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The Portland daily press. [volume] (Portland, Me.) 1862-1921, January 06, 1886, Image 2

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TIIlI Pit PBS.
WEDNESDAY MORNING, JAN. C.
We do not read anonymous letters and comtnun
cations. The name and address of the writer are
n all eases Indispensable, not necessarily for pub
lication but as a guarantee of good faith.
We cannot undertake to return or preserve
communications that are not used._
There is a certain amount of satisfaction
in knowing that the last murder in Maine
was committed by a New Hampshire man.
The latest report from Columbus says that
John Sherman is sure of a re-elsction. The
McLean gang have not succeeded in finding
any purchasable material in the ranks of
the Republican legislators.
It would not be a bad idea for Secretary
Bayard to notify the Chilian government
that its Secretary of legation in Washington
gets drunk altogether too often to be persona
grata to the government.
Congressman Perry Belmont is going to of
fer a resolution providing for a select com
mittee of nine to investigate the workings of
the civil service law, with a view to amend
ing it if deemed expedient. The chief com
plaint against the law is that it does not put
Democrats into office fast enough. An amend
ment that will make it do more in this direc
tion will undoubtedly be heartily approved by
tlie majority of the Democratic members of
the House and their constituents.
It is gratifying to observe that Gov. Hill in
his message takes strong ground in favor of
reforming the municipal governments of the
large cities of New York State. Gov. Hill
has never been known as a reformer, but he
is apparently on the road to conversion. It
is’to be hoped lie will not backslide and that
any measnre passed by the legislature look
ing to a cure of the evils he admits will re
ceive his prompt approval. Such conver
sions as Hill’s are apt to he viewed with sus
picion and a long career of well doing is nec
essary to convince the public ;that they are
genuine.__
The insanity plea has never accomplished
much for criminals in this State. Its last
failure was in the Hodgdon murder case at
Bath. Hodgdon, while drunk, killed his
mother. After his arrest he feigned insan
ity and was sent to the insane hospital for
inspection. The physicians of that institu
tion found no indications of that disease.
Whatever halluciation he may have labored
under at the time of the murder was shown
conclusively to be the result of the liquor
which he had deliberately drunk. He goes
to the State prison for life, and nobody can
gainsay the justice of his punishment.
On second thought the President concludes
that the newspapers are not so black as he
painted them. Some of them he still con
tends do deliberately and habitually lie, but
the most of them he admits do not wilfully
misrepresent. That is about the fact. There
are bad newspapers and good newspapers,
but the latter are largely in the ascendency.
A good many of the alleged falsehoods of
newspapers are the misrepresentations of
people upon whom newspapers have to de
pend for information, and the really guilty
party is the newspaper’s informant and not
. the newspaper. Judicial investigation by
newspapers is impossible.
Speaker Carlisle, it is said, has submitted
to the President two propositions in regard to
the silver coinage. The first is that the coin
age of standard silver dollars shall be sus
pended when tlie total amount shall reach
the sum of $250,000,000. The total coinage is
now $215,000,000. and at the present rate it
will require nearly two years to reach the
limit. The second plan is to suspend coinage
at once and issue silver certificates of the de
nominations of one, two and five dollars to
the full amount of standard silver dollars in
the treasury. It is not believed that the rad
ical silver men in either brancli of Congress
will agree to these propositions, but an at
tempt will be made to secure tlie adoption of
one or tlie other of them.
Somebody said to be a “well-known Re
publican,” has been investigating the charg
es against Eben F. Pillsbury and communi
cates to the Boston Globe the result. He
finds that the only thing Mr. Pillsbury is
guilty of is staunch Democracy. Nevertheless
there stands on the’ report of the committee
thet investigated the count-out the following
letter from Mr. Pillsbury, the authenticity of
which has never bean denied:
Augusta, Nov. 7,1879.
Bro. Pratt :
Yours received. I think it the clerk does not
make his record in open town meeting it is fatal.
Let me know what town it is so that 1 can calcu
late upon results. Have you found any other ir
regularities? In haste,
E. F. Pillsbury.
The significance of that letter will out
weigh the belief of anybody vaguely described
as “a well-known Republican.”
Speaker Carlisle is having a heap of trouble
with the committees. Mr. Randall’s enemies
insistthat that gentleman’s adherents shall
be snubbed as far as practicable and the silver
men want the earth. Secretary Bayard has
thrown his influence against the retention of
ex-Gov. Curtin as chairman of the committee
on foreign affairs and in favor of Perry Bel
mont for the place. At last accounts Mr.
Bayard seemed likely to have his way.
Bland ;will be retained at the head of the
coinage committee but in deference to the
views of the President the majority of the
committee will be made up of anti-silvermen.
A good deal of bad feeling is certain to re
sult no matter how the committees are made
up. Every Democrat in the House insists on
having a prominent position and the number
of such poaitions is far from enough to go
around._
January 1 the Minneapolis Tribune issued
a sheet of thirty-two pages, giving a com
plete history- of the growth of the city dur
ing the past year. The city contains today
more than 140,000 inhabitants. In 1860 the
population of the town was only 2564, and as
late as 1872 it was dismissed in the Gazetteer
with a few lines describing it as a post vil
lage of Minnesota, with 10 churches, 2 na
tional banks, a United States land office, 3
flouring mills and 6 saw mills. It is now the
metropolis of the Northwest, with a real es
tate valuation of over 877,000,000. The value
of tho buildings erected in 1885 alone was
89,715,010. The number of business houses
established in 1885 w»« 1,845 ;|capital invested
in the flouring trade,830,411,810; jobbers’sales,
8137,640,000 ; 313,998,166 feet of lumber were
sawed; 32,469,760 bushels of wheat received;
5,100,962 barrels of flour made, and the value
of the manufactures within the city was
854,060,700. The growth of the city from
year to year is surprising, and from decade
to decade astounding. In a little more than
ten years, if its present growth continues, it
will contain a population of 300,000 souls.
And only a few- miles away is the city of St.
Paul, whose growth is scarcely less wonder
ful. __
There are skating rinks and skating rinks.
Charges that may be sustained against some
of them cannot be sustained against all of
them. There is nothing in roller skating,per
se.that leads to immorality, and when indulg
ed in with moderation there is -no con
clusive evidence that it is physically injurious
Undoubtedly there are a considerable num
ber of well authenticated instances where
acquaintanceships formed at skating rinks
in this city have led to ruinous results. But
so there are of acquaintanceships formed at
dances, and other amusements where the
sexes are brought together. In some re
spects a good many of the dances that abound
here during the winter time are more de
structive to morality than the skating rinks.
The hours kept are very much later, and the
exes are brought into more intimate rela
tions. A movement to abolish the cheap
dance is quite as necessary as a movement to
abolish the skating rink. If what we hear
of some of the skating rinks and some of
the dances be true, the sooner they are both
abolished the better. But we are not pre
pared to say that they are all equally bad.
On the contrary, we think there is a differ
ence. But the surest way to shut them all
up—dances and riuks—if it be desirable to
do so, and certainly the opinion of the cler
gymen of the city on this point is entitled to
great weight, is for parents to refuse to let
their children visit them. Back of patron
age will kill them very quickly.
The native who carried from the field the
body of the Prince Imperial, when he lost
his life fighting in South Africa, was present
ed with a diamond ring and pensioned by the
Empress Eugenie. He came to Massachu
setts and was lost sight of, hut tlia ring was
found last week in a Boston pawn shop.
CURRENT COMMENT
AND LIKE THEM A CUBSE TO THE COMMU
NITY.
North American.
Discussion of the tariff has to break out
periodically, like the smallpox or the
measles.
MORE PRTENDEBS THAN THRONES.
North American.
A new pretender has been found to the
throne of France. It now only remains to
find the throne of France.
a “scoop” in western journalism.
Cincinnati Enquirer.
Our chimney burned out last night, and
the spectacle attracted a large and admiring
crowd. It was the only newspaper chimney
in town that burned out. We strive to
please.
OUR FOREICN LETTER.
[Special Correspondence ol the Press.]
Acting upon the advice of our sailor friend
to aim for “the four horse team and biggest
coachman,” as soon as we touched the wharf
opposite the Isle, we leaped upon the pier
and entered into a running match with a few
others who were on the alert for the main
chance as well as ourselves, this side and
that up a steep ascent, like a string of team
horses. Having several times been nettled
that out of excessive modesty, a trait wholly
unappreciated in England, we had permit
ted ourselves to be crowded into tight cor
ners, we mounted to the topmost seat and
sat down with a chuckle of satisfaction close
by the Great Panjandrum himself, from
whom we were told to expect a treat—if we
were careful to brush his coat in the right
way. The drive now crosses the glens and
glades of the Trosaohs, passing a litfle
thatched cottage, which lias sheltered chil
dren of each generation in its turn, for three
hundred years. Beneath this humble roof
the Queen of the Gipsies, or Scotch^Tinkers,
entertained Queen Victoria while journey
ing with the Prince Consort through Scot
land. Happily our driver was in a good mood
and we easily touched a sympathetic chord.
At every turn he broke out in a recital of
long passages of the “Lady of the Lake,’
! with sit Mi (Vrvnr and national nride that we
fancied we could see the chieftain’s daugh
ter, “her satin snood, her silken plaid, her
golden brooch, such birth betrayed” as she
stepped “from the silver strand and pushed
her liglit shallop from the shore, kissing with
whispering sound and slow, the beach of
pebbles white as enow.” We peered into
the deep gorge beneath the cliff, where Fitz
James stooped over his dying steed and ut
tered his impassioned wail of grief: “Woe!
worth the chase: woe worth the day that cost
thy life, my gallant gray.” He would sand
wich these quotations in with his own char
acteristic comments in such a droll way that
it is quite too bad that you should lose them.
But back to our seats on the stage, which luck
ily are always kept for you, no matter how
many times the passengers may alight. Our
orator fairly lost himself in the dramatis
persona: and raised our enthusiasm to the
highest pitch in his recitation of James’s in
terview with Roderick, where he says, “Can
naught but blood our feud atone ? Are there
no means? “No stranger,none,”—when came
an ominous sound, “faint and far from dis
tance borne,” swelling as it approached, till
the whole vale resounded with the echoes,
and the mountain peaks seemed to shiver and
crash beneatii the lightning stroke. Peal
mingled with peal, the thick clouds enveloped
as in darkness, and before we could plunge
from our ecstasy to sense the tremendous
convulsion in the elements, the very heavens
epened and the pitiless floods poured upon
our poor unprotected heads.
We heard not another word of poetry, our
driver was so blinded by the rain he could
hardly keep his horses in the road. That
morning, wearied with tugging about water
proof packs and umbrellas, with child like
trust in the smiling face of the heavens and
the genial winds, we had forwarded every
ounce of encumbering baggage to Edinburgh.
We could do nothing but patiently bow our
heads to the storm for nearly two hours.
After a space, when there was not a feather
or ribbon lelt to be spoiled, we tried to hnd
the little compensation we might in listen
ing to the awful voice of the tempest,
and the jokes of a jolly Westerner, whose
spirits could not be wet down by a heavy
Scotch mist. In this sad plight, we bade
adieu to James, Lord of Snowdoun, and the
fair Ellen, and sought the shelter of a rail
road station at (Hollander. Here we shivered
and wrung out rivers from our garments for
two hours longer, waiting for the train, nev
er so slow and tardy. Late in the evening
we found a resting place at the Windsor
Hotel, Edinburgh, under the very shadow of
the Old Castle.
EDINBURGH.
The next morning was spent at a haber
dasher's to repair the damage done by yes
terday’s drenching, that we might make our
selves respectable representatives of our
glorious republic. We discussed the proba
ble merits of the various objects of interest
in the city, and concluded to take Edinburgh
in chronological order, beginning with the
old Castle, the cradle of Scotland’s early
renown and the home of many of her rulers,
from Bruce down to the time of Charles I.
Like all similar structures of early days,
this fortress served alike for the abode of
the royal family, a fort of defense against an
invading army, and a refuge for the peasant
ry in times of distress. It is kept in order
by a squad of soldiers, as a relic of Scotland’s
early history. One might tarry a long (time
and ruminate over the mysterious providen
cies of the past, in the unattractive room,
not over eight feet square, with a single case
ment window, the wrhole suggesting anything
but the luxurious appointments of royalty,
where a few weeks after Mary, Queen of
Scots, witnessed the bloody soenes of Holy
rood, she gave birth to her first born son,
James VI. of Scotland, and more familiar to
the people of the New World as Janies I. of
England. We looked from the window down
the perpendicular wall 200 feet high, where
tradition says, when only a few weeks old,
he was lowered in a basket and taken to a
place of safety. Such was the intense bit
terness of feeling between the Catholics and
Protestants after Mary came from France,
that each church was determined by fair
means or foul, to baptize the young prince
into its fold. Could these grim walls reveal
the secrets of state and domestic life en
trusted to their stony silence, we might hear
startling facts, which would seriously de
range the most enduring institutions and
social fabrics of the present time.
M. C. P. B.
THE NEW YEAR’S TOILETS.
At the Receptions given by the Presi*
dent and Cabinet Officers.
At the New Year’s reception at the White
House, Miss Cleveland wore a court train of
garnet velvet, with tablier of white silk
wrought with beaded embroidery. The cor
sage was of white, cut square in front and
heart shaped at the back. The garnet vel
vet formed a peasant waist in front. The
sleeves were short and the pearl colored
gant-de-suede readied high above the el
bows. She carried a bouquet of white roses.
Mrs. Bayard wore a train of white satin,
with richly embroidered white Canton crepe
draped shawl shape over the skirt. She
wore a bouquet de corsage of natural roses.
Mrs. Manning wore a very faint shade of
heliotrope satin, embroidered in pearl and
crystal beads all over the front. It had a
train, as did the dress of each lady in the re
ceiving party. Mrs. Whitney wore white
satin, richly embroidered in silver. A mag
nificent diamond necklace and diamond
comb completed her toilet. Mrs. Vilas wore
a shrimp pink silk, witli oriental trimmings
and embroidery on crepe lisse. Miss Bayard
wore a delicate gray satin, veiled with a little
darker shade of tulle. Miss Nannie Bayard
wore a pale amber uncut velvet dress, and
Miss Florence Bayard wore light pink silk.
Mrs. Lamont, wife of the President’s pri
vate secretary, wore a toilet of flame-colored
f‘Madame Iteuterskiold, the Swedish minis
ter’s wife, wore a carriage dress of black vel
vet, with white bonnet and plumes. The
Misses West, of the British legation, wore
dark blue dresses, with bonnets and muffs
to match. The skirts of the dresses were of
silk, striped with red, blue and old gold, and
the bodices were trimmed with a little gold
passementerie, and had full fronts of white
crepe lisse. Mrs. Helyar, of the same lega
tion, wore a gray plush, the bodice trimmed
witli pink Chinese crape.
At the reception given at Secretary Endi
cott’s house by Mrs. and Miss Endicott Mrs.
Endicott wore a gown of red silk with a tab
lier of pale brocade, and Miss Endicott was
attired in a white dress embroidered in mer
lin. Mrs. Secretary Whitney received fo
the first time in the old home of the Ereling,
liuysen’s. She wore a gown of white satins
embroidered in silver. Mrs. Bayard had her
first experience of a Washington New Year,
the family having been aoonstomed to spend
the holidays at their home in Wilmington.
Mrs. Bayarcl received iu a dress of white
crepe de chene with a high corsage. Mrs.
Manning wore white satin and Miss Man
ning white cashmere. Mrs. Vilas’s toilet
was of crimson silk draped with Chantilly
lace.__
PERSONAL AND PECULIAR.
There arc 285 lawyers in the present Con
gress.
Mr. Tennyson’s fortune is put down at
$400,000.
Of Jay Gould’s partners, Mr. Conner is
said to be worth $3,000,000 and Mr. Morosini
$2,000,000.
Lieutenant Greely’s book to be pub
lished this month will have 100 photographic
illustrations.
Roscoe Conkliug has received as a Christ
mas present a barrel of chewing gum. It is
for Mr. Conkling’s dyspepsia.
The total number of deaths from small pox
in Montreal during the late epidemic ex
ceeds 3,000, distributed over 500 houses.
The health of ex-Vice President Wheeler,
who has not been well for come time, is now
better than it has been for several years.
Mr. Parnell probably receives the largest
mail and sends the fewest replies of any sim
ilarly conspicuous politician in the world.
Senator Palmer, of Michigan, is to move
this week into his new Washington house,
the dining room whereof contains “twenty
one tons of solid mahogany, imported from
Honduras.”
Secretary Manning, the newspaper gossips
say, like Salmon P. Chase, works in his li
brary for several hours before breakfast. He
works in the evening also unless he has a
dinner party on.hand.
Col. Fred Grant, in accordance with the
special request made by his late father, sent
a presentation copy of the “Memoirs of U.
S. Grant” to ex-Secretary and ex-Governor
Geooge S. Boutwell, who was Gen. Grant’s
personal and political friend.
A New York man who owns much real es
tate has, in view of the threatening aspect
of the silver question, inserted in all his
leases a proviso that the rent shall be paid
in gold coin. “I don’t want to pay my debts
in a depreciated currency,” he says, “and I
don’t mean that any one shall cheat me out
of what is due, even if Congress does think
u a
«■***
Claus Spreckels, “the sugar king of the
New World,” as he likes to call himself, is
said to derive an income of 15,000,000 from
his sugar plantations in the Sandwich
Islands. In his domain he wields the most
autocratic power of any monopolist in the
world. His home at Honolulu is like the
dream of a Sybarite. His wants are served
by an army of negroes.
The new postmaster of Philadelphia has
directed all his subordinates who required to
give bonds to have the bonds prepared by
Mr. Megaree, a defeated Democratic candi
date, whose price is ten dollars for each
bond. Heretofore the bands have been
drawn up at a cost of fifty cents each. The
number of employes who must give these
bonds is eight hundred, so that Mr. Megar
gee will make a fine thing of it.
One reason why everybody* in Pittsburg
does not use natural gas is that in repairing
the frequent leaks the gas has t# be shut off
from every consumer on the main. For in
stance, a glass factory was suddenly left
without gas for an hour and a half, a big
furnace chilled and the company lost 824,000.
A big restaurant was left without fuel in its
ranges at 11 o’clock and had to send its cus
tomers away hungry. So business men put
a clause in their gas contracts, calling for a
constant supply or else indemnification for
losses, and a good many private citizens stick
to the dirty but reliable coal.
The Hon. S. S. Cox lias sent to the Presi
dent from Constantinople a copy of his work,
“Three Decades of Federal Legislation,”
bound in that city. The leather of the bind
ing is the finest white morocco. The cloth is
a web of Turkish embroidery in silk, gold
and silver. The initials of President Cleve
land appear in the centre of each cover, and
surrounding them is a Turkish sentence sig
nifying “May Allah guard you.” This is a
counterpart of the copy presented by Mr.
Cox to the Sultan of Turkey. Only two vol
umes were prepared in this style.
SKIN i BLOOD
Diseases from Pimples to Scrofula Cared
by Cnticara.
Hundreds of letters In our possession, copies of
which may be had by return of mail, repeat this
story:—I have been a terrible sufferer for years
from Diseases ef the Skin and Blood; have been
obliged to shun public places by reason of my dis
figuring humors; have bad the best physicians;
have spent hundreds of dollars, and got no relief.
I used the Cuticura Remedies, which have
cured me, and left my skin and blood as pure as a
child’s.
COVERED WITH HALT RHEUM.
Cuticura Remedies are the greatest medicines
on earth. Had the worst case of Salt Rheum in
this country. Mv mother had it twenty years, and
in fact died from'it. I believe Cuticura would
have saved her life. My arms, breast and head
were covered for three years, which nothing re
lieved or cured until I used the Cuticura Resol
vent, internally, and Cuticura and Cuticura
Soap, externally. J. W. ADAMS.
Newark, O.
HEAD, FACE AND BODY RAW.
I commenced to use your Cuticura Remedies
last .July. My head and face and some parts of
mv bodv were almost raw. My head was covered
with scabs and sores, and my suffering was fear
ful. I had tried everything I had heard of in the
East and West. My ease was considered a very
had one. I have now not a particle of Skin Humor
about mo, and my case is considered wonderful.
Decatur, Mich. Mrs. S. E. WHIFFLE.
ECZEMA FROM HEAD TO FEET.
Charle Eavre Hinkle, Jersey City Heights, N. J.,
writes: “My son, a lad of twelve years, was com
pletely cured of a terrible case of Eczema by the
Cuticura Remedies. From the top of his head
to the soles of his feet was one mass of scabs.”
Every other remedy and physicians had been tried
in vain.
CUTICURA REMEDIES
Are sold everywhere. Price, Cuticura, 60c.;
Resolvent, $1.00; Soap. 26e. Prepared by the
Potter Drug & Chemical Co., Boston, Mass.
Send for “Haw to Care Skin Diseases.”
npi!»e Pimples, Skin Blemishes, and Baby Hu
tlUL Dlj, mors cured by Cuticura Soap.
CUTICURA ANTI-PAIN
PEASTER is a new, original, ele
gant and infallible antidote to Pain and
Inflammation, banishing Rheumatic,
Neuralgic, Sciatic, Sudden Sharp and
Nervous Pains as by magic. At drug
gists. 26e. jan2-SW&w2w
Hale’s Haney the great Cough cure, 25c. 50c
and $1. Glenn’s Sulphur Sonp heals & beau
tifies, 25c. German Corn Remover kills Corns
and Bunions. HiU’s Hair and Whisker Dye,
Black and Brown, 50c. Pike’s Toathncke
Drops cure in one minute, 25c. Denns Rheu
matic Pills are a sure cure 60c
jant6 eod2dp&wlynrm
The "CANS"
FRENCH BHDEB
IN AMERICA.
LADIES wiu 1)6 Pleased to learn that
-an agency for these beautiful
dress shoes has been estab
lished in this city.
The Cans French Shoes are hand-made
of the highest grade of Kid produced in
France, and by the best workmen.
M. G. PALMER, ■ Agent for Portland.
sepl4 eodtfnrmcM
NEW STYLE PIANO FORTES
Piano Fortes of the very best make, the Hallet
& Davis new style upright piano, Steinway & Son
Parlor Grand; also organs of several styles and
makes. Piano stools and covers. Tuning and re
pairing done at short notice. \VM. P. HASTINGS,
114Mi Exchange St.. Portland.oct20dtf
DAWSOAS
NEURALGIC CURE
is the OLD and RELIABLE REMEDY
for Neuralgia, Rheumatism, Hrinticn.
McnHnche, Earache, Toothache and every
other kind of ache produced by a Deranged Nerv
ous System. It is the greatest remedy known for
the above complaints, and is a
SERE CERE.
Gan be used outside as well as inside. Head care
fully the testimonials. Buy it and use it as direct
ed. All Druggists.
CEO. C. COODWIN & CO.,
BOSTON.
janleocllm Agents lor Ifew Englaud Mialei !
MUdEliLANEOlIS.
About Letting Down Prices!
After a notably strong ten weeks’ trade we have begun to take bearings of the
season. Much of the Clothing we made in September, October and November you
are wearing. Yon took what you liked. Others, that we thought as well of is
still herd, and New Clothing steadily pressing in from our work shops. What
will make it go 1 Lower Prices will. We thought them cheap enongh before.
You will thinK so now, when a
Big Boy’s Black Diagonal Overcoat
goes for $8.00, been selling for $12.00.
A Big Boy’s All Wool Suit, used to be $12.00 and $15.00, now only $8.00 and
$10.00.
Boys’ Long Pant Suits, all wool, now going at
$6.00 and $6.50,
that were $10.00 each, (Ages 10 to 14 years). A Boy’s
ALL WOOL OVERCOAT
only costs $4.00. Others, extra good, for $5.00, $0.00 and $7.00. Ages 4 to 14
years.
Men’s and Young Men’s line
BUSINESS AND DRESS SUITS
at only $10.00 ; Regular $15.00 quality. Several colors in Men’s Heavy
Winter Overcoats
in all sizes, at $10.00, $12.00 and $15.00; also at lower and higher prices. We
speak principally of the
BEST BARGAINS.
Our prices are put down to the lowest notch to start with; the experience of the
season shows ns we failed in judgment on a few, and
DOWN THEY CO.
Most of the stock holds its own, right in quality and price.
Until further notice our store will be closed every evening at 6 o’clock, except
Saturday evening at 10 o’clock.
STRICTER OWE PRICE.
Boston & Portland Clothing Co.,
255 MIDDLE ST., PORTLAND, ME.,
-w. O. WARES. - - - - Manager.
Jan5 ___atl
ONIMORE CHANCE!
A Lady’s Gold Watch Free!!!
-A.T
Morrison & Go’s New Jewelry Store,
303 CONGRESS ST.
Having decided to give away a beautiful Gold Watch, also other Elegant Presents to some of our cus
tomers Feb. 1, we offer every lady and gentleman who visits the store before that time a chance to be
come the posessor of the same free of charge. We do not require you to buy anything, only call and
see our new stoi c and register your name.
MORRISON & CO.,
No. 565 Congress St., Under Grand Army Hall, Portland, Me.
JOB LOTof LADIES' OUTSIDE GARMENTS
TO BE CLOSED OUT AT A GREAT SACRIFICE.
Below we shall quote prices that will be of great Interest to customers
in waut of a good garment for a small amount of money:
lO Newmarkets - former price $7.00 - at $4.50
15 New markets * - former priee 8.75 - - at 5.50
15 Newmarkets - former price 9.00 - at 6.00
lO Nice Berlin Twill - former price 12.00 - - at 8.00
We also have several lots too small to advertise that will be sold at
about one-lialf their usual price. Wchavea few very fine Plush Gar
ment* that will he closed at a big discount.
SHORT WriA-FS.
We have a few of these goods that we shall close out this week at
prices less than the material would be worth to make up.
Any customer intending to buy a garment this season will do well to
call and make a selection from some of the lots advertised above as
they are special good value.
N. H. STIJDLE Y,
499 Congress St., cor. Brown.
dec29 ai1
THE MURDOCK LIQUID
FOOD COMPANY
Substantiate their claims by quoting a few
surgical cases in their Free Hospital lot
Women.
The first semi annual report of the surgical tie
partinent of this institution shows that 55 have
received treatment, 3 have left soon after entering
(contrary to advice), 47 operations have been per
formed, 37 cured, 6 improved, 8 unchanged. The
longest time any one patient has received treat
ment, 73 days; the shortest, 14 days; average,
21 23-51.
Murdock’s Liquid Food is administered
to each patient at ttc discretion of the at
tending surgeons, and it is a significant
fact that in the history of the hospital there
has not bren a ease in which difficulty has
been experienced in keeping the nutrition
np to the stnndurd, a matter which other
hospitals find great annoyance in adjust
ing.
SAVED FROM CONSUMPTION.
Mrs. \V. entered hospital July 17, suffering from
the effects of childbirth. She was weakened to
such an extent that she was unable to eat or di
gest her food; had severe cough, pain in the lungs
and night-sweats. Her physician feared she was
going into consumption, and informed her friends
that unless something was done immediately she
would probably live but a short time. She was
put on Liquid Food and a generous diet of other
Food. Xu three weeks she was well enough to bear
an operation, which was performed. Convalesced
rapidly; discharged in four weeks. Now, three
months from date of operation, is in perfect
health.
A CASE OF INS ANITA.
Mrs. C., low spirited and dejected smee birth of
child, several vears ago, lias been in insane asylum
once since. Examination disclosed a difficulty;
operation performed, rapid convalesence; all symp
toms of insanity gone; cheerful and happy at the
present time, five mouths from date of operation
THESE CASES ARE CITED TO SHOW WHAT
MURDOCK’S LIQUID FOOD, COMBINED
WITH SKILLFUL SURGICAL TREATMENT,
WILL DO FOR THE MANY AILMENTS OF
WOMEN.
iskreirnl hcnlth Will DO
ndmitof im operation can be ■ufllciently
built up by tbc Liquid Food in three or
four weeks so that an operation can take
place with safety*
Common cases can, by the use of the Liquid Food
be built up in three-fourths the time required by
other treatment.
Our Mr. A. L. Murdock is the flrst American
ever honored by having a ward in one of the lead
ing hospitals of London named after him. The
managers did it to show their appreciation of the
value of his Liquid Food in chrome surgical cases.
He also supports a Free Hospital for Women, of GO
beds, in London, for Lock Diseases, Consumption,
Intemperance, Paralyzed and Cancer cases, ihe
beds are all occupied, and the patients prescribed
for by some of the leading physicians of London.
Liquid Food is in general use by the govern
ments of the United States, England and the lead
ing governments of Europe.
--3 2
OF THE
LEADING HOSPITALS OF LONDON.
devoted to geueral diseases, have it in constant
use and acknowledge it to be the only Raw Con
densed Food known (and much richer than it is
represented by warrant); also free of insoluble
matter, and can be retained when the stomach re
fuses water.
CAUTION—Remember that an extract adver
tised as the Original Liquid Food, and by other
names, is not a food, but the manufacturers of it
have used our trade mark, essays, hospital reports,
etc., without our authority. IV e have sued the
said parties for outraging our rights and deceiving
- the public.
The only essay on Condensed Raw Food or Raw
Food Extracts read before any medical association
or society was on Murdock’s Liquid Food.
Around each bottle is a pamphlet which contains
the said essays and hospital reports.
MURDOCK’S LIQUiTFOOD CO., Boston.
BRANCH ) 7 Snow Hill, London.
WORKS, ) aS4 St. Fa ill St.. Hontrenl.
iioy21 SM&Wtf
CHOICE CHRISTMAS GIFTS.
Art Pottery, Fine Etchings, Engravings,
Paintings, etc.
CYRUS W. RAVIS,
CIO CONGRESS STREET.
de!7 eodtf
i * '
THE
Union Mutual
LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY,
OF MAINE.
ORGANIZED IN 1818.
lias had thirty-five years’ experience
J"TS RECORD IS
Death losses paid, - - $7,892,511.71
Endowments paid. - - 3,140,251.96
Surrendered policies, • 5,592,112.84
Dividends,. 4,208,602.74
SHOWING A TOTAL PAYMENT to
Policy-holders of nearly
Twenty-one millions of dol
lars, equal to
SIX HUNDRED THOUSAND DOL
LARS, paid policy-holders for each year of
the company’s existence.
ITS PRESENT ASSETS ARE $0,333,
001.07, while its liabilities are only 85,
033,570.50.
IT HAS TUKREFOBE A SUBPLUS of
$400,000.00 according to the Massachu
setts standard, and of $723,200.00 by the New
York standard.
THE UNION MUTUAL recognizing its mu
tuality, is the most liberal company in its
dealings with its policy-holders.
ITS POLICY CONTRACT is plain and
definite in all its terms, and no chance
misconception.
ITS Pd&I&f £S ARE
INCONTESTABLE
After three years for any cause except fraud.
IT PAYS DEATH CLAIMS, WITHOUT
DISCOUNT, immediately the proofs are com
plete and satisfactory, and without waiting 60, 90,
or any number of days.
XT ISSUES POLICIES on all approved
plans, and its
Adjustj'i> premium plan and
NON-FORFEITURE INVESTMENT PLAN
are ssecial features of this company and issued by
none other.
THE ADVANTAGES of Ihia Company are
AGE, EXPERIENCE, STRONG FINAN
CIAL CONDITION, LARGE SURPLUS, EQUIT
ABLE and ATTRACTIVE PLANS, ana conser
vative management.
Call or send to any Agency Office for a circular
of its plans.
JAMES SINKINSON,
MANAGER FOR MAINE AGENCIES,
Porllsind, Maine.
| mart eodtf
The Portland Masonic Relief
Association.
THE annual meeting of the Portland Masonic
Relief Association will be held at its office,
No. 85 Exchange street, Portland, Me., on Tues
day, January 12,1886, at 7V» o’clockp ni., for
the purpose of electing officers and transacting
any other business which may legally come be
fore it. Per order,
janodtdA. E. CHASE, Clerk. _
POLICE NOTICE.
THE regular monthly meeting of the Police Ex
amining Board w1U he held at the Common
Council room, at the City Hall, on TUESDAY
EVENING. Jail. 6, at 7.30.
jan5dlt C. W. GODDARD, Chairman.
BUMIKBKM CABDB.
Herbert G. Briggs,
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND SOLICITOR
—OF—
AMERICAN AND FOREIGN PATENTS,
No. 93 Exchange Street, Portland, Me.
E^-All business relating to Patents promptly
a faithfully executed. Jul2atf
Haskell & Jones,
MANUFACTURING CLOTHIERS
—AND—
Men’s Furnishers at Whole
sale and Retail.
FINE TAILORING A SPECIALTY
HASKELL & JONES,
LANCASTER BUILDING, - 470 CONGRESS ST
OPPOSITE PREBLE HOUSE.
iioy12 d6m
STEPHEN BERRY,
(fflookj fob <md (qo/ocL
No. 37 Plum Street.
~~ McKUSICK & ELLIOTT,
HORSE SHOERS,
— HAVE REMOVED TO —
no. as msriojsr street.
First door above Fore St. Thankful for past
patronage we desire a continuance of the same at
our new quarters. declUdtf
HAWKES BROTHERS,
— DEALERS IN — ,
Granite for Building, Cemetery,
and Monumental Purposes,
Office and Works foot of Wilmot St, PORTLAND, ME.
Geo. E. Hawkes, Melvin J. Hawkes.
Special Attention given to Cemetery' Work,
dec 18 _ <10m
EDUCATIONAL.
ENGLISH MD CLASSICAL SCHOOL,
FRANKLIN BLOCK,
Corner Congress and Brown Streets.
Winter term will begin Monday,
Jan. 4th.
C. B. VABNEY, A. M., Principal.
dec2t)_ eodtf
ART LESSONS.
IB. A. 12. mOORE will takea limited num
ber of pupils during the winter. Instructions giv
en in Crayon Portraiture from the flat and from
life. Also In Academic Drawing from casts, still
life, and the living model. References: Prof. Otto
Grundmann, Boston, Prof. Henry Johnson, Bruns
wick. Harry B. Brown, Esq., Cyrus F. Davis. Esq.,
and Mr. J. T. Stubbs. Portland. Studio, 34
First National Bank Building. jan2eodlm*
PUPILS thoroughly instructed In Stenography
and type-writing in the briefest time consis
tent with thoroughness: speed gained with each
lesson. Lessons given day and evening.
MISS A. L. SAWYER,
537 Congress St., Brown Block, Portland, Me.
dec29_eodtf
INSTRUCTION IN ENGLISH AND CLASS
ICAL STUDIES
Given to private pupils by the subscriber,
J. W. COLCOBD,
7 BOYD STREET.
AccountBooks
Order Blank Bnoks far New Year
Early.
Check Bnoks, Printing and Ruling
of all kinds.
L01G, SHORT k HARMON,
474 Congress Street.
octlO eod3m
HOTEL DIRECTORY.
Embracing the leading Hotels at whien the Daily
Press may always be found.
AUBURN.
ELM HOUSE, Cburt St.-W. S. & A. Young, Pro
prietors.
BATH.
SHANNON’S HOTEL—Jerry Shannon, Proprie
tor.
BATH HOTEL—C. M. Plummer, Proprietor.
BETHEL.
BETHEL HOUSE-W. F. Lovejoy & Son, Pro
prietors.
BOLSTER’S Till,I.S.
HANCOCK HOUSE—M. Hancock, Proprietor.
BOSTON.
QUINCY HOUSE—J. W. Johnson & Co., Proprie
tor.
AMERICAN HOUSE, Hanover St.-L. Rice &
Son, Proprietors.
BRUNSWICK.
P. & K. DINING ROOMS-W. R. Field, Proprie
tor.
CANTON.
CANTON HOUSE—N. L. MANDS, Proprietor.
HIRAM.
Mt. CUTLER HOUSE—Freemam Pugsley,Propri
etor.
(UKiilSU V1L1.AUK.
LINCOLN HOUSE—C. E. Woodbury, Proprietor.
CALAIS.
AMERICAN HOUSE—M. D. Gardiner, Proprie
tor.
CORNISII.
DAVIS HOTEL-M. B. Davis, Proprietor.
ELLSWORTH.
HANCOCK HOUSE—George Gould, Proprietor
EASTPORT.
PASSAMAQUODDY HOUSE-T. H. Bucknam,
Proprietor.
CRAY.
GRAY HOTEL.—C. E. Whldden, Proprietor.
LEWISTON.
DeWITT HOUSE—Quinby & Mnrcli, Proprietors.
MACHIAS.
EASTER IIOTEL-E. E. Stoddard, Proprietor.
MECHANIC FALLS.
COBB'S HOTEL—P. R. Cobb, Proprietor.
NORRIDGEWOCH.
DANFORTH HOUSE-C. Danfortli, Proprietor.
PORTLAND.
CITY HOTEL, Corner ol Congress and Green Sts.
J. W. Robinson, Proprietor.
FALMOUTH HOTEL, Corner of Middle and Un
ion Sts.—J. K. Martin, Proprietor.
PERRY’S HOTEL, 117 Federal St.-J. G. Ferry,
Proprietor.
PREBLE HOUSE, Congress St.—M. S. Gibson,
Proprietor.
U. S. HOTEL, Junction of Congress and Federal
Sts.—McDonald & Newbegin, Proprietors.
RAYMOND VILLAGE.
CENTRAL HOUSE—Win. H. Smith, Proprietor.
SACCARAPPA.
PRESUMPSCOT HOUSE-W. S. Pratt, Proprie
tor.
SKOWHEOAN.
COBURN HOUSE-ltobert WHaines, Proprietor
Dirigo Mineral Water.
Iced water ruins digestion; Dirigo water im
proves it; is always palatable, refreshing and
heaHhful. Delivered daily, cool and refreshing
from the spring. Our improved cans will keen the
water cool from 3f> to 48 hours; use of cans free
water per gallon 10 cents.
RU5DLETT BROS., Proprietors,
je23 413 For* Street. dtf
LAW NOTICE.
CHARLES W. CODDARD
has removed his law office to
Davis’ New Block, Corner of Congress
and Exchange Street!.
decl6 dlwteod8w
■. I'll —
PIVAM1A1,.
BONDS2
Rockland.6s & 4s Bath.6s & 4s
No. Pacific Gold..0s Maine Central. 7s & 5s
Anson.4s P. & O. R. R—6s
ARETAS SHURTLEFF,
No. 194 3IIDDLE STREET, Portland.
January 1,1884. Janldtf
FIRST MORTGAGE COUPON BONDS
—NEGOTIATED BY—
The Minnesota Loan and Trust Go.
Bearing Keren Per (.'eat latere**!.
— FOR SALE BY —
WILLIAM H. EMERY,
188 middle Street, Portland.
Below are the names of a few Savings Banks in New
England who hold a large amount
of fiipuii sppiirif*
Rhode Island Hospital Trust Co., Providence, R. I.
Mechanics’ Savings Bank, ProvideneeR.. I. Peo
ple’sSavings Bank, Providence, R. I. New Hamp
shire Savings Bank, Concord, N. H. Keene Sav
ings Bank, Keene, N. H. Nashua Savings Bank,
Nashua, N. H. Littleton Savings Bank,Littleton,
N. H. Littleton National Bank, Littleton, N. H.
dec8dim*
F. O. STEVENS,
BROKER,
39 Exchange Street.
Stocks, Grain and Petroleum
Bought, sold and carried on margin of one per
cent, and upwards. Quotations constantly received.
Private Wires to Boston and New York.
Parties buying or selling 10 shares of stock have
the same advantages as those dealing in 100 or
1000 shares.
CASH SETTLEMENTS.
Orders by mail or telegraph promptly executed.
dec23eod.3in
nuoBun s mm,
BANKERS
Cor. Middle and Exeliange Street.
Choice Securities, suitable for Savings
Banks and Trust Funds, constantly
on baud,
Jan1-:._ eodtf
PORTLAND
TRUST COMPANY,
First National Bank Building.
City, County and Railroad Bonds, and
other First-Class Securities.
INTEREST ALLOWED ON DEPOSITS.
jelO eodtf
INVESTMENT BONDS.
State of Maine, - - Oa, due 1889.
l ily of Portland, - • tta, -l 1887.
« ... 6a, “ 1888.
Portland Water Co., - 6a, “ 1888.
“ “ “ - 6a, “ 1891.
Biddeford Ac Saco Water Co.,3a, “ 1904.
Maine Central K. B., - 7a, “ 1919.
<i « ii . 3a, “ 1919.
City of Zanesville, O., - 4a, “ 1999.
Darke County, O., - 6s, “ 1890.
City of St. Couia, - - 6a, “ 1887.
a a . 6a, “ 1888.
City of Duluth, ... 6a, “ 1908.
Iowa Loan aud Trutl Co., 6a “ 1890.
ADd other strong securities, for sale by
H. M. PAYSOY & CO.,
dec3oNo- 32 Exchange St.^
MORSE&PINKHAM
Stock Brokers
—AND—
INSURANCE AGENTS,
NO. 9 EXCHANCE ST.,
PORTLAND,
Will execute buying or selling orders In Stocks
on tire New York Stock Exchange, through ilieir
regular correspondents, Messrs. Henry' Clews &
Co., New York, WTegular commission, either for
cash or on margin of not less than 5 per cent.
Orders for Grain and Petroleum also received.
decI8 eodtf
PULLEN, CROCKER & GO.,
Bankers and Brokers,
NO. 33 EXCHANCE STREET.
Investment Securities
for Sale.
AGENTS FOR GREEN & BATEMAN
NEW YORK,
For transactions on New York and Chi
cago Exchanges. Connected by private
wire. Quotations constantly displayed.
MARINE INSURANCE
ATLANTIC
MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY
OF NEW YORK,
Insure Against Marine Risks Only.
This Company will take risks at their office, New
York, on Vessels, Cargoes and Freights, and issue
open policies to merchants, making risks binding
as water-borne.
Premiums on Marine Risks from 1st
January, 1884 to 31st December,
1884.*3,958,030.44
Premiums on Policies not marked
off 1st January, 1884. 1,447,756.70
Total Marine Premiums...'..*5,505,796.14
Premiums marked off from Jan. 1,
1884, to Dec. 31, 1884...*4,046,271.04
Losses paid during same period. 2,109,919.20
ASSETS:
$12,938,289.38.
Six Per Cent. Interest on amonnt Out
standing Script Paid on and af
ter Fell). 3, 1885.
Dividend to Policy Holders on Premium
Terminating in 1884.
40 PER CENT.
LOSSES PAID IN THIRTY DAYS AFTER PROOF.
J. D. .JONES, President,
CHARLES DENNIS, Vice President,
W. H. MOORE, 2d Vice President,
A. A. RAVEN, 3d Vice President,
J. H. CHAPMAN, Secretary.
J. W. MUNCER & CO.,
CORRESPONDENTS,
Portland, - * - 191-2 Exchange St.
Ieb3 ’85 dlmeodllm&w6w
CARD.
Mlt. L. M. LEIGHTON, long and favorably
known in Portland and vicinity, and in the
eastern part of tills State, and for eight years or
more in the grocery trade here, and for the past
two or more years head salesman in our employ
has been admitted to an interest In onr business
dating from Jan. 1st, 1886, and the firm name is
changed from this date to OREN HOOPER, SON
& LEIGHTON. If you want a new Carpet or a
new Parlor or Chamber Suit pleaso give us a call.
jan5 dlw
NOTICE.
1HAVE this day bought the Hair Cntting Sa
loon of L. J. Bailey No. &X'heNtiiiit Mt.,
near corner of Congress, where i will be pleased
to wait upon all of my old customers and as many
new ones as may come.
J. H. B. MORRILL.
janl dlw
1 THISPAPERr«S"M^SS
Advertising Bureau (10 Spruoo Street), where udvertl®.
{ in* contracts rniiv made for It IN jj^W YORK*
AnVBKJHKJVT*. _
12th Stockbridge.
City Hull, Wednesday Evening,
Jan. Otli.
TABLEAUX D'ART!
A series ol beautiful pictures given by
12-YOUNG LADIES-12
from the N. E. School of Oratory.
Attired in Grecian Drapery, introducing scenes
from Old mythological Lcgead., Biblical
Scenes and some of our famous Poets. Instan
taneous changes and beautiful colored calcium ef
fects. Assisted by the Harvard
COLLECE QUARTETTE.
Messrs. Briggs and Howard, Tenors.
Messrs. Stewart and Easton, Bassos.
Elmore A. Pierce. Eeciter.
W. R. Stewart, Yoedle and Whistling Soloists.
Prof. S. K. Kelley, Director.
Reserved seats 76 cts. Admission 60 cts. Now
on sale at Stockbrldge's. dee31dlw
WALTZING, AT. GILBERT'S,
Wednesday Evening.
EXTRAS COMMENCE JANUARY 13th.
Respectfully,
Janodtf M- GIGBKBT.
A SUPPER AND DANCE
will be given by the
LADIES’ AID SOCIETY,
— IN —
GOOD TEMPLARS' HALL, Wednesday Eie'g, Jan. 6.
Sapper at 7.30. Admission, gentlemen 26 cents;
ladies 16 cents. _janSdat*
NOTICE.
THE Maine Charitable Mechanics Association
will commence a course of free lectures at
their Library room, Wednesday eve, January 0,
at 7. 30 o’clock, subject: "Physiology of Sleep
and Dreams,’’ by Seth C. Gordon, M. D.
jan6d2t Per order of Conun ittee.
CITY HALL,
Thursday Evening, Jan. 7th.
Grand Military Ball
—AND—
COFFEE PARTY
—BY THE—
ASSISTED BY THE
LADIES' HONORARY CORPS.
Admission 50 Cents.
Tickets for sale at McGowan’s, Stockbridge’s,
Sbaw’s, F. A. Turner’s and W. S. Banks’.
dec31 dtd
PORTLAND THEATRE.
Friday and Saturday, January 8 and 9.
DO YOU KNOW
— THAT —
LEONARD GROVER,
—AND—
LEONARD GROYER, JR.,
' — WITH THE —
iaflison Square Theatre Co.,
will appear in that most successful of all plays,
THE
Private Secretary?
NO ADVANCE IN PRICE*.
Seats 76 and 50 cents; Gallery 35 cents. Sale
of seats Wednesday, Jan. 6. Jan4dtd
COM INC
The Original Nashville Si mi cut* (10 singers)
City Hall, Tuesday, Jan. lJth.
Tickets Sold Monday, Jan.4th
at Stockbrldge’s.
All tickets reserved at 25 and 35 cents.
dec31 d4t
GOOD SEATS
now on sale at Stockbridge’s for Boston Symphony
Orchestra concert, Jan. 13th, assisted by Mis*
ltadecke and Miss O’Brien, on two grand pianos;
also tickets ready for (lough. Recital by Fritz
Keise, “Rose of Castile” and the opera of
“Martha.” Martha tickets 50 and 75 cents.
dec31dlw
Bijou Skating Parlor, - Federal Street.
Evening AdmiMaion:
Gents.15 cents} akatM 10
Ladies.10 cents { SKates. 10 cents.
Afternoon Admission:
Lldies:::::::.:::.meei,ts} skate,.»cent,.
P. S.—Polo and all Other Exhibitions the admis
sion will be 25 cents; Saturday Afternoon Games
10 cents.
declOdtf C. H. KNOWLTON. Mana gerr
On and after November 1st, 1885,
onr prices will be for
CABINETS $5.50 PER DOZ.
PANELS *6.00 PER DDZ.
All persons wishing work made at present rates,
should call lu now, as after the above date the
prices will positively be as here mentioned.
We would also call the attention of the public to
our CLCR RATE*, by which families with
their friends, by a little exertion in getting a num
ber to set, can then contract for, and secure the
advantage of SPECIAL PRICE* for their
portraits. We assert that we make no difference
whatever between the QCALITV of such Con
tract or Club Photograpns and onr regular work,
for which we receive more, but in all cases endeav
or to have it thoroughly FIBST.CLA*» in ev
ery sense, and RATI SF ACTION MCA RAM
TEED. For further particulars about the club
photography, call on or address, for circulars,
^gjOCfV^
PHOTOGRAPHER
514 Cougress Street.
oet21 dti
ibem Books,®: Cantatas.
Ditson & Co. offer to Choirs, Anthem, Chorus
ami Quartet Books unequalled In quality anil va
riety. Send for lists! Of the following Anthem
Books, the first three may be called the easiest,
but none are too difficult for ordinary choirs.
Perkins’ Easy Anthems, $1.00 or *0.00 per doz.
American Anthem Book, 1.25 or 12.00 “
Dressler’s Sacred Select'ns, 1.50 or 13.50 “
Emerson’s B’k of Anthems, 1.25 or 12.00 “
Anthem Harp. Perkins, 1.25 or 12.00 “
Gem Gleaner. Chadwick, 1.00 or 0.00 “
Laus Deo. Henshaw, 1.00 or 9.00 “
Santoral. Palmer & Trow
bridge, 1.00 or 9.00 «
Vox Laudis. Leslie, 1.00 or 9.00 •*
Not a poor book iu the list. Choir leaders who
have used one run no risk In ordering any of the
others.
New Cantatas for Choirs and Societies.
Christoforus. Legend, Rheinber
ger, *1.00. *9.00 doz.
Fall of Jerusalem. I’arkhurst, 1.00, 9 00 “
HolyCitv. Gaul, 1.00, 9.00 “
91st Psalm. Ballard. .(’,0, 5.40 “
Out nl the Depths. Darling, .32, 2.88 ••
Rebecca. Hodges, .65, 6.00 “
Ruth and Boaz. Andrews, .65, 6.00 “
Herbert and Elsa. Thayer, .75, 6.72 "
Heroes ol’76. Trowbridge, 1.00, 9.00 “
Specimen copies of any of these books mailed
post-free, for the retail price.
OLIVER DITSON A CO., Boston.
I dec26 eod&w2\v
WE HI. MARKS,
Book, Card
— AND —
Job Printer
PRINTERS’ EXCHANGE,
97 1-2 Exchange St., Portland, Me.
FINE JOB PRINTING A SPECIALTY.
All orders by mall or telephone promptly at
tended to. novlleodtl

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