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The aegis & intelligencer. [volume] (Bel Air, Md.) 1864-1923, March 31, 1922, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016107/1922-03-31/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE /KGIS ia noted fur its
Reliable New? and Forceful
Editorials expressed in conser
vative language.
$1.50 PER ANNUM
It is the Seeds which grow that count
! LANDRETH’S GARDEN SEEDS 11
ARE RELIABLE
We handle them in liulk; also make a specialty of TOMATO SEED
Planet Junior Cultivators and Garden Tools, Poultry Wire, Drain
Pipe, Perfection, Puritan and Florence Automatic
Cook Stoves and Spraying Material
Agents for HUDSON and ESSEX CARS I
Auto Accessories and Genuine Ford Paris
F. BOND BOARMAN, Bel Air, Md.
Milk Can Prices Greatly Reduced
Lower Now Fhan For Years
\
tOn equipment for the dairy, prices are return- (j
ing to normal quickey than many other things.
Food and clothing, for an example, has drop
ped in price, but far from a pre-war level. ‘I
Conway’s Milk Cans, however are just about
one-half what they have been in price, but the ~
quality remains as always, the best. Today
our price is practically one-half.
It’s time to purchase milk cans—our prices are
at low level: our cans—you know them—are
what milk cans ought to be.
Baltimore [ Pattern HERE’S THE PRIC ES:
tS gallon - - - $3.70 each
70r7/ it gallon - - 4.30 “ |
New York or Baltimore Pattern, marked free, h
which includes permit number. h
Send Along ) our Orders!
We have plenty of all sizes in stock. 0
WM. A. CONWAY
N. Y. Pattern 626 628 Forrest Street Baltimore, Md.
Local and Long Distance Phone Connection
-
Taste is a matter of
* /
Chesterfield
CIGARETTES
of Turkish and Domestic tobaccos— blendod
20 for ISc U
| “ fSO - 4^
CREAM WANTED
g W eet or sour. I pav on butter fat basis. Can
use any quantity. Weekly payments. 1 also,
pay lop market prices for Eggs. No commis
sion deducted.
F. HURWITZ
912-914 Watson Street, ::: Baltimore, Maryland.
National Union Bank
References: National Marine Bank
The Maryland Farmer
1878 1920
J. C. TAYLOR & SON
MARBLE WORKS
ALL KINDS OF
MARBLE AND GRANITE MONUMENTS AND HEADSTONES
__ ,a p. PIIONK JRRRETTBVILIE, MD.
HONEST NEWS HONEST VIEWS
HONEST ADVERTISING
THE A^GIS
AND INTELLIGENCER
BEL AIR, MARYLAND, FRIDAY MORNING. MARCH 31. 1922
NOTH t: TO CKKIIITOKS
I'j t •.. y ,.f 1...1ice ll.iti (hi* i nlieni
i .r i.btuiiiC.l • Mn. Mi Oriibiiiix Imm of Ifm
, ... i ■ . . Mil. iHlfi* I*-lameiiliii y mi •
maicy y it Mini
| 1,.'. n Mm mil Omnly, d*< <ll Mil All |mimh,
■ 1..■ \ inv < l.tinte m'liiiiai .lid deceit mi| me beiebv
| i ..111 in) In exhibit the uliir with the leval
j vourbet* Ibeieol
I till nr krfuir the Ul day f September. 1M27
• i) rv may ofr %Me l<> In * Ik- I'lluili-d bum
I ml| benefit* ul mil estate All iierxiln 'iidebted
li., . M) i| |..'„i,. .in- i ei(iic-i*i| lii rnnke .ihh.cilii.l.
|ih yurt'll!.
l,i.rn under mu bulMl* mnl *eii|a till* l*l day
M I
| rilfKl. < LINTON SMITH
i.yjiiu.y, I I INTON SMITH
Kxeeulora
;i
NOTICE TO ( KKIHTOKS
| , i . • notice that the "übaeribei bat
..I, ~,i,c.| i ...in Hu Oiidmii* four* of Harford
i .. .ci'. . I# mi-i tet anient my on Itrt* elat
AMANDA STEELE
; .■ i.i llarfmd County. deceimed All |ier*oni
r. ..mi (lain.* avail.*t atd deceased are hereby
in it i to exhibit the name with the leal
voueber* thereof
fin n. before the Kih day of September, 192 J
1 they iiinv otherwise by law la* excluded frotr
* .it lieiicf.'- ul ••Mid e.lnle All |iei*oi.h indebted
mhl eita'e ue ri|ueleil to make iinmedialr
' payment.
Ii i. veil under my band and *ea I thi* Sth day o|
Maiib, I
WM I* STEELE. Exeeutor
Executor’s Sale
i
Hv virtue of the power mid authority contain*
ed in Hu* Inst Will ami Testament of William
It Taylor, late ot Harfoitl County dwwmed.
the umlersitinetl Kxeeiitor will offer at Public
Sale at the Court House iloor at llel Air. Mil. on
Monday, April 3rd, 1922
At 12 o'clock M. the following
REAL ESTATE
of which said deceased died seixetl.
>•': I All that
KA H M
<-iluate on ro;ul from Sitlney Park I.iiiiiliiik to
Micluielsville that was ciun|Kiscdof aevei al 1 1 nets
or paitK oi tracts ol land, vis: "Mnldlcbni
oiiuh." "Smith's l olly He*uivcycd." "Hlnnuil
Swamp". "Sherilt’s Hall". "Cook '•* Ih.idde Pur*
ehii-c" containinv
150 ACRES
nime or le.--. heinc the ►Mine and all land de
ei lad in a ilwil from Sarah McClaxkey el al
to Asa \V. Taylor and James F. Taylor, dnled
the lllh ol April, IHI7, and recoidisl in Liber
a! II l> (i. No. ;t:i Folio I Cl, one of the latud
UecouU of said llarlord County
>C lift acres of thi* iurin is tillable, the balance
in wiaal.
Improvements consist of one
liliNtiAMlW, seven moms;
II'NGA LOW, four rooms.
Ham. with "tabling lor S
horses , Slosl Sfahie for four
horses. Cow Shed; VS aaoit Shed. (SrHimry : ’
Chicken Houses, Meal House, Milk HoUnc. and
1.. House
2 All that
TRACT OF LAND
called "Sidney Park" containinv;
•J( > AC ’KICS
oi less. ladn it all that purl of the land
' described in a deed from James .1 Archer. Till*-
lee, to Asa VV Taylor and William II Tavloi,
I dull'd (he MMh ol Oi lolhi. INNN and recorded in
I I .liter A 1.. J No ti'l folio la. one ot the I.ami
) lie.'old ol aid llarlord County which lie on ■
1 I the notlhwealerly sole of tlie afoiesuid load
/ . known •. tin- toad from "Sidney Paik (.and
. ' io Mii'liuel vlllc, lliml once was. except
• •lie and one hall notes theirs.l .old hv the aid
j William It I'ivloi in hIH 111 el line, one hull mm
I" I'holnu Mmphl ulie ucle to II Maid Mlel.il
) j the iinproveinciit roienU ol A
.• i.wmiNn win.
I 1..10 I aide 10l tool hoise .
and a ehh’kr n hoo e Ihr
I land I' all in Wood I m cpl alioiil one in le
'tin-. i>io|MMlie* ate ala.ill ll.iee mile, limn
I Ma mlc. ii, lor the iiii.*l pail o\ei a good road.
I and aie roiivemeiil Io *chiadN, stores and Ituil
' roads.
I Thev v ill he oifered sepanilely and louethei ■
and sold the wa> deemed inoril advanliluisiUH.
> | TKKMS OF SAI F
| The lenna of sale are; onc-lhnd of Ihe pur
chase money Io la- paid in cash on Hie day of j
• ale or on the ratification thereoi. in the dis.
crelion of the nndeisigned, one-third in nix |
‘ ox.nth* and residue in twelve months, or all
I cash at ihe option of the purchaser. The I
cied.l payments to heai interest from the dav
I ol sale and t>. he secured hy Ihe notes or lannis I
of (he purchaser with surely Io he approved .
I hv Ihe nndei signed. '
I.AWIIKNCK M TAYI.nII.
| K'eciilorol William II Tnyhn. deceased '
f•• miivllht C Moyle. Aiiclioneet. i
Assignee’s Sale (
OF— \
Valuable RealEstate 1
) SIT! ATF NF.AH KAI.MIA IN IIAKFOKII (
| CIH’NTV I
I Mv viilue ol Ihe power and aillhoiily contained
in a iiioi Ikiiku I tom James F .lionks and |
) Imu a Brooks, his w ile, to Henry A Wliilnkd.
dated on or ulaml the .'lllh day of O. ohei In j
1 Ihe year nineteen bundled and seventeen, and
leeoided amongst Ihe I.and Kecoids ol Harloid
I I ounty in I.liter J A K No lf>7, folio fdi,
, and duly assigned Io Jacoli A. Imxeii, on oi
' uls.oi (he Iwenly-tbird day of February, Hi.’ I
i del a ull haviiiK occoi i et| (herein, Ihe under*
• lined, assignee ol said inoitvage, will sell al
i Pohlie Sale al Ihe court house d.so in Mel Ale.
I I Monday. April 10th, 1922
Al 12 o'clock M , Ihe following described prop-
I erly, !hal is Io my .
ALL THAT PARCEL OF LAND
composed ol liacls or parts of liaela ol land
called "Arabia IVliia” ami "Hiirdsloiie,” oi hv
whalaiatvei name oi names known oi tailed,
siliiale oil Ihe south westerly side of Hit* piddle
i 11 lad leinli iik (miiii Ihe Stale Koad neai Kaliola
In Jnniiey's Finding. in Ihe Thinl Kleclmii
i I" luel ol Harloid Coiiiily, containing
17i ACRES
. looie oi less, being Ihe Milne and all Ihe land
I ' conveyed hv and descrilied in a deed from Hie
| vcnmiii A William*-, allorney, and iinolhei to
, the said James K lliooks and I .am a liiooks,
i dated on oi alioiil Ihe Iwenlv sixth day ol Oi Io
l liei. in (he year nineteen bundii-d Hint sen n
teen, and recorded ■ iiiongsl Ihe I,and Mennd'
, ot llarlord County in l.dier J. A If No h,n
folio 7C.
The improvrmenla on this- ."'X
pi.ipeity consist ol slone
I * FILING lllldel
lale ms.l, slahle and some
other outbuildings in mimm! ic
pail, and has on it some 1 1 ml Irees. The greal
ci pail ol the land is clear and in a i'.mn! stale
of i nilivalion.
Siloate as this properly is. near the Stale
l(..ad, in* a cood nclghls.ilhmml. convenient to
’lores, iiiilts. ii.-hiM.ls and churches, it could he
made a valuable pro|ierly.
TKKMS OF SAI F
One thud ol Ihe pmehase money Io la* paid
in ia‘ll on Ihe day ol sale, one-lhird in h
months and the balance in twelve months finni
■ lav nf sale, and Io lie seen red lh • •n I • It <
lion of the assignee ol said r.no - M*<•, i i all
• ii-h al option of pureha*ei oi fiurchnsei. eied
u pa>meni io leat inieiesl from day of sale
JACOH A IMIXFN.
* Assignee of > >ud marltfN
I W, Thompson. Auctioneer
’.I'M'MIM M M M'M'II M W'M'MM M MMX tf |M M KlffM M'M
Bull & Culp
■j DEALERS IN
• IK.
5 Rough and Drcsswl Yel- J
“ low Pine and Cypress
LUMBER j
I LATHS, MILLWOKK, J
S MOULDING, SASH, J
S DOORS, BLINDS \
K H,
; LTC. I
i I
s
j Window & Door Frames
A I,SO .
g Screen Doors & Window ft
i Screens a Specialty $
i Niagara Hard Wall Plaster, |
.|| Wall Board. Bricks,
“ Cement and iii
Hydrated Lime.
K'
i '‘Quick Service” |
£ Our Motto
■d k n
le Y. H
iK! B
J Mill and Lumber Yard |
i just behind
First Presbyterian Church ;
BEL AIR, MI).
Phone 386-J
KUNKCL_
serviccT
COMPANY
After selling you the proper type and size B
| of tire for you trucks and applying it care. B
fully, we still obligate our- I
selves to assist you in get- I
ting from the tire the last (sgv I
mile of service built into it K
, at the Goodyear factory. m
Regular inspection is made s! 1 * /) I
to discover under-inllation \/ i. \(f ■
—tread cuts misalign- <r !m j ■
ment of wheels and other An" K
causes that contribute to A 11. ■
I premature tire destruction. r ly iJ ■
C orrection follows Inspec- L-i S
tiun. Big Mileage follows m
I! Correction: M 1 Al l
Bel Air Road, Bel Air Phone 85 I
| GfETZ |
\ PHARMACISTS JKWlll-RS OPTOMETRISTS J
Ali ■ 1111. IO 11011110011 IIIIIIIOIIIOIIIUO.iI IKIIIII IIMVI 101 l Hill 110100011.0000 V
A Message to the Women of Harford |
A I.< iii lh. I.niiudi y I’loldcMi. KOTI Aan Q
Q . lieui l ■■iioiii'li io throw' and ca-*y Io dl"|as* \
\ .i. ii 1 1 v hy folhiwiiie. directions loiind In every U
Q h. l\ole\ me well made •>! f‘ellucnllnii a won A
\ il> ■ ■ ill ii niln > v uhsni hen | now used in leadm \J
() vA r.lni mi.l line .•mi'.- I*l l a loiiK bib *mi> e- A
a i.iiih i in V
U ’ ’ ~1...ii i nme lii Mini A
\ HKH " 0
A I j X
, uyvi I ... V ■ V*.v Jf - .viol. 11 ii velllic ot In 1111. mid II "li|iplv Q
r\ mK, ‘' Jy o he nil ihe In mm n .In ■ . \
■ ' 111 l ii ii iiil • v hv 0
GET IT FROM GETZ |
(J Ilia, till s 1.10 VIHMi 111(1 Ii SKlltl': (|i|iiii(i. till' Cmnlliimsc X
Haynes
Americas First Car
Model 55 Touring - $1595
Model 75 Touring - $2,395
WM. T. MEYERS
Distributor
1723 North Charles Street
BALTIMORE, Ml).
AGENT Wanted in Harford County.
Write for particulars
PRICES OF
Phila., Diamond Grid Storage Batteries
In Effect at Once
I OKI >, ( HI'.VKOI II l!Mt, OV I .If I AM I. ftl If K 1. I Mi i’lwn.-il Afl
one yai j- h.lim
I OKI). ( 111 VKOI I j I!iH, OVKIM Wli I IM UK I lMi I.SA (OA
IK ......it I > J''.... ;.1.t....
i iikv(;nia i Hi. < \ i , ' ni.i,. t ii u.mi-■ i;. . t ii\\M i'.i;
111 l(!K, . KHSI'IX, ill It. O'., Kl! SKI , VXW Ml, so ,;i 'it, M() Q()
1 .'it, 1i ot. ...ii (. .11 uni i. vjjwrvf.vrvr
• HKVUOI.IT I'li, < ,VM*, COI I (IIAIMI'.I' tII A NIII.KI: __
!• KK I l'.\. 11l h ON. Kl II ,M\\V\l 11. JH;fl flO
i::o i.sa ih moniii g.m..-mi..
MOfRIK TIJ I ; A I - rnotilh . g.i.n .int.o (t ar\ f\f\
11: wku’v t|)4U.UU
MAXWKI.I. .IJ 1.1 \ I!) I>■ Monll, $40.00
Ih'liuir Work as cheap as is consistent
with good workmanship and material.
All jolis guaranteed.
WE WELD’’ALUMINUM
HARFORD GARAGE, Bel Air.
TfSf SIMON GETZ
Everybody Invited
Io bring a nof your tamiHlieri Silverwaie and we will show y<>u
liow Miinple it im to t Iran and LrigliM-n ndvef witfiout ruliliing, h otiring
or nrratr King willi
NO RUB
He. Irl< ( Icarisr Plate. <Jiw k. ( imvini. nl, S.itivf.ii |„ry an.l I.> oiiriinii..l
Prepare for the Spring Raim,
UMBRELLAS SI.OO and Up
MARCH Maorßeoiris are here '
Sole Agent For Victor Victrolas
I ALKALI OK ACID IN SHOK POLISH
HARMFUL TO LKATHKR
IMishes that contain five acid or
alkali are likely to injure leather. This
is ene of the conclusions from tests
made hy the llureaii of Chemistry. A
polish of the emulsion type containing
five alkali caused cracking across the
vamp of shoes where the leather is
subjected to frequent bending. Many
of the litpiid cleaners often put up in
combination with paste polishes for
use on light-colored shoes, contain ox
alic acid, which is likely to injure
leather.
In the absence of water-soluble dye
in the polish, free acid or alkali can be
detected by stirring up some of thi*
polish with warm ruin water and test
lag the clear water after settling, with
red and blue litmus paper. A change
from red to blue indicates free alkali,
while a change from blue to red indi
cates five acid. In the presence of
water-soluble dye, free acid and alkali
can be detected only by chemical analy
sis.
There is a general belief (hat tur
pentine in shoe polishes is injurious to
leather, but the tests did not bring out
any injury (hat could be ascribed to it.
The turpentine sometimes becomes
rancid, acquiring a sharp, disagreeable
odor and causing the polish to become
gummy and unsatisfactory to use, but
the quality of the leather does not
seem to be affected.
Various other constituents are used
in the manufacture of shoe polishes.
Mo -i modern polishes far leather con
■ i'i ef mixtures of waxes colored with
dye and softened to a (Misty coasts
tency, usually with turpentine. Those
fie from turpentine are produced by
emulsifying the mixed waxes by bod
ing them with a solution of borax of
'••da. coloring with dye or finely pow
tiered bone charcoal, anil mixing with
a '■• lulion of ordinary soap to form a
p.t le oi \vith a solution of ('aside map
to Imiii a liquid polish. There are
.d o liquid poll be consisting of shel
lac, wave . and dye in alcoholic solu
I ion,
FEIIRI \l<V COW UNCORDS
Following table gives records of
rows which have produced more than
, Id pounds of butterfat or 100(1 pounds
mdk during February.
Lbs. Lbs.
Milk llutterfat
VN diner I*. Iloopes 711 44.5
” 012 4M.8
Dr. 11. Iloopes 1200 0(1.0
” 1110 52.2
” 051 ILK
” 072 47.0
i ’’ infill 02.5
” OIK 50.2
* Hamilton Amoss 1122 51.0
( " KIO 44.0
” 1020 IIK.H
1 T S. (Hadden KOI 4M.1
) S. NV. Wilson lOKO .MO.I
• S. A. Williams 000 45.5
•I. F. Michael 1170 I4.fi
) Calvin (Salbreath 702 40.0
I ” 7511 41.0
” 1110 50.0
' .lame It. (.albreath I IKK 17.5
| ” I 101 52.0
” 1005 02.2
I ’’ 1200 10.4
) .1. C. Rutledge 1110 00.7
M K 25 40.7
” 1005 50.0
S. W. Thompson KOI 40.2
T. W. Scarlf 1074 41.2
" 1110 55.5
” 1215 04.0
" 1200 20.0
" 1527 51.0
” 1200 04.5
’* 1 OHO 08.0
M lOKO 41.4
" 1500 05.0
11. Wilson Wheeler 1548 02.0
” 1024.4 51.0
" , 1100 50.0
•lames W. Davis Air Son 1020 52.0
” 707 40.4
” Kl7 41.0
M 078 40.1
M It 05 57.0
” 1004 02.0
” 1187 52.7
D. Laid McNahh 000.0 55.22
I ALLSTON FARM FILS’ CLCII
The Fallston Farmers’ Club was
pleasantly entertained at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. 11. W. Hays on Saturday
evening March 18th with the following
members present: 11. W. Hays, T. W.
Forbes, Robert S, Preston, Wm. A.
Harlan, Fdwln Harlan, Frank Foard,
John It. Foard, Curville F, Amoss,
Charles F. Wiggers, Charles K. Hurton
and Leltoy Scarlf. Messrs. James M.
Cm sell and Caleb ,). Moore, were on
tie* sick list wen* unable to attend.
The visitors were County Agent Del
ink Wm. L. Amoss and Mr. and Mrs.
S. F. Dame run and family.
Messrs. Win. Harlan and It. S. Pres
ton were Ihe committee of inspection.
About an hour was spent out of doors
inspecting the new property and its im
provernenls.
Mr. Hays’ home is located on the
slate road *4 mile north of Henson, and
I In- improvements consist of aii now
buildings. An orchard of peach trees
planted last spring was found in a
thrifty condition. Mr. Hays has a pros
peel of an alMindunre of other fruit
I for this year. In the garden was found
' plant of blackberries, raspberries and
st 1 n wherries.
The house showed careful (dunning
(n < to convenience, light and comfort,
and while there has Ireen much done al
• eiuly, Mr. Hays has much more in
I mind for Its completeness.
After our return fi*om the out of
doei. Mrs. Hays invited us to a bounti
ful supper Hi which we all did justice.
The discussion for the evening was:
"Tin- Value of Home Mixing of Feiti
llyeiv” which means a great saving to
I Hi** farmer and was ahly handled hy
Mr. Derrick.
(At the usual hour the Hub adjourned
to meet at the home of Is l (toy Searff
ou Sat 111 day evening, April 15 at. 4
k o'clock.
I SFCRFTARV.
L WIK.II 'l'll K MARK lor MII.K IT
I'RIOVKNTS MI.HI NIHOK
stan him;
Producers who ship milk to city dis
tributors have voiced frequent com
plaints becao e of the disparity he
tween their figures on the quantity of
, in Ik shipped and those of the dealei>
on the quantity received. In order to
- locate the cause of complaint by study
mg the actual loss between the country
hipping point and the city plant the
j Department of Agriculture made an
m 1 ligation on the Haltimore market.
Record kept on more than 1,100 cans
l, wed that the lo s between the coun
trv station and the city plant was less
than I per cent. The loss on trains
probably due to pilling, was only 0.10
1 p- cent; and from the city railroad
[, (del form to the plant is was 0.55 per
cent.
However, it was found that when the
milk was weighed in the city plant
then* was a shortage of 2,50 per cent
( | on tin amount hipped according to
• in measure in Hie country. Of fhi
•hi rtage, 0.71 per cent was due to ac
Dial losses, while 1.82 per cent was the
difference between can measure and
weight. This is easily accounted for
hy the fact that cans become dented
and battered, which decreases theii
holding capacity.
In a former investigation by tin de
pail merit an even greater discrepancy
w .is found between can measure and
-.eight, the difference being over '{ pet
ceni It would com that there would
be less trouble between producers and
dealers if the milk were weighed at
both ends of the lino.
I DEDICATED TO THE
BEST INTERESTS
Of OUT
County, State and Nation
VOL. LXVII-NO. 13
I RI.COMMKNDATIONS OF SPECIAL
COMMITTEE OF THE MARY
,. LAND AO RICH LTD RAL
SOCIETY
s
V (Relating To The Tomato Industry)
* J. K. Patten, (’hainnan. East New
l * Maiket; (’. (’. (adder. Princess Anne;
s A. (J. Fnsor, Forest Hill.
k ' Tin Committee held a meeting and
* conference with a special committee of
1 the runners of Maryland at tin* Ren
* neil Hotel, March Kth, 1022.
* A general discussion of the tomato
indu try wan taken up by rvpre tento
* live of the growers and canners. It
was pointed out (hat the present de
nmnd for future tomatoes was not es
pecially good, considering the short
’ pack of lust year. Some contract fa
lures were being made at 80 to Ksc tier
* dozen, No. 2 Cans. It was hoped (lull
tie* advertisement through “Canned
[ Coeds Week” and other means would
1 increase the public demand for canned
goods and especially tomatoes.
The urgent need of canners and
growers cooperating to improve the
1 quality and standards of Maryland's
pack was emphasized.
Urges Contract System
Tin committees discussed very thor
‘ oughly the contract system versus
open marketings of the fruit. It is
the recommendation of the joint com
mittee that both growers and canners
1 should return to the regular contract
system. It insures safety to the grow
er and enables the eanner to forecast
m pari ('<• 1 in . puck, thus assisting in
the creating of business in futures,
and enabling t he jobber nml wholesaler
to plan their sales for some months in
advance.
Puiticulur emphasis was placed u|miii
Hie d- liability of inspiring confidence
1 in the (.rude hy fullllhnent of the con
tract by both imrtios. Your commit
1 t e recommend a caicful coii.-ddora
Hon ol this feature of the business to
u!l local funnel .’ associations. In fact
it i the opinion of the committee that
fanners should not grow even 11 small
an cage of tomatoes this year except
under a property executed contraid lie
twee.l (he grower ami eanner.
, It was fell that if the Joint commit
tee could he a factor in promoting a
serious consideration of lids question,
much would he accomplished towards
stabilizing the industry in the state.
Increased Yield
The growers’ committee felt that ev
ery Hl'orl should be made by tomato
growers this year to increase the yield
per acre. Seed should he selected,
special cure should be taken in the pre
paration and fertilization of the land
and the tomato plants should lie plant
ed in the Held at least (wo weeks earli
er than has lieen the custom in the
past. All plants should he in the field
hy May 20th. Tests have shown that
early planting is more profitable ii
securing increase! yield. Plants should
also he sprayed in the hod and Held to
prevent the (lea beetle, Might and other
troubles. 'Tomatoes should not Im
planted in land affected by wilt. Spec
ial meetings of growerr should be held
to discuss these questions. Growers
should secure a special circular number
a I of the Extension Service, University
of Maryland, from their county agents,
which gives special suggestions for in
111 used yields.
Market in g The Crop
It was the belief of the Joint com
mittee that the problem of the proper
marketing of the crop was largely a
growers’ problem. That Is, the grow
er should consider Hie outlook and
(limit the acreage according to con
tract.
It Is believed that the growers of
each county or region should cooperate
in raising the best quality of fruit and
sell cooperatively by contract, to the
highest bidder. If this crop Is grown
and sold through an organized agency
in the county or local city much great
er results will be secured by both
growers and canners.
We, therefore, recommend Uiat the
t growers of each county get together to
ecu elder this problem and sen* If it is
not possible to grow and sell tomatoes
on a commodity basis, as is now lieing
4 done by (In* dairymen with milk,
f The committee has no special ierom
r mendution at this time* regarding price,
c except that it Is repotted that the can
nerg are offering $12.00 per ton and
the growers feel that they cannot
. grow tomatoes for less than $15.00.
1 However, this is a matter for each
1 growers’ association to lake up as sug
get*ted above.
1
TO INVESTIGATE (DMT OF MO
TOR VEHICLE OPERATION
What it costs the Government to op
erate motor vehicles engaged in road
building Is shortly to Is* determined
through a system of operative records
recently installed by the Hureau of
Public Roads.
Out of the surplus war material turn
I ed ovei hy the War Department for
distribution among the States, the bu
' H reau has retained a large number of
( motor vehicles, which are used priori
pally on forest road work in the West.
, These motor vehicles are kept at var
I ions central points where shops are
I maintained for repair work.
Complete records will he kept of all
r oil. gasoline and supplies of every kind
used by each vehicle. Even the nurn
' her of lube patches will he kept. Itec
( ord will also Is* kept of the numlrer of
hours of shop work required; of days
I idle and busy; of distance*' loads are
carried and the character of the loads;
and the gross income from the opera
lion of the vehicles. The information
thus obtained will be combined with
, t similar information from some of the
States operating the surplus war
equipment turned over to them, and
I will form a valuable addition Hi the
, knowledge of the cent or highway
I tnu u-port.
;iH FIRES IN NIGHT IN HAUNTED
HOUSE
T 'The isolated farming community of
Auligonlsli, in Northeastern Nova Hco
li.i, baa haunted house in which .'lB
mysterious (Ires followed one another
in strange procession during one night.
On several other nights more fires
occurred, stalling in walls, under eaves
f and in furniture. Neighbors and in
ore* instance a (siliee detective bearing
u the stories the aged farmer, Alexander
MacDonald, his wife and their adopted
y daughter, Mary Allen, recounted of
e their adventures with the nocturnal
II visitant, kept watch and lestifb-d to
L. th** “flame ghost.”
So intense is the interest that u re
ward of S2OO has been offered for
s proof that the baffling manifestations
s are not of supernatural origin. The
!i aged couple and their adopted daugh
•I ter who lived in the homestead for 20
1 years, became so terrified that they
have abandoned it.
•• The first signs of the unnatural were
it in 1010, when cattle and horses, left
it eeurely tied in the adjoining barn,
o .sere occasionally found untied and
wandering out of their stalls in the
morning.
'I wil.il HI MIMICS IMOKISIi
>r Sacramento, Calif., March 10 Hun
* I dred-< of wild horses have perished of
ir htaivation on the Owyhee Desert us a
result of deep now and cold tempera
ture . according to dispatches received
y ' today from Wmnifnueka, Nev. Stock
*1 men arriving at Winnemucka brought
lefiorts of Hie los to livestock,.
Il The cold weather hardened the snow
d to such a degree that horses were un
it able to reach the grass. Numerous
• attic and beep also were lost.

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