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The Portland daily press. [volume] (Portland, Me.) 1862-1921, October 22, 1892, Image 4

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PORTLAND DAILY PRESS.
- AMD -
MAINE STATE PRESS.
Subscription Rates.
DAILY (In advance) *6 per year; *3 for six
months; *1.50 a quarter; 60 cents a month.
The Daily is delivered every morning by
carrier anywhere within the city limits and at
Woodfords without extra charge.
Daily (Not in advance), invariably at the
rate of *7 a year.
Maine State Press. (Weekly) published
every Thursday, *2 per ycar;*l for six months;
60 cents a quarter; 25 cents for trial subscrip
tion of six weeks.
Persons wishing to leave town for long or
phort periods may have the addresses oi their
papers changed as often as desired.
Advertising Rates.
Dr Daily Press *1.50 per square, first
week; 75 cents per week after. Three inser
tions or less, *1.00 per square. Every other
day advertisements, one third less than these
rates.
Half square advertisements *1.00 per week,
first week; half price each succeeding week.
"A Square” is a space of the width of a
column and one inch long.
Special Notices, on first page, one third ad-'
ditional.
Amusements and Auction Sales, *2.00 per
square each week. Three insertions or less
* 1.50 per square.
Reading Notices in nonpariel type and classed
»ith other paid notices 20 cents per line each
insertion.
Pure Heading Notices in reading matter type
25 cents per line each insertion.
pj'ont, To Pei, For Sale and similar ad
vcrtisementa. 25 cents per week, in advance,
tor 40 words or less, no display. Displayed ad
vertisements under these headlines, and all ad
liscmcnts not paid in advance, will be charged
id regular rates.
In Maine State Press—$1.00 per square
for first insertion, and 50 cents per square for
each subsequent insertion.
Address all communications relating to: sub
senptions and advertisements to Portland
Publishing Oo.. 87 Exchange Street,
Portland. Mb
THE PBESb.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22.
TWELVE PACES
FOR PRESIDENT,
BEJtJAlUNJARRlSOAI.
FOR VICE PRESIDENT,
WHITELAW REID.
One of the cheapest and easiest ways
to acquire fame is to change your poli
tics a few weeks before a Presidential
election, and write a letter giving your
views on the subjects before the country.
The fame obtained in this way is, to be
sure, somewhat ephemeral, but there is
lots of it while it lasts. You are certain
to have honorable prefixed to your name,
and to be described as a person of high
standing, and of wide influence, and the
prediction will be made that a large numg
her of other people, In consequence of
your great influence, will follow your
exampl e. This prediction will not be f ul"
filled, but it is no less flattering to one’s
vanity on that account.
The disputation that is going on so
fiercely as to what manner of man Colum
bus was seems hardly worth while. The
observance of the 21st of October was
conceived as a commemoration of the
discovery of America and the wonderful
progress of 400 years. That of course
brings the career of Columbus as a navi
gator and discoverer conspicuously be
fore the people, and challenges a dis
cussion of it. We believe that it is gen
erally admitted that he was an intrepid
sailor and that his perseverance in the
face of great obstacles enabled him to
reach an island adjacent to the American
continent in 1492—in short that he is en
titled to the glory that he has been get
ting for some centuries past, for it is
really because he was a bold and adven
turous navigator, and not because he was
supposed 10 possess superior moral
qualities that he has been glorified. The
fierce discussion as to whether lie
was a saint or a sinner,
whether he was a Mediterranean
pirate or a pious skipper, whether he
was responsible for the existence of
slavery in this country has very little
bearing on the commemoration of the
discovery of America. Columbus’s fame
if all these questions are settled against
him will not be disturbed, for it is iden
tified with none of them.
It is a common remark that this is the
dullest Presidential campaign in a quar
ter of a century at least. What everybody
says must be true, is a trite .saying, and
almost everybody is saying this. But
dullness and lack of interest are not nec
essarily synonymous. Our Presidential
campaigns have usually been accompanied
by a great deal that appealed to the eye
and not a little that appealed to the stom
ach. Torchlight processions and parades
of various kinds, barbecues in the West
and South and clambakes in the East
have been prominent features of them.
There has been undoubtedly in this cam
paign much less of these things, and
'their absence may account for the pre
vailing impression of dullness. Admit
ting the dullness in this sense; is there a
lack of interest? It is impossible to an
swer that question conclusively until the
vote is thrown. A large falling off of the
vote would be indicative of lack of inter
est, but until election day demonstration
of this kind cannot be had. While a lack
of interest in a President campaign
would be something to be deprecated, it
admits of much doubt whether mere lack
of noisy or spectacular manifestation of
interest is a bad sign. It is a question
‘whether a hurrah campaign is con
ducive to that thoughtful consider
ation which every intelligent ami
patriotic citizen should give to the
questions at issue, and which lie
should make the foundation of his vote.
To our mind the permanent disappear
ance of a considerable amount of the
spectucular element in our Presidential
campaigns would do no harm. Enough
of it to eulist the attention of such vot
ers as cannot be reached in any other
way may be a good thing, but so much
of it as to distract the attention of the
voters must be harmful.
A TAM MANY POET
How the Hon. Amos Cummings Used to
Stir Up the Hoys for Greeley.
In this busy age it frequently happens
that a man in one short life plays so
many parts that it is sometimes forgot
ten that he sorved in the army, or was
governor. Carl Schurz is a good exam,
pie of the one, and (Jen. Butler of the
other. No one now-a-days seems to re
member that ex-Senator Schurz was a
major-general, and Massachusetts peo
ple have pretty well allowed themselves
to forget that Gen. Butler was once their
governor.
The Hon. Amos J. Cummings, of New
York, has had so busy and eventful a ca
reer, in and out of Congress, that his fel
low citizens may well be excused if they
forget that he was once a poet, or that a
pamphlet edition of his poems was pub
lished by the New York Sun as long ago
as 1872, and yet so it was.
The volume was entitled “The Sun’s
Greeley Campaign Songster, by Amos J
Cummings,” and we regret to say that as
a poet Mr. Cummings was not entirely
original; that here and there his poems
showed only too plainly the source from
which he was then drawing inspiration.
For example, this verse was not built
fvAm an A niflnnan rrwtrlAl "
Hurrah! we’ve won it gallantly! Carl Schurz
lias pierced their left;
For Grant has cried for quarter, of ah his
guards bereft.
The carpet knights are sorely pressed, and rid
ing frqin the rear;
Full well they know their borrowed plumes they
can no longer wear.
The mailed banditti of tbe South before our
troops went down,
And troops of presidential kin are fleeing
through the town.
Colfax lies low with Kobeson, Ben Butler under
neath,
The trusty blade of Horace in their hearts has
found a sheath;
A nd like an angry grizzly, Fish licks his wound
ed paw,
Whilst victory is perching on the Hat of Chap
paqua!
Mr. Cummings should have disguised
his author a little more. “After Macau
lay, a long way after him,” the average
reader of that poem must have ob
served.
And yet Mr. Cummings could be origi
nal when he tried, and thoroughly Span
ish, capable of writing down to any one
of the people who wanted to read his
poems. For example there is (page 19)
this gem:
Now despite all the sneers,
And the irowns and the tears
Of the fearful old blowers who blew so,
Horace G. will go up
And turn out the bull-pup.
With his boss, the modern Crusoe.
Chobus.—O, poor, brainless receiver!
You had better accept a retriever;
For in March, seventy-three,
You’ll be up a tall tree,
Inquiring the way to Salt Kee-ver.
There was just a suggestion of “to the
victor belong the spoils” about this
(page 49) but then the Democrats who
were shouting “Hurrah for Horace
Greeley d-m him” needed something of
the sort to cheer them on to the polls:
Come, rally round old Horace, boys,
He never can be beat;
He’ll weed the office-holder out
And sift them just like wheat.
He works all day upon the farm,
He puts his produce in the barn;
A farmer wise and great is he
To rule this land of liberty.
And this will go far to show that while
Mr. Cummings was then a poet, he was
no prophet:
Then raise our Farmer's banner high,
And catch the favoring gale;
Inspired with courage, zeal, and hope,
There’s no such thing as fail,
For Victory waits upon our flag
* And cheers us on our way.
To sing a Greeley song by night,
And beat his foes by day
These few extracts must be taken as
specimens of what Mr. Cummings can
do in the way of verse making. The
time may come when that little book
will be in demand. Mr. Cummings may
be the Democratic candidate for Presi
dent, and then it would work in well
when the “Life and Writings of Hon.
i t *-* _?_m _i J ^__n. j
XXin\jo w • vuiumiugo ii i/uiu ww |
for.
There may sometime be a second edi
tion (it is to be fondly hoped improved)
of Rufus Wilmot Griswold, and then the
poems of Mr. Cummings would work in
as filling, if nothing more. If nothing
else comes of them, should Mr. Cum
mings grow rich as well as great, copies
of his Grealey campaign book would
command almost any price the holder
might choose to ask. It will, all things
considered, be well for those who own
copies of that now somewhat rare book
to hold on to them, for until they com
mand a premium in the market, they will
serve to recall an almost forgotten, but
still in the main thoroughly American
poet.
How’s This.
We offer One Hundred Doilars Reward for
any case of Catarrh that can not be cured by
Hall’s Catarrh Cure.
F. J. CHENEY & Co., Props., Toledo, O.
We, the undersigned, have known F. J. Che
ney for the last 15 years, and believe him per
fectly honorable in all business transactions
and financially able to carry out any obliga
tions made by their firm.
West & Truax, Wholesale Druggists. Toledo,O.
Waldiug, Kinnan & Marvin, Wholesale Drug
gists, Toledo, Ohio.
Hall’s Catarrh Cure is taken Internally, acting
directly upon the blood and mucous surfaces ot
the system. Price 75c. per bottle. Sold by all
Druggists. Testimonials free.
oct21d&wlm
DOfilOLlis."
1 have the largest assortment of dog and cat
collars to be found in the State, and shall
.sell them at about one-half the usual price.
Also guns and sporting goods.
G. L. BAILEY,
263 Middle St.
octlS d2w
SITIOStK A A

MISCELLANEOUS. _
)
>v
I I
____ l IW1
I
makes as many cripples as ac
cidents, and its Victims suffer
more. If you have it in your
blood drive it out by the use of
ALLEN’S SARSAPARILLA.
A\r. Chas. A* Rogers, of 1127
Congress St., Portland, A\e.,
suffered for a year before he
found a remedy. His arms
were so lame that be could not
raise them above his shoulders.
His back and shoulders pained
him so badly that he could not
walk erect. Three bottles of
/Vilen's Sarsaparilla helped him
and five bottles cured him
entirely. Was not that
worthwhile? Try it yourself.
128 doses, 50 cents.
Allen Sarsaparilla Co.. Woodfords, Me.
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS,
^TURDAY
Qtjzz
On October 22, 1859, Louis
Spohr the celebrated composer
and violinist died at Cassel in
Germany.
ne was Dorn at x>ruiiswit.K m
1784, and was the greatest of all
composers for the violin. He
visited all of the European
countries, and besides his music
for the fiddle, was the author of
several operas and oratorios, and
among these “The Last Judg
ment.”
With cooler weather we’ll be more
than busy today.
An extra attraction to our Chil
dren’s Department is another lot of
those Little Giant Suits, warranted
all wool and not to rip, $5.
Near by are Overcoats and Ulsters
with hoods or capes, or plain, for
Boys, 2 1-2 to 15 years. You had
better see them before we tell you
the price.
Men’s Suits, Overooats and Ulsters
for all that come.
Expect to find the kind of furnish
ings you want here, and you’ll not be
disappointed.
New neck wear for today.
FARRINGTON & BICKFORD
Formerly Farrington Bros.,
542 CONGRESS STREET.
dit
— ,
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
Store closes tonight at 6
o'clock.
The Weather Today
U likely to he
fair.
Portland. October 22, 1802.
IN the matter of health
and comfort the
character of the out
er clothing is of far less
importance than that of
underwear.
People , are learning
this and consequently
show more concern than
ever before for the quality
and shape of their knit
garments.
The underclothing
made by the Dr. Jaeger
Company in Germany is
pre-eminently the best in
the world. Only the
finest, purest wools enter
into its construction, and
the fabric, which is en
tirely unlike any other, is
finished as well as skill in
v v wx ivuiuuomjj otvw
Aside from the sani
tary properties of this
“health underwear” the
fact that it is pure wool
and absolutely free from
all coloring matter, is
faultless in shape and
wears well is sufficient
reason for its wonderful
growth in popular favor
and the increased liking
for it
Our store-has the sole
selling agency for Dr.
Jaeger’s goods in Port
land and vicinity, and
complete lines of all
weights and styles are
carried in both depart
ments—Men’s and Wo
men’s.
Illustrated catalogues
giving full description
and prices free on ap
plication.
We have just received
our fall stock of the cele
brated Munsing Plated
Jersey Ribbedv Under
wear, for Ladies, in both
single and combination
suits, beautifully finished
goods and at popular
prices, examination solici
ted.
OWEN, MOORE & CO.
■ ■■ A*.
A rtw Pm.
Standard Maine Corn - - 10c per can.
(New pack, in patent self-opening cans)
Standard 31b Pears - - - 20c per can
“ California Apricots 18c “ “
“ Alaska Salmon - 13c “ “
“ Maine Lobster - 18c “ “
New California Raisins - - 8c per lb
Choice New Figs - - - - 12c per lb
The 10c corn mentioned above is a
first-class article, and the patent open
ing arrangement does away with the can
opener.
Those Maine packed pears are going
fast.—They ought to at the price.
We have an unusually fine lot of olives
in bulk.
Remember the Original Arabian Cof
fee.
We are sole distributors.
We sell Teas.
Watch for our “Ads.”
Grape sale Saturday.
Marriner£Company
GROCERS,
No. 222 Middle Street,
UNDER FALMOUTH HOTEL.
oct22 dtf
THE STUART,
9S-94rARK STREET.
Booms Single or En Suite. Newly Furnished
Thoroughly Heated. Baths.
Electric Bells. _ Good Service.
Guests at The Stuart mav obtain Meals by in
door connection with the'dining rooms of The
Sherwood or The IViisou. sept3S&Tt!
GRAND OPENING
StockbripcE
Entertainments, Oct. 26th and 27th._
12—ENTEBTAIN M ENTS—12
Grand Opening Wednesday Ev'ng. Oot. 26th.
rhe grandest stage production of modern
times. A novelty without parallel, which
has had overwhelming success in
Berlin and New York,—
;<A TRIP TO THE MOON.”
beautiful scenes and marvelous light and
mechanical effect.
rickets 50c, 75c, and 81.00- Now on sale.
No. 1 to be followed by the great
rravary Concert, Seidl’s Orchestra and
Soloists, Kagan Lecture, “Faust,”
iherwin’s Concert, Damrosch's Orches-.
tra and Soloist, Smith and Page,
‘Paderewski.” Talmage, Master Tyler
and Strakosch Co., New Bostonians.
Course Tickets $5, $6 and $7.
Tickets now on sale at Stockbridge’s Music i
sourse or evening tickets. Send for prospectus.
rOrULAIt mm.
12—ENTERTAIN MENTS—12
Grand Opening Thursday Ev'ng, Oct. 27th,
Boston Society Ladies in a MIN8TKKL Enter
tainment, calling themselves the
CHARITY WARBLE IS.
In Black Faces and Powdered Wigs.
Bones, Tambos, Interlocutor. Ladies’ Or
chestra, Ladies’ Quartette, fDaneing, Banjo
Playing, Vocalists and Instrumentalists.
Tickets 50c., 75c and $1.00. Now on sale.
No. 1 to be followed by
The New Marine Band, Couthoui and
Whitney. Kagan Lecture, Tab
leaux D’Art, “Village Doctor,” Jennie
O’Neil Potter, Maritana Opera,
Kemcnyl Co., Kellar, Salvini, New
Bostonians.
Course Tickets $3, $4 and 5.
;tore. Half fare on the railroads to all holding
oct20dlw
FINANCIAL.
PORTLAND NATIONAL BANK,
FRED E. RICHARDS, President,
W. W. MASON, Vice President,
C. G. ALLEN, Cashier.
Deposits in our
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
in small or large amounts
draw interest from the first
day of each month.
Jly25 <>tf
—TMB —
Casco National Bank
-OF
POHTIjANi jL,, tvtr.,
Incorporated 1824.
Accounts of Individuals, Arms and corpora
tions received on favorable terms.
Interest allowed on time
deposits.
Stepim R. Small, Marshall R. Coding,
President. Caehler.
f«b!4 dU
SCIENTIFIC MANUAL,
with every bottle of
Frye’s Amandine
is of such value for
the instruction it
contains you cannot
afford to be without
it. Every bottle fur
nishes you one.
— SOLD BY —
RINES BROS.
oct4 eocltf
Now is the time to
try a nutrient for
the skin. The lack
is the cause of dry
ness and chapping.
Frye’s Amandine
nourishes and
soothes the Skin.
SOLD BY
J. I DYER k CO.
oct4 eodtf
CALIFORNIA EXCURSIONS
VIA
SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY.
Apply to E. E. CURRIER, N. E. Afft.,
193 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON, MASS
Jly20 eod6m
FINANCIAL.
CITY BONDS,
WATER BONDS,
TOWN BONDS,
STREET RAILWAY
BONDS. ,
Suitable for the investment of Trust
Funds.
-FOR SALE BY
II. III. PAYSON & CO.,
32 Exchange Street. j
jy4 Gtr
Toledo, Olio, Consolidated
Street Railway Co.
Five percent Bonds,
due July 1,1909.
The Consolidated Street Eailway of Toledo,
was chartered in 1885. On July first 1889 tills
Company was consolidated with the Metropoli
ta . Street Eailway aim the Central Street Eail
way Comp nies.
Hie Toledo Consolidated Street Eailway Com
pany has now under operation 82 miles of track
and the road runs through all the wards and
principal streets of the city, and reaches all the
parks, cemeteries, county and city buildings,
opera houses and hotels.
The earnings of the road are sufficient to pay
the expenses, interest ana leave a large surplus.
These earnings of course will increase rapidly as
the city is constantly growing.
In 1870 the City had a population
by the V.S. Censusof.31,584
In 1880 . 50,137
In 1890 . 81,434
Mr. E. A. Newman, the Manager of the Port
land Street Eailway Company, made a personal
examination oi the property In our behalf, aud
the legality of the issue has been passed upon
by competent counsel and we have their certi
ficates on file at our office.
We recommend these bonds for Savings
Banks Investment and for Trust Funds.
Price 98V2 and aceured interest.
WOODBURY MOULTON,
Cor. middle and Exchange Sts.
ronTXjikKrx), me.
oct7 dtf
TfiTAtteition jf Investors!
Is invited to the Securities of the Northwertern
Guaranty Loan Company of Minneapolis,
Minn.
This company was founded in 1872, incorpo
rated under the laws of Minnesota in 1884,
and had on Jan. 10th 1892, according to the re
port of the public Examiner|and Superintendent
of banks of the State of Minnesota.
Capital Stock paid in.§1,250,000.00
Surplus fund. 125,000.00
Additional Liability of stock
holders under laws of Mini.esota $1,250,000,00
It has never passed a dividend, or defaulted
a payment. In a letter written by its Vice
President to us on the 27th of June, he says,
“We are today mailing cheeks to our stock
holders, the seventeenth (17th) semi-annual
dividend kt the rate of eight (8) percent per an
num. We will add Twenty-Five Thousand
dollars to surplus account July 1st.”
We are offering for the present, at par and
accrued interest, The Gold Debenture Bonds
of this company, issued in denomination of $50,
$100, $5o0, S1000. bearing Interest at the rate
of 8 per cent, payable semi-annually.
These bonds are fully secured by a deposit
of real estate and other loans, with its Trustees,
and also by a guaranty fund.
We also offer Prime Commercial Paper,
Guaranteed by this Company, in every case
secured by ample collaterals, at current rate
oi interest.
We have handled large amounts of this paper,
and in every instance it has been promptly paid
at maturity.
We solicit the most searching investigation
into the methods and affairs of the company,
as when ever this has been made it has been
greatly to its advantage.
Inquiries by mail promptly answered.
CHAPMAN BANKING CO.,
• 4.07 miuuic OUCCk.
| ju2 eodfcf
INVESTMENT
S ecurities
ON HAND AM FOR SALE.
Duluth Street Railway, first mort
gage 5 per cent Gold Bonds dne 1920.
Price 92 1-2 and interest.
Municipal and County Bonds.
First mortgage Water Company
Bonds.
Local Bank Stocks.
Particulars furnished upon applica
tion.
Special attention given to the collec
tion of Bonds, Coupons and Dividends.
Correspondence solicited.
SWAN &BARRETT,
HANKERS,
ISO Middle Street, Portland, Maine.
octldtl
SMOKE AN
ONION
AMUSEMENTS.
PORTLAND::: THEATRE.
■ G. E. Lotlirop, • I Lessee and Man,
Saturday Evening, October 22.
GREATEST OF SENSATIONS.
NUTMEG" MATCH
I Written by William Haworth, author of “The
Knsigu.” Under the management of Litt and
Davis.
With all its startling, realistic and pic
turesque scenic and mechanical effects, in
cluding the
Pile-Driving Scene!
IT 1 A monster Pile-Driver run by a big
HEATS l Steam Engine, operated by a skillful
THEM [Engineer, is shown in full blast.
ali.. J The All-Star Cast headed by the ac
complished comedienne,
MISS ANNIE LEWIS.
THREE NIGHTS,
Commencing Monday, Oct. S4tli,
First appearance in this city of
:-: GO WON GO MOHAWK:-:
The only American Indian Actress Pre
senting her beautiful picturesque
Drama in 5 acts, entitled
WEP-TON - NO-IVI AH,
Tlie Indian Mail Carrier.
Supported by a thorough efficient company; also
introducing her celebrated aidiau Ponies,
WONCY & BUCKSKIN.
Tickets 25, 35 and 50 Cents.
Seats on sale for all attractions one week in
advance. _ostl7<ltf
Breton Fete and Grand Rirmess of
Nations at the Alameda, Bath,
OCTOBER 23tlk TO 29th INCLUSIVE.
In aid of the Bath Public Library. 200 ladies
and gentlemen will take part in dances of all
nations. Directed and originated by Miss Me L.
Eager of New York. First time in the state
and most magnificent production ever g ven
here, viatlnees every afternoon. Bewitching
children’s dances. Supper served at the Eng
lish Inn in the hall. Half rates on M. C. R. K.
during week of Kirmess.
PORTLAND DAY!
Friday, Oct. 28 Fare from Portland, in
cluding admission to hall—Portiana. Wood
fords. Westbrook. West Falmouth and Cum
berland, $1.50; Yarmouth, 81.45; Freeport,
$1.10, and Brunswick 70c, to Bath and re
turn. Reserved seats on sale at Stockbridge's
commencing Tuesday, Oct. 25th. oetlSdSt
GILBERTS
Class for children Saturdays commences Oct
1st.
For Masters and Misses, Young Ladies and
Gentlemen Thursday commencing Oct. 6th.
For Ladies and Gentlemen Monday and
Thursday evenings commencing Oct. 3d.
For further particulars please call or send for
-GH.A.TJIJ
PROMENADE CONCERT
)
— AND —
COFFEE PARTY,
— IN AID OP THE —
St. Dominic’s Conference
— AND — , if
St. Vincent de Pnul Society.
— AT —
CITY HALL,
Tuesday Evening, Oct. 25.
Concert from 7.30 to 8.1f>. Grand march at
8.15. Refreshments served In Reception Hall,
from 6 o’clock fill the close of the cotfee party
Tickets, Gents 60c, Ladies 25c. octl9dtd
CLOSINB OUT SALE
LIDIES'xdGENTS’
Slightly Soiled
Ladies’ Norfolk and New Brunswick
Pants and Vests.
$2.00 each, former price $3.12
1.75 “ “ “ 2.25
1.50 “ “ “ 2.62
1.35 “ “ “ 2.25
.75 “ “ “ 1.25
GENTS’ BLUE MIXED RIBBED,
tic each, former price 75c
GENTS PLAIN MIXED,
37c each, former price 50c
41c “ “ “ 60c
71c “ « “ 87c
GENTS' CAMEL'S HAIR,
$1.09 each, former price $1.37
We make those low prices to
close them out. We are not go
ing to keep these makes again.
They are all in good order ex
cept that they are slightly soiled.
It will not injure the wear. Toil
will never buy them so cheap
again.
1.I. DYER lCO.
oct5_dtf
i
MISS A. L. SAWYER,
Teacher of Shorthand and Typewriting
Centennial Block, 93 Exchange
Street.
rOBTLAND, MA1BE. SeptTeod

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