OCR Interpretation


The Key West citizen. [volume] (Key West, Fla.) 1879-current, August 24, 1933, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Florida

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016244/1933-08-24/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for PAGE TWO

PAGE TWO
' €i)f gSteat
t - - ‘‘FublUhed Dailv Except Sunday By
k " *toa cctizun publishing co, mc.
P| L. F. ARTMAN, PniUrat.
3u * From The Citizen Building,.
P ' Corner Greene and Ann Streets
”only Dally Newspaper in Key West and Monroe
-*- „. County
Lett-red at Key West, Florida, as second elass matter
'■ V riFry-FQluth tear
. MeuUr Of Ota Associated Press
X he Associated Press is exclusively entitled to use
ff't repubiication of all news dispatches credited to
it or not otherwise credited in this paper and also
th* local news published here.
SUBSCRIPTION RAPES
One Tear Jl'.OO
Six Months „ 6.00
Three Months 2.50
One Month .85
Weekly .20
NATIONAL EDITORIAL
AS6QOAT.ON
ADVERTISING RATES
Made known on application.
SPECIAL NOTICE
All reading notices, cards of thanks, resolutions ef
respect, obituary notices, etc,, will be charged for at
the rate of 10 cents a line.
Notices for entertainments by churches from which
a revenue is to be derived are 5 cents a line.
The Citizen i_ an open forum and invitee discus*
slon of public issues and subjects of local or general
interest, but it will no* publish anonymous cont
||HjtspqllX •*'
NATIONAL ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES
. FROST, LANDIS & KOHN
, S6O Park Ave., New York; 35 East Wacker Drive.
CHICAGO; General Motors Bldg., DETROIT;
Walton Bldg.. ATLANTA.
Greece's surplus crop seems to con
sist mostly of vowels.
• Public flogging’ will positively lessen
crime: Try it, Uncle Sam.
Pity the poor NRA private whose
wife is" a lieutenant-general.
Invention of the straight pretzel is an
other blow to a cherished tradition.
From an Alabama movie theater ad:
“Cool, pure air—Coming, ‘Hell Below'.”
Lots of folks who never do anything
else on time buy all their, stuff that way.
What’s in a name? Sergeant Picciolo
of the Florida National Guard band is a
cornet soloist.
A classical Greek dramatist defines a
well-to-do man as “one who can live with
cne borrowing.”
Gandhi is in again. How long will it
be before he starves himself out again?—
SffiN-fend Tribune, , ,
3K5 said that in times of emergency
aimnatiri~ produces the man it needs, and
leFus hope that Cuba will be no exception.
If newspapers printed alt the publicity
dope s6nt out by government bureaucrats
thergpVould be no room for news or ad
verjjqgpents. T ANARUS: f
mm** i , -
,v‘- ‘C\
;Woman Suicide Reweds Husband On
Df tidied.—Miami News headline. No tell
these suicides will do after kili
rhave largely solved the problem
KTSKift production, but have made no cor
3PWPtllUiing advance 'in the problems of
faW jjjstrlbution.
• T-
• mm ** ■
' '££the ratf it is rroing, Oklahoma will
fee mT of debt in ii,pQo years according
a state chamber of commerce official.
ItiuOhat's making better headway than
i&tfft states can boast. w
if * ' ' ' '"" ™ W ' mm
' Ambassador Guggenheim, as repre
sentative of interests that wished to keep
Machado in the saddle, gets a deserved and
.particularly savage lambasting in a book,
“The Crime of Cuba,*’ by Carlton Baels,
Vformer newspaperman, who has a thor
ough knowledge of Latm-American coun
tries.
The Purpose ot NRA is commendable ■
auul Liu ie is general sympathy for it
thfeiugJuutt the nation, but the methods are
open for serious objection. Talk of boy
cotts” aiid “economic destruction” presage
JciitttgeT for its ult mate success. in the
propaganda cooperation, not coercion,
ahooßbbe stressed.
At the banquet held on the conclusion
oCihe Paris-Bordeaux automobile race
back in 1896. one of the speakers prophe
sied that at some future date the speed to
be attained by a car would not be 15 but
60 mites an hour. And at this, it is re
corded that one of the leading manufactur
ers present whispered to the chairman that
it w*s unfortunate that there should al
ways he one person who made an aaa of
himself!
THE BOND ELECTION
Afte* arious explanations, which
turned out to be wrong, regarding the
bond election to be held on September 18,
DEFINITE information has now been ob
tained about the number of freeholders
that MUST vote to make the election
legal.
The Citizen, in common with hun
dreds of Key Westers, including at least
one lawyer, was under a misapprehension
regarding the majority of votes that must
be cast to approve the proposed bonds.
We were informed that the majority must
be of all freeholders in the county, but
such is not the case. Here is the correct
information on that point:
Using the same basic figure of 1,000
that Tilt itizen used before, 501 votes
must be cast to approve the bonds, but the
difference is this: all those votes need not
be in favor of issuing the bonds.
Briefly, assuming that there are 1,000
freeholders in Monroe county, at least 501
of them must participate in the election to
make it valid, and a majority of that 501
must be cast in favor of the bonds to adopt
them.
But if only 500 votes are cast, and the
entire 500 favor the bonds, the election is
lost because a majority of freeholders did
not go to the polls.
A majority must vote, 501 or more,
and a majority of that majority, 251 or
more, must favor the bonds to make the
election a success.
Scores of Key Westers have ! already
volunteered to take part in the campaign
that will be waged to see to it that far
more than a majority of freeholders go to
the polls, feeling assured that if a majority
votes there will be a prepondering ma
jority of the first majority that will favor
tfie bonds. Indeed, The Citizen is unable
to determine how a single resident of
Monroe county, unless he is against the
county’s interests, can vote against the is
suing of the bonds.
Freeholders should bear in mind that
the issuing of bonds will not increase taxa
tion one cent; will not be a lien on any
real estate in the county except the right
of way for the proposed bridges, and that
the payment of interest on the bonds and
the eventual liquidation of them are
guaranteed solely from tolls and other
revenue that may be derived from the
operation of the bridges.
Finally, let us all join in the move
ment to get out every possible voter to
participate in the election to be held on
September'lß.
AMERICAN HORSES
During the period of Indian wars in
the West, the redskins generally had good
horses and ponies, which they rode splen
didly and often successfully in their com
bats with United States troopers sent to
quell their many uprisings in the years fol
lowing the Civil War.
It is uatural to assume that the Indians
always had horses, but such is not the case.
The Indian got his first horses from the
white men, for at the time of the discovery
%f America this continent was horseless,
and all the horses which exist here today
are descendants of animals brought over by
'Europeans.
Going back to the Ice Age, however,
fossil remains show that many horses roam
ed over both North and South America. In
size and appearance they were very much
like the ordinary horses of the present.
How they came to disappear centuries ago
is an unexplained mystery.
Going back still farther, remains of
many varieties of primitive horses have
been found, some not larger than a shep
herd dog, with three and even four toes.
The earliest of little horses had five toes,
but no remains of these have been foAnd
on this continent so far, although many
have been discovered in the eastern hemi
sphere.
The earliest horses were no larger
ilw* a fox, and the eyes of some of these
earl) breeds were set far down on the
head, midway between the ears and the
none.
The magnificent Pereherona of the
present are dependents of the lowly five
toed ’critters'’ of the past. But if they
could talk they would perhaps decline to
admit it.
I disagree with every word you aay,
but will defend to the death your right to
say it.—Voltaire.
After an intensive study of crime.
Pruf. Moley will begin conversations with
the war debtors,—Washington Poet,
TT3 KE7 WSST C7T22SH
Daily Cross-word Puzzle
Solution of Ynierday’s Puzzle
}K|E|L|P||S|C|RjAIPMPjE|L|E|
(MIOIR |A IL. IA ta ip. cWflOl I
ACROSS
1. Southern con
stellation
4. Wooden shoe
9. Staff
13. Cover
13. Crimped
fabric
14. Feminine
name
15. Seif
16. Full of dis
pleasure be
cause of a
wrong
18. Reveler
20. Otherwise
21. Catch sud
denly:
colloq.
22. Opposite of
aweather
24. Submissive
26. Heads
28. Alternative
30. Afflicted with
age
31. Hue
32. Couple
33. Near
34. More certain
35. Seek
36. Engrossed
37. Highest trump
in five-card
100
38. Wild hog
40- insect
45. Regions of the
earth dia
metrically
opposite
47. Meadow
48. Freeze
49. Watchful
50. Vetchlike
plant
51. Spread loosely
52. Cuban dollars
53 Cereal Brass
T~ 2 3 pH 4 18 ip? 70
__ ~ 3 IP
* M
/---
m fr" §ilrff
W~ 3- " tM}:. 40 A' ’ 42 43 4 - r
in __
' PH *7
r rw — -~w~
FTTH” 111 1 Brll I
KEY WEST IN
DAYS GONE BY 1
Happenings Hare Just 10 Years 1
Ago Today As Taken From 1
The Files Of The Citixen
The ease against George Rava
naugh, of the Navy Club, charged
with having intoxicating liquor in
his possession, was dismissed in
the court of Justice of the Peace'
Eugene Russell. The dismissal was
due to the time for issuing of a
search warrant having elapsed be
fore the raid was made. It was
issued on August 8 and not ser
ved until August 18.
One of the prettiest of the many
weddings of the year was cele
brated last night when Miss Helen
Elizabeth Wetmore beeanfe the j
biide of Albert Montecino . Jr.!
The eereraony was performed at
the home of the bride 1120 Cath
erine street. Miss Mary Collins
cousin of the bride, was maid of
honor. The bridesmaids were
Misses Ottilee Knight and Lettie
Solomon. Morris Chancellor was
best man. Ceremony was read
by Rev. S. A*. Wilson, of the First
Methodist church. A reception
was held after the wedding at
which wedding cake and punch
were served.
j
Men of the U. S. S. Cleveland
will entertain theiy friends in Key
yfest with a danee *t Aj-dhovittf
hall tonight. Chief Haywood, head
of the committee from the Cleve-'
land, stated today that the person
nel of the ship will stop at no ex
pense to make the affair a great
success. The six piece banjo
orchestra from the Cleveland will
furnish the music for dancing.
, _ i
Editorial comment: Since the
street cars do not make the j>ost
office the number of bell taps per
trip has been reduced several
thousand.
The B. Y. P. U. of the First
Baptist church will entertain to
night at the paatortum. The or
ganization has enjoyed a steady
growth and today is an important
factor in church life.
The Citizen has been adv*sed
J there will be no boxing bout be
tween George Gardner ar.d Young
Kid Sharkey at the down town
arena.
Rev. E. L. Ley, pastor of the
Memorial Methodist church re
turned to Key West on the morn
ing train from a vacation u the
j mountains of North Carolina He
[reports a nice trip and t return
| iag to his duties with renewed en
; ergy.
I Key Wes* can present a ba*e-
I ball team which can hold its own
[with art? mat ear team along the
east coast if the local players wilt
only come oat for practice or. the
8. Half score
9. Firearm
10. Burden
11. Valley
17. English river
19. Tree
23. Gaelic sea god
24. Lawless
assemblage
25. City in. Minn
esota
26. Opening In a
ship’s side
27. Beverage
28. Acknowledge
29. Decay
31. Ornamental
vessel offered
as a prize
32. Acrobat or
drinking
glass
34. Hindu worn •
an’s gar
ment
35. Winter fodder
36. Considered
37. Nuisances
38. That which
attracts
39. A single time
41. Poems
42. Roman tyrant
43. Weird
44. Alleviate
46. Soft food
□OWN
1. Fish sauce
2. Capital of
Latvia
3. Embellished
4. Rub hard in
washing
6. Metric land
measures
6. Ignoble
7. Driver of an
automobile
/" •- >mn<M 'X
Puff straightens his car without
hitting the wall.
But just then his motor goes into
a stall.
“We’ll make for the pit and re
pair the ol’ bus,”
Says Puff, “then get Gasso for
starting this fuss!”
Today’s Birthdays
Ihr. Samuel A. Eliot, noted Bos
ton Unitarian clergyman, son of
the great educator, horn at Cnm
hrulge. Mass., 71 years ago.
i
Rev. Lewis S. Mudge of Phila
delphia. noted Presbyterian church
official, born at Yonkers, N. Y..
65 years ago.
George 0. Crawford of Pitts
burgh. president of Jones &
Laugbhn, Steel, born at Madison,
Ga 64 years ago.
Ralph C. Holmes o# New York,
chairman of the hoard, the Texas
Company, born at Sheron Center.
Pa., 59 years ago.
Dr. Steadman V. Sanford, paes
ldent of the University of Georgia,
born at Covington. Ga., 62 years
*go-
Judge James M. Morton, Jr., of
the First U. S. Circuit Court, at
Boston, born at Fall River, Mass..
64 years ago.
Samuel W. Reyburn of New
York City, noted merchant, born
in Hot Springs Cos., Ark-, 61 years
•go.
Max Beerbohm, Britain’s famed
writer and caricaturist, bom 61
years ago.
rotoss Sal • t . wile -4 1
onfekiv with Imperial Ecmius
burly brofftou *rr Mtssrtt**;
s ta tf ft fall* —A*t j
A <n*wd estimated at 49,000
ners-iO * noted the National Flower
tad Garden Show m St Louis on
opening day.
call from the captain. With the
cfatnag of the league of Florida.
! state players from the league will
1 jobs teaaas along the con** the
>m as last year Now m the
' time for local player* to get busy
laad perfect themselves to moot
other teams from thof the emit
REPUBLICANS NOT !
READY AS YET TO
START CAMPAIGN
i
G. O. P. LEADERS FOLLOW
INC WATCHFUL - WAITING
POLICY LOOKING TOWARD*
SOME KIND OF “BREAKS”
< II > \ **<<• l (itl I’rew)
WASHINGTON, Aug. 24. j
There are very definite reasons!
for this republican campaign of j
silence which prevails at the pres-,
ent time.
Everett Sanders, chairman of'
the Republican National commit- J
tee, attempted at the close of the!
special session of congress to con
duct a series of political revival!
meetings, but there came reports J
that many of the republican lead- i
era objected strongly to his>
activity.
They expressed themselves as
believing that this is no time for
anything like fchr.t, far the reason
it was said, that there are no out
standing irsues at the present.
At any rate, Sanders soon called
off his conferences and made a
trip to Europe.
Watching And Waiting
The strategy of the G. O. P.
leaders seeing to be one of watch
ful waiting. They are waiting for
the breaks.
Political precedents indicate to
them that they will recapture some
of the seats in the house that they
lost in the Roosevelt landslide of
last year.
Some of them feel per
haps that the hope of re
capturing control of the house
soon U a forlon one, but that
enough will return to the fold
to give them something to
work on.
Meanwhile thoughts of the
presidential campaign in 1936 or
conflicting personal political ambi
tions take secondary places. Poli
tical parties usually return to
power by trying first to gain con
trol of one of the houses of con
gress.
The Penrose Plan
The late Senator Penrose of
Pennsylvania is credited with hav
ing said back 'in 1912, when told
! that the republican party's deci
sion to renpininate President Taft
\ would result in a split and wreck
jage oil election day: “What of it
so long as we control the wreck
age?”
Eight years later Penrose and
the Old Guard republicans were
in complete political control of the
'.country again. And that, whether
j four, eight or 12 years, was what
j Penrose had in mind,
j Breaks Coming—They Hop*
Political issues will begin to be
clarified as soon as congress gets
back to Washington next January,
i It will be then that permanent leg
islation, embracing the workable
parts of recovery machinery set up
in the special session, must be
written into law.
Republicans are hoping that
there is where they will begin to
i get the breaks, politically speak
j ing. Until then they arc likely to
! keep silent'.
Today In History
79—Pompeii anti Her: ulaneum
Italy, destroyed by eruption of
ttt. Vesuvius.
1572—Massacre of St. Bartho
lomew Pan-, followed directly by
a religious war.
Isl4—Capitol. Treasury build
ing and White House burned down
by the British in Washington.
1857—Beginning of the finan
cial panic which culminated in an
almost entire suspension of the
banks the country over.
Today’s Horoscope
Although m ease the major as
pect* are not favorable the per
son b>rn today ml* be a promis
ing experimentalist and an ac
comjiltshe<i critic there will be a
tendency to a r net plaining nature,
probably dissatisfied with tta
achievements. Mich of this may
be avoided by srhoefaig the mind
to content, since there should be
a fair measure of sweeesw.
yrszsm
W YOUR
I VACATION!
£ THIS VIA® IM
| FLORIDA 4
brum MfAUNf
\ ////fftltUnx i
TODAY’S WEATHER
Temperature*
Highest .92
Lowest - 78
Mean ...' 85
Normal Mean 83
Rainfall*
Yesterday’s Precipitation .12 Ins.
Normal Precipitation 14 Ins.
• I'M* record over* a4-kur H*rUd
rniliHtc at H oVtock Ihta morela*.
Tomorrow’* Almanac
Sun rises 6:05 a - m *
Sun sets - 6:53 P* ra -
Moon rises 10:36 a. m.
Moon sets 10:00 p. m.
Tomorrow’* Tide*
A. 11. I*- M-
High 12*9
Low 6:10 6:09
Hitrometcr at 6 a. in. today:
Sea level, 29.85.
Lowest Highest
, Last Night Vusterdax
Abilene 74 98
Atlanta 70 .86
Boston 66 78
Buffalo 64 ~ 76
Chicago 62 78
Denver 66 82
Detroit 66 76
Dodge City 62 84
Duluth 58 70
El Paso 70 94
Galveston 78 92
Helena 48 72
Huron 56 82
Jacksonville 74 88
KEY WEST 78 82
Los Angeles 66 82
Miami 80 88
Minneapolis 68 82
New Orleans .... 78 92
New York 70 74
Pensacola 76 86
Phoenix 86 106
Pittsburgh 64 76
St. Louis 68 88
Salt Lake City... 54 84
San Francisco .. 52 62
Seattle 6O 86
Tampa 76 88
Washington ...... 70 76
Williston 52 64
WEATHER FORECAST
Key West and Vicinity; Partly
cloudy tonight and Friday, pos
sibly local showers Friday; gentle
variable winds becoming gentle to
moderate southeast. i
Florida: Partly cloudy tonight
and Friday, possibly local showers
Friday.
Jacksonville to Florida Straits:
Gentle to moderate west
southwest winds over north por
tion and gentle variable becom-
A New Era Prosperity
Is Ahead of You
TAKE A VACATION NOW
COME TO MIAMI
“THE MILLION AIRES' PLAYGROUND"
With Prices That Fit Everybody's Pochothoofc
HOTEL RATES LOWEST EVER QUOTED
PRICE# FOR MEALS IN KEEPING WITH THE TIMES
New Low Prices om All Recreational Activities
Inquire at Our Tourist Information Bureau About
Interesting Side Trips, Sight-Seeing, Etc., and See Our
Recreational Host A bent Fishing, Oslf and Other Sports.
HOTEL LEAMINGTON
"Miami's Moat Popular Motel
N. E. FIRST STREET AND THIRD AVENUE
NEAR BAY FRONT PARK
CONDENSED STATEMENT OF CONDITION OF
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF KEY WEST
as at the close el business June Mb >*D
Csaaptr slier'* Cell
RESOURCES
Loam snd iavestments _ I 245.054 J 1
Overdraft* * MM
Banking House, Furniture
and Fixtures SUK>7.7$
Bonds of States and Poa
•easione of the United
State* ..... IMM7OM
MumrtpaL FmWie Utility,
Railroad aad Other
Bonds A Securities IIIMTS M
Call Loans, Stock Ex
change Coßeteral |IM,MIAf
Stock Federal Reserve
Bank S.SASOO
United States Govern-
RMNBt ftvrurifc®*#
CmklS.nlllM IIMJHN
ft
LIABILITIES
glOS.ttaO B®
sSpfee ml Undivided Profit. _
Z, MilAdt-M
l |UiLa2 J t|
THURSDAY, AUGUST 24, 1D33.
ing moderate southeast over south
portion; w’eather fair tonight and
Friday.
East Gulf: Gentle variable
winds over north portion, and
moderate southeast and east over
south portion.
WEATHER CONDITIONS
The disturbance has passed in
land and decreased in intensity,
being central this morning over
western New York. Buffalo 29.48
inches. It has caused high winds
and gales on the middle Atlantic
coast and over the extreme east
ern Lake region, and rains from
Virginia northward over the east
ern portion of Lake Erie and
I southern New England, the
! amounts being heavy in the Mid
| die Atlantic States. Showers also
! occurred during the last 24 hours
|in central and southern Florida,
| central and western Texas, Okla
homa, Minnesota, and North Da
kota. Temperatures are above
normal this morning in northern
* Michigan and portions of New
I England, and readings near 100
J degrees occurred yesterday in een
-1 tral Texas and western Oregon;
[while elsewhere temperatures are
generally seasonable.
G. S. KENNEDY,
Official in Charge
MANY JAPANESE
DRAWN TO BRAZIL
FOR COLONIZATION
tM AfMeltU4
RIO DE JANEIRO. Aug. 24.
Almost every Japanese ship this
year brings several hundred Nip
ponese immigrants all of them
with a rudimentary knowledge of
Portuguese and Brazilian cus
toms.
The Japanese colonization so
ciety, which holds a contract to
bring a total of 25 000 Japanese
settlers this year, gives the im
migrants a fortnight’s schooling
before they sail for Brazil. Dur
ing the ocean trip, clasps are held
aboard ship.
As many as 1,200 come at a
time, most of the immigrants dis
embarking in Santos, for settle
ment in the interior of Sao Paulo.
The Japanese engage successfully
in coffee growing, cotton and rice
raising and tea planting. The tea
industry i* new, but several plan
tations are about to enter the pro
duction stage.

xml | txt