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TUESDAY, APRIL 4, 1939
by 55c 2 ELLIOTT TAYLOR
Chapter 39
The Besieged City
"IT IS all over with James,"
* Petrel told them.
"I say. you dd that!" Peter was
concerned, affectionate.
“I would have been broken any
way. It never really worked. I’d
been away too long. Perhaps I
could have held him to it I don’t
know. I didn’t try. Because he’s
more In love with Tamara, and I
think they’ll be happy."
“With Tamara—after all!" Pet
ronella could heai the edgy ‘re
sentment in Peters voice. She
squeezed his arm, and smiling,
shook her head at him reprov
ingly.
“Don’t be angr. Think straight!
I didn’t at first That wa* why.
when Clare first asked me to come
out here. I wouldr't But she made
me see it differently."
There was a silence, till Tony
• said fervently. “Lord bless Clare!”
Peter withdrew his arm in hasty,
comical embarrassment.
“I say. you two can get or with
out me for a few minutes. I think
I’d iust like to get back into the
light and rea'i Marigold’s letter "
Petronella opened her handbag
and found it for him. ‘‘Here it is!"
When he had gone. To.iv*? arm
went around her shoulders. Grave
ly. he asked her. “Would you go
home again, ant. wait for me in
if I Drnmised to be there
within a rronti.’"
Petronella tut red. and stood
sauarp with him. She smiled and
shook her head. “There’s no need
I’m nnt afraid anv longet.”
H*s arms went round hei n"!l
--jro hpr r’o*e to him he hissed
hard and oainfullv hrM
tihtlv to him. hi' rough lean
cv—V nressed against her own
“T Incatjr to lose ~r>,i tike
n ut I thought it was for vour
gC®'* ** t
mutrln t know. Tf I hado t
|n"'d von it m*"ht u -ve been “
Kp held her awa\ from him ex
altn!r'< mijrt'v
- T h“!ieve 1 nnr
om to t-v a"*' s *'. Y->’*
r ef cr and revolted T
thrill"*'* vn'M marrv von.- Tames
a’' 4 live haontv TVpnk.
irni" nvnr n*eh mfi-r!ro
ttt T.Oll hadn’t worried me
<*-> that Thor msrrv
I n ,* T remrc t" the- *><r
„* h->—-“d e**”ritv. wh ; "h
*-"~i TV,t n-oe t*'"
1., . | n-r;* a rrn->h
r „ ---, n.. thot tirne T wasr’* *o
<t , ra f ; t a fW?e4jl*n “ *
*-• mi • “ehte. rr.-'r-s-d
♦„ Potnt rea.d ’-’a y‘—
frnw, vo" r letters didn't
r-Jhntti hoorn "
von hr-® tried to stop
p.. -.—-..lnn 'I ’ “
T f vt .-r’< re-r>in #•"h t
!_ ; mu 'o'""'* r *'‘ J -oti ha' 1
|V. . (n r"Vi h"" 1 -
r* r~a„d “n—c sno*
fr-- * *— **—" A **
* „„I. U r w Wot *v> rV-' J --
r _ ' _.. 11 -.1 hr-
so he could srr
h— *“ "ft
•h,i'ro *h?Ti P >* V""' *"*PS ft-ft
r*-r- r T.i-l-rl T l '® ct**-S
()! * -*• *— h **
*t, 'f : -C A mMrh *" H-.
f rr ' j not serrv 1
r*-" Jim;!..*"
|M ’’’T'q efttt
r#WA- Pr.rrt P-ijU-ii |e
it; hrll R'l* tn
trip ,♦ •*•! r"'>nV>r!t. things feet
re * "
r*V) p ■ , ' l * -* W
V. n-i-r-4 V°’ v t : "’h*t*'. nr, h'<-
|,.l tenwimKrt chp nTC
C'—o hrd been ri'*'-* forms
h*t ♦- * l -.--ft A* ♦.r —.-ftI V A.
I one. ‘tark Priv*
“II’E’RE getting near Albacete
* fiod Peter. He's rr< b
ablv engaged in nolitical argument
by this time” With Tonv’s arm
round her. Petrel opened he com
partment doni again Peter looker!
up at them. He had been studying
with the corporal ,a grimy map if
the environs of Madrid.
“In cake Clare’: idea is feasible.
I think I’ve spotted iust the place
for your children’s camp,” he told
toer "Place called Chinchon. prac
tically deserted now. barns, school.
Casino all readv for occupation.
Come and look!”
Petrel bent obediently. “Where
Is it?" she asked “I believe we
went there one dav. when we
were last in Madrid.”
“That’s the place!" He looked
up into her face, which was close
to his own. He raised his eyebrows,
question ingly. “Everything all
right?"
Petronella smiled and nodded.
One of her hands was still in
Tony’s. Tony leaned forward.
"Peter getting curious?" But
Peter denied it flatly.
“Shucks! I’ve got eyes," he said.
They accomplished the long,
dark drive to Madrid safely. But
they did not feel sure that the lor
ries. ahead of which they hurried,
could have done the same. It was
a moonless summer night But
there were stars. They drove as
fast as they dared, without lights.
They left the convoy several miles
behind.
They had been going for over an
hour m Peter’s large car, when
they heard the drone of planes to
SCOOT TROOP
HOLDS SESSION
Members of Boy Scout Troop
51 held a very interesting meet
ing last night at the headquarters
in Wesley Hall. The meeting was
in charge of Scout Anthony Al
bury and the session was opened
with the Lord’s Prayer, followed
by the flag salute. Mr. Peirce
gave a short talk on test passing.
the west They knew what they
might have to expect.
“Drive on. ftst.” he urged the
driver. They fleo through the
warm summer night past barren
hills, and barely cultivated fields.
The isolated, curiously shaped
trees of Spai 1. stood darkly
against the star-whitened sky._
A few minutes later, behind
them, they heard the rattle of ma
chine gun fire.
Real War
PETRONELLA turned in her !
seat to look through the talc j
window, in the back of the hood.
She was silent. She was hoping
that the voun cornoral would
have come through with his life.
That the plight oi those men was
not as terrible as it sounded.
“Afraid thev’re getting it. But
they’ll have scattered." Tonv’s
arm tightened round her. She
leaned her head, so that it touched
his, for a moment.
“They didn’t see us. We shall get
through all right now.” Peter was
casual. Petronella supposed that j
he was used to this kind of expe
rience. His only reason for hurry
ing had been th&t she was with
them She remembered other
times, when “vet. that degree of
caution would not have occurred to
him. But Madrid must be more
perilous than anvwhere else they
had been together. This was real
war. To perform his job. Peter
must risk his Mfc constantly. He
would do so. unfailingly. She was
beginning to understand w hy
Martin thought st much of Peter.
Peter’s work did still come first
with him. even though he loved
Marigold, and must wish t< live.
Had she alwavs misiudged him.
-he wondered, or had he changed?
nast vears. c he had believed that
work was a blessing to
Poter. because he loved danger.
Bpcaiice he was never fully alive,
ov/iop* when h* was encountering ,
risks. Rut whether that had been
or not. when he was ■
h“!i**ved that now he h*>d
outlook He seted witn
rp~l
And Tnnv? She had not dared J
to a=k. vet. whether they con
♦n,nlned flving over thp lines, to
Tranoo’s territory as Martin he
tieved nnsrible Tonv was still h**re
*"d had not mentioned leaving,
would >,t soon enough.
Thev were searched for arms
and h?d to show their papers four
gfipf pnfpri.J the cjtv. he-
Inrp the" -cached the hotel RristM.
Twice, ♦heir car was fire'* upon for
no apparent reason Here and
hnildiv<*s. aM fallen cascades of
oasonrv showed where shells had
drc-iped.
“S-ip-ns farlv o”iet Peter com
reer-ted Petroneßa controlled a
to laugh *s v e would get
used to it soon Whet he meant
was tb**t *here h—d a hr*ef
in shellin'*. The nnrter
of the hotel assured them “there
y-i- —ot touch h*>opening torveht j
"With an t f itpk. we shall all pt
sleen" Tonv r "reed, cmiling.
n..,-* it pptrel."^
Pfi'p.ii'h *atd good night to I
*w,oro hnfh. r ' , r some tim° she i
oT?nd I* imnncsihle to sleep Tho-e :
t.,-- ;no-mi**ppt noise below *n
♦h st r '*'’ 4 s. SV° heard fisin®.' and
Vniv that, as *hev had told h"r to i
ojrr** sr* ; nnrs were b ,,c v from
roof fens and windows. Although
•he was h’nnv tonight, hem was
haoninnser TJotor’s
WOr/ts she '-prw that he W 35 ex- j
ooctine th ! ns to get tvorse. The j
front lire was getting nearer 1
-r. 3 -or F-aneo was go’ng to take ;
Thn horrihle things han- i
n-ning c*it thre r.ow. were noth
ing to thev would spe if thev
-♦-•'•ft-t Tf she s*eved Petrel eon- ]
hprsplf For Peter would
ce“*air!v remain, or. with Tonv
r.niv oychence* Madrid for an
eoinilv hazardour adventure. As j
lore as she could steed it. without :
hindering them. Petrel deter- i
mined she would wait here. From j
what Peter had told her. she could
do Clare’s iob. easilv. within a few
davs. But it migh h® some time
hpfore she was asked to help in ,
ac*ual organization.
She met Peter at breakfast, and
poured out his coffee for hbr He
saw that she was pale. He smiled
encouragingly. But he himself
looked disheveled and tired.
“It is extraordinary how you get
used to things.”
“Yes. I expect I shall." • i
"There’s a big raid expected to
night. so I’ve advised Tony to put
off Chinchon till tomorrow. He’s
going to introduce vou to some
of the most useful authorities, in
stead.
“Do you think they’ll agree?"
"Thinking it ovet. I believe it is*
too near home. These people are
extraordinary. A week ago. a camp
was planned fo* them, and a train
load of refugees, was deoosited
about forty miles south. But bv
the time the second train arrived,
the first lot had time to discover
how bare and uncomfortable
everything was and to feel home
sick. They simply oiled in and
came back again."
Petronella could not help feeling
he might be right. It would not be
as easy as it sounded, to help Clare.
(Covvrioht 1939 Ora cm RlHott Taylort
Tomorrow: Love ud war.
and read a notice, which was sent
by the Court of Honor.
Announcement was made re
garding the Boy Scout sphagetti
supper being arranged for April
15 for the purpose of raising
funds for the summer encamp
ment, and at the end of the
meeting tickets were given the
members for distribution.
Anew game was played and
the meeting came to an end with
the scoutmasters’ benediction.
Guests attending the meeting
were former Scoutmaster George
F. Archer and Mrs. C. C. Price.
RESUME OF SAINTS’
CLUB GIVEN BY ST.
AUGUSTINE RECORD
KEY WEST PLAYERS TRYING
TO MAKE BERTH ON TEAM;
TO BE SEEN IN ACTION
SOON
The St. Augustine Record of
April 1 had the following article
concerning the Saints’ baseball
club of that city, and on which
team several Key West players
are attempting to gain a berth:
“Skipper Mobley claims that
his outfield is 0.k., but he will
keep one of the rookies as a sub
stitute. The regulars will be Glen,
Howell, Archie Helm, from last
year’s squad, and Ray Headbfi, a
good prospect from Jacksonville.
Zimmerman, from the baseball
school thrt was conducted here,
will stick around a few weeks. J.
. Barcelo, of Key West, has not
been able to be seen in action yet,
but we will tell more about him
in a few days.
“The pitchers in camp are Earl
Eickler, Pete Gadek, John Low
!
ers, Tenny Miller, John Bundy,
Dallas O’Neal, Donald O’Higgins
and Harry Wickers. A few more
will report in camp before a se
lection is made.
“Faulene Kirkland will return
to the lineup this year. played
a great game for the Saints last
year. Bill Snyder, picked up
from the baseball school, will be
given a chance at short. Other
i infielders in camp are Joe Cow
chi, an Indian lad; Ernest Step
hens, and a boy named Kirkland.
Also here are Mario Hernandez,
Anthony Kelly and J. Carbonell.
"Ludy Judy, skipper last year
l of the Saints, will be back with
the club, and Joe Navarro, a
1 Cuban catcher, make up Mobley’s
! squad at present. From this squad
he must pick five amateurs of no
professional experience, five with
at least Class D experience and
five with experience of more
than Class D”.
So, it will be hard for Skipper
Mobley to pick out five non-ex
perienced men. . .and there are 24
players in camp.
HIGH SCHOOL NINE
WILL BEGIN PLAY OF
SEASON TOMORROW |
NEWLY-ORGANIZED OUTFIT
TO HAVE U. S. ARMY AS
OPPOSITION; LINEUP OF
EDUCATORS GIVEN
_____
The newly- organized High
School baseball club will play its
first game of the season tomorrow
afternoon, 4 o’clock, against U. S.
Army nine at the Army Bar
racks.
Soldiers have been practicing
for several weeks and are ready
for the Educators. The School is
whipping a club is shape for next
year when games with upstate
high schools will be played.
Lineup of the Educators in
clude: Eddie Nelson, catcher;
Charles, pitcher; E. Pinder, first
base; Joe Atwell, second base;
Jasper Walker, third base; L.
Gonzalez, shortstop; J. Ogden,
Anthony McMahon and Peter
Rosam, outfielders. There are
several other outstanding players
at the school who will be out for
practice after this game.
Army will use Nodine, White,
Ross and several other players,
who will give any amateur club
in the city a hard tussle.
OBLIGING GROCER
OKLAHOMA CITY—Mrs. Mal
colm Rosser of Muskogee thinks
she has the best grocer in the
state of Oklahoma. To place an
order she calls him and says
“Send a wiell rounded meal to
day. with all the. vitamins, and
the usual amount of meat” And
he does. She never has to worry
about diet details, or a change of
. menu.
SPORTS
Washington Roar
’< •••*•• "V £ X
J D
■ ■ II
JjF
W.. ■ *■:
' P I
From the throat of Clark Griffith, the “old fox” of
the Washington Senators, comes a shout to the rookies to
hustle it up. He’s at the Orlando, Florida training camp.
IL©
By HUGO S. SIMS, Special Washington Correspondent of The Citis} |
Eccles Challenges Foes Of Spending
To Balance Budget And Get Recovery
Marriner S. Eccles, chairman of
the board of governors of the!
Federal Reserve System, has been
the outstanding advocate of the
policy of governmental spending?
as -the major effort, at this time,'
to promote recovery.
i
Recently, before the special ’
Senate committee on Silver Leg
islation Mr. Eccles denied that
prosperity depends upon “volume
of currency”, pointing out that
there was considerably less cur
rency outstanding in the ’twen- i
ties when we had reasonably full
employment. Today currency in '
banks is $5,700,000,000 and bank
deposits subject to check, $26,-
000,000,000, while in 1929 the
figures were $3,600,000,000 and
$23,000,000,000, respectively.
Employment and national in- j
com, according to the Eccles;
theory, depend not only upon the'
amount of money in existence
but also upon its use. Idle money
does little or nothing to produce
employment or increase national
income. Illustrating this theory, j
$1,000,000 spent every day would |
produce better results than $lO,-;
000,000 remaining idle in the j
banks.
More significant, however, was
the challenge to Congress to
slash spending and test the
soundness of the views of those
who Oppose his program. Declar
-1 ing that this would not be his
way and that a “policy of re
trenchment under present condi
tions would have disastrous re
sults”, Mr. Eccles admitted that
“a great majority of people ap
pear to believe that business con-!
fidence would be restored if the
budget were balanced and that
the spurt of economic activity that
would result would accomplish
our common aim of recovery.
Because “we live in a demo
cracy” the “viewpoint of the ma
jority should promptly be made *
effective” as “the country is en
titled to a clear-cut and prompt
determination of this vital issue”.
Consequently, as Congress deter- \
mines the taxes and the amount
!of government money to be used
for different purposes, the budget!
can be balanced by reducing the
level of expenditures which is
controlled by Congress.
Elucidating his own viewpoint'
Mr. Eccles said the crucial ques
tion is how to make our abundant
I money supply function more ef- j
fectively. He recognized two
schools of thought:
(1) His own, believing that en
couragement should be given pri
vate enterprise for profitable em
ployment of surplus funds, men
and resources, but with the pro
viso that when private enterprise
failed to function the government
•should help put men, money and
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN
resources to work upon non-com
petitive socially and economically
desirable public activities, includ
ing the building of roads, schools,
hospitals, public buildings, etc.
Such expenditures, plus those for
farm benefits and adequate bene- 1
fits to the aged, will increase the
demand for the output of indus
try, sustain existing investments
and provide outlets for new en
terprises. Thus the national in
come would be enhanced and the
budget ultimately balanced.
(2) Another, which believes
that business confidence cannot
be restored until a balanced bud
get is assured through reduction
of government expenditures, that
continued deficits are holding
back private investment, that
government employment is de
moralizing and destructive of the
moral fibre of our people, {hat
public expenditures are wasteful
and piling up a burden of debt,
which our children and grand
children will have to pay. This
group believes that for every i
dollar the government borrows
and spends private enterprise is
deterred from spending two.
JL
Defending his own position, Mr.
Eccles says that “when our pro
ductive capacity is in excess of
current demand, as it is today, it
does not make sense to me to ex
pect that a reduction in demandj
originating ffom government ac-!
tivities is going to lead the mak
ers of agricultural implements,
the railroads, the automobile
manufacturers, the textile indus
try, or, for that matter, any
other, industry, to enlarge plant,
capacity, increase production and,
thus furnish employment”.
He continues: “If the buying
power of millions of people on
WPA rolls or in public construc
tion, or in shipyards and airplane
factories is reduced, I do not see
how we can expect more houses
to be built and more capital ex
penditures to take place**. •’
Following the Eccles statement
Senator Harrison and Senator
Byrd, leaders of the economy
group, accepted the challenge,
but with the distinct understand
i ing that the job was not that .of
Congress alon%. Mr. Harrigofi said
no one "believe* that the Federal
! budget can be completely.. bal
anced now” end Mr. Byrd declar
> ed* that the efforts of those who
| haye been working for “retrench
ment and economy” could be
! greatly aided by cooperation frtxti
j thqse in the executive branch of
•the govemnteftt.* * *
Hie Virginia Senator Hailed Mi*.
Eccles’ recognition of the- fact
that “business' men add the
public generally believe deficit
spending to be a ' deterrent to
business recovery and its con
, tinuaaoe has impaired hsirin—
confidence”. He said it was the
duty of those in authority to
translate the public will into ac
tion and suggested that Congress
immediately cancel all lump sum
: appropriations and assume full
control over all Federal expendi
tures.
“CLASSIFIED*
COLUMN
Advertisements under this head
will be inserted in The Citizen at
the rate of one-cent (lc) a word
. for each insertion, but the mini
mum for the first insertion in
every instance is twenty-five
cents (25c).
Advertisers should give their
street address as well as their
telephone number if they desire
results.
Payment for classified adver
tisements is invariably in ad
vance, but regular advertisers
with ledger accounts may have
their advertisements charged.
__________________________
FOR SALE
.
FOR SALE—Cottage Reed Organ
in fine condition. Apply Il
lingworth, 615 Elizabeth street.
apr3-tf
FORD TRUCK, 1%-ton, mechan
ically perfect, good tires, very
economical in operating. A real
bargain, $l5O. Phone 810.
apr4-lmo
R. S. HOWARD PIANO, $50.00;
Electric Range, $25. Two-burner
(covered) Gas Plate, $7.50. AIL
in good condition. Apply AL-'
BURY’S SERVICE. marl3-tf
PERSONAL CARDS, $1.25 per
100. THE ARTMAN PRESS.
}un2s-tf
SIGNS—“For Rent”, “Rooms For
Rent’’, “Apartment For Rent”,
“Private Property, No Tres
passing”, 15c each. THE ART
MAN PRESS. - nov2s-tf
DESIRABLE CORNER LOT,
55’x84’, reasonable price.
Terms. Abstract, of Title furn
ished. Box CM, The Citizen.
mar27-tf
FOR RENT
.■'-■—■■■■ ■■■ ■ ■ ■
APARTMENT, 1104 Division
street, opposite Tift’s Grocery.
Modem, hot water. See Ray
mond Lord, County Court.
mar29-tf
I
FURNISHED HOUSES—aII mod
em conveniences. 1114 Grin
nell Street nov3-tf
ROOMS
NEW VALDEZ INN, 521 United.
Sixteen beautiful new rooms.
Across South Beach. Phone
9135. . feb23-tf
HOTELS
BRING YOUR VISITING friends
in need of a good night’s rest to
OVERSEAS HOTEL. Clean
rooms, innerspring mattresses.
Under new management. 917
Fleming Street. novlß-tl
HELP WANTED
WANTED—Six men, phone for
appointment at La Concha
Hotel Wednesday from 2 until
6. Mr. Brewer. apr4-lt
WANTED
"‘ “ 1
WANTED—A chance to bid on
your next printing order. The
Artman Press. mayl9-tf i
JOB PRINTING
of AH Kinds
* Wo are equipped to
do aU kinds of print
ing quickly, eco
nomically, and with
the best of workman
ship. Call 51 for an
estimate.
RAPID SERVICE
REASONABLE PRICES
FREE ESTIMATES
THE AKTMAN PRESS
PHONE St
TW Citizen Building
THE WEATHER
Temperatures*
Highest 82
Lowest 70
Mean 76;
Normal Mean 74
Rainfall*
Yesterday’s Precipitation .01ns.
Normal Precipitation .05 Ins.
*Tki record term S4-lur period
endinic at H o'clock this morainic-
Tomorrow’s Almanac
Sun rises 6:14 a. m. I
Sun sets 6:45 p. m.
Moon rises 8:32 p. m.
Moon sets 7:10 a. m. {
Tomorrow's Tides
AM. P.M.
High 10:16 11:20;
Low 3:50 4:41 ;
Barometer, 7:30 a. m., today
Sea level, 30.00. J
WEATHER FORECAST
(Till 7:30 p. m.. Wednesday)
Key West and Vicinity: Partly
cloudy tonight and Wednesday:
gentle to moderate winds, mostly
northeasterly.
Florida: Partly cloudy tonight
and Wednesday, becoming un
settled near east coast.
Jacksonville to Florida Straits
and East Gulf: Gentle to mod
erate winds, ryostly northeaster
ly, and partly overcast weather
tonight and Wednesday.
L *l> \ f
j .. , JP / Jk * & | iJ * | Mil A
zjmUMh
jMrjjL I There’* nothin? to compare to tibe ffceehlei
fragrance of Spring aa yon travel along epee
i m 1 HFxßf highways. To really gat the "teeT of Sp^ng-
I jyMjjHT jqk time... to enjoT the new-horm beeaty mi
l changing landacapee... go North fry bee. ITa
t YY the best way to traveL yet tares are free
f> —si?"* than ever.
1] jES NEW REDUCED EARES—
JarLwmt lllr S 7-V. barl'at'e. Ik C. III.SM
A Miaiwi XU** • harlMite 1X75
i iPwI Stlaeta lU-V. Ilirhimnr lM
vUuItBEA * kaiUMMiar .. Ma.k'itwa, U. C. I7.se
Na-lii illc 13 w* l*hiletfelphia .... !•.&
ii 3 K\*k Illc I -.mi fit i .karr h 3M.75
* hi-*ic -!-**• >ew lark 3aoj
j | —! BUS STATION
Cor. Southard and Bahama Sts.
W&k PHONE 242
■ I jmm Mr rar — i i mg| - M 5 W 9
Tt INFORMATION O
r OR TOURISTS
Entertainment Fishing Accommodations
MONROE THEATER
Joe E. Brown—Leo Carrillo
FLIRTING WITH FATE
and
FRESHMAN YEAR
Matinee—Balcony 10c, Or
chestra 15-20 c; Night—ls-25c
NO NAME LODGE I
Famous Bahia Honda Fishing •
Reef - Tarpon - Permit -
Bone Fishing
Cottages— sl per person and up J
Stone Crab Dinners a Specialty j
Phone No Name Key No. I j
For Information
OVERSEAS
CAFE AND LODGE
Marathon. Fla. Phone No. 4
"The Best in Food and Rooms*’ {
Between Key West and Miami
COMPLETE GARAGE SERVICE
Charley Toppino. Prop.
"Meet Your Friends At . . ~
Key West Bowling Alleys
Opposite Jefferson Hotel
S ALLEYS
DUCK PINS . . . TEN PINS
Open 11 A. M. to 11 P. M.
Management
"Billy*’ Warren and "Jack** Long
PAGE THREE
SECOND SHEETS
500 Sheets
for
50c
MANILA. fHxll
WHITE
TYPEWRITING
PAPER
500 Sheets
for
75c
—THE—
ARTMAN PRESS
The Citizen Bldg.
PHONE 51
. For Over a Generation
Strong Arm Brand
COFFEE
Obtainable Ail Over Town!
Piiate
Steffi Duna . . . Stanley Momor
I CONQUER THE SEA
Also—Comedy -Shorts
PRIZE NITE TONIGHT
"Key West's Outstanding!"
LA CONCHA HOTEL
Beautiful—Air-conditioned
Rainbow Room and Cocktail
DINING and DANCING
Strictly Fireproof Garage
Open The Year Around
PIRATES COVE
FISHING CAMP
Pirates Cove, Sugar Loaf Key
BEST FISHING IN FLORIDA
Individual CABINS with
Appointments for the
Discriminating
CHARTER BOATS

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