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Associated Press Day Wire
Service
For 60 Years Devoted to the
Best Interests of Key West
VOLUME LXI. No. 218.
City Council In
First Of Two
Special Meets
Plumbers’ Code Scheduled
Tonight ; Delinquent
Taxes Up For Discus
sion Tomorrow
City Council will keep a busy
schedule over this wekend with
two special meetings slated for
discussions on subjects of city
wide interest.
First of the “specials” has been
called for tonight at 8:00 o’clock,
when the second and final read
ing of the new Plumbers’ Code
Ordinance—s4-pages long will
be featured.
The second special meet will
open tomorrow night, scheduled
as a full discussion of ways and
means to collect delinquent taxes
owed the city.
Citizens of Kev West have ex
pressed much interest in tomor
row’s meeting and Indications are
that a good-sized crowd will be
in the gallery seats to witness
council procedure on the ques
tion.
In that a recent maneuver pre- 1
vented collection of personal i
property taxes—distress warants !
for which were issued by tax col
lector Sam Pinder, only to have
council interference when the po
lice department was stopped from i
making collections—residents are
wondering what may prevent a
serious attempt to collect 1030
delinquent real estate taxes.
It was pointed out recently that
if anv process of tax sales is to
be attempted, publication of the
delinauent list is necessary. The
council appeared to be about
evCnly divided on the subject.
The estimated cost, using the
countv li?t as a criterion, would
be in the neighborhood of SI,OOO.
National Defense
The Republican View
By ROBERT A. TAFT
United Slates Senator from Ohio
President Roosevelt is appeal
ing for a third term, in vioation
of the principles of the American
republic, largely on the ground
that he has been the only true
exponent of preparedness and is
the. only man competent to carry
on a preparedness program.
While substantial progress has
been made in the last few months,
the history of the last seven years
shows that no one could possibly
have been more incompetent in
preparedness for defense than
the New Deal administration.
In accordance with the plat
form of 1932. President Roosevelt
reduced the expenditure for the
army and navy during his first
year. Adolf Hitler came into
power in Germany in January,
1933. and the seven years of the
present administration saw the
rise of the German army from
100.000 to 4jQ00,000 men, with the
most modem mechanical equip
ment. If we waked up suddenly
to find ourselves unprepared to
meet a possible attack by Ger
many, it could only have been
the fault of the present admin
istration.
• • •
• The causes of unpreparedness
were inherent in the New Deal.
When the first emergency blank
check for $3,300,000,000 was vot
ed by Congress in 1933, it was
proposed that $2,000,000,000 be
spent for mechanization of the
army. The President rejected the
MOTOR TUNE-UPS PROPERLY DONE WILL SAVE GAS... WE ARE EXPERTS IN THIS LINE, LOU SMITH AUTO SERVICE, DUVAL AND DIVISION STEEP
(the SCcm TUrat (Eitizcu
RAIN, RAIN- AND
STILL MORE RAIN
"We've had enough rain,
thank you—at least for the
present".
That was the consensus of
opinion in Key West this
morning as more rain de
scended to push the excess
for the month and the year
up to new high levels.
Weather Bureau records
today revealed that a total of
7.11 inches of rain has fallen
so far this month, not in
cluding the fall after 7:30
o'clock this morning, which
was considerable.
Excess for the month was
listed at 4.38 inches—and the
excess since January Ist is
3.44 inches. Last year a to
tal of 42.38 inches fell. To
match that figure, approxi
mately 14 more inches of rain
will have to fall during the
next three and one-half
months.
CIVIL SERVICE NOTICE
Comdr. G. B. Hoey, U.S.N.
! (Ret.), senior member of the
Labor Board at the Naval Sta
tion, notified The Citizen of the
• following amendment for exami
; nations for Sailmaker and
Joiner:
“The United States Civil Serv
ice Commission announces that
as sufficient applications have
been filed to meet the needs of
the service, no additional ap
plications for the examinations
listed above will be accepted un
less filed with the Recorder,
Labor Board, U. S. Naval Sta
tion, Key West. Florida, prior to
the hour of closing business on
September 18. 1940.”
proposal, and turned it over to
P.W.A. for all kinds of public
works.
Untold billions have been
spent, but for purposes having a
much closer relation to making
votes than to making ships. New-
Deal types of spending have been
the first love of the administra
tion. but comparatively little has
gone for defense because the
voting public were not interested
at that time.
There was not even a plan for
preparedness. The possibility of
German victory' has always exist
ed. and should at least have been
Drovided for. On May 16. 1940,
the President requested a billion
dollars to put us in good defense
condition. Two weeks later he
asked for another billion. Now
he is demanding another bill for
five billion dollars more. Even
on May 31, when the Germans
had broken through in Belgium,
he was satisfied with an army of
280.000. Now he wants 1.200,-
000. Certainly the first program
and the second program must
(Continued on Page Four)
WEEK-END SPECIALS
DATE NUT and DEVIL'S
FOOD LAYER QQ n
CAKES OOL
Maloney Bros. Bakery
Phona 818 812 Fleming Street
THE SOUTHERNMOST NEWSPAPER IN THE U. S. A.
COUNTY HAS
1728 ROOMS
FORTOURISTS
HOTEL COMMISSIONER RE
LEASES REPORT SHOWING
17 HOTELS AND APART
MENT HOUSES
(Special to The Cltlsea)
TALLAHASSEE, Sept. 12.
Monroe county has 1,728 rooms
available for tourists and winter
visitors during the 1940-’4l sea
son. according to figures released
by W. M. Taylor, state hotel com
missioner.
The facilities. Commissioner
Taylor said, are approved and li
censed under the strict health,
sanitation and safety regulations
of the state hotel commission.
A breakdown of the figures,
Taylor reported, shows that the
epunty has 17 hotels with a com
bined total of 735 rooms available
for transients, 17 apartment
houses wfith a combined total of
249 rooms, and 114 rooming
houses with a total of 744 rooms.
Permits were issued to a total
of 19.582 hotels, apartment houses
and rooming houses within the
current license year, he went on,
in all counties of the state. This
represented a total of 313,979
available rooms.
ONLY 94 HAVE
RENEWED CARDS
DRIVER’S LICENSES ARE
MOVING SLOWLY; AUTO
ISTS AWAIT DEADLINE
In usual style, awaiting close
ness of the deadline date on Octo
ber Ist, Key Westers are re
porting in quite desultory man
ner to the office of County Judge
Raymond R. Lord to renew their
driver’s licenses, or to get new'
ones, as the case may be.
At noon today, less than 100
licenses had been renewed, this
in the face of nearly 3,000
licenses that will have to be re
newed according to last year’s
figures. So far there has been no
indication that the deadline date
will be extended, it was stated.
BATTERIES CHASE BOMBERS AWAY
EXPECT DRAFT TO
START ON OCT. 15
SENATE-HOUSE CONFERENCE
DECIDES FINAL STATUS
OF BILL
IBt ANMOciated Prem)
WASHINGTON. Sept. 12
Senate and House conferees end
ed their discussions on the Burke-
Wadsworth conscription bill this
morning and members of the
special joint-committee prepared
to offer final drafts of the revis
ed bill to their respective houses
late today.
Highlights of the new measure
will find all men registering be
tween the ages of 21 to 35 inclu
sive with a special amendment
calling on taking over factories
“if the need exists”.
The House amendment to de
lay the measure for 60 days was
turned down by the conferees.
Army experts were looking
forward to the start of conscrip
tion by October 15th, with actual
training to begin a month later.
In the meantime, appropriations
were being rushed to build hous
ing quarters at several training
camps. A total of $30,000,000 was
set aside, tentatively, for that
purpose.
WALLET. LOST IN 1938, FOUND
SOMERSET. Mass.—While at
tempting to save a youth from
drowning during the September.
1938. hurricane, William Sylvia
lost his pocketbook contaniing
$l5O. Recently, the wallet was
found, battered, but intact, by an
inmate of a Swansea orphanage
and returned to Mr. Sylvia.
KEY WEST, FLORIDA, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1940
WANNA ‘ STAY IN BED TOMORROW?
••• * • •
Science-Unbeliever, But Warns Addicts To Beware
• • • ••• mm*
IF SUPERSTITIOUS, YOU’D BETTER
By ROBERT E. GEIGER, AP Feature Service Writer
Tomorrow is Friday the Thir
teenth.
Some people are so super
stitious about it they won’t get
out of their beds, and maybe it’s
just as well. If they did, there
would be a good chance some
thing would happen to them.
Science says so.
“Science doesn’t take any stock
in superstitions”, says Dr. Law
rence W. Miller of the University
of Denver, a psychologist well
versed in the reasons behind hu
mand behavior.
“Nevertheless, if you are des
perately fearful something is go
ing to happen to you on Friday
the Thirteenth, it is well to stay
in bed.
“You may be so upset you’ll be
off your guard or you may con
centrate so deeply on one fear
DOUBLE TROUBLE
For the superstitious there's
a double dose of ill luck on
Friday the Thirteenth. Both
Friday and 13 are associated
with the goddess of trouble.
Friday probably became an
omen of death because of its
association with the crucifixion.
The numeral 13 probably
first became a similar omen
because of the thirteen people.
Christ and the 12 apostles,
seated at the last supper.
that your alertness to other dan
gers will be diminished.
“Something entirely different
from what you had expected and
planned a defense against may
happen and take you unawares.
Thus trouble catches up with you
on Friday the Thirteenth”.
Some superstitions, according
to Dr. Miller, are good for people.
“There were superstitions about
crime, adultery and property
rights in olden times”, says Dr.
Miller. “For instance, the ghost of
the victim was supposed to in
habit a murderer's soul and tor
ment it.
“Such beliefs tended to restrain
murderous or criminal inclina
British Open Up With
New Gun On Nazi
Bombing Planes
(Bj- Aaftnciatrd I’rvnat
LONDON, Sept. 12.—Anti-air
craft batteries, consisting of
either new guns brought on the
scene or guns formerly held in
reserve, opened ud on the Nazi
raiding bombers last night and,
for the most part, prevented any
serious damage to the city in the
fifth night’s effort to bring fur
ther demolition to London.
Banging away in grand style,
the batteries fired incessantly,
dispatches stated, and succeeded
in bringing down a number of
planes and driving all others to
other points before bombs could
be dropped.
Daylight raids this morning,
and another late this afternoon
on this city were reported. One
bomb this morning fell in front
of famous old St. Paul's cathedral
and it was feared that the struc
ture had suffered irreparable
damage. Ropes kept the pop
ulace at considerable distance
from the cathedral.
Hitler’s planes conducted high
pressure raids on other English
cities, including Liverpool, where
the R. A. F. forces put up a
strong battle to drive the bomb
ers away. Considerable damage,
however, was inflicted on city
property of all types before the
raiders left with empty bomb
racks.
Rome dispatches carried stories
of increasing action on several
African sectors today, one story
stating that Italian forces were
on the march, heading towards
Suez points. Recapitulation of
plane losses, made by the i
i tions at a time when there were
neither laws nor policemen”.
Only A Guess
Many superstitions are dated
so far in antiquity nothing au
thentic is known of their origin.
It’s only a guess how many mod
ern ones were started.
“Some students say the com
mon superstition that it is bad
luck to light three on a match
had its origin in recent wars”,
says Dr. Miller.
“If a soldier lighted his cigaret
and kept the match burning long
enough for two or more other
men to get a light, enemy sharp
shotters had time to take careful
aim and fire upon the match
holder”.
People who knock on wood to
keep ill luck from intruding,
usually after they have made a
boast, are observing a ritual that
once was a religious one.
Form Of Supplication
“In ancient times pious peoples
touched a wooden cross as a form
of supplication”, savs Dr. Miller.
“It was a prayer. They believ
ed, the cross cast a spell of good
fortune about them. And so knock
ing on wood became an invita
tion to good luck”.
The horseshoe probably is a
sign of good luck because the
horse had been a friend of man,
Mr. Miller says.
Other things, like four-leaf
clovers, are good luck symbols
because a series of coincidences
probably occurred in which a per
son had good luck immediately
after he found, or otherwise had
some association with, a four-leaf
clover or other object.
From Days Of Black Magic
Similarly cats and witches are
symbols of ill luck. Incidentally,
says Dr. Miller, the black cat su
perstition dates back to the age
of black magic when darkness
was a svmbnl of eerie things.
People looked askance at any
thing black.
In one state a recent study dis
closed 4,000 superstitions held by
various citizens.
German People Wonder
j
About Hitler’s
Guarantees
* By l*rpn)
BERLIN, Sept. 12.—Adolf Hit
ler s embarrassing position in re
gard to vulnerability of Ger
many's capital city from plane 1
attack was made all the more
noticeable last night when news
agencies noted a full three-hour
attack by R. A. F. bombers which
brought additional damage to
many public buildings, the pride
of the German feuhrer.
Bombs fell on one of the city’s
main airdromes, creating havoc
and other damage was inflicted
on railroad stations and trans- :
porting lines from the city.
Believed to be strictly re
taliatory raids following the
Nazi bombing of Buckingham
palace yesterday, the British ap
parently were centering their
blows to force Hitler away from
his decree to “level London".
It was reported here today that j
the German people are beginning
to wonder about Hitler’s former
assertion that Berlin’s defenses
were ample to keep all British 1
planes away. So much damage j
has been inflicted already, and
so easily, that there is mounting
fear in the city that Berlin stands
in constant danger of entire de
struction.
Other British attacks last night
were centered on the great port 1
of Hamburg, where dock facili
ties were again damaged.
Italians, listed a total of 370
British planes shot down in the
Mediterranean Sea battles, to 63
Italian planes. Shipping losses
were also listed, including 27,000-
tons of British ships yesterday.
IJAYCEES WILL
! CO-OPERATE IN
! GUARD PROJECT
i
'
BACKS UP LIONS' POST
OFFICE RESOLUTION AND
CONSIDERS CONDITION OF
! CITY'S STREETS
Full cooperation of Junior
Chamber of Commerce will be
given organizers of Key West
Home Guard, it was decided at a
j meeting of this body last night at
Delmonico Restaurant. Joe Allen
presided.
Jaycces were addressed by
; Major Bob Spottswood, head of
I this organization, who told of its
functions and benefits to the
community and of the success
which the new semi-military
group had experienced in the
first stages of its organization.
, Club also went on record as
supporting 100 per cent a move
ment by the Key West Lions
Club to open another money or
der window in the local post of
fice. Resolution from the Lions
showed that present facilities
were inadequate to handle the
volume of business caused by the
increased governmental and
other activities. Jaycees adopted
a similar resolution to be for
warded to the Postmaster Gen
eral.
In cooperation with other
Jaycee groups in this district, the
local body voted to contribute to
the expansion work now going on
at Snapper Creek Boy Scout
Camp near Miami.
Lengthy discussion on condi
tion of city streets brought
about the appointment of a com
mittee composed of William R
Warren, Jr., chairman, Joe Pin
der and Henry Taylor to investi- 1
gate the possibility of getting a
WPA project to put streets in
shape before beginning of winter
season.
NO WONDER HE DIED
1 KANSAS CITY—John Cleve
land Price. 48. died of a heart at
■ tack while in a dentist’s chair.
He had just had twenty teeth ex
tracted.
WILLKIE SAYS F.D.R.
“DOES NOT KNOW”
i •
COMMENTS ON PRESIDENT S
SPEECH MADE LAST
NIGHT
i
H T Prrul
ELWOOD, Ind., Sept 12— Re
publican presidential candidate
Wendell L. Willkie commented
on President Roosevelt’s first po
!
litical speech made last night be
fore members of the national
i
teamsters’ union.
Declaring that Roosevelt was
heading for trouble with his
i “class-conscious and economic
sabotage” talk, Willkie stated
that “the kindest word that could
be said about the President was
that ‘he just doesn’t know what's
going on in the world today’.”
Republican leaders are heading
for Indianapolis today where a
mammoth conference is sched
uled for tonight. Starting tomor
row, Willkie will head West on
a tour of fourteen states.
ADVISORY
ADVISORY 10:00 a m EST
The tropical disturbance of mod
erate intensity was central 7:00
a. m. EST. about 200 to 250 miles
north of Puerto Rico apparently
moving slowly westnorth west
ward or northwestward. Caution
advised vessels in path
WEATHER BUREAU,
Jacksonville
Cnly Assessor
Takes Exception
To M AM
NINE INMATES
AT COUNTY HOME
A report from Icwii— War
ren. superintendent of tfao
Monroe County Mean. Snai
the names of cone persons
now supported by the cwugy
at that institution. The i
- was read at the cnaa
misrioner s msrting loot
night.
Inmates are:
Samuel Otis Moms .T 7.
Andrew J. Barthotow 71
Thomas Wilson. 88. Chaihi
H. Thompson. 78, ■obect
Randal. SS. Eugene FnHnrtL
63, Emily Sawyer. 77. Mu
A. Williams. 71. Mmase
Rodgers. 72.
APPROVE FIVE
LIQUOR LICENSES
ACTION TAKEN AT LAST
NIGHTS SESSION TWO
NEW ONES POSTED
Board of C v unty Cmamummmm
ers pa. sed its apprmai rm bw
new liquor licenses for csiaOtaafe
ments m the county at the meet
ing last night
Tho. c who may now praceec
to sell liquor by payment of tbr
license fees to the tax collector
by October Ist are:
Rene S. Marrhesaeau Craig.
Fla.; Julius F Stone Bora Cluca
Mabel McKinney. Key Larg<
Fred L. Marvil. Key West, aac
Edwin H Sylvester and Gbeam H
Billingsley. Key West
Two new applications au
placed on file for act**; at the
next regular meeting m October
They were* from the Ha ban* Ma
drid Club and from the Starhgh*
Club.
OUR DEFENSE
{EDITOR'S NOTE: Tmm mmm m r mmr *amm f
program. Future toloosos anti appaar a Tha OMbb •
Thursdays and Mondays*
THE UNITED STATE* NAVI
A fleet is an organization that
I comes alive when men have sweet
and strainea. trained and anew
lated deep in the bolds cf tfaear
fighting ship, across a mhlw
square miles of ocean, acruas a
space of years. A Beet is an r
-gaiuzatton of men—and aha*.
A ship is a cross between
fortress, a bridge, a krwwitK.
a rocking horse, a skyscraper
and a human being. The aate
of a fighting ship are more com
plex than those of a huraa br
ing. but no work of man ha* an
exterior more ponderous and
formidable It is put tugrtarr
on a set of building way*, a,a.
I two or three cranes Those
iranes. with a thousand men. i *~
a billion pieces of steel jnfea
place, and weld them fast Un
der the blue white hrssmg heat
of the flaming arcs, a sftup *
forged from the first stringer
laid for the keel, till dr comes
fully alive, a unit of our fleet
The story starts a long way
back of that point It starts m the
Navy Building m Waakungtae.
where the General Board sketch
es out the needs of the flee*. TV
deliberations of this lufh body
go to the President, who twibod
ies them in a message to Con
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