Insurance of Every Kind,
-AND
FOK ANY AMOUNT,
Can be obtained in
First Class Companies,
Only, no others being represented at this agency.
All persons desiring insurance of this ckanu'
ter, are respectfully invited to call.
Portland, Feb. 7, 1868. leblldtt
REM O Yr A. L .
A. F. HILL & CO.,
Manufacturers, Jobbers and Retailers of
MEN’S
FURNISHING
Q- O O D S,
hare removed to tlielr new Store
No. 107 MIDDLE STREET,
Opposite Brown’s Hotel.
feb4 dtl
R E M O V A E.
Swett & Bradley,
DKALEBS IN
COOK & PARLOR STOVES,
For Wood or* Coal,
Have removed to
No. 134 Exchange Street.
idjf Tbe public are reepeetiully requested to ex
amine the stoves and prices. dec30d3m
REMOVAL.
WOODMAN,”TRUE & 00.,
IMPOSTERS AKD DEALERS IK
DRY GOODS!
WOOLENS,
Gents’ Furnishing Goods,
AND SMALL WARES, .
Have this day removed to Woodman's Block,
Corner of Middle and Pearl Streets,
Nearly opposite their old site.
Agents for Maine for the World-renowned
Linen Finish Oollai* ?
With Cloth at the Button Hole, and
Gray's Patent Molded Collar
—ALSO—
Agents for Singers Sewing Usohine.
WOODSIAS, VRI E A CO.
Portland, Dec 2d, 1867. dec3d4m
REMOVAL.
H. M .BBE WJSn,
(Successor to J. Smith & Co.)
Manufacturer of Leather Belting,
Has removed to
NO. 92 MIDDLE STREET,
Marrett & Poor’s New Block, where may befcund a
full assortment ot Leather Belting, as cheap, and
equal to any in New England. Belting and Loom
Straps made to order. Also for sale, Belt Leather
Backs and Sides, Leather Tiimmings, Lace Leather,
Belt Hooks, Copper ltivets and Burs. jy 19dtf
mr. mYrrill,
Counsellor and Attorney at Law,
has removed to 144J Exchange Street, opposite pres
ent Post Office. july9dtf
B £ M O Y A Jm l
W. II. CLIFFORD,
Counsellor at Law,
Aad Solicitor of l*ateute.
Has Removed to
Corner of Brown and Congress Streets,
JalS BROWN'S NEW BLOCK. dtf
E.IVERY STABLE!
BOARDING AND BAITING
By the subscriber, in the stable recently occupied by
Samuel Adams, rear of
LANCASTER HALL J
Prices reasonable. B. P. RUGKJ, Agent.
July 23. dtl
Hard Times!
ETERY OXHtoavs “ it is hard times/* and what
everybody says must be true.
ELWELL ft BUTLER
have MARKED DOWN their entire stock of
BOOTS & SHOES,
and are now selling them at hard times prices. All
persons who believe it is hard times, and wish to pair
chase goods according] y are particularly Invited to
eall at Mo. 11 Market Square, nearly opposite
Uni e«l States Hotel.
N. B—Custom Work and Repairing done as -well
and as loir as at any place in Portland.
February l. dtf
FOR HALE.
ONE EIGHT HORSE POWER
Portable Engine.
w. n. rniLLin.
0 Commercial St., toot oi Park St,
Portland, Aug 29,-dt
B. W. GILBERT.
SUCCESSOR TO OH.BF.HT & SOBS,
BANK IS H ,
18 STATE STREET, SANTOV.
DEALER IB
Government Securities
ABD AOEKT BOR
Union Pacific Railroad Ponds
at par. Interest six per rent Id gold. Maps and
Pampulets turnishoa.
gyAgeuu ter Central aaU Union Pad tie Bonds.
January 31. Jr6w*4
miscellaneous.
No. 5.
8 MILIA 8IMIL1BUS CU8ANTUR.
Humphrey’s Hoinrcopathic Specifics,
HAVE PROVED, Irom Ihe most p tuple experi
ence. an entire success; Simple—Prompt- Effi
cient, and Reliable. They are the only Medicines
perfectly ad-pted to popular use—so'simple that
mistakes cannot be made in using them; so harmless
as to be fre^trom danger, and so efficient r.s to be al
ways reliable. They have raise 1 the highest com
mendation from all, and will a'wayg render satislac
i on.
No. 1 Cures Fevers, Congestion, Inhumations, 26
* 2 “ Worms, Worm J^ever, Wonn-Collc, 25
i Frying Colic orTeething of infants, 25
4 “ Diarrhcra oi children or adult 25
5 “ Dysentery, Grit In", blllious Colic, 25
® “ Cholera-MorbusNausea.Vomi! ing,25
7 ‘ Roughs, Co ds, Bronchitis, 25
.. jj ** Neuralgia, ToAfca'bo, Iacenche 25
.. ,1 « Headntbes.SicV'-Headache,Vertigo,25
I? yy*pei»fcio. Biliious Stomach, 25
44,1 4* Suppressed or painful Periods, 25
}2 •' Whiles* too profuse Veiiods, 2."
*» i4 !* * roMP> Cough. ditticult Breath ng, 25
‘ Jj ‘ Sot! Hhcuin,Erv»i|el s.Eruptions, 25
* *3 Rheumatism Rheumatic Pains, 25 j
4. tS ‘ Fevers Ague, dull Fever, Ague, 50
17 “ Files, blind or bleeding, * 50
tA ** Opthalmy, and sore or weak eyes, 50
* 1® “ Catarrh, acute or cronic, Intluenza,50
20 * Whooping l ough,violent Cough*.50
*21 “ A«ihuia, Oppressed Breathing, 50
22 Bar Discharges,Impairs! Hearing,50
a? Bcr.»tfula,enlarged<ilandf,Swelling*, 50
* 24 * General Debility,Physi alWeakucSs, C
“ 25 “ Dropsy, and scanty Secretions 50
,2® 4< Seasickness, sickness from riding, 50
27 * Kidney-Disease, Gravel, 50
28 “ Nervous Debility, Seminal
Emissions, Involuntary Pls
chargts 1 00
* 29 11 Bore Mouth, Canker, 50
‘ 30 ** KJrinni y Weakness, wetting bed, 60
4! It 4« Gainful Periods, with Spasms, 50
32 Buffering* at Change of Life, 1 00
“33 “ Epilepsy .Spasms, St. Vitus* l'aiice.l 00
34 M Diphtheria,ulcerated Sore Thro . 60
FAMILY CASES
Of 35 large vlula, ntoroeco c *we«
containing a specific for every
ordiuary diseusc a family is sub
ject to, uud a book of directions, #10,00
Smaller Family and Traveling cases,
with 20 to 28 vials.from SS to #8
Specifies lor all Private Disease*, both
for Caring and for Preventive treat
ment, in vials and pocket eases,.SI to $5
!3r*Theso Remedies by the caseot single Box are
sent to any part ot the Country, by mail or express,
Itree ol charge on receipt of the price. Address
Humphrey’s Specific
nOIKEOPATHIC MEDICINE COMP’V
Office and Dcnot No r,S2 Broadway, New York.
DIt. HUMPHREY is consulted daily at his office,
persona.!) or by letter as above, lor all 't.rmi of ala
eases.
F. fioeelior and Crosman ft Co, Agents.
dcfieodly
J. B. HUDSON,
may bo tound at
W. I*. FREEMAN’S,
NO. 31 FREE STREET.
Those who have been trading with me at LANCAS
TER HALL, and all others, will do well to call
beiore purchasing, as I can furnish
ALII kinds of Furniture
AT LOW PRICES.
Old Furniture Repaired in Goal
Style and at Fair Prices.
Ieb7d3wJ, 11. HUDSON.
NEW
WHOLESALE
Fancy Goods House!
WK desire to Inform our customer* that we have
associated ourselves together under the firm of
MERRILL, PRINCE & CO,
(Late Merrill Bros. & Co., Boston,)
And have leased one-hall of the store occupied l»y
John IS. Fal ner,
No. 140 Middle Street,
Over Lome Sc Little’s,
Where we have a large and well selected stock ot
FANCY DRY GOODS I
SUCH AS
GLOVES, HOSIERY,
YA.R3STS,
Small Waref, Trimmings,&e,
wLicit we offer to the trade at the
Lowest Market PrieewJ
Merrill, Prince & Co.
February 6, dtf
THIS PORTLAND
Kerosene Oil Conip’y,
Would inform the public that they continue
Manufacture
Portland Kerosene Oil,
From Albert Coal Exclusively*
The prevalence of a large quantity of Inferior and
dangerous oils in the market, at a cheap price
many of which are little better than Naptha itself—
and the exigence of false reports in regard to the
PORTLAND KEROSENE OIL, render it a mailer
of Justice to ourselves, as well as safety
to consumers, that some notice should be
taken of these facts. Therefore, we again
present an advertisement, and would call
attention to the high standard ot our Oil, the
fire test of which is 135 degrees of Fahrenheit, and
often reaches considerably higher; also, we would
say that we are determined to maintain its long es
tablished reputation.
Portland Kerosene Oil Company.
Poet[<and, Me., Aug 4th, 1867.
aug24dly.
FERTILIZERS
The Subscribers are now prepared to till orders for
CUMBERLAND
Raw Bone Phosphate of Lime,
At a ieduction In price of
Five Dollars per Ton.
Bradley’s, Coe’s and Lloyd’s Phosphate.
Also
Lodi aud Essex Poudrette
At manufac urei’s prices.
KEXDALTj & WHITNEY.
Portland Feb. 1, 1868. fob 3-d3m
TRY
MORTON'S CARPEDIAM
- FOR THE -
Cure of the Love of Strong Drink.
Can be Uireu Secretly.
Price Fifty Cents Per Bottle.
For sale by all Druggists, also at my office No. 10
Elm street, or gent to anv address on receipt of price.
leb7eo<ilm W. K. ‘MOBTON, Boston, Mass.
LUMBER
Drying and Planing Mills,
JtC. J. D. Larrabee & Co.,
West. Commercial street.
Kiln-Dried Lumber for Sale.
PERFECTLY Dry Pine Lumber planed and ready
for use.
Dry Norway Pine and Spruce Boards planed and
jointed, for floors. All kinds of lumber furnished at
low prices. Various Wood Mouldings for house-fin
ish and lor picture frames on hand and made to or
der. We can do job work, such as jig sawing, turn
ing, planing, sticking moulding, &c, in the best
manner.
KS^Prompt personal attention.
R. J. D. LARRABKE & CG..
dc24d3m West Commercial St., Portland.
TO IRON-WORKERS, et als.
JUST RECEIVED, cargo ClftlBEK
I.AND or FOBGE COAL. This Coal is
direct trom the mine and delivered on l>o&rd vessel
without landing on wharf at Georgetown, conse
quently it is clean and fresh mined.
AT WHARF NI’GAtl LOAF egg and
GREEN WOOD stove sizes—leliigh.
Also, cargo LOHBERRV COAL, stove
size—tree burning.
Also, cargo JOHN**’, stove and egg sizes.
“ “ HARLEM*II, egg and broken
sizes—lehlgli.
la^'The above named Coals need no praise.
JAR1EN H. BAKER.
Dec 9-ls dtl Hicbnrdaon’s W harf.^
Advances made ou Goods to the
Island of Cnba.
Messrs.OHUBOHLL,BBO WN8 & MANSOH
Are prepared to make liberal advances on ad kinds
of Lnmber, Cooperage and Provisions, to any oi the
Ports of the Island, and their connections with the
first class Houses ot the Island, make this a desira
ble mode foi parties wishing to ship Goods to that
market,
Portland, 16 Dec. 1867,_dcW*’
GREAT DISCOVERYl
HYDRO-CARBON BURNER.
THIS machine burrs water with any Petroleum
Oil. It can be adjusted to run the largest steam
engine, to bake a biseuit, or to boil a tea-kettle. It
can be kind!e<l or extinguished iu an instant, with
out loss ot fuel. May be seen at
No. M Federal Street, Portland, Maine.
HT*Town and County Rights for sale.
AGENTS WANTED!
December 5. eod3m __
For Sale.
_ilwit Fo. 10 Union Street.
DAILY PRESS.
PORTLAND.
Tuesday Horning, February 25,1868.
Hair I in peach meat Managed.
A sensational dispatch to a New York pa
per, Sunday morning, spoke of civil war as al
most inevitable, of 50,000 volunteers Irorn
Maryland and Pennsylvania to support the
President, and of “ the frightful tendency of
events.” To one party to the great disturb
ance at Washington, the tendency of events
is indeed “ frightful,” for it is sure to bring
the political career, begun as alderman of an
obscure village, to a final close, and is tolera
bly certain to finish It by subjecting the Pres
ident to punishment tor crime. The measure
of that punishment is to be determined by
the conduct which Mr. Johnson shall see fit
to pursue from this time forward. Five years
imprisonment or ten thousand dollars fine, or
both the fine and imprisonment, are the pen
alties incurred by the violation of the Tenure
of Office act, but death is the penalty of trea
son. The fine and imprisonment are already
earned; if Mr. Johnson has a mind to try his
hand at a coup d’etat and to resist the law
by force, the question whether treason is a
crime to be punished and to be made “odious”
will be settled. The gallows stands at the
end of the path which President Johnson
has begun to tread, and the only thing that
will prevent his following it will be the pru
dence of his advisers.
xoe only penalty Inflicted by the Senate
Bitting as a high court of impeachment, is
removal trout office and adjudging the guilty
party thenceforward ineligible to any official
position. Impeachment having been deter
mined upon, it becomes interesting to inquire
what the course of proceeding will be, and
how long it will take to remove Johnson and
put Benjamin Wade in his place. Ten days
is frequently spoken of as ample time for
bringing the proceedings to a close. It may
be that by economizing time to the utmost,
ten days may be long enough to put a new
man in the White House. But it will take
ten very busy days.
Ine nrst step to be taken after tbe passage
of an impeachment resolution by the House
Is the appointment ol a committee to im
peach the party at the 'oar ol the Senate, aDd
to state that articles will be exhibited in due
time. Regular articles of impeachment must
then be prepared by a committee, reported to
the House and then presented to the Senate,
alter which a committee is appointed to con
duct the impeachment, and process is Issued
by the Senate, summoning the party to ap
pear on a certain day. This process is served
by the Sergeants at-Arms.
On the return day of the process, the Sen
ators are sworn, and if the President is on
trial, the Chief Justice presides over the Sen
ate sitting as a court of impeachment. If the
accused does not appear his default is record
ed and the trial proceeds ear parte. He may
appear either in person or by counsel and is
entitled to a reasonable tirpe hi which to an
swer the articles of impeachment. Great lat
itude is given him in making this answer.
He may deny the whole charge or particular
parts; he may plead not guilty or plead spec
ial matters in justification or excuse. After
the answer is given in, the next thing in order
is the replication to the answer, to be submit
ted in writing by the House of Representa
tives.
Alter the pleadings are complete a day is
fixed for trial. On that day the Representa
tives appear at the bar of the Senate either
in a body or by the managers selected for
that purpose. The managers then open the
proceedings with an explanatory speech, after
which the trial proceeds substantially as in
common judicial trials. After the evidence is
eomplcte, If any debate arises it is conducted
in secret, but a day is fixed fer a final public
decision by yeas and nays. When the court
is assembled for that purpose, the presiding
officer addressees each member separate
ly by name in the following manner: Mr.
-, how say you, is the respondent guilty or
not guilty of a high crime and misdemeanor,
as charged in the —th article of impeachment ?
The member addressed rises in bis place to
respond. If two thirds of the Senators
present decide that the accused is guilty, the
Senate proceeds to fix and declare the proper
punishment.
The course of proceedings above described
Is according to the American precedents. It
may at any time be changed by legislation,
and Senator Edmunds of Vermont has a bill
already before Congress providing, among
other things, for the suspension of the person
on trial from the exercise of his official
powers.
The Financial Situation.
III.
TO LESHEN THE BORDEN OF NATIONAL
TAXATION.
There wee raised tor 1868, by duties
levied upon Importation, rated as
currency *239,828,868
Direct taxes and excite duties, 312,881,738
Total, *882,410,606
For 1867, by duties levied upon Im
portation, *238,223,743
Direct taxes and excise, 270,120 J07
Total, *504,344,450
This was upon each Inhabitant of the
United States for 1866 $15 and for 1867
$13.30. From 1851 to 1861 the taxes per capita
had not exceeded $2.25.
No argument is necessary to show that this
amount of taxation is in excesi of the pro
ductive power of the country. It is to be
hoped that the experiment of determin ing
how severe an imposition of taxes a people
can bear will not be tried in this country.
The imposition of taxes is a subject upon
which a free people must always be sensitive
and a function which under our constitution
is to be performed by that branch of the leg
islature most completely under the popular
control. It is enough therefore to say that
the American people, who have the power of
taxing so entirely under their control, have
expressed their opinion in the most unmis
takable way, that the present rates of nation
al taxation are greatly in excess of what they
are disposed to submit to. The legislature
have no discretion whatever, but to regard
the plain behests of the constituency in this
respect, and to determine in what manner
and upon what articles the demanded reduc
tion of taxation shall be had so as not to in
jure the public credit.
The first and most obvious means of les
sening the taxes is by establishing specie
payments. Mr. CommtssionerWells computes
that the sum required lor the expenses of the
government tor the next fiscal year exclusive
of interest on the public debt is $140,000,000.
Hon. K. J. Walker in a letter to the Secret iry
of the Treasury asserts that by the resumption
of specie payments the amount of the ordinary
expenses of the government may be reduced
30 per cent. This would leave but $98,000,000
required in gold to pay the ordinary expenses
of the government. But though all materials
purchased by the government might if paid
for in gold, be purchased at 30 per cent, less
than for currency, fixed salaries, the most of
which have not been increased since the war,
would not be diminished when paid in geld.
Perhaps 25 per cent, is a sufficiently large re
duction to allow for a substitution of gold tor
currency payments. This would leave to he
provided by taxation 105 millions annually.
Mr. Y> alker estimates that the war and navy
expenses may be required to be twice the
amount expended for the year previous to the
war which would make them $50,003,000 and
the other ordinary expenses 60 per cent, great
er than the same year, which would b« $48,
000,000 or a total for ordinary expenses of the
government of $104,000,000.
Now If $2,000,000,000 of the national debt
remained tunded in bonds bearing C per cent,
interest in gold, the other $500,000,000 to be
placed without interest as will he hereafter
explained, there will require to be raised for
interest annually 120 millions, and as soon as
the bonds can be funded at 5 per cent 100
millions and when ftinded at 4 per cent. 80
millions. This will require a total revenue of
$224,000,000.
- -. __
Commissioner Weils recommends .the rais
ing of *152.000,000 by internal taxes, to he
imposed upon the following articles alone:
Distilled spiiits, ferented liquors, tobacco
and its manufactures, incomes, stamps, leg
acies and successions, banks, railroads die.,
salaries gross receipts, raise llaneous fines,
penalties, die. This schedule can be greatly
simplified. Let us suppose only this portion
of it is left, the estimatesjbeing those of Mr. I
Welles:
Distilled spirits, «50,<HHi,§.lo
Fermented liquors, e,00u 0on |
Tobac oand its maiiu&ctuies. 20,000,000
. Incomes, 35,000 ooi)
Legacies and successions, 2,000,000
Total, #113,00 *,003
Let stamp taxes be abolished because they
ro onerous and troublesome to the people to
an extent disproporlionate to the revenue
deiived from them; because they are the oc
casion of many vindictive prosecutions, when
the omission to use them was the result of
ignorance or heedlessness rather than fraud,
and of defences against just claims based up
on mere non-couspliauce with a prescribed
formality. Let taxes on banks, railroads, in
surance companies, Ac, be swept away for tire
same reason that manufactures and sales are
exempted, and because they are reassessed
with interest and premium upon shareholders
who bear them in the end.
Let the taxes on legacies and successions
he retained, because as is ably explained by
John Stuart Mill, the right eveu of children
to the property that has beetr ac mmulated by
their father without exettiou of theirs is not
a right wholly unquestionable, and where
property falls to remote heirs it is more like
a stroke of good luck than by an equitable
claim. At any rate no citizen is in so favora
ble position to make a donation to the State,
as he whom the State secures in a succession
to an estate be never contributed to create
and which the lawful owner might if he
pleased have given to a public charity, and
which passes to the iortunate inheritor by
the accident of the owner forgetting to make
a will.
Let tire tax on incomes lie retained as In
itself the most just lorxn of taxation possible,
aud some efforts be made to make its assess
ment fairer and more equal. Income and
not capital is the true subject ot taxation.—
In this respect the State taxation, which is
based upon cross property is open to objec
tion. Lands, buildings, vessels, manufactur
ing establishments, stocks of goods, which in
stead of yielding incomes may be running
their ownm in debt are still taxed at their
value, whilf large incomes derived from less
tangible sources escape taxation altogether.—
Au income tax, with a proper deduction of
what is speut or ought to bo spent for one’s
maintenance and that of one’s family, has
this advantage, that it always is an assess
ment upon clear actual gains, above the
amount necessary for a living.
lhe advantage of an income tax is that it
covers the whole legitimate field ol taxation
and is a sufficient and fair substitute for the
taxes on manufactures, on corporations, on
sales and on bonds. If all these sources of
profit amount to a surplus over the prescrib
ed exempted sum, they ought to be taxed; if
not, they ought to escape taxation. Having
been taxed as income, they ought not to be
taxed again to the speci 1 source whence the
income was derived.
In the general reduction ot Internal taxation,
which amounts to a virtual abolition of all
special taxes, except upon incomes and such
luxuries as are not of universal use, and
when used profusely universally considered
deleterious, the demand to tax the United
States bonds will not be likely to be beard.
1 admit that they are not exempt by the
terms of the law from national taxation.
But can Congress Impose upon them a tax
for the use of the United States, without tak
ins back without the consent of the bond
holder a part of the consideration it solemn
ly pledged Itself to pay ? If it may tax the
bonds one per cent may It not tax t! em six
per cent, and thus rebate the eutire inter jet?
Can Congress tax them for t/e usi of the
States, and donate the proceeds o; the tax to
the States without an evasion of the contract
to exempt them from Stale taxation? Would
it be a fair fulfilment of the agreement to ex
empt these secutities from State taxation
for the government itself to impose a tax for
the use ot the State? Can Congress tax one
class of bonds, the very class it seemed to
prefer, without joining State bonds, Railroad
bonds, and city bonds, notes and mortgages?
Can an excise tax be constitutional that sin
gles out one article of a general category for
imposition? Has cot the exemption from
taxation for five yeats through the entire pe
riod when the government was a borrower,
ueen equivalent to an interpretation by Con
gress, that the contract itself contemplated
the exemption ? Would it lie magnanimous
in a government dealing with its own citizens
as its creditors to say: We kept back the tax
while we were soliciting loans fiom you ol
8000,000,1100 a year, now we have got all we
want, though we need but $200,000,000 a year
we will tax you, and all the more iu that
you have gone so long untaxed? Now it is
beginning to be within the power of the
government to pay these bonds, would it not
be more consistent with national houor to
call them in as rapidly as )>ossible, and sup
ply their place with bonds subject to State
and municipal taxation ?
There remains, then, only 8112.000,000 of
revenue to be provided for by a tariff. The
present tariff yielded for I860, $170,000,000,
aud for 1867 8176,000,000 in gold. Reducing
the sura to be levied to $112,000,000 would
allow tea, coffee, and sugar and raw materials
generally to be admitted free of duty, aud all
other products at a greally reduced rate. Im
portations would increase; the revenue, in
stead of falling off with diminution of duties,
might, and on many articles would increase.
The inducement uow held out to siutigglin?
would he effectually removed, and the large
army of special agents of the treasury, and
extraordinary officers of customs employed
at great expense to detect and punish frauds
upon the revenue, might be dispensed w ith.
Duties being payable in coin, which will have
become of equivalent value to the ordinary
circulating currency, a premium added to ex
cessive duties no longer oppresses the con
sumer, upon whom the importer throws its
burdens, with an additional profit to himself
Whatever views may hitherto have been
held in reference to protection it is obvious
that the principles of flee trade have rapidly
gained ground under the bard experience of
the last few years; and that a point has been
reached in many articles of manufactuie and
production at which high rates of duty have
only enhanced the price to the consumer,
while the cheap production and manufacture
have been just as much beyond our reach as
ever. The excess of imports, the steady ac
companiment ofliigh duties and large prem
iums on gold, show that protection to home
industry has not been afforded, that we have
loaded ourselves with taxation to the verge ol
exhaustion, while foreign fabrics glut our
market.--, and our own manufactories lan
guish in profitless operation or fall into com
plete decay. It is very obvious that the peo
ple of the West, and Ihe people of New En
gland, heretofore the great advocates of a
protective tariff', have become willing to try
the experiment oi competing with foreign
manufactures on a scale oi duties to he based
mainly on considerations of needed revenue.
G. F. T.
Alabama
What unaccountable nonsense it is for some
ofthe Republican and all of the Democratic
papers to talk ot the admission of Alabama
nnder her new constitution as a “breach of
contract,” because a majority ot" registered
voters did not participate in the election as
required by act of Congress. Their reasoning
is this: By the terms of the reconstruction act
the people ot Alabama were told that they
could oppose the adoption of the constitution
as successfully by staying away from the polls
as by voting against it. Accordingly they
adopted the fertner alternative and stayed at
home, thus defeating the eoustitution, though
the uumber of votes in its favor was within
four or five thousand of a majority of all the
electors iu the State, and those against It only
— JU._-_ ■ —
I a few hundreds. Now, say the Springfield
Republican and other semi-Democratic sheets,
it will be a breach of contract and an infamous
outrage for Congress to recognize the validily
of the constitution and admit the Representa
tives trom Alabama, elected thereunder, to
Congress.
But it happeus that there are two parties in
all contracts — humoring the critics of Con
gress enough to call the legislative act passed
by a |w)wer competent to enact it a contract—
and the party complaining of its violation
must come into court with clean hands. How
| was it in this case? Did the ex-Rebels of Ala
buna content themselves with passive but
j legitimate opposition to the constitution con
templated by law? If they had confined them
selves to resistance by this method thoir
claim to preclude Congress from taking fur
ther action would be poor enough, since that
body has supreme control of the whole matter,
and may rightfully exercise its own discretion.
Nothing < f this kind gives strength to their
position. They actively and unlawfully made
use of every expedient that satanic ingenuity
could conceive to prevent a true expression of
the people of Alabama on the subject of the
adoption of the constitution. They kept
thousands from the polls by lies, by threats,
and by physical force. This is the way they
kept their part of the “contract.” These are
the people in whose behalf the Springfield
Republican thinks it worth while to prate.
Varieties.
—A lady who had carried two common
pigeons from their home in Missouri to Illi
nois, a distance of two hundred miles, keep
ing them in a close box, lately missed them
and has received a letter from Missouri saying
that they had returned to their old haunts.
—The London fire brigade recently spent
several hours huutiug up an aurora borealis
which was supposed to be a great fire in the
suburbs.
—A Montreal dispatch says the leading
Ministerial organ there continues the publica
tion of letters calculated to create a feeling of
uneasiness in regard to the Fenian movement
on the Eastern frontier.
—A Kansas reporter, having been on a buf
falo hunt, says that the party killed seventy ot
the animals, and he has lived on the meat so
long that his head is shaggy, and he bellows
when he tries to talk.
—The Toronto Globe advocates the opening
of roads through the great North-West terri
tory, at the expense of the Ontario Govern
ment, rather than not at all.
—The Boston Pilot thinks the man is living
who will see a majority of the people on the
American continent Kornaa Catholic.
—Bills to provide for direct taxation for ed
ucational purposes, to reduce the number ot
members from 46 to 31, and to abolish the offi
ces of clerks of the crown and ot the circuit
court, have been introduced into the New
Brunswick Parliament. Solicitor-General
Skinner has resigned, and his office will l#
abolished.
—A Washington dispatch says the famous
Kit Carson, who has been in that city for some
days, is iul applicant for an Indian agency in
the Wist Strange to say he is likely to be
beaten by a politician who is also an appli
cant, hut who never saw a wigwam. Carson's
name is a household word among the frontier
men and friendly Indians.
—A Canadian recently ran a snow-shoe
race against au Indian and made two miles in
fourteen minutes.
—A Quebec paper says: “While a young
girl was gathering chips in Mr. Valin’s wood
yard, St. Roch, ou Saturday afternoon, she
thoughtlessly darted forward to pick up a block
of wood from under the descending axe of ous
of the laborers. While in the act of grasping
the piece of wood, she received tho full blow
of the axe on the shoulder, being literally
nearly cut in two. Though ttill alive, her re
covery is pronounced hopeless. No blame is
attached to the axe-man.”
—r Jorence ighttngala has subscribed
£1060 to a fund tor erecting an infirmary at
Rotherham, England.
—A new edition of the poetical works of
Robert Browning is announced in London in
six monthly volumes. The first will contain
“Pauline “Paracelsus,” and “Strafford.”
—The Germans have lost one of their beat
novelists by the death of Adelbert Stifter, who
died recently at Lina, on the Danube, In the
seventy-second year of his age. His works
are “Studieu,” which consist of six volumes of
short stories; “Bunte Steine," a similar col
lection in two volumes; and two novels, “Der
Nachsoinmer,” and “Witiko.”
—Mr. John C. Breckinridge was seen in
Beirut, the old Berytus of old Phoenicia, the
other day, he having entered on a tour through
the East. He was humming, not “The Hun
ters of Kentucky,” but Partant pour la Syria.
—A great horseflesh dinner was served at
the Langliatn Hotel, London, on the 6th. The
company was numerous, and the. unanimous
verdict was for eating the horse. Herealter
horseflesh is to be considered good. The ef
forts that are made to induce men to eat their
old friend prove as much that food is scaree,
as that the equine quadruped can be made aa
serviceable to man in death as he has been in
life from immemorial time.
—A newly-discovered letter of Peter the
Great is now going the round of the Russian
journals. Iu this very characteristic epistle
Peter informs one of his courtiers that he has
heard that his, the corn tier’s, brother wishes to
marry a foreign woman, and that he perfectly
understands his reasons lor making such a
choice, the inhabitants of Russia being less
civilized and less polite than those of other
countries. He has heard that the courtier has
forbidden his brother to contract the meditat
ed union, hut his Majesty not only permits it,
he positively orders it.
—The obscene papers and immoral books
with which this country is just now flooded,
are seized by the customs authorities of Can
ada when carried over the line.
—The Whitby (C. W.) Chronicle says:—
Some two mouths ago Mr. Joseph Moon, re
sid'ng at Port Union, missed a valuable milch
cow, and for days and weeks made search for
her in every direction without success. A few
days ago on going to the ice house, (which had
not been entered since the cow was missed,)
whut was his astonishment on discovering the
missing animal—and still alive, after having
been immured without food or water for thir
ty-nine days!
—in me jsovaoootta Mouse ot .vssemoiy it
has been officially announced that the Legis
lature will be prorogued whilst the delegation
is absent in England. This shows the firm de
termination of the Nova Scotia people to ad
here to the course they have resolved upon.
Mr. Howe was to have left Halifax on Friday
: us one of the delegates; and his confreres
would follow him in the course of a fortnight.
— General Sam Houston, while President of
the Texan Republic, received a challenge to
light a duel with some person whom he con
sidered his inferior. Turning to the bearer of
the challenge, ho said: “Sir, tell your princi
pal that Sam Houston never fights down hill1“
—Every one has noticed the incongruous
readings which are often found on places well
plastered or papered with hand-bills. The
amiable wife ot A. Oakey Hall late a candi
date for District Attorney of New York Coun
ty, relates that she was astonished to find,
from some of these band-bills, that the New
York public were seriously advised to “ Bug
lhe best Fireside Companion, A, Oakey Hall."
—Two young women, who were watching
the body of a supposed dead child,in Aberdeen
Mississippi, were somewhat startled when
the youngster sat up and requested something
to eat.
— the Princess o[ L>euch tenberg bas given to
the Mineralogical Society of 8t. Petersburg,
on the occasion of her marriage, a collection
of fossils which she had made in her various
tonrs in Europe. The association has elected
her an honorary member.
—It is ever the case with effervescent mate;
rial that to be very sparkling it most be thor
oughly bottled. This has proved to be the
case with Gen . Bntler-tbe tighter the place,
the greater the “pop." The General, while lu
active practice in Massachusetts, was a terror
and torment to Judges oi thin calibre. On one
occasion Judge Sanger having been bullied
and badgered out of all patience, petulantly
asked, ""'hat does the counsel suppose I sm
on lid’s bench tor?” Scratching his head a
minute, Ben|amin F. replied: “Well, I confer#
your Honor’s got roe there!”
—During the rebellion a regiment ot Con
federates was marching through Arkansas, up
to their knees in mud. An officer riding by a
party of soldiers who were assisting to pars a
?'“S ~i"~
IhZgh With you this hitch; but if you ever
have any more Cnions to break up, gov
test your W* 1 u<rt * tk*T‘

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