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The Key West citizen. [volume] (Key West, Fla.) 1879-current, August 23, 1933, Image 1

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Associated Press Day Wire
Service
VOLUME LIV. No. 200.
Economic League Strongly
Advocates Voting Through
Of Bond Issue On Bridges
Committee Appointed To
Call On W. R. Porter
Offering Cooperation In
Matter
At the meeting of the Economic
League la it night the bond issue
of $12,500,000 to be voted on
September 18 was the principal
subject of discussion.
The matter was brought to the
attention of the members in a talk
setting forth the different phases
of the matter and the necessity
of get'ing out as large a vole of
freeholders as can possibly be tak
en to the polls.
Several property owners stated
they intend to vote for the bonds
and have been urging others to
register, pay their poll taxes and
do likewise.
The sense of the meeting was
that all property owners who have
the interests of the city at heart
and believe the bridges will be the
forerunner of greater and more
lasting prosperity, wi!l vote for
bonds.
Not only vote but insist on oth
ers vot’ng, explaining that voting
for these bonds will have no effect
on tax assessments which will re
main unchanged.
After the discussions] and I the
decision that the league < will pldy
atrttWhre part Iff th/ election. a
committee was appointed to call oh
Wm, R. Porter and offer the serv
ices of the league in any capacity
the members’ can be used before
and on the day of the election.
Anticipating great activity on
the part of the lefcaue members
during the campaign to put over
the bond election by a big majori
ty, a drive is to be started This
week to have as many members as
possible at the meeting next Tues
day to outline plans and carry out
whatever ideas Mr. Porter may
suggest to carry the matter to
success.
EIGHT POSITIONS
IN CIVIL SERVICE
EXAM ARE LISTED
CALL FOR SERVICE IN DIF
FERENT BRANCHES TAKING
IN FLORIDA, MISSIPPI AND
SOUTH CAROLINA
The United States Civil Service
Commission announces open com
petitive examinations for various
positions. The salaries named are
subject to a deduction not to ex
ceed 15 percent during the fiscal
year ending June 30, 1034, as a
measure of economy, and to a de-!
duction of 8 4 percent toward a j
retirement.
There positions in question arei
for service in Florida, Mississippi
and South Carolina. Applications J
wiT be received by the manager of
the Fifth U. S. Civil Service Dis
trict, Atlanta, Ga. Applications
will be rated as received and eli
gible- may be certified as soon as
rated.
The following are the position*
and salaries in connection with the
proposed examination:
Operator, trad builder, 31440 to
SIBOO a year.
Operator. tractor f crawler
type). *IO2O to *IO2O a year.
Operator, tractor {wheel type).
$ 1020 to $1320 a year.
Truck drivAr, *IO2O to $162 a
year.
Operator, power blade grader,
$1440 to SIBOO a year.
Operator, traction grader. 31020
to $1620 a year.
Foreman, road and ttail con*
*truction. $1620 to S2OOO a year.
General foreman, road and trail
construction. $2300 to <2600 a
J'**'
‘NEW DEAL HAS
BROUGHT ABOUT
MANYCHANGES
OIL REFINERS’ ATTACK ON
INDUSTRIAL RECOVERY
PROGRAM IS ONE OF OUT
STANDING ISSUES
By HERBERT PLUMMER
<Rr Aaiorlnted Press!
WASHINGTON, August 23.
Now that the “new deal” has
emerged victorious in its first
court test, one of the most im
portant and significant phases of
the new administration’s program
has been reached.
It was something worth watch
ing when the oil refiners of Tex
as came into the District of Colum
bia supreme court attacking the
industrial recovery a<*t and asking
that it be set aside. Here was a
test of one of the most weighty
problems that have arisen since
adoption of the constitution itself.
The refiners complained that
the President is exercising powers
which must be exercised by con
gress alone. And when their coun
sel was asked by the presiding jus
tice whether he thought the act
was based on federal powers over
interstate commerce or power giv
en to the federal government to
meet emergency conditions, he an
swered flatly.
“The act can’t be sustained on
any grounds.”
Then The Court Spoke
court. it dfrvetopellr
indicated that it holds a contrary
view, by deciding that all laws,
“including the constitution, should
be read in emergencies in the light
of the law of necessity.”
The final decision, of course—
and one which might mean that
the program of the “new deal”
will either stand or fall —rests
with the supreme court of the na
tion.
>lt highly doubtful whether
the supreme court wil make a de
cision on the new laws any time
soon. Itt’s almost physically im
possible. The court has adjourned
until October. With the facili
ties the justices have at their dis
posal it would seem almost im
possible for decisions affecting the
“new deal” to be handed down
during the next session which
comes to a close in May, 1034.
Necessity Or Precedent
The philosophy of the court as
is now constituted and as it has
been revealed in decisions seems
to many observer* to be liberal.
Even without the preseifce of
Oliver Wendell Holmes on the
bench this appears true.
While no one can predict what
will happen to the new laws when
they do reach the court, some be
lieve this will play a prominent
part.
Meanwhile, speculation con
tinues as to whether the important
governmental changes made by
the new administration are to be
passed upon finally by justices
having their eyes on present con
ditions and not wholly on prece
dents. In this connection the Dis
trict of Columbia decision is cer
tain to be pointed to as signifi
cant.
ESTONIAN WARSHIPS
PURCHASED BY PERU
Illy IwfhilH Pmo
TALLINN. Estonia. Aug. 23.—;
Two Estonian warships, the Leo-<
nuk and the WatuboU. have been!
sold to Peru for 2,500.000 kronen. |
about $410,000. The money will;
go into the construction fund for
two submarines and several tor
pedo boats.
CALIFORNIA WOMAN
OWNER OF S6O BILL
IS) Imfte(r4 l‘r,,
FRESNO. Gal.. Aug 23.—Miss
Kay V. Koch is the possessor of a
S6O bill printed by the govern
ment in revolutionary days and
bearing the signature of James
Wilson certifying it s redeemable
,m Spanid willed dollar*.
&ep Wt& Citizen
Hitler Shuttles By Air Over Reich
Establishing New Speed Records
<By Associated Press!
MUNICH. Germany, Aug. 22.
—Spending much time in a faat
private airplane, Adolf Hitler
has been flitting about Germany
of late establishing speed records
in his effort to keep engagements
at widely distant cities.
His air-mindedness has brought
him the popular nickname of “the
flying chancellor.”
Outspeeds Regular Planes
Hitler being both head of the
government and leader of the na
tional socialist party, his duties
demand his presence alternately
on the Wilhelmstrasse in Berlin
and at the “Brown House.” na
tional headquarters of the nazis
in this city.
Using a plane which the Luf
thansa placed at his disposal, to
gether with a crack pilot, the
chancellor makes this Bavarian
capital almost a suburb of Ber
lin. His fast machine flies the
450 miles regularly in two hours.
Ordinary passenger planes take
three hours for the trip.
Only recently the “flying chan
cellor” established something of a
record. Starting from Bayreuth
at 8 a. m. Hitler flew to Munich
for the reception of a group of
450 young Italian fascists.
Tail Wind Record Made
At noon Hitler left for Berlin
to attend a funeral, after which
he mounted his plane again which
took him back to Bayreuth where
he attended the Wagner music
festival.
Some time ago Hitler’s private
pilot, Captain Hansl Baur, per
formed another stunt. Flying the
chancellor from Munich to Ber-v
lin, Baur managed the stretch in
a little over one hour, helped by
favorable tail winds.
Captain Baur is an experienced
aviator who has done far over one
million “air kilometers” in the
regular passenger service. For
his achievements in the Berlin-
Rowfh sei**#r across the Alps,
Mussolini decorated him with the
order of “Corana d’ltalia with the
degree of a “Cavalrere.”
MANAGEMENT Of
DETROIT BANKS
GETS DENOUNCED
REV. COUGHLIN HEARD RELA
TIVE TO “WRECKED” INSTI
TUTIONS IN MICHIGAN SEC
TION
Illy Associated Pr„)
DETROIT, Aug. 23.—1n strik
ing language. Rev. Father Charles
E. Coughlin, bitter eritic of Detroit
banking methods, denounced be
fore a one man jury “mismanage
ment” which he said “wrecked”
Michigan banks and brought about
the closing of Detroit's two nation
al institutions.
The priest pounded the witness
stand and said “God Almighty
could not raise the First National
Bank” when questioned if he
thought that bank and the Guar
dian National Bank of Commerce
could be reopened.
He said he believed depositors in
the two banks would receive 80
percent of deposits ultimately. To
date they received 40 percent.
FLORIDA TAKES
94 PASSENGERS
The steamer F'orida of the P.
and O. S. S. company sailed yes
terday afternoon for Havana with
04 passengers, 71* from Key Weafc
and 17 from Tampa.
On the ship wer* 470 sacks of
mad. two automobiles and one mo
torcycle.
Freighter Comal, of the Clvde-
Mallory lines, is due at Key West
tomorrow afternoon from New
Orleans, enroute to Miami and
Jackson vi'ia.
ARE YOU INTERESTED
in xav.ng money? If so, buy the
things you need for your Home
before August 31sL Price- after
ithat date wtU advance from 25 to
50 per cent to cover replacement
,pn*e*.
LONG'S N’RMmmE STORE.
‘ ag2:t it
KEY WEST. FLORIDA, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 23, 1933.
Germany’s Flying Chancellor
; |h^9b
Adolf Hitler has taken to the air in order to meet his many
engagements in different German cities. He is shown alighting at
Munich, a “brown shirt” guard of honor and nazi party officials
greeted him.
HARD MAHER TO
SHAPE CODE FOR
COAL BUSINESS
OVERSHADOWS ALL ACTIVIi
TIES OF RECOVERY ADMIN
-ISTRATION; CONFERENCES
ARE BEINa.HELD
llty A Mandated T'rrmmt
WASHINGTON, Aug. 23.—The
serious problem of shaping a final
code of fair practice for bitumin
ous coal again overshadowed man-:
ifold activities of the recovery
administration.
The only word on its progress'
was that a “break might come any I
time,” and that not only Adminis-i
trator Hugh S. Johnson, but Presi- ‘
dent Rooseve't himself is keeping
a close tab on developments.
While coal conferences went oni
i privately between officials, opera-!
tors and labor leaders in separate ]
offices, factions of the rbtallj
trade began airing animosities in
public hearings, advocating sup
i pression of forms of competition
denounced by witnesses as unfair. ■
A group of seamen representing
I the marine workers industrial
; union arrived at Johnson’s office
from 'Baltimore and presented •
i demand for a code for ship crews,
longshoremen and harbor workers.
| Hearings opened on women’s
dress industry. Indications were
that final action on the code for
the automobile industry will have
to wait a few days while Johnson
works out a problem of “open
shop” versus the “closed shop.”
! SPECIAL RIGHTS FOR
JUGOSLAV RED CROSS
(Rr Prml
BELGRADE, Jugoslavia. Aug.
| 23.—The Red Cross of Jugoslavia
j has been granted freedom from
ail taxes on property owned and
( funds held in Jugoslav banks, the
right to frank letters and many
( other extraordinary privileges by
; a law passed in a short summer
session of parliament.
The draft of the law was sub
{mitted to parliament by the
( minister of war. who pleaded for
> these special aids to Red Cross
| work on the ground that the ©r
iganiaation was to be regarded as
a subsidiary of the sanitary corps
I of the army.
SUBMARINE TOMB IS
RAISED BY SOVIETS
UMUflttxi fVr-%*)
KRONSTADT. U. & S. R., Aug.
21—The soviet training sub
marine. No. 9, which sank m May,
1931. with all hands, has been
: raised from the Golf of Finland
sand towed here. The bodies of
I the crew i 21 were twiried with
1 Mil IM*i
EXAMINATION FOR
IMMIGRATION UNIT
HELD HERE TODAY
TESTS BEING MADE TO DE
TERMINE EFFICIENCY OF
EMPLOYES; MERIT AND
ABILITY ESSENTIALS
Members of the U. S. immigra
tion service in Key. West are this
afternoon undergoing personal
examination bv a board of ex
,
aminers appointed by the secre
tary of labor.
1
These tests are being made to
determine the efficiency and ap
titude of employes and the find
ings of the board will be on the
sole basis of merit and ability.
On August 9 the U. S. im-
I migration service went out of
existence as a single unit and for
• a few hours men in the service
[were unemployed. The following
I day the service was reorganized
in conjunction with the bureau of
j naturalization, and immigration
service men were temporarily em
; ployed.
i To determine whether or not
! the employment is only temporary
ior will be permanent depends on
the merit and ability of the men
in the service here who will un
! dergo the examination tests given
Iby the board which arrived on a
coast guard plane from Miami
( this morning.
The board consists of W. W.
Brown, vice chairman of the board
jof review of the department of
iabor; Dr. Thomas H. Healy, as
sistant dean of Georgetown Uni
versity School of Foreign Service,
! E. G. Dodge, examiner of the civil
! service commission, ali of Waah
■ ington. D. C,. and Andrew Jordan,
'assistant district director of
| naturalisation, of Chicago.
MANY REFUGEES
! RETURN TO CUBA
j GROUP FROM KEY WEST
LEAVES YESTERDAY ON
STF.AMER FLORIDA
|
Numbers of Cubans who have
jheen in the United States for the
; past year, expatriates under Ms
i rhado edict, are returning to their
native homes.
f Among the passenger* on the
Florida bound for Cuba yester
day were some from Tampa. New
? York and Miami including several
| from Key West.
In the group from this city were
Francisco dt Miranda Varena and
son Francisco. Jr. Gustavo Boin
:f, Lab Roberto Boulloa. Ed
uardo Alcantara, Miguel Angel
* .its.
Raging Storms Batter Atlantic
Seaboard; Several Large Sups
Battle With Gale On High Seas
RAYMOND GONZAGA
RUN OVER BY AUTO;
ON DUVAL STREET
SEVEN-YEAR OLD BOY BADLY
INJURED; CAR IN ACCIDENT
DRIVEN BY MISS WINONA
LOUNDERS j
Raymond Gonzaga, Jr. t seven : !
year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. j
Raymond Gonzaga, of 212 South-j
ard street, was knocked down and]
injured yesterday afternoon by am
automobile driven by Miss Winona
Lounders, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Oscar Lounders. The) acci
dent wa9 unavoidable on the part
of the driver, witnesses say.
Miss Lounders was driving north
on Duval street. Just as the car
arrived opposite the Monroe the
ater, the boy darted from behind
a car parked in front of the thea
ter directly in the path of the car
driven by Miss Lounders. •
He was struck down by the
bumper and a wheel passed over
him. Traffic Officer Alberto
Camero, of the city police depart
ment, was riding by on his motor
cycle and started to pass the
Lounders car at the time the acci
dent occurred. '
As soon as possible, Miss Lpun
dera brought her car to • a , stop,
which was quickly done, a#.Officer
Camero says she was not driving
more than 12 miles an hour. The
officer picked up the holy, placed
him in Mia Lounders’ car and lie
was taken to jth* Marine hospital.
Arriving tlyre it was said no
doctor was avai’able.' Raymond
was placed in the automobile of
; Rogelio Gomez, taken to a private
, hospital, and first aid given.
Today The Citizen was told at*’
i the hospital that he had a badly
j bruisSd leg and other abrasions
! about the face and body, but the
1 seat of suffering was in the left
chest in the region of the shoulder
' where the wheel of the* car passed
over him.
SMALL RETAILERS
SCORED IN MEET
CALLED “UNFAIR COMPETI
TORS" BY BUSINESS AS
SOCIATION PRESIDENT
i By
WASHINGTON. Aug. 23.
—Small retailers, whose in
vestment Is nut mure than
SSOO, were celled aeureee of
unfair competition by A.
Lincoln Wisler, president of
the United Business Men’s
Association of Chicago, at re
sumption of a hearing on the
retail cede.
STORM REPORT
WASHINGTON, D. C.. Advis
ory 9 :00 a. tn.: Northeast storm
[warnings ordered 10 a. m. north
iof Boston to Eastport. Me., and
northeast storm warnings contin
ued from Boston southward to
; Delaware Breakwater and storm
■ warnings changed to northwest
' south of Delaware Breakwater to
] Wilmington* N. G.
Disturbance of unusually great
! intensity * central this mornings
j near the Virginia Capes, moving
northward. H will causa dan
srervm.* northeast gales tin* after
noon shifting to northwest to
night from the Virginia Capa* to
Delaware Breakwater; strong;
northwest winds end gale* this af
s tern non and tonight south of Vir
ginia Cape* to Wlhningtoa; dan-'
[geton* northeast gala* thin after
noon and night from Delaware
'Breakwater to Boston and ia*
; cue dag north wind* this aftgr
[ noon probably reaching gale force
[tonight north of B©**or tn Ea*t-
E jw*t, 1
Threat To Shut Down
Newspaper Is Spur
To Lax Advertisers
The drabness of a growing
community without a news
paper was brought to the con
sciousness of the business men
of Cement, Okla., who were
promptly roused to action.
H. P. Wettengel, publisher of
the “Courier,” of that town,
announced in his editorial col
umns, that he “had become
convinced, long ago, that the
merchants did not care what
became of the paper.” He then
added that he would cease pub
lication, as he could not af
ford to be a philanthropist.
This irritated the merchants
and 18 business men appointed
a delegation to call on Editor
Wettengel. They handed over
enough advertising contracts to
warrant him in the continuance
of the “Courier” for at least
one year.
GANDHI’S FAST
TO DEATH ENDS
ON EIGHTH DAY
* * i
CAJRRIED ON IN PROTEST TO
&RITISN GOVERNMENT; HE
WAS TAKEN -TO HOSPITAL
AND THEN,RELEASED
(dr tMWlntfd Press)
POONA, India, August 23.
Mahatma Giandhi broke hi* fast
which Wad ih it# eighth day, short
ly after he had been uncondition
ally released from custody by the
British government.
The. frail nationalist leader was
fasting in'protest against the gov-j
emment’g refusal to grant him;
privileges to carry on a campaign!
in behalf of the untouchable class.
Because he was steadily grow
ing weaker, he was removed to
the civil hospital recently from
Yeroda jail, where he had been
serving a one year sentence for
civil disobedience,
It was reported previously that
should his illness become critical,
he would be released, as would
any prisoner under the same con
ditions.
Immediately after hie release.
Gandhi was taken in an ambulance
to the villa of Lady Vittai Das
Thaekersey where he fasted for
three weeks in M*) in behalf of
[the untouchables, the lowest class.
WORKING PARTY
RETURNS ON IVY
l • . * '' '
ARRIVE ON BOARD LIGHT
HOUSE TENDER FROM RE
BECCA SHOALS
When the lighthouse tender Ivy
returned to Key Writ* from Dry
Tortuga* and Rebecca Shoal* light
house Monday afternoon the work
ing party which had completed the
reparr* and scraped and painted
the Rebecca Shoal* structure re
turned on the vessel.
Other structures in this district
are to he palutuß. scraped and re
paired, but fund* tar employ tag
men for the work have not been
assigned up to this time.
Aa soon aa money hi available
for tha work, which H is export
ed wit) he within a short time, light
structure# at Mnfa— Reef, Pa
cific Reef and Sand Key will be
given tha regular overhaul.
Tenders Ivy and Poppy sailed
today tor Tennessee Reef where
preparetioss are being made for
the euMiu'ha of a *ght *u*'on
like the ana. recently completed a*
fWenL Shusla.
For 53 Yean Devoted to the
Best Interests of Key West
PRICE FIVE CENTS
Death And Destruction
Wrought Over Wide
Area; Cape May Muni
cipal Pier Washed Away
<llr AtiMtatfS Prtu)
Caught between a raging
northeaster and a tropical
hurricane blowing up from
Bermuda, the Atlantic sea
board found no respite from
five days of storm and gale
which had already wrought
death and destruction over a
wide area.
An S. O. S. from the Old
Dominion liner Madison with more
than 90 persons aboard, sent a
coast guard cutter plowing
through the high seas to her aid
off Cape Charles, Va. Within a
short time the cutter wirelessed
it was damaged by the storm and
had to hove to for a time.
A faint call for help said the
forward deck house of a coast
wise steamer was washed away
and that the craft is in im
mediate need of assistance. The
ship left New York for Norfolk
yesterday.
Great Damage
Reports from along the eastern
seaboard told of thousand* of
dollars worth of damage by the
hurricane and possible less of
life. Communication along the
entire Maryland ihore was cut off
early today.
At Norfolk wind* of 70 to 80
miles velocity, accompanied by
heavy rain, marooned vacationists
and Hooded low lying sections.
\ The North Carolina coast is also
being pounded by mountainous
wave# and an unidentified four
masted schooner wallowed help
lessly off the shoals near Maneto
while a coast guard craft stood
by unable to give assistance.
Body Wash#* Ashore
New Jersey, which received the
i brunt of storms of the part four
days, continued to be buffeted. A
; 300 foot municipal pier at Cape
May was washed away and tele
, phone and electric lines blown
down.
The body of one of seven vic
tims of Sunday’s storm wa* wash
ed up on the shore neajr Atlantic
S City. New York missed! the brunt
|of the gale, promised for yester-
I day, but heavy rains continued.
[ Along the coast the heaviest rain
[for August in many yean is re
ported.
great damage from
STORM IN VIRGINIA
NORFOLK. Aug. 23.- -Storm
damage at Virginia Beach was es
timated at about t 1.000,000 this
i afternoon.
The seawall was wrecked and
many houses undermined.
A similar estimate of damage
i was trade for W ilioughby, suburb
of Norfolk where tide* ware
highest.
Electrical current was cut off
in Portsmouth this afternoon after
three negroes had been elec
tror
The victims were a man, woman
and their child, wading together
through a flooded street when they
struck a high tension wire.
CITY SINKS 4 FEET
IN THIRTEEN YEARS
(Hr a so* ma a *#••
I ran JOSE, Cat, Aug. tt
[ Much of U# city has set* led fmr
\ feet in the past 13 years, survey*,
iby the United States result and
[geodetic survey have disclosed.
[The sinking is attributed to rth
imoval of underground water.
'ADD STORM
STRAND THEATER
James Doan-Joan Bennett }
ARIZONA TO BROADWAY
Jack HoH-Genovieve Tobia In
THE WRECKER
Matisse- Bsfaeaj 10., OrW
lea, Itdihj Night IMN

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