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The Key West citizen. [volume] (Key West, Fla.) 1879-current, March 27, 1936, Image 1

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Associated Press Day Wire
Service.
For 56 Years Devoted to the
Best Interests of Key West
VOLUME LVII. No. 75.
Slow Army Recruiting In Britain
Hinders Plan To Expand Defense
Four New Battalions Are
Wanted For Regular
Army Along With Six
Thousand Men For Navy
By ELMER W. PETERSON
(Hj I'rrfts)
LONDON, Mar. 27.—Failure of
young Britons to rush forward
with enthusiasm as army re*
cruits may prove one of the im
portant problems of Britain in
building up the several branches
of military service.
Four new battalions are wanted
for the regular army, along with
6,000 men for the navy, and thou
sands more for the Royal Air
force, but the number of appli
cants is not encouraging.
“The problem facing the re
cruiting service is how to stem the
downward trend in the numbers
applying to join the army,” says
the annual report on recruiting.
Quality Offsets Scarcity
“As far as the quality of the
men is concerned, the trend is in
the right direction, but the dis
quieting factor is the falling-off
in the number of applicants.
“There were 80.203 applicants
last year as against 68,061 this
year. Fortunately this decrease
is more than offset by the cor
responding fal! of 12.259 in the
number of rejections.”
High standards of enlistment
are given as one reason for the
difficulty in finding men. For
every three offered enlistments.
* it“-fe pointed baA | wh* ' usually
rejected at first sight, the second
'or physical, medical or educa
tional reasons, and only the third
approved.
Conscription Hint Voiced
On the theory that more pub
v lic'ty is the solution to the prob
lem, Viscount Rothermere. pub
lisher or the Daily Mai!, has of
fered large prizes for the best
ideas on attracting recruits.
“Young ■? Britons of today,”
writes Rothermere, “are not show
ing the same read ness to serve
their country under arms as did
their fathers. Resentment of dis
cipline is strong among the new
generation. The unemployment
benefit keeps in idleness many a
young man of good physique who
might be wearing the king’s uni
form with far greater profit to
himself and to his country.
“Young men who are fit for
service in the armed forces of the
crown should present themselves
without delay to the nearest re
cruiting office. They have every
thing to gain and nothing to lose
by joining up at once.
“The alternative is. not an
easy-going civilian life, but com
pulsory service, for the national
need is imperative.”
PLANE CARRIES
13 PASSENGERS
|
Plane of the Pan American
Airways left yesterday afternoon
for Miami with 13 passengers.
During the first five days of the
week there were 60 departing
passengers and 60 ‘arrivals, an
average of 12 passengers each
way daily.
Departures yesterday were:
Charles Farris, Albert Stern.
Caroline Stern. Sonia Brown,
Rose Weiner, Mabel Green, C. M.
Stewart, Ernest Sherry. J. G.
Curtis. Anna Guito, William R.
Porter and Gertrude Pendell.
DRESSED POULTRY
YOUNG TURKEYS
YOUNG DUCKS
SOFT BONE ROASTERS
HENS STAGS FRYERS
DRESSED, Ready For The Pot
FulforcTs Poultry Farm
Phone 880 I Deliver
GETTING TIRED OF DRINKING THAT OLD BRAND OF BEER? LET US SUGGEST THAT YOU TRY WAGNER’S, IT SATISFIES BOTH TASTE AM) POCKETBOOK
DISTRIBUTE FUND
TO CITY FORCES
MONEY WAS PART OF THAT
RECEIVED FROM SALE OF
OLD CAR TRACK
Thirty-nine employes of the city
j received S3O each and one em-
I ploye received $lO today when
i $l,lBO was distributed as part of
| back salaries due fire and police
| departments employes.
This money was part of the
i $1,500 received from the sale of
j salvaged street car rail, the bal
\ ance of which is to be paid when
! the rail is weighed and the full
, amount of the purchase price is
; known.
City’ employes yesterday consult
-1 ed with the mayor and discussed
J long past due salaries and the
j possibilities of the future. They
! were told that expectations wero
that funds would he forth com*
ing to make other payments on
salaries due.
The mayor also informed the
other members of the group it was
the intention of the council to
| pass the proposed one cent a gal
! lon gasoline tax which has been
passed on its initial and second
reading.
At the conclusion of the meet
nig. which was held on the first
| floor of the city hall, it was mu
i tually agred between the mayor
. and employes that the matter rest
j until April 6.
THREE LICENSES
TO WED ISSUED
During the -weak muling Mareh
27 there have been three marriage
licenses issued from the office of
! the county judge, making a total!
• of seven for the month to date.'
j Issues this weqk were to:
• Leonard Harris and Wilhelmina
! Washington; Kelcey V. E. Curry
i and Sara M. Mullen; Willard E.
Burchell and Marguerite Varela.
LEAVES YESTERDAY
J. Gerry Curt’s, director of the
{ WPA employment division, left
j yesterday afternoon for Miami
[ for a short visit with his family.
‘Golden Rain’ Next Serial
i *
!
Story by Margaret Widdemer Begins Today, March
27; Her/Novels Were‘Best Sellers’ from Start
Margaret Widdemer, whose
“Golden Rain” is The
next serial story, was born in ajx
old stone rectory near Philadel
phia, of old American stock.
Even while, as a young girl, she
was librarian to Dr. Rosenbach,
the collector, she had literary am
bitions, and she began to publish
poetry and prose,yevy early. Suc
cess came soon —her first novel
was a best seller and her second
won a prize.
“Golden Rain,” starting today,
March 27, continues a succession
: of popular novels which have come
i from her busy typewriter since
i she made this enterprising start.
I The story is laid in a suburb of
Philadelphia and in New York and
i the author knows both localities
well, having been born in Pennsyl
vania, though she lives now in
Larchmont Manor, New York,
when she is not summering in the
Adirondacks or wintering in Man
hattan.
Iris Lanning is the heroine of
! the story, a girl born in a small
Pennsylvania town who suddenly
! finds herself transplanted in New
j York, with an idea that she could
repeat the Cinderella 6tory. But
Broadway Meat Market
Carrie* Only
FIRST CLASS MEATS
Steer Meat
Genuine Spring Lamb
When You Want Good Meat—
CALL 268
Iver £&tst Citizen
STEAMER OZARK
DUE TOMORROW
CLYDE-MALLORY LINE VES
SEL WAS SCHEDULED TO
REACH PORT TODAY
i Steamship Ozark, of the Clyde-
Mallcry Lines, scheduled to arrive
from New Orleans today,will not
arrive until tomorrow. Informa
tion of a delayed sailing was re
ceived yesterday afternoon by C.
■ E. Smith, local general hgent.
Freighter Colorado, of the same
lines, is due to arrive Sunday
morning from New York, and aft
er discharging freight will sail for
Tampa.
Powerboat Heron, of the Over-
Sea Transportation company, ar
rived this morning from Miami
£nd intermediate points.
Motor ship Miss Nassau, which
arrived yesterday morning from
Tampa and took on a tractor for
use in the Mexican mahogany for
ests. sailed yesterday afternoon for
Payoobispo. The tractor is own
ed by Rafael Ruesga, Mexican
consul at Tampa.
PLAN TO IKE SMALL
PLANE IN SERVICE
TO BE OPERATED BETWEEN
KEY WEST AND MIAMI
FOR FIVE DAYS
Airplane service between Miami
ai:d Key West for the next five
days will consist of a Sikorsky
four-passenger mail carrying plane.
This information was issued 5:10
o’clock la. t evening from the Mi
ami Pan American airport in a ra
diogram to Key West.
FERA Executive Officer Frank,
lin E. Albert told The Citizen to
day the radio message was from
James Yonga, president of the Mi
ami-Key West Airways and read
as follows:
“On account of continued emer
gency MC9137 will be on sched
ule from Saturday through Wed
nesday inclusive. March 28
through April 1. Commodore will
resume schedule Thursday, April
O >
U.
Mr. Albert said the week
plane schedule is to continue into
about the middle of April. It is
possible that at that time a three
dry-week schedule will become ef
fetive and continue as long as
traffic warrants.
fr ■■■
MARGARET WIDDEMER
it doesn’t work out that way and
Iris finds that the glamorous fairy
prince doesn’t turn out to be the
true lover forever and ever. '
Miss Widdemer tells the story
entertainingly and with a lightness
of touch which she always com
mands. The Citizen’s readers will
follow it with interest from the
first chapter appearing today.
KEY WEST FIREMEN’S
DANCE
For Convention Fond*
HABANA-MADRID CLUB
Tomorrow Nile, 9:30 till ?
Music by Del Woods’ Orchestra
ADMISSION SI.OO
KEY WEST, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 1936.
TENDER IVY
j LEAVES PORT
■ - -- --
LIGHTHOUSE VESSEL SAILS
| YESTERDAY FOR VICINITY
OF SANIBZL ISLAND
Tender Ivy, of the lighthouse
department fleet, which returned
j Wednesday evening from activities
| on the west cojast, sailed yesterday
j afternoon at 4 o’clock for the
i vicinity of Sanibel Island.
! The Ivy’s master was instructed
j to locate and mark the site of a
barge which recently sunk in 30
! feet of water near the island and
, is considered a menace to naviga
; tion.
The buoy indicating the sunken
i vessel is to remain until U. S. en
gineers clear away the wreck and
‘ make it safe for vessels, to navi
gate those waters.
Tender Poppy is following out
a schedule of work in Miami har
bor. The Poineiana is in port. \
Powerboat Number 31. of the j
lighthouse department, sailed yes
’ terday with Machinist Wm. Vassiej
[ and asasistant for Tortugas where
| repairs will be macj£ to the engine
generator. They are expeetd to;
. return tomorrow.
ECONOMIC HIGHLIGHTS
Happenings That Affect the Dinner Pails, Dividend
Checks and Tax Bills of Every Individual; Na
tional and International Problems Insep
arable From Local Welfare
Up to a short time ago, it was
: the common belief that the pres
• ent session of Congress would be
short, sweet and snappy. This
j being a general election year,;
’ Congressmen were known to be
, chary of legislative dramatics,
i wanted only to get through neces-j
sary business as soon as possible
and go home for political fence-1
building. Usual forecast was that
Congress might adjourn in April.'
would certainly wind up its af
fairs early in May.
! A delay in adjournment is now
practically inevitable—and it is
possible that “The Most Exclusive
Gentlemen’s Club in the World”
will still be in session when the
blistering weather comes.
First and most important of
| events to throw a monkey-wrench
into the hitherto quiet running
Congressional machine, was the
President’s proposal for a tax on,
corporation reserves, designed to
raise some $700,000,000 a year.
All informed observers know’ that
new taxes are necessary—even
though the holders of elective;
positions soft-peddle the fact
when talking to the voters, and
speak vaguely of reductions in the
tax load. During recent years
only about 51 per cent of Fed
eral expenditures have been paid
for out of current revenues—the
remaining 49 per cent has been
! chalked up against the future, in (
I the form of additions to the na- (
i tional debt.
Argument appears over what is
| the best way to raise additional!
J money. Many authorities are of,
| the opinion that the safest way,j
I s economically speaking, would be
to broaden the tax base and lower'
income tax exemptions. This has
been suggested in the Senate by!
j Senator LaFolette of Wisconsin.;
! However, the suggestion was met
with almost a feeling of horror;
by most Congressmen, who know:
that such a tax program would be;
politically unsafe. Consequently, j
the big idea has been to find a j
way of increasing revenue that:
will not antagonize the average
man. will not hit him directly. A;
j tax on corporation reserves seem
ed to fill the bill perfectly.
Even so, the way toward the :
! bill’s fulfillment is far from;
1 smooth. The House Sub-Commit
' tee on Ways and Means has
■ agreed on a bill which would tax t
undivided profits from 15 to 65;
per cent. By the time this is
j read, the bill will probably be on:
the floor and in debate. If the j
conservatives in the House have;
j their way—any many prominent!
Democrats who are pro-Adminis-j
tration in most matters fall intoj
that classification when it comes
to revenue measures —the bill will,
have a hard time passing As is to
be expected, industrialists are
against the tax, as are prominent
business magazines and business
MRS.&BABCOCK
DIED THIS MORNING
| ,
FUNERAL SERVICES ARE BE
ING CONDUCTED THIS
AFTERNOON
Mrs. Harriett Babcock, 91, died
. 6 o’clock this morning in the home
!at 426 Elizabeth street, after a
lingering, illness.
Funeral services are being held
4 o’clock this afternoon from St.
I Paul’s Episcopal church where the
body was placed at 10 o’clock.
Rev. Arthur B. Dimmick is of
ficiating.
Pallbearers are: E. H. Gato, 111,
Ross C. Sawyer, William L. Bates,
Robert Russell, Karl 0. Thomp
son. Eduardo Albertus.
Mrs. Babcock is survived by two
daughters, Mrs. J. M. Navarro,
Key West, and Mrs. L. C. Brin
: ton, Boston, Mass. Eight grand
! c-hillren: Mrs. 11. T. Pillans, Mo
bile, Ala.; Mrs. C. W. Brunson,
Long Beach, 'Calif.; Babcock Na
; varro, Chicago, III.; Guthrie Bab
: cock and Mrs. Ted Stadig, Miami;
George Babcock. Ray Navarro and
; Dan Navario, of Key West. There
are also six great-grandchildren.
commentators, who believe the
tax would endanger corporation
safety.
j General informed opinion is
that a reserve tax will pass—-but
that its provisions will be soften
ed, tempered and modified by
Congress.
| Another event which is likely to
cause an uproar in Congress, and
1 may result in long drawn out
legal battles, lies in recent ac
| tivities of the ComjTiittee which is
investigating lobbying activities
concerning the Public Utility Act
of 1935. This'Committee, headed
by Senator Black of Alabama, se
cured from the telegraph com
panies copies of all wires sent by
some 1,000 organizations and in
dividuals between February 1 and
December 1. 1935. Whether these
telegrams dealt with utility lob
; hying or an invitation to dinner
’ made no difference —everything
' the firms and persons involved
sent over the wires was seized. It
’ is estimated that the total num
her of telegrams taken by the
Committee runs past the 5,000,-
000 mark.
Disclosure of this resulted in a
terrific wave of indignation,
criticism and clenching of fists.
Results is that suits are being
considered to prevent the Com
mittee from carrying on such ac
(tivities, on the grounds that they
, are in direct violation of the
i Fourth Amendment to the Con
stitution. In answer to this, Sen
ator Black said that if any judge
. issued an injunction against his
! Committee, he would ask Con
gress to “enact legislation taking
away that jurisdiction from the
j courts, for Congress creates juris
! diction of those courts.” z z z
| So here are two potential
sources of fireworks —and others
: are simmering, notably the pro
t posed housing plan and the relief
; problem. Storms are brewing
: over Washington.
J The tense European war situa
tion went from bad to worse re
cently, then from worse back to
bad. Worst occurred when France
refused tot talk to Germany so
; long as troops occupied the Rhine
, land. Germany in return refused
; to recall a single soldier, and high
French spokesmen then intimated
, that it might be wise for France!
jto fight a “preventative war”
now.
The progress back to bad was
marked by a change in the French
attitude, doubtless brought about ’
:by anxious English diplomacy.i
France seemed to soften, inti
, mated she might talk terms with
Germany yet, even if German
troops are in long verboten
Cologne.
So hope for peace soars anew.!
But all seem to believe it will be’
a transitory peace.
CONTINUE WITH
! BEAUTIFICATION
! OF PROPERTIES
OFFSHOOTS FROM DATE
PALMS BEING USED IN CON
NECTION WITH PROGRAM
AT LIGHTHOUSE GROUNDS
I
Offshoots from the prolific date
' palms on the grounds of the home
of Mrs. George W. Alien at Ann
i and Caroilne streets are being used
f in the furtherance of the beauti
j fication program at the lighthouse
j department reservation.
Superintendent Wm. W. Demer-
I
• itt, of the department, received a
number of these offshoots from
! Mrs. Allen. They have been
■ planted in front of the adminis
tration building and on the grounds
i surrounding other units.
When they reach fell growth
they will, with the poineianas and
Jerusalem thorns already flourish
ing on the grounds, present an
| attractively beautiful sight.
BAND CONCERT
j HERE SUNDAY
!
PROGRAM TO BE RENDERED
i
AT BAYVIEW PARK BY
HOSPITALITY BAND
The program for the Key West
j Hospitality Band to be presented
| Sunday afternoon at Bayview
j Park was announced today. The
! concert starts at 4:30 P. M.
The Sunday concert is one of
; the twice weekly programs being
presented by the band which is
j under the Federal Music Project,
| Dr. Nikolai Sokoloff director, part
,of the Works Progress Adminis
tration. George Mills White is
| supervisor of the local music pro
ject, and Alfred M. Barroso is
[ conductor of the band,
i The program follows:
I.—U. S. Cruiser Columbia
: March—C. L. Browman.
i 2.—Robert le Diable (from
Meyerbeer’s opera)—T. Tobani.
3. —ln a Moonlight Garden—K.
L. King.
4. —Straussiana. waltz—Strauss.
5. —The Cadet’s Own—Lauren
dean.
6. —Muttering Fritz, Trombone
Solo—Lopez.
7. —Fortune Teller, Selection—
Victor Herbert.
8. —-Enchanted Night, waltz—
K. L. King.
9. —Lights Out, March—McCoy.
10. —Star Spangled Banner —
Key.
Much Interest Manifested In
Pan American Poetry Society
According to reports of officers
in the local chapter of the Pan
American Poetry Society, there
: is a growing interest in the cul
tural activities now being pro
jected by this organization, which
is designed to bring into contact
as well as the great writers the
poets of the Americas, and to fos
ter a better understanding of. j
and a greater appreciation for
the works of the poets and writers
of Latin America.
In this important and far reach-1
ing activity, Key West is re-!
garded, and rightfully so. it is:
shown, as the logical as well as |
the geographical pivot for such a
cultural movement embracing
North, Central and South Amer
ican countries. This, together
with its historic Spanish associa
tion for more than a century, is
being stressed in correspondence
with poets and writers in the Am-,
ericas and with professors in the
leading universities in* the Latin
American republics.
It is pointed out that the move
ment is considered of such im
portance to Latin America that
the San Carlos Club has given the
use of the club rooms in the his
toric San Carlos building to the
Pan American Poetry Society for'
meeting purposes, and the use of;
its large and valuable library to:
the mentoers of this organiza
tion.
To bring the aims of the so-*
Mole-Like Frock Troops Rearfy
; To Rise Fron Grond Aiog Khae
MORE FUNDS FOR
i FLOOD REFUGEES
LOCAL RESIDENTS ARE MAILT
RESPONDING TO CAUL
SENT OUT
Citizen- of Key West ate
responding to the rmfi of the loi
1 Cros. for cogtrAutw. to io
, fund being raised to ■Himwto thr
' sufferings of ji rrso— a the
i flooded district* ta the aorta.
Previously acfciu>or iedge J C'.i*
Hit- Leila Pitcher 2-00
Mrs. J. R. Slower- 2.M
Fath-* Saunders LM
• Loanie Baker . . 1.88
j Edcnnd Carry -5#
Mrs. Win. R. Warren EM
Columbia Steam Laundry EM
Friend . 1 *C
Mr. and Mrs. Wing Let 5 M
Mrs. Mary Lee Grab*..". .... 1 M
Mrs. Godf-ry Thompwm I.M
Key West Woman s Chib It •
: Miss Mary Louise Sgotts
wood I.M
John Maloney Spott.tr oad I.o*
Miss Ileen Williams 2.80
John Bogart I.MI
Mrs. Jerry Trevor IN
Wm. P. Kemp J.N
S. tCabrera, Jr. EM
Rotary Club if.M
•Curry Memo IN
Wm. N. Knowles T 18*
Charles Archer -1M
MRS. TAYLOR TO
! ERECT RESIDENCE
!
Another residence is to he erect
ed on a site in the Marietta Tow
ers rubdivisioti. This trill he a
two-story frame dwelling to be
constructed for Mrs. Hugh Tay
lor at a cost of $5,0410.
This is indicated on the of
building and repair permits issued
from the office of Building In
! spoctor Harry M. Baker. Other -
! sues are for:
, New roof, galvanized iron. 718
! Eaton street. Owner, J. D. Redd;
cost, S2OO.
j Repairing floors, 700 EhzabeCi
street. Owner, N. W. M. church;
j cost, SSO.
Repairs to roof at. 927 Eaton
j street. Owner. S. B. Guther; cost,
j $215.
j Repairs to roof at 502 Petronia
I street Owner, A. Aguero; coat.
SSO.
General repairs at 725 Love
, Lane. Owner, Wiliis Brady; cost,
] $l5O.
Genera 1 repairs at Francis and
j Southard streets. Owner, E. S.
] Bairstow; cost, SSOO.
ciety before the cultural group*
in Cuba, Andres Vargas Gomez,
j vice president of the local chap
ter of the Pan American Poetry
Society, and vice Cuban Consul in
this city, will leave within a short
time for Cuba, and will be ac
companied by Raymond Laxeano.'
also a delegate from tbe local
j chapter. Mr. Gomez is a grand
son of the Cuban patriot and
liberator. General Maximo Gomez.
A visitor and former resident,
i who pledges support to the meve-
J ment is Major O’Farril! who has;
a distinguished military service
; record, having served as an #f
ficer in the American and FYeacfa
armies as well as holding the rank
lof major in the Cuban army.
Major O’Farrill is serving as a
director of the society's activities
in cooperation with tbe president.
Mrs. Robert Byron Russell.
It is announced that the sneisty*
will sponsor classes in conversa
tional Spanish (Berlitz method)
, for those adults who may wish to
learn Spanish. These classes wifi
begin as soon as a sufficient num
ber of adults have been enrolled.!
and it is stated the number wil
be limited. Those interested are*
asked to call Miss Marie Cappiek,
j phone 436-J for information re
, garding tbe society, or the Span
: ish classes which will he open to
j non-members of toe Paa Amer
i icsn Poetry Society as well as to
* members. \
pm nncrsTi
Pcwas of >ii and Lso
rmior ti* tnr soil swr oatow
griionn **“*s whror ttomoamis of
crack Wwogo hnr *hr aoog
wcaftm w *he dag whoa fowl
: d*phono t fatis and thr F—eh
1 war soriar aio—s oho netsoo.
! reguijco.tii on thr fsnhhrr, Frmrn
i grease suH hHZ of oaaghora fijr-r
--' many. Ease*. Ban amid rf. £•■<*-
1 lens, Stuttgart Ff—hi in V* fr
: iogtie ana otarr noportasn sni ■ -
< trxa4 centers art* ctoaa to thr .’iso
| her.
in 193a thr tofar Aader Magi-
I not. then France's anWi r of
; war. pwthed through thr fisaC
; credos Tor thr 1925-auir < ansa
|o i forti: icotmm which were to
j bear hi.- name. Today thr ■agi-
I not line is I'oiophjtn—a oati ml
I mam fswtatiua of F rrorh pn
reich.
At Kehi. German side of the in
ternational bridge here, naan in*k
across the Rhinr at egg-shaged
casemate* facing the roach, hot
what they canao* aee are the an>
dergrotmd “abn” beneath a orb
only fiat —d— and wheat
fields, they know that n s-x
years F'ranee ana bwdt shell proof
beiow the surface.
electric railroads enwarrnwg a*-
| dergronnd uarrocka. mesa hah*.
tier troops Irse m the light gen
erated by their owa underground
power plants.
Endbm belts carry diN from
deep munition dumps to the eare
f’Silj -aranc laged big guas. An*i
airt-rs't battmrs are as ta*L-d
that French expert* Win ee a
curtain o r bad wonld faere at
tacking pianes ta esnoa the 'ren
tier only at tremendous hrtgfcU.
Eiaborate vent- at mg ysema
mmkt the jmieryrosnd bnrrarlcs
habitable and stares af ox* pm
wait gainst the day whew *toel
doors crash shut against ga* at
tack*.
Underground stoswnaasns cow
tarn enongh faad and drink for
k Tiaiti 11
reserve* and srppiieo ta the frank
with e a few boars. A aetnook
rvatem.
SATL’RDAY NIGHT
DANCE
HAUL; 5 CLUB

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