OCR Interpretation


The Key West citizen. [volume] (Key West, Fla.) 1879-current, August 24, 1933, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of Florida

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016244/1933-08-24/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for PAGE THREE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 24, 1933.
NATS GET EVEN
BREAK AS YANKS
DROP ONE GAME
WASHINGTON MOVES CLOSER
TO PENNANT AS RESULT OF
TAKING CLOSING CONTEST
IN TWO PLY WITH DETROIT
< Special to The Citizen)
DETROIT, Aug. 24.—As the re
sult of the Yankees dropping one,
the Nats got an even break and
moved closer to the American
League pennant. After outstand
ing work by Tommy Bridges on
the mound and at bat had won the
opening engagement of a twin
bill with Washington, 2 to 1, the
Detroit Tigers suffered a return
of their pitching weakness, and
the Senators won the closing
game, 9 to S.
The Cleveland Indians stopped
the Yankees, taking the contest by
a score of 2to 1. With Clint
Brown scattering the Yankees’
six hits over five innings to out
point Charlie Ruffing in a pitch
ing duel, the Indians took the sec
ond game of the series. • -
The Chicago White Sox defeated
the Red both games of a
double bill, taking the opener by a
score of 3 to 1. The tally in the
concluding game was 12 to 1. The
Boston outfit’s losing streak was
extended to nine straight games
when they were held to seven hits
in the twin affair.
The Boston Braves downed the
St. Louis Cardinals, 4to 3. With
Wally Berger’s big bat blasting
out the winning runs for the sec
ond successive day, the Boston
club strengthened their hold on
second place in the first of a three
game series with, the Cards, which
was played in mist and fog. Berger
hit his twenty-third and twenty-,
fourth home runs to capture the
lead in the National League from 1
Chuck Klein and drdvd: in l all of
Boston’s runs.
The summaries:
American Ln|M
First Gam*
At Chicago R. !!. R.
Boston .... 13 1
Chicago 3 7 0
Batteries: Kline, Rhodes and
Ferrell; Jones and Grube.
Second Came
At Chicago R. H. E.
Boston 14 0
Chicago ...„ 12 IB 2
Batteries: Fullerton and Gooch;
Durham and Berry.
Firat Game
At Detroit R. 11. E.
Washington 17 2
‘Detroit 2 10 0
Batteries: Crowder and Sewell;
Bridges and Hayworth.
Second Gama
At Detroit R. H. E.
Washington .. 9 13 2
Detroit 5 11 1
Batteries: Stewart and Berg;
Marbarry, Auker, Hogsett and
Pasek.
At Cleveland R. H. E
New York 16 0
Cleveland ... 2 9 0
Batteries: Ruffing and Dickey;
Brown and Spencer.
No others scheduled.
National Laagne
At Boston R. H. E.
St. Louie —3 6 2
Boron 4 4 1
Batteries: Carleton. Johnson
and O’Farrell; Betts and Hogan.
All other games rained out.
I ~i
GAHEpjgDAy
AMERICAN LEAGUE
New York at Clere'and.
Boston at Chicago, two games.
Washington at Detroit.
Philadelphia at St. Louis two
games.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Pittsburgh at Nrw York, two
games.
Cincinnati at Brooklyn, two
game*..
Chicago at Pittsburgh, two
ipumwL.
St. Louis at Boston
SPORTS
FUNERAL HOMERS
VS. CURS AGAIN
SECOND GAME OF FIVE GAME
SERIES TOMORROW
NIGHT
Presenting a slightly rejuvenat
ed lineup, the Cubs will tackle the
Lopez Funeral Home ten in the
second game of a five-game series
to be played tomorrow night at
Bayview Park.
One of the most interesting
games ever played in this city re
sulted from their wlast clash and
the Funeral Home won by only
a single run, after Sterling of
the Cubs had completely outpitch
ed Lunn of the Undertakers.
Although the Cubs are noted
for their late rallies, the Funeral
Home pulled the trick on them in
the last game and walked away
with the contest.
Manager Aguilar expects to
pitch Ward tomorrow night while
the Funeral Home has kept their
battery a secret.
Another hard-fought game is
looked forward to by fans.
rSPORT-ri
SLANTS
By ALAN GOULD [=3
(Hr Associated Press)
Few illusions about the “box
fight business,’’ little worry about
the “chiaelers” in the racket and
no false notions about the. pos
sible return of the miliioh dollar
heavyweight days bOset the new
executive head of- ftfewi' l York’*
Madison Squape .Garden, .
• Colonel JoKri ! R&ed Kilpalrifck,
| All-America end atj Yale vyhen the
gridiron spotlight Was '
brightly on the 'Elfc all-around
athlete, soldier and -bujiiriOSs tnan,
steps ‘into the spot Once dominated
by Tex Rickard with thefiatic side
of the business pretty well batter
ed but. not by any means hopeless.
*?t< is by observation that the
lafet fighter a champion’s manager
wants to send his man against is
the logical or popular contender,’’
said Colonel Kilpatrick. “This is,
of course, one of the strange fea
tures of boxing. We may not be
able to cure it but the less Becrecy
and less bargaining we do under
cover, the more likely we are to
make the matches that the public
wants to see.
“My idea would be to say,
frankly, that so-and-so makes the
most desirable match, then make
it clear to everyone exactly what
obstacles, if any, arise to prevent
making the fight on a reasonable
basis. Of course 1 know there are
all sorts of subterfuges, that the
managers of fighters find ways
and means to get around the rules
and regulations. But by more
[ direct dealing, the promoter at
least can make his own position
clear and let the public’s attitude
. take care of the fighter.'*
Boxing At Fault
There probably is no doubt that
the box-fight business has in many
respects greased its own skids.
Champions have been moved
around like the pieces on a check
erboard until the point has been
reached during the past few years
when the general public knew few 1
of the professional titleholders by
name, without first being prompt
ed, and still is not in the least con
cerned about it
In fact titles have been so
cheapened by state and national
differences, causing conflicting
claims by three or four boxers
for the same championship, that
they no longer mean much.
A title match is in itself no long
er the gate attraction it once was
proof of which was furnished by
the fact that the Schmchng-Baer
heavy-weight match this summer
with nothing but personal rivalry
at stake, outrfrew by 340,000 the
t'arnera-Shaikey championship af
fair.
In short. Colonel Kilpatrick
takes over an industry at a time
when a world’s championship
match can draw barely one-fif
teenth or less* than seven percent
of the “gate" for the peak pro
motion achievement of Ter Rk
kard’a career—the second Demp
sey-Tunney fight in Ctksg . i
Gordon Fetero Not At s(k*
The future of the Garden is not,
of course. based on what happens
to boxing or Colonel Kilpatrick’*
1
DION RULES ON
BALL FLAYER IN
LOCAL UNE-UP
DECIDES PIRATES WILL NOT
BE ABLE TO KEEP ACEVE
DO; CLUB HANDS IN WITH
DRAWAL FROM LEAGUE
President Dion, at a meeting
held last night, decided that the
Pirates wouldn’t be able to keep
Armando Acevedo, and that he
would have to play with the Tro
jans.
Whereupon the Pirates handed
in their withdrawal from the
league.
But fans will still see their Sun
day doubleheader. Anew team,
called the Young Stars, have been
organized and will play the first
game against the Trojans at 1:30
and the Sluggers will take on the
Trojans in the second game. The
league will continue as usual with
the Young Stars taking the place
of the Pirates, but anew schedule
will have to be drawn up.
The Young Stars may secure the
services of any of the Pirate play
ers, but said players may not go
with any other team in the league.
Asa roster, the Young Stars
have presented the following play
ers for a starter: L. Martinez, C.
Castillo, G. Garcia, C. Garcia, L.
Garcia, B. Bazo, B. Garcia, L.
Gonzalez, A. Rendueles, A. Her
nandez, M. Acevedo, M. Sanchez
and H. Molina.
TURNER JUNIORS
WIN OWE MATCH
AVENGED FORMER DEFEAT IN
! CONGEST MTH Rfct
WEST TEAM
Whining a closematch with the
Key West City team, the Turner
Juniors net'team avenged a for
mer defeat by taking the matches
by nine points to six.
The Miami team won by the
margin of a doubles match, after
Key West had won three out of
five matches in the singles depart
ment.
Two doubles and a single match
were cancelled because of the
| heavy rain which inundated the
East Coast last weekend.
Following are the results: Rog
er Delano took Peter Varela in
hand 6-1, 6-1. Seymour Feur
broke through the cuts of A.
Gomez and took, a 6-1, 6-2 win.
Jack Sinclair then turned in the
first win for the locals by trim
ming Harold Kramer, 6-2, 6-4.
Robert Pinder then got the num
ber of Leo Koehler 7-5, 6-3. Ig
nacio Carbonell came through for
the third straight Key West win
by and, owning Jack Roy 6-4. 4-6.
6-2 in the only match to go more
than three sets. It was hard
fought throughout.
In the doubles, Albury and De
lano of Miami, defeated Varela
and Sinclair to the tune of 3-6,
6-2.6-S in another close match.
The games were played on the
Granada courts, Coral Gables and
took place on Monday and Tues
day.
BALL MEETING
THIS MORNING
TREASURER report and ex
penses OF TRIP DIS
CUSSED
There was a meeting of the
Key West Diamondball League
this morning in The Citisen office.
Present were President Tint
Pittman. Treasurer L. P. Artman.
Collector Sands and Field Mana
ger Jonathan Cates.
The finances of the league were
reviewed and the treasurer made
bis report. Discussion was also
■ held on methods to be used to set
tle for the amount owed by the
> Key West Diamonriheii team for
i expenses in its recent game in the
Ka-t CiMtet League.
efforts to apply the pulmctor to a
.sagging poru
Ihe togged crowd that ever
| paid admission to an event in the
‘ famous Eighth Avenue arena did
not come to see blood spiffed but
to hear Paderewski may.
MAYOR MALONE
PERFORMS GREAT
FEAT ON LINKS
STRIKES GOLF BALL GOOD
AND SQUARE AND CON
NECTS WITH BIRD WHICH
TOPPLES TO GROUND
Killing two birds with one
stone cannot be done, it is stated.
Neither can a golf player drive
from the tee and kill a bird with
the ball he drove. Bqt this latter
thing, that cannot be done, was
done yesterday on the Key West
course.
Many “believe it or not” items
have been written that tax the
mind to believe. Some of them ap
pear outside the bounds of possi
bility. and seem hard to believe
even when proven.
However, be that as it may,
Mayor William H. Malone, driving
yesterday afternoon at the eighth
hole, from which he never before
made a successful drive, struck the
ball fairly and squarely.
It started on its flight, and when
about 190 feet from the tee a bird
known as a hell diver, crossed the
line of flight of the ball and was
struck in mid-air.
The ball stopped. The bird
stopped and both fell to the
ground. Mr. Malone picked up
the bird and took it to the caddy
house, where it is being kept as an
evidence of the remarkable inci
dent.
RUSSIANS PLAN
STRATOSPHERIC
ATTEMPT SOON
SPECIALLY BUILT BALLOON
DESIGNED FOR ASCENT OF
FROM SIX TO THIRTEEN
MILES
(By, Annoftatfil Pre)
LENINGfeAD, Aug. 24.—Soviet
aviation’s first venture into the
stratosphere •is scheduled to be
made within the next few weeks
in a specially constructed ballbori
designed, sor aii aftent bf from
six to 13 miles.
Three—possibly four—r-of the
leadihg aerologfsts' in
tend to set out on a voyage into
the upper reaches of tM at&oSi
phere before the suutmer ends oil
what is contemplated as the first
of a series of such flights for
scientific observation.
To Study Cosmic Rays
Their primary purpose is to
study the cosmic rays, electro
magnetic phenomena and the
physiological influence of great
heights on human beings. But
they also hope to better the record
of Prof. Auguste Piccard, who
on his second ascension reached a
height' of more than 53,000 feet.
The first test flight of the bal
loon, constructed in the Air In
stitute’s factories here along the
general lines of Piccard’s craft,
was pronounced satisfactory by
the constructor, M. Vasenko and
B. Fedoseinko, the chief pilot, al
though it was allowed to climb
only 3,100 meters during its al
most 14 hours in the air. It was
brought down safely some 30 miles
from Leningrad, its starting point.
Molchanov Likely Commander
Both Vansenko and Fedoseienko
probably will make the first flight.
Prof. D. Molchanov, director of
the institute and organizer of the
ascension, likely will be in com
mand. Whether the flight will be
started from Leningrad or from
Moscow will depend on weather
conditions.
The balloon, designed by En
gineer I. Chertovsky, was more;
than a year in construction and
only soviet materials and equip-]
ment were used. The envelop**
is made of a special rubberized
fabric to which a paint compound
Has been applied to make it im
pervious to the sun’s heat. It has
a capacity of 20,000 cubic meters
of hydrogen gas.
Basket Typo Suspeasiea
The cabin is constructed of non- \
magnetic, rustless steel and can
accomodate four men for a mini
mum of 12 hours. It u slung in
what resembles a basket, the bot
tom of which is fitted with a
shock-absorbing device to soften
the impact of landing. Portholes
fitted with non-sweating and non
freezing glass—four around the
side*, one in the top and one in the
floor—provide the means of ob
servation and photography.
The crew will receive neee—ary
air from a liquid oxygen apparatus
within the sealed cabin, which al
so will have a pow:ful -Lort *a*
radio tnusseaixsioa and receiving
**♦ _
THE KEY WES? CITIZEN
Helen Of Hewlett Gives Notice
She Wants That Golf Crown Back
■ J
BBflV . -mm
m Shl
jjj ' r • •
After a dismal 1932 season, when the couldn’t even qualify to
defend her national title, Helen Hi ckt hat come back tbit summer
with a miraculout brand of golf. She’t teriout, at leatt. Virginia Van
Wie, pretent women’i champion, it thown below. They’ll have it out
at Chicago.
HOW THIY
STANDS
4- ; eg *&4Spßfifli
AMEIttGAN LEAGUE
Club— w. L. ret.
Washington ‘...1..L..V 7& 40* -1061
Ntew York Ai ; v 69 47 .595
Cleveland ! ; ; 0 .512
Detroit 61 6i .500
Philadelphia 57 59 .491
Chicago „.. : ....L. 56 63 .471
Boston 49 70 .412
St. Louis 44 77 .364
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Club— W. L. Pet.
New York ..... 68 43 .613
Boston 65 53 .551
Pittsburgh 62 53 .539
Chicago ;.... 62 53 .539
St. Louis 64 55 .538
Philadelphia 48 64 .429
Brooklyn 45 65 .409
Cincinnati 44 72 .379
‘ Today’s
Anniversaries
1759 William Wilberforce.j
English philanthropist, statesman
and orator, who led the movement
for the abolition of slavery, born.
Died July 29. 1833.
1784—Joseph E. Worcester,
noted school-book writer and dic
tionary-maker of his day, born at
Bedford. N. H. Died at Cam
bridge, Mass., Oct.. 27, 1865.
1810—Theodore Parker, noted
Boston Unitarian clergyman, re
former and author, born at Lex
ington. Mass. Died in Italy,
May 10. 1860.
lfsS —John Newton. Union
army chief of engineers, a noted
civil engineer, bom at Norfolk,
Va. Died in New Work City, May
1, 1895.
1847—Charles Fallen McKim.
noted American archetect of his
day, bom in Chester Cos., Pa. Died
Sept. 14. 1909.
1960—Laura Drake Gill, pro
fessor of mathematics, dean, foun
der of the first vocation bureau
for college women itn Boston I,
born at Chesterville. Maine. Died
at Berra. Ky„ Feb. 3, 1926.
1863—George Brinton <*ald
well. New York and C hicago fi-;
naoctal authority, founder altd j
firm president of the Investment 1
Bankers Awwiktioti f America,
been at btiuint. h. Y- IM m
Near \r% M*y -i". 1933,
Subscribe TV C&&M—**e
* mmUtm
Tireetoa*
AUGUST
TIRE SALE
Save the Cotton Procett Tax
(Effective
As LONG as our present stock lasts
we’ll sell you tires at today's low prices.
Rubber is up 150% and cotton has gj jjT
advanced 50%. Judge for yourself the I I v-J
course that tire prices must take. I I 1 V ' 3^|§
At today’s low prices don’t take
chances with thin worn tires! With our I
liberal trade-in allowance you ran equip I
your car with a set of new Firestone j
High Speed Tires at very low cost. Don't
delay. Come in today.
LIBERAL TRADE-IN T wtMASTERPIECE Jf
L ALLOWANCE |^m CONSTHUCTION j
DURING THIS SALE FWtrme High Speed Tiros are **tra
UURmVI mi 9 WPSfcfc ,Hty—superior In ovory way—
_ MUM iim—tii aster lads, deaifn, construction and
at . workmanship. Every High Strwtdb Coed
TlftsfOftf is Gum-Dipped tor greatest Safety end
HIOW Wtl TVPt Blowout Protection— tle safety that
I fain SStrT 1 **** **** 1 odjr Firestone gives you.
!!H " Mr, " lt “ ■— TODAY'S tOW MllClt
*l*ll i *)b3 Jlrrstss* flreataae"
SJ2S-18... gs.ee iVy* iW* -**-* *2*f2 I j
XI sa.fe _ •.!• iTkit.... O.T#
5-SO-19 .. . ttsf# 12j° , i4s.lt 10.19 Ma.t. w I*9o 1
6.00-18... XX.7S >fl 5 "W s Tlrtittu flrtstes* I
<.nn_,on fC 68 114, .21*5 nwiffikUHL-J tBWB TTfl .
6.50-19 H.D. X7.Se f-l 4 f>°4 J6_ MJ ♦“- 4.8*
aa we tnaA 47 ! e.ft *— n*m. I4<
4 -00*18 H. D. aV'*r r®’” memmme^mMmSmmSSSSSmmmmmmmmrn
PAUL’S TIRE SHOP
RAYMOND CURRY. Mgr.
! Fleming and Grmnefl Streets Phone 65
EXAMINATION OF
IMMIGRATION MEN
HERE CONCLUDED
RESULTS OF TESTS WILL BE
MADE LATER; BOARD HOLD
ING EXAMINATION LEAVES
FOR TAMPA YESTERDAY
Examination of the officials of
the local immigration unit was
completed yesterday and the re
sults of the tests are to be made
later, it was announced yester
day.
Since the merging of the immi
gration and naturalization branch
es of the department of labor
these tests have been authorized
by the secretary of labor and 11
examining boards are now mak
ing a tour of the United States.
These tests are being made to
determine the merit and ability of
the men in the service and it is to
be, it is said, a case where the most
competent men will be retained.
In other words, a survival of the
fittest, as shown by the results of
the examinations.
Members of the examining board
that came to Key West are:
W. W. Brown, vice chairman of
the board of review of the depart
ment of labor; Dr. Thomas H.
Healey, assistant dean of George
town University School of Foreign
Service; E. G. Dodge, examiner of
the civil service commission, all of
Washington, D. C., and Andrew
Jordan, assistant district director
of naturalization, of Chicago.
They left yesterday afternoon
for Tampa where the examination
of the employes in the service will
b'e given the same tests as were
giveVi .those of the local unit.
At 78£ Jpse Quidada of Reno,
Nevada, who once made a saddle
for Theodore Roosevelt, is engaged
in making a saddle* for Governor
Fred Balzar. , A !f
PAGE THREE
CLASSIFIED
COLUMN
Advertisements under this head
will be inserted in The Citizen at
the rate of lc a word for each in
sertion, but the minimum for the
first insertion in every instance is
25c.
Payment for classified adver
tisements is invariably in advance,
but regular advertisers with ledger
accounts may have their advertise
ments charged.
Advertisers should give their
street address as well as their tele
phone number if they desire re
sults.
With each classified advertise
ment The Citizen will give free an
Autostrop Raxor Outfit Ask for
it
FOR RENT
furnished¥ouse for rent,
containing 12 rooms, on lot
50x198 feet, in select section of
city, 1307 Whitehead street op
posite beautiful Coral Park, and
facing the sea. Garage in rear.
Rent SSO monthly. Apply to L.
street or The Citizen Office.
P. Artraan, 1309 Whitehead
FOR SALE
STRAWBERRY PLANTS, Mis
sionary and Blakemore. 1,000
$2.50 or SI.OO per 100. 10,.*
000—520.00. John Lightfoot,
E. Chattanooga, Tenn.
augl4-l6t
RADIO REPAIRING
RADIO REPAIRING. We repair
all makes. Guaranteed service,
J. L. Stowers Ku.c Cos. mayl
WANTED
WANTED—You to that wa
have the right prices on letter
heads, envelopes, business cards,
statements and any form of
printing. Satisfaction guaran
teed. Call 51. The Artman
Press. jan7

xml | txt