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The aegis & intelligencer. (Bel Air, Md.) 1864-1923, December 08, 1916, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016107/1916-12-08/ed-1/seq-4/

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BETTY’S LIFE SAVED BY
USE OF RED CROSS SEALS
Bha Was Taught How to Caro For Har
oalf Aftar Har Mother Had Diad.
“She who real pretty, and so full of
fun that the dimple* were always
•bowing In her round, red cheek*.” :
The visiting nurse of the Anti-Tuber- I
culosls Hocloty wan talking. “Her j
•yea were b’g and brown and nut-col
ored hair curled naturally In little
rtn'rleta over her forehead and ear*.
She was just eighteen when we first
met her and so neat and attractive
that one would think she belonged to
the well to-do clans of working people,
but when we followed her to her home
one day we confronted startling fact*.
“The red In her cheeks was the flush
of unnatural Inw’ard fever, the high
spirits were a pitiful antidote to pith
less conditions, and the Mg brown
eyes naw only squalor when they were
not fixed upon a typewriting machine
or closed persistently to any view but
an Imaginary bright one.
“The room we entered waa a gen
eral living spa*’©, used also as an eat
ing, cooking and sleeping apartment
There was but one bed, and Betty
bad to sleep In It with her mother,
who was too weak to alt up. An oj>en
cuspidor sat where It would be con
veniently near the l>ed, which placed
It by the stove, where their food was
cook<*d. The mother, who was suffer
ing In an advanced stage of tuber
culosis, did not like cold air. and her
querulous demands caused Betty to
keep the door and windows closed.
“ ‘Well/ said Cheerful Betty, with a
laugh, 'that Isn’t so had us not hav
ing any windows or doors to close, Is
It? Tilings might be worse/
“Infinitely worse/ said I. *Yu
might even take a notion to stuff the
windows and doors with rags to cut
out what oxygen comes In through the
cracks.’
“Red Cnwi Christmas Beals, with
their cheery message of hope, gave
Betty a chance to get well after her
mother died. I* It worth while to save
the Bettes? Buy your share today.”
HOW RED CROSS SEAL
IDEA CAME INTO BEING
Originating In Norway, Method Wm
Tsksn Up Hers Nina Yssra Ago.
Over $3,230,000 has been raised by
Rod Cross Christmas Beals In the Inst
eight years, and yet many people who
will buy these holiday stickers at this
ninth annual sale do not know bow
this Idea originated.
While Red Cross Heals really date
back to the Civil Wor when “Charily
Stamps” were first used, the first cum
puign to sell holiday stickers for the
tuberculosis light wua only nluo years
ago In Delaware. Miss Emily I*. Bis
•ell of Wilmington rend an article by
Jacob Rlls describing stamps used fur
tuberculosis work In Norway, and she
conceived the idea of a similar plan
here. Single handed, she launched n
sale which resulted In SB,OOO clour
money. When Miss Rtssell tried to
con vine© the American Red Cross that
this Idea should be made national as u
Peace activity of that society, she met
with op|K>sltlon. but finally persuaded
the authorities, with the result that on
an Investment of a few hundred dol
lars $135,000 worth of Konls was sold
In 1008 and the great national cam
patgn was launched. Since then the
sale has gone forward by leap* and
bound*, until now the Red Cross Beal j
Is u Institution in the United Staten, .
•nd offers to every one a chance to |
help In the people's fight against the
people's discs so. Last year over 7d,-
000,000 Beals were sold, and this year
tlie American Red Cross and The Na
tiunal Association for the Study and
Prevention of Tutierculosls, who con
duct the sale, are out for a 100,000,000
sale or $1,000,000 for the Tuberculosis
War.
The policy on which thu hulo Is con
ducted Is that the money, except for |
tho deduction of legitimate expenses. |
ahull remain In tho community where
tho Beals are sold.
RESTORED TO HEALTH
BY RED CROSS SEALS{
Holiday Msssengora Bring Happlnaaa to
Homaa Burdened With Tubarouloaia.
Deserted by her huHliaml, suffering
from tulKMvuloHls In a double form and
supporting herself and young boy by
her needle, the A nil-Tuberculosis As
social lon In u Western city found an
unfortunate consumptive, living In one
room with two little beds—one for her
self and one for her l*oy. Everything
was clean; but, oh, so |K>orl
That was n year ago.
This morning she took a train for
tho state ainiKurtum. where she will
have a dm me to get well, while her
boy Is being cared for by the Anti
Tuberculosis Association with funds
derived from tho Red Cross Beal Bale
Hen* Is the story of another family
when* happiness and health wen
brought through the medium of Red
Cross Beals:
Tuberculosis had made heavy do
maud* upon the family, and tho In
come had entirely stopped for several
months, it was inevitable that tin*)
•hould run Into debt for grocery bllb
•a well us tho rent. With such worry
tnxlety and depression It Is not al
ways easy to find a silver lining In
the clouds. The condition was recog
nixed, however, by the visiting nurse
and the sick father was sent to a hos
pltal. and jiroi*er care was provided
for the other*. Relief was also oh
talned. and now both rent bills and
grocery bills nn* being gradually lessen
ed each week Each member of the
family has had nursing care for sonic
ailment or other.
Every Red ('roes Bimil Bold helps W
better conditions like these.
BUM OF BUST
Heavy Losses May Be Caused by
This Disease,
STATUS OF TROUBLE GIVEN
■aeh at Common Cereals Including
Corn Subject to Attack—Qrouoo
Have Marked Influence an
Prevalence of Rush
Patholo
jjebJDnlted Btataa Department of Agrt-
A very actions epidemic of atom
raat (“black mat”) of wheat which oo
•urrad the pa at season, especially In
the spring wheat states, haa forcibly
kronght to light the heavy losses
which may be cauaed by thla disease.
Tho following It a brief description of
tha present status of our knowledge
•f the cereal rusts and of the efforts
which are being made, especially by
tha department of agricultural to In*
pawl gats and combat them.
Kinds of Rusts.
Bach of the common cereals Indnd*
Og corn Is subject to the attack of
fast Aa viewed by the farmer, this
nut looks somewhat similar In all
Ctaes. In reality, however, there are
amoral different klnda of nut which
are distinct from each other oud which
vary la their virulence of attack.
Wheat, tor instance, U known to have
In thla country three klnda of rust:
(•of rest, stem rust, and a yellow or
■tripe rust Oats is commonly a fillet
ed with both a leaf nut, sometime,
also called “crown nut,” and a stem
nut. Barley and rye also hare last
gad Won nuts. On eon. howavtr.
(r z===
/ U k
a l .
Wheat Head* and Straw Showing Ef
fects of Ruet. Wellman'* Fife
(Smooth on Left) Haynaa Blue
•tern, No. 61 (Velvet).
only one kind of mat Is found, and
thla la rarely serious.
Tho oat rusts are very commonly
present and sometimes cause severe
epidemic* In certain oat-growlng
states. Of the wheat rusts the most
Important one at the present time Is
the stem rust commonly called the
“black rust” which was the cause of
the epidemic of mat In the spring
wheat states this year. The leaf rust
of wheat la almost always present ov
ary year and Is familiar to most fann
ers as “red rust” and while It un
doubtedly does at least a slight dam
age. It seldom If ever causes a severe
loss. The yellow, or stripe rust of
wheat has only recently been discov
ered In this country. It also attacks
barley and certain wild grasses and
has been found In the western part of
the United States, bat not as yet east 1
of the Rocky mountains except In east
ern Wyoming. It Is a common rust
In Europe and considered a serious
disease. If It continues to spread In
this country, and If It proves as serl- |
oum an enemy to wheat here as It hu*
In Europe, It Is possible that It will
add materially to the rust troubles of
our cereals.
Grasses as Ruat Plants.
The life histories of the rusts are
sometimes complex. This Is especial
ly true of the most important of tho
wheat rusts; namely, tho stem rust It
may pass a part of Its existence on un
ornamental shrub known as burberry,
Berber!* vulgaris, where It produces !
rust*'spores In May or June. These
rust spores may Infect wheat or other
cereals. The stem rust may also In
Its red and black stages live on many
common wild grasses. It Is alno a
fact that the stem rusts of the other
cereals may also pass their spring
stage on the barberry plant. Although
the rust may live over tho winter on
grass plants or nmy bo brought up In
the early spring from the Bouth with
out tho Intervention of barberry
plants, nevertheless, barberry plants
serve as an active means of spreading
the rust In a very vigorous fashion.
The common burberry should not be
1 permitted In the neighborhood of any
i grain-growing farms and. In fact, it
j would best be eliminated entirely from
the grain-growing states at least. The
small-leaved barberry, Berberls thua
hergll, called also “Japanese barber
ry.” Is not attacked by tho rust and
may be safely planted.
Rusted Seed.
Since the cereal rusts may also live
on grasa plants, a considerable study
ban been undertaken to find out the
i exact relations between the rusts
' found on wild grasses and those on
cereals. The mutter Is found to be
somewhat complex. There cun be no
doabt that the grasses have a marked
Influence on the prevalence of rust,
) and that wheat rust epidemics are con-
I slderubly promoted by the common
j wild grasses. The different rusts are
found, however, only on certain kinds
of grasses and these relationships, to
gether with the posnlble effect of the *
grasses on the virulence of an epi
demic, ore now being Investigated, j
Rusted Seed.
Another extremely important quo*
tlon under investigation 1* that of
rust In the seed. It has been known
for some time that in badly-rusted
fields the rust If often present even
on the tips of the wheat seeds. It has
been thought by some that tills nisi j
might be trnnHiultted by the seed to the
young seedling and thus start the epl- !
deiulc again In the following spring.
Evidence from field and greenhouse
experiments conducted up to tho pres- I
ent time does not supiwrt this view,
hut conclusive evidence la dependent
on further Investigation.
Aa far aa Is known at the present
time It is safe to take seed from a
rusted field. It la necessary, however,
that the lightweight, shrunken ker- 1
nels be removed and only tho heaviest
seed obtainable used from such a '
field. Much of the wheat from tills |
year's crop i* of very poor quality,
and should be thoroughly fanned and i
screened. Bpeclal effort should be
made this year to provide for good
seed wheat for next year. Germina
tion tests, of course, should be made.
Co-Operative Work.
A number of state experiment ata
tlons are vitally Interested in the rust
work and are co-operating with the
cereal pathologist of the department.
Tho stripe rust In the western states,
Its distribution and occurrence, togeth
er with Its Ilf© history and varietal re
lations, are at present under Investi
gation.
There la also considerable co-opera
tive work being done on the variety
testing and breeding of cereals for rust
resistance. Tho major portion of this
work Is devoted to wheat, but oats Is
also receiving some attention. In this
work rust nurseries are maintained at
four experiment stations where each
year an artificial epidemic Is secured,
thus allowing for continuous ruat rec
ords on any given variety, and also In
suring the most severe rust conditions
possible. Work on spring wheat la In
progress at the Minnesota station; at
the lowa station on spring outs; at the
Kansas station on soft winter wheats;
and at the Tennessee station on soft
winter wheats and winter oats. The
field trials on rust resistance are sup
plemental by greenhouse tests, where
both seedling and mature plants are
artificially Inoculated with rust and
degree of Infection noted.
Testing and Breading.
The results on the variety testing
for resistance up to the present time
have demonstrated several general
fuels. None of the common, or so
called bread spring wheats, is to any
useful degree Immune to the
rust attack. The most commonly
grown of these susceptible varieties
of spring wheats are the Fifes, Blue
stems, and bearded wheats, Including
such varieties us Marquis, Power Fife,
Haynes Bluestem, Prelude and Pres
ton. On the other baud. It bus been
abundantly demonstrated that certain
varieties of durum and einmer are ex
tremely resistant to the rust In con
trast to the common spring wheats.
This fact has boon very clearly dem
onstrated In tiie rust epidemic of the
past season, where the common
wheats, aa well as many* varieties of
durum wheats were very heavily rust
ad, while other adjacent rows of du
rum wheat were practically clean of |
mat In tha flehWnanr farmers sot
I rereoSevere loss m tneir durum crop
on account of the rut, while othera
obtained yield* of two to three times
I a* many bushel* of better grade wheat
. Jlimn wm* obtained from the common
bread wheats In the *ame vicinity.
1 Tills demonstrates very atrongly the
| necessity for planting, where durum
wheat 1* NucceHHfully grown, only the
resistant types.
I Fertilizers and Ruat*.
The result*, obtained particularly at
the Minnesota station In determining
the effect of artificial fertilizer* on
! rusts Indicate that soil fertilizer* do
| not play un important part either for
: or against resistance In a real field
epidemic, and that a* a factor in farm
practice, the relations between tho ap
plication of commercial fertilizers and
the rust can largely be disregarded
It seems highly Improbable that any
control of rust through the applica
tion of any reasonable amount of com
nierclul fertilizers can ever be hopec
for.
Control Measures.
It 1* well known that seed treatment
has no effect on the rust. 801 l treat
ment Is also almost ineffective, except
Insofar as good noil practice Hill put
the seedbed in the best condition and
promote the most rapid mid vigorous
growth of the wheat plant.
Of course, spraying of grain fields
is not only impracticable hut useless
a* well. Certain farm practices, us
for Instance the use of well-drained
land, however, should be followed In
order that the crop may he given the
best possible chnnec to escape un epl
demlc or to endure It.
Early maturing varieties on well
prepared land sown ns early In the
season ns possible, may assist In es
caping the rust If the attack is lute.
There can be no logical reason for
maintaining common burberry plants
anywhere In the vicinity of grain
Helds. Certainly no new one* should
bo planted and tin- old ones should
bo removed.
K -
STRAW FOR FERTILITY
Practice of Burning Piles After
Threshing Is Wasteful.
Bolls In Many Sactlona Would Ba
Greatly Benefited by Addition of
Fertilizing Conetltuenta
Present In Stalks.
From the time the prairies wore first
cultivated up to a your or *o ago it
wu* the general custom to burn the
piles of straw which dotted thu field*
after tho full threshing. In fact, it Is
yet a very common practice and a very
j wasteful one.
It Is hd established fact that or
gaols mutter Is essential for soil fer
tility. No one disputes tho fact that
our prairie soils are already rich In
till* essential, but In many sectlona the
Molls would be greatly benefited by
the addition of the fertilizing constitu
ent* wldch are present In tho *traw.
Hopkins of Illinois gives tho value
of oat straw for nmnurlal purposes at
SB.BO per ton. Wheat straw is valued
at $2.58 per ton. The same relative
comparison gives the value of fresh
farm manure at $2.22 and barnyard
manure at $2.34 per ton. Anyone who
destroys a ton of wheat or oat straw,
therefore, destroys more fertilizing
elements than are contained in tho
average farmyard manure.
The best method of handling straw
Is to feed it to stock and return the
manure to the land. Thus It serve*
a double purpose—fodder and manure.
When fed to horses or cattle on u
. maintenance rntlou or those doing
comparatively little work, oat straw
la considered by Hoard's Dairyman to
he from one-half to two-thlrda thu
value of good clover and timothy hay.
The manure from one ton of wheat
straw la worth $1.52, and that from a
ton of oat straw Is worth $2.84. Thu*
tho wastefulness of burning straw I*
evident
When sufficient live stock Is not
kept, however, to use all of the straw
In this way, the* straw can be returned
directly to the land. It may bo spread
and plowed under or used as a top
dressing on grain or pasture.
QUALiTYIs MOSTIsSENTIAL
I
Greatest Profit Can Ba Expsoted Only
From Llvo Stock of tha Vary
Hlgheat Grade.
(By a A. TROWBRIDGE.)
Quality becomes more essential to
profit In live stock forming each oen
son. When labor, land, anil feed were
cheap It was possible to renllxe a prof
i It on live atock of nn Inferior grade,
hut with the present high coat of these
production factors and a constant dls-
I crimination on the market against the
"scrub,” It haa become evident that
the greatest profit can he expected only
from live stock of good quality. It
may be possible for tho feeder or deal
er to make a profit on Inferior live
stock If he Is able to buy It sufficiently
j cheap and sell quickly, but usually
someone has not realized the greatest
• possible profit when a “scrub" gees to
I ibarket. If it Is not the feeder, It Is
' the man who produced the animal.
ALIGHTING BOARD FOR BEES
Writer In Gleanings of Bee Culture
Describes Devlcee He Uses Suc
cessfully on Hlvee.
A short time ago someone described
a floor-board which provided an en
trance under tho hive, and thus entirely
eliminated the porch. The only notice
taken of It was by one beekeeper, who
said that nu entrance under the hlvo
could not be watched against clogging
up, etc. I will describe the board I
Invented some years ago and still u*e.
say* a writer In Uleuulnga of Bee Cul
ture.
The main floor of the hive Is com
posed of board* of the right leugth
Floor-Board Under Hive,
nailed across batten* on edge, say
three Inches by one. Tho front board
I* only three Inches wide, and between
this and the next 1* a apace of four
Inches, after which the boarding to the
back is solid. Of course the “well”
thus made Is protected at the sldee by
pieces of the same thickness nulled
on to tho battens. Tho front board
v ha* a V-shuped piece cut out from the
underside to half its width, the point
of the V to the front. The alighting
board slides close under this floor on
ledges nailed to the battens.
DON’T RAISE CROP OF WEEDS
Expnslve Plants to Havs In Garden
or Anywhere Else—Uaa Plant
Food and Moletura.
Weeds are exiieuslve thing, to have
In gardens or anywhere else; they rob
garden crops of food and moisture,
many of them are natural food for all
kinds of Insects, which when they have
J .devoured -the choice parts of woods
attack adjacent Kune-u crop#.
I Who's Afraid of Chills?
I The wind can howl at the eaves, and the
g frost spin traceries on the window panes—
|K4M but not a single chill gets near the youngster.
Vtlßi Tor his bath, beside his crib; your own dress
ing, a cosy breakfast table —get a Perfection
fi* o, firm If a quick to heat, durable, dependable. Inez
. W / I Pensive to buy and to use. As easy to carry
_VfVI I about aa a work-basket, and good-looking
•I \ */ VI wherever you leave it The comfort insurance
today of more than 2,000,000 homes. Ask any
/ department store, furniture or hardware
/ A */_•*! i y A \ Atmddin Security OH—for boot result m
/I 1 fl l\ STANDARD OIL COMPANY
‘air (• *oO o • e f_\ * A
;> ]|ppsf£i; 1 ee o. fcPo # dB
■ ■KJHL If 7 'Si\
i— ■■
THE
I SAVINGS BANK
OK HAUKOlll) CO.
i BEL AW. - MARYLAND.
r _
CAPITAL STOCK SIO,OOO
’ KAHN Cl) BllKll*li(7K|s2.nOO
IHTEHtSI IN SAVINGS DEPOSITS
. DEPOSITS UK('KIVKI)
SUIWKCT TO CUKOK
I ,
1
1 DIHEOTOH9
1 DENIS J. SHANAHAN
• JOHN B. WYSONO
EDWAKD H. HALL
R. LEE MAGNEBB
, CHARLES A. McOAW
JAMES T. NORRIS
WILLIAM J. SHANAHAN
W. WORTHINGTON HOPKINS
WALTER W. PRESTON
i
WAIIfK W. PHISION. President
OtWS I SHANAHAN. Via-Preside*!
JOSiPH K. SHANAHAN. Coshter.
1
a———— mmmmmmmmmmmmmtammammm-ji
J ROYSTON STIFLER. JOHN B. PEERY
Stiflcr & Pccry
BEL AIR. MD.
PHONES M and HOI-12
Real Estate and Loans
If you want to sell your FARM or HOME rail
ami give ua a description and let ua allow you
how soon we will aell It. If you want to pur
chase a Town or Country Property call to aee
ua. We have both for aale.
M. DEAN & SON,
PUNEIAL DIRECTORS AND EMRAUEIS
Funerals'attended to in am
part of the county or city
irrvlcc Up-to-OaU end Price Rcwoiubh
At Any.
*e art at year Servlet Da; ar Hi((ki
Nloan's Liniment Kaara P*tn
Sloan’s Liniment la flrat thought of mothers
for humps, bruises and sprains that are continu
ally hnppeninu to children It quickly pene
-1 (rates and soothe* without rubbing. Cleaner
and more effective than muaay plasters or oint- j
menla. For rheumatic ache*, neuralgia pain
and that grlppy soreness after oolda. Sloan’s
I inintent gives prompt relief. Have a bottle
handv for bruises, -trains, sprains and all ox
i ternal pain. For the thousands whose work
ealls them outdoors, the pains and aebes follow
ing exposure are relieved by Sloan’s Liniment.
At all druggists. 25c.
Baraaui
AWW preparwUoa of nertt
Helps to •radioes* dandruff.
Stop That Cou||h
A hacking cough weakens the whole system,
i drains your energy and gets worse If neglected:
your throat is raw, your cheat aches and you
feel sore all over. Relieve that cold at onoe
with Dr. Kin*’ l New Discovery. The soothing
pine balsams heal the Irritated ntentbranea, and
the antiseptic and laxative qualities kill tb*
Kms and break up your cold. Don’t let a cold
ter. Get Dr. King’s New Discovery today
at your Druggists, 60c.
Rennert Hotel
Located la the heart of Baltimore.
Car. Liberty ui Saratoga Sto.
Offers its patrons
every facility of s first class
Hotel.
: Nai first Class. Service tie Best
Or tk, Pita Eiclu.lv.ly.
WM. PEPPER CONSTABLE.
ATTORNHV AT LAW.
VOO-70® Maryland Trot. Building
Baltimore. Md.
-Aie-
IClktoa, Maryland.
IN BUTTON ON TtTMDAYR.
1 —The ASgia Job Depart
ment is Up-To-Date.
...... ....... -...1. ,
Say It
i By Wire -
* I
< DON'T H KhITATB >
to pick up your phone and call a
ua. Give ua your order end we
m will be only too glad to deliver *
4 what you want at iuat the time r
e you say. All of the many de* a
I ■ partments in our drug store ►
abound with seasonable offerings u
which are at your disposal and
a to which you nave ready access I
4 due to our immediate delivery in .
4 response to your telephone re-
quest •
j Boyd & Fulford [
Experienced Drugiclata
Qwmwmm'vimm *
TZ
S UK lee Cellss• TmlTI
•wii. I locd •** rv-frvty rv*ff yM Kill fw I
mm uu nk* sa -.luttm, km un
fat corn Ji,
h h Bfui. u t. D.-- U/lM M
C’ hul harmless to fifV I
tmhtm. haw ir-
hukl ***“
**. ho* uui 91 .00. j/ 2
Richardson’s Pharmacy. Bel Air
W. Carl Holloway, Perryman
Jno. H. Smith, Caraina Run
William B. Selfe. Darlington
E. Tucker A Co.. Forest Hill
R. Burton Smith, Castleton
Jarrett Bros, k Ward. Jarrettsvllle
I 1 ftOWFTLTO
Tat ENGLISH
When You Need
A Bond
KBMBMBBK THAT THB
American Surety Co.
OF NEW YORK
The Largest Company in the
World with Capital and Sur
plus of over $6,000,000.
WHITES BONDS OP
Administrators, Executors,
- Guardians, Trustees,
and all other BONDS requir
ed in Court proceedings.
-ALSO-
Official & Miscellaneous Bonds
For further Information apply to
JOHN D. WORTHINGTON. Agent.
BEL AIK. MD.
CHESTER HECK
BEL, AIR, MARYLAND.
Practical Painter
la prepared to give estimates on all kinds
of Inside and ontslda work.
ONLY PIRST-CLASI WORK DONE
Satisfaction Onarantood. Give mo a trial
ESTABLISHED 1178 BOTH PHONES
DANIEL RIDER
IMI Gretaiauunt Aw.. Salto., Md.
Commission Merchant
NH n> uu o* —
WHEAT, CORK OATS. NAY, STRAW. U
—oaaan km—
MI Feed, Gluten Feed, Gotten
Seed Heal and Oil Cake Meal
will receive prompt uuatloa
1 J. F. MITCHELL,
AUCTIONEER
, IWWrite or Telephone to Calvary, Ud.
JOSHUA W. McCALL,
-LICKNHKD
AUCTIONEER
AND REAI CSTATE BROKER
MR-Notea discounted on day ot eale if
' eo desired. Terms 2%.
PHONE 28 W BEL AIR, MD
JUILTON J. DANCE
A ~' l, Licensed Auctioneer
Prompt attention given to all business en
trusted to his care.
Glen Arm, Baltimore County, Md.
Phone--Fork
C. C. RICHARDSON & BRO.
Auctioneers,
Real Estate and Personal Property Sold
Paper approved and clerk furnished when De
sired. Satisfaction Guaranteed. BEL AIR. MD.
ISAAC W. THOMPSON,
Auctioneer,
For the Sale of Real k Personal Property
Terms 2% BEL AIR, UD
■M~Satisfaction Guaranteed.
CHAS. L HORNBERGER
Funeral Director & Embalmer
BENSON, MD.
PROMPT SERVICE DAY OR NIGHT
LADY ASSISTANT
Auto Hervloe When Denlred
Funerals Attended In City when necessary.
PHONE BEL AIK 809-F2.
LAMM HOUSE
Warren HI., Near l*n. It. It. Httlon,
HAVIIK UK GRACH. MD.
Cuisine I nsurpassed.
Hot-Water Heat.
CoaOhs"
Kill If You Let Them.
liulmd hill your Couch with DR. KING'S
HEW DISCOVERY. II h,al. Irritated
Threat and Lung*. Thou.and. In last
40 yaate banalllad by
Dr. King’s
New Discovery
Money Back If It Fail.
All I>rudi.t. 800. end *I.OO
MMnraHßWßi>. ?■,
SHAKE INTO YOUR SHOES.
Allen's Foot-Ease, the antiseptic powder to be
shaken into (be shoes and sprinkled into the
foot hath. It relieve* painful, swollen, smart
ing feet and takes the sting out of corns and
bunions. Use I* when you pul on rubbers or
heavy stocking*. Allen’s Fnot-Kase Is a certain
relief for sweating, callous, tired, aching feet.
Sold by Druggists everywhere. Be. Always
use It to break in new shoes. Trial package
FREE. Address. Allen S Olmsted. U Roy. N. Y
CHICHESTER S PILLS
, TUK DIAMOND MUAND. A
la H. a Sa.l itwM mcVill"\w/
> ' •, kiM with Ultra Kit twin, vjy
Vw* 0 jraaf* known at Boat, Ssfcsl, Always Reliable
SOU 8Y
Thiough the
E, A. Strout Varm Agency
World** Larvres* Farm Agency
New York. Boetoo. Philadelphia, Syracuse
Over 10,000 fauns told. Write to
day fog free booklet, "HOW TO SELL
YOUR FARkL M Addreaa our ngenL
For further particular* apply to
FRED. C JONES, Agent,
DARLINGTON, ■ MO.
Telephone lit 11 Darlington.
FARMS WANTED
I have buyer* for Harford County Parma.
Send me full description of your firm, together
with location and lowest price, subject to usual
rata ot commission.
J. W. McCALL. Bel Air. Md.
; Famous Frederick Co. Uhc
A mine off wealth to the Farmers
—MANt'PACTVIBU SI
I IL J. GROVE LIME COMPANY
Ume min, Frederick 00., Md.
Another One “Right from the Busy Corner.”
STEAM VULCANIZING
We Vulcanize your casing and if it blows out or
goes bad in the vulcanize before it does else
where in the casing we replace it free of charge.
ALL-NIGHT SERVICE
THOMAS & SELFE, S'
r THE TWO 810 LEADERS
THE BEST SIX AND THE BEST FOUR
Buick and Dodge Bros.
Couiier the itudiag *f the ■uifectiren btfare jm baj ■ car
- ' — "" -
ARCHER & LEE
HARFORD QARAQE
BEL AIR, - - MARYLAND
wwwmiiiuHWMoeweMetetetHwwwHeweii
Harford Garage
J. MYRCKLE WELLS. Prop.
Automobiles Hired, Repaired, &c.
TIRES AND TUBES
in all sizes on hand at all times.
TROUBLE CALLS RECEIVE PROMPT ATTEN- *
TION.
PH ON E-BEL AIR 830.
: I WANTED
*
Owners of Country Homes and Estates to draw on us
for the following:
COLORADO HI,UK HI’RUCK. KOHTKHB GKAFTKO BLUK BPRDOI
NORWAY HIMtUCK. RKTINOHPOROH. ARBOR VITAK'U IN
VAIIIETY, WHITE PINKB and othw good Evergreen Tree*
Autumn Planting Season for Kvergrreos***
August. September. and first part of October.
Fruit, Shade and Ornamental Trees, Hedging of California
Privet and Japanese Barberry, Hardy Shrubs, etc.
Thl. .luck hu been carefully grown and we Invite your In.peotlon
Grier Brothers, Nurserymen
FOREST HILL, - MARYLAND, R. D.
C. * P. Phone-Bel Air. Md.
WESTERN MARYLAND COLLEGE
WESTMINSTER, MD.
REV. T. H. LEWIS. O. 0., LL. 0., PRESIDENT
For Young Men and Young Women Separate Departments
L OCATION unexcelled, 1,000 feet above the aee, in the bigfa
————— lands of Maryland. Pure air, pure water, charm
ing scenery. Only an hour’s run from Baltimore.
EQUIPMENT complete. Twenty acre Campus; Modern Build
— 1 mgs; comfortable living accommodations; Labora
tories, Library,Gymnasium, Power and Heating Plant
CURRICULUM to date. Classical, Scientific, Historical and I
, Pedagogical Courses, leading to A. B. degree.
KJSr- 1 Music, Elocution and Oratory. Strong Faculty.
PREPARATORY SCHOOL for those not ready for College.
Gardiner’s Ice Cream
“THE GOOD KIND”
The undersigned is ready to supply the pub
lic with Gardiner’s Ice Cream, in any quantity
from one gallon up
Special attention paid to orders for festivals,
Picnics, etc. Write or phone for prices.
JarrettsVille G^eaiijery
PHONB NO. D. N. THOMAS,
Jarre us vllle 14 k. Proprietor.
|L. i
T. H. CHALK & SONS
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
Produce Commission Merchants
WE are in abepe to tell produce to ea good advantage ae an, Homs
in town and if you wiah QUICK RETURNS wo can give them
to you by eelling at market price*. If you went a better price
we can get it for you by taking more time and giving a good, fraeb
article. Any consignment, large or small, by rail or truck, will have
our prompt attention.
T. H. CHALK C& SONS
418 East Street, . , - Baltimore, l(d.
WIRE AND IRON WORKS’ 1
MANUFACTURER* OF ALL A INI* OP
Wire, Ornamental, Structural aid Irtu Work,
Counter Railing*. Office—
aova Fnosae. Partition* end Fencing, n™*"* Fmoaaao.
OPncE 151*14 N. Rejcsto St - WORKS-Aentfwd Avtaa*
Baltimore, Md. Md t. I L
*
J. C. TAYLOR, ’
MARBLE WORKS.
—ALL KINDS OF
Marble and Granite Monument* and Headstone*.
MD. fhonm. JARRETTSVIT t f
| Work deßvmd and put up fa any d

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