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The Key West citizen. [volume] (Key West, Fla.) 1879-current, February 20, 1933, Image 1

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Associated Press Day Wire
Service -
VOLUME LIV. No. 43.
ZANGARA SENTENCED TO EIGHTY YEARS
Japan Will Withdraw From
League Of Nations Unless
Assembly Changes Course
Definite Decision Made
In Connection With
Activities In Manchurian
Controversy
(llr Amoi’lnlri Frrat
The Japanese cabinet has
definitely decided that Japan
will withdraw from the
League of Nations unless the
league assembly usets all
predictions and votes against
the prepared report on the
Sino - Chinese controversy
this week.
This also will mean Jap
anese withdrawal from the
world disarmament confer
ence.
A foreign office spokes
man in Tokyo said he would
not be surprised if Japan’s
campaign to annex the
Chinese .administered prov
ince of Jehol to Msnchukuo
began tomorrow, the day the
league takes up the Sino-
Japanese report which con
demns Japanese military
activities.
Japanese military traffic
choked the Manchurian rail
road along the eastern bor
der of Jehol and indications
were the zero hour was at
hand for a big push with
about 50,000 troops to. be
poured into the province,
opposing at least twice as
many Chinese.
The Japanese command
was confident that Jehol
City, capital of the province,,
which is 200 miles from the
kattlefront, will be occupied
in five days after the drive
starts.
Chinese officials in Peip
ing informed the league they
were complying with the i
government's orders to resist
“the Japanese if they occupy)
Jehol City.
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
Through unforscen circum
stances the matinee performance
on Washington’s birthday for the
benefit of the
HARRIS SCHOOL
P.-T. A. LUNCH FUND
will not be given. Money will be
refunded to those who have pur
chased tickets.
MRS. M. K. BKRKOWITZ,
Chairman of the February En
tertainment Committee.
fcb2o-lt’
RADIO REVUE
THURSDAY NITE,
8:15 O’CLOCK
CARDEN THEATER
Ticket* at Frank John*on'*
All Smli Rerr*ed
SING HALLELUJAH!
We Represent K. W. F. A.
To Be Heard In Address
At Gainesville
B;? m B
IB aw
KB ~
jih|
COLONEL ALVIN M. OWSLEY
Past National Commander Amer
, ican Legion
ALVIN M. OWSLEY
TO GIVE ADDRESS
AT GAINESVILLE
PAST NATIONAL COMMANDER
OF AMERICAN LEGION
PRINCIPAL SPEAKER AT
UNIVERSITY CEREMONIES
GAINESVILLE. Feb. 20.—Al
vin M. Owsley, of Dallas, Texas,
past national commander of the
American Legion, and a brilliant
speaker, will deliver the principal
address here February 22 in con
junction with the presentation of
the Fidac medal to the University
of Florida for distingushed service
in promoting international good
will and understanding.
The ceremony will be a major
part of the second cojjgress of the
University of Florida’s Institute of
Inter American Affairs which will
convene February 22. The morn
ing session on which Mr. Owsley
will speak, is to be held in the uni
versity auditorium beginning at
9:45 o’clock.
National commander of the
American Legion in 1922-23, Mr.
I Owsley is now a distinguished at
| torney of Dallas. During, the
World War, he rose to the high
j office of Lieut. Colonel, serving
| with the 36th Division, A. E. F.,
participating in the Champagne
and Meuse-Argonne offensives.
Col. Owsley was decorated v with
the Commander Legion of Honor
by France in 1923; with the Order
of Polonia Restituta by Poland in
1924, and the Confederate Service
Cross in 1927.
A Texan by birth. Col. Owsley
graduated from Virginia Military
Institute in 1909 and then at the
University of Texas in law in
1912. Ijiter he pursued legal
study in London. He has served
in the Texas state legislature, and
for two years, 1919-20, was as
sistant attorney general of the j
Lone Star state.
The subject of the address by
Mr. Owsley has not been atmounc
jed. but he enjoys m national repu
jtation as a speaker.
TO INVITATION HOLDERS
The undersigned have j*t been advised ®f tke relay ia
arrival of tke Italian Training Skip Colombo. Tke kip will
* r, ' w ** *ke afternoon of the 25tk. Therefore, all invita
tion* to tke afternoon tea, wkick kave heretofore keen sent
are extended until Monday afternoon, February *7tk. We
trust that tke invitation* will be used on that occasion.
MAYOR AND MRS. WM. H. MALONE.
®lit Eep Cttijen
CARLOS MENDIETA
ARRIVES HERE ON
BOAT FROM CUBA
CUBAN REFUGEE MENTIONED
AS NEXT PRESIDENT OF IS
LAND REPUBLIC MAKES
STOP ENROUTE TO MIAMI
Colonel Carlos Mendieta, who is
freely mentioned as the next presi
dent of Cuba, to succeed Machado,
was an arrival on the steamer
Florida Saturday afternoon from
Havana.
After having sought sanctuary
in the Mexican embassy, where he
remained for 42 days, he was giv
en. safe conduct to the pier of the
P. and O. S. S. company, and em
barked for the United States to
join the many hundreds of his com
patriots who have been forced to
flee their native land to escape
the persecution of Machado and
his henchmen.
Other refugees from Cuba, ac
companying Colonel Mendieta,
were Roberto Mendez Penate, for
merly governor of Santa Clara
province; Colonel Aurelia Hevia.
former secretary of the interior
and his son, Manuel Hevia; and
Dr. Gabriel Landa, prominent at
torney on the islaiTd. All of these
had been sheltered in the Mexican
embassy, where they fled after
taking part in the last revolution
ary movement. ' ‘ *
There was a large number of
Cuban refugees at the station to
meet the distinguished travelers on
theiT arrival and they remained
until the train left carrying their
compatriots to Miami where they
are to confer with General Mario
G. Menocal and other eminent
patriots who are there making
their homes.
. Another prominent arrival from
Cyba Saturday was Oscar Cintas,
Cuban ambassador to the United
States, who was on his way to
Washington, accompanied by Mrs)
Cintas.
Sheriff K. 0. Thompson and
deputies Clements Jaycocks, En
rique Mayg and Ray Elwood were
at the station in the event that
any undue demonstration was
made after the arrival of the' visi
tors.
MAJOR GENERAL
JOHNSTON DEAD
WAS CHIEF OF STAFF OF
AMERICAN ARMY OF OC
CUPATION IN GERMANY
(llr AuorlßtrN Prru)
NICE, France, Feb. 20.
Major-General William H. Johns
ton, retired, chief of staff of the
American army of occupation in
Germany, following the world
war, died at hit home here.
General Johnston was com
mander of the ninety-first division
during the World war. He was
born in Ohio. 1
/ “S
Washington BirthcTay Eve
DANCE
Tuesday, Feb. 21 10 ’Till ?
CLUB (MIRAMAR
Music by Blue Devils
REST ASSURED
that every prescription yon bring j
here will be carefully compounded ;
by a registered graduate phar-l
macist.
GARDNER’S PHARMACY'
- ■n . . - - - I
KEY WEST. FLORIDA, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1933.
America’s 10 Biggest Problems
No. 8
How Many Americans, And What Kind?
By williAm fielding
OGBURN
Research Director, President’s
Committee On Recent
Social Trends
(Written For The Associated
Press)
For the first time in his
tory it is a practical question
to ask how many people we
should have. In the past the
population increase from im
migration, but not that from
births, could be regulated.
It is not yet clear that the size
of our population can be dictated j
by public policy, yet the nations
are tending that way. England,
Japan, Italy and France are active
ly developing population policies.
But do we know how many peo
ple we want?
If we do not have enough people
we cannot develop our industry
and natural resources. If we have
too many we may have unemploy
ment and the standard of living
will be low or it will be raised more
slowly than it would if there were
fewer people.
What Large Population Means
For the manufacturer a large
population means a market, for
the real estate owner a higher
value for land. For the Imperialist
a large population probably means
more power. For the individual
family the problem may be that
of providing education and eco
nomic advantages. For the wage
earner it is likely to mean a lower
standard of living.
The‘increase of population in
United States is rapidly slowing
down. By 1976 we may have a
stationary population of, say, 165.-
000,000, or even a declining popu
lation. >
Where Shall They Lire?
Another important question is
where shall the people live? In
congested or unplanned cities or
dispersed outward from urban cen
ters, How large should our cities
be? It has been thought that peo
ple would solve these questions by
living where they found it most
comfortable since they were free
to move. But the answer is not
quite so simple. Regional and
urban planning which would lead
to a better distribution is greatly
needed.
There also is a problem of the
House Joins Senate On
Measure For Repeal Of
Eighteenth Amendment
(O; Aaoeelate* Preaaj
WASHINGTON, Feb. 20.—Congress put
repeal of the Eighteenth Amendment up to
the states. The resolution calls for submis
sion of prohibition to state conventions, pass
ed the house 289 to 121. The senate previous- •
ly passed the resolution.
PREDICTED VOTE ON MEASURE
WASHINGTON, Feb. 20.—Democratic
leaders predicted the prohibition repeal
measure wiU pass by 20 votes when the house
votes on proposal probably today.
Drys were steadfast and say the pro*
posal will fail. Passage would mean submis
sion ol the Eighteenth Amendment's fate to
state conventions.
Trends Of Population In U. S.
- .. QR INCREASE BY STATES
TOTAL POPULATION. 1920-Isd,g^
MILLIONS OF PEaSONSr-- ' ■' -1-1 * ' m ‘ * ""'03 —
ni —— ——r—t annual increase —————————
ao [POPULATION of u s.
II —j
n . VI I STATIONARY POPULATION AT
° 18.000,000 OK. DECLINING
POPULATION SEEN POSSIBLE
OAi 5V1975
02! LJ
°W> •’* • •■s'-•'*.V W-! 1 jp.iti''aLlii VL ajia. 'IT 'vl -ii
The quantity and quality of population present one of the 10 big
problems feeing America, says Prof. William Fielding Ogburn, end
the question of where the people shall liva—in cities or rural districts
—is one of the factors involved. The charts above show the trends of
population.
quality of population as truly as a
problem of' quantity. On the phy
sical side there are Jack Dempseys,
Babe Ruths and Babe Didriksons,
athletes of marvelous physical
equipment. On the other hand
there are the large number so
physically unfit that they were not
permitted to enter the army.
On the mental side there are
Einsteins, Michelsons and Justice
Holmes. But also there are in
mates of feeble-minded institu
tions. It matters a good deal from
which of the groups our future
generations come.
Practical Question Involved
It is partly a question of re
search because we do not know
very much about the inheritable
traits a particular person carries.
But it is also a practical question
of controlling mating and procrea
tion.
Breeders of horses and cows can
select for mating much more ef
fectively than human beings are
likely to do voluntarily, especially
in the face of sentiment and lack
of knowledge.
But these facts in no way di
minish the importance of the prob
lem of the quality of population
especially since medical progress
and sanitation are permitting so
many persons to live who would
not have survived under, say, the
conditions of natural selection in
the Ice Ages in which our ances
tors lived.
Both the quantity and the qual
ity of population arc questions of
immense importance for human
welfare.
STUMBLES UPON
TRIPLE MURDER
HAPPENS IN SPEAKEASY IN
NEW YORK KNOWN AS
PORKY'S PLACE
IBr Aaaorletr* PrtM)
NEW YORK, Feb. 20—
John Sweeny, peddling hi*
paper*, pushed into a speak*
easy known as Porky's place
today and stumbled upon n
triple murder on tbe floor
before the bar where lay tho
bodies of a young brunette
and John Egan, bandit and
burglar, who escaped from
Sing Sing last December.
Behind the bar was the
body of Michael Griffin, bar
tender.
Each had been killed by a
shot isf the head. Police did
not knew the wocean.
STRAND THEATER *
The Home Town Tima ter
Today
Double Feature
NAG A N A
else-
HOT PEPPERS
Matinee. HMSc; Night. lb*2Se
MONROE THEATER
McKenna of the Mounted
Matinee, S-10c; N.ght, 10-20 c
Pleads Guilty On Charge
To Assassinate Roosevelt
TOLD JUDGE HE WAS SOfeRY HE DIDN’T KILL
PRESIDENT-ELECT; ASSERTED HE DOES
NOT LIKE WAY CAPITALISTS TAKE ALL
THE MONEY; MAYOR CERMAK AND MRS.
GILL IMPROVING
(By Associate* Press)
MIAMI, Feb. 20.—Guiseppe Zangara pleaded
f
guilty to assault with intent to murder President
elect Franklin Roosevelt and three of his five victims.
The plea followed the judge’s/refusal to postpone the
hearing.
The assassin told the judge he was sorry he didn’t
kill Roosevelt, and said he’s “sick all the time” and
didn’t like the “way capitalists take all the money/’
Zangara said he did not want to shoot Cermak
or anybody else except Roosevelt, and that he did
not regret what he had done.
He said the American people had mistreated
him and he didn’t care if he lived.
He also said he thought maybe the “cops will
kill me if I kill the president.**
Zangara said he was not crazy and that he had
a picture, of Roosevelt in his pocket when he tried the
assassination.
“Somebody moved my arm,” he said. “They were
crazy, they should have let me kill him.’’
Defense counsel said they believed the plea of
guilty was the proper procedure but “this man’s
mental state at present is a puzzle/’
Zangara was sentenced to a total of 80 years
i
imprisonment on four charges, each carrying a maxi
mum penalty of 20 years.
Specific charges were attempted assassination
of Roosevelt and assault with intent to murder Rus
sell Caldwell, William Sinnott and Margaret Kruis.
WANTED “100-YEAR SENTENCE”
Zangara scoffed at the idea that he was insane
and said the attempted assassination was premedi
tated.
He said he planned to kill the president-elect
when he read Roosevelt was coming here.
The sanity commission report that Zangara was
a “social misfit,” was read in court.
The Italian-American then made a statement
•from the witness stand and told a ''part of his life’s
history, and said the attempted assassination was de
liberate.
Asked if he wanted to live, he shrugged his shoul
ders. The judge then pronounced sentence.
Zangara has not been charged yet with any crime
for the shooting of Cermak and Mrs. Gill. Should
either die, it would be a murder case.
He was taken back to the jail after the sentence.
He told, when sentence was passed, “Don’t be
stingy—give me 100 years.”
MAYOR CERMAK AND MRS. GILL IMPROVE
MIAMI, Feb. 20. —Mayor Cermak and Mrs. Joe
Gill, wounded by assassin’s bullets intended for
Roosevelt, were reported improving.
Doctors said they “believe we may look forward
to a speedy recovery of Cermak.”
Mrs. GUI was reported “coming along nicely.”
For 53 Years Devoted to the
Best Interests of Key West
PRICE FIVE CENTS

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